3D effect explanation.

#1SatarackPosted 6/17/2010 2:18:46 PM
Okay, first, this isn't a depth effect, it's stereoscopic, which means it's producing two images to create a 3D image that pops out of the screen like in a 3D movie. But how are they doing it?

Well the fundamental for any 3D technology is that there are two images, one for the right eye, and one for the left eye. This means that there must be some system to filter these two images so that the one for the right eye does not reach the left eye, and vice versa. Traditional 3D used glasses as a filter, the old red and blue/green glasses, and the new polarized glasses. But if we aren't going to use glasses as a filter, than what will we use instead? Well, there are a few ways this can happen. One, the pixel sheet itself can be designed so that alternating columns of pixels emit light into one of two "eye zones". Or, you can have a regular flat pixel sheet with a special filter layer that redirects the light from alternating pixel columns into one of two "eye zones". What do I mean by "eye zones"? Well this type of 3D assumes that your eyes are located in certain locations, and directs the light to those locations. The weakness in this technology is that the effect only works if you're in the right spot, looking at the right angle. Btw, Sharp has had 3D monitor technology of this nature since 2002, so it's not really that new.

http://news.cnet.com/2100-1040-978499.html

But this weakness is not much of a concern with the 3DS, since it's a handheld device, the user can easily adjust the monitor to have the correct angle and distance for the effect to work. Personally, I think they are using the Sharp technology, since it uses a filtering barrier which can be adjusted it's filtering behaviour, or even be turned off to have 2D, which would explain the 3D slider on the 3DS.
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#2kodfish36Posted 6/17/2010 2:20:15 PM
I'll take your word for it.
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#3MetaKirbyFanPosted 6/17/2010 2:22:10 PM
Good explanation, but how do you know this for a fact?
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#4ryan0991Posted 6/17/2010 2:25:55 PM
Finally, someone with some brains.
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#5Satarack(Topic Creator)Posted 6/17/2010 2:36:11 PM

From: MetaKirbyFan | #003
Good explanation, but how do you know this for a fact?


I don't, but I did some googleing on 3D tech without glasses, and the fundamental way this is achieved is by assuming your eyes are in a given location. There are many ways to direct the light there, I only mentioned the two different fundamental methods. I don't know the specifics of exactly how you would design a "Lenticular" pixel sheet to direct it's light, or how a single filter can direct the light to both eyes. But I don't think we need to know the specifics, only the the general method of how it works, and regardless of the filter method, it works by assuming your eyes are in certain spots, and directing the images to those spots.
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#6MetaKirbyFanPosted 6/17/2010 2:53:12 PM
Okay, just checking. Man, Nintendo can turn something so simple into something so revolutionary.
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#7WetterdewPosted 6/17/2010 5:02:06 PM
I knew about this already, but I'm wondering how they redirect the light to each eye. You suggested an extra layer on the screen that would redirect the light. That seems it would work best, I guess. I wondered why people were saying that the left-right pixels would be arranged in columns rather than in an alternating grid, but this explains it: it would be easier, and I guess the effect is as good or good enough.

But this weakness is not much of a concern with the 3DS, since it's a handheld device, the user can easily adjust the monitor to have the correct angle and distance for the effect to work. Personally, I think they are using the Sharp technology, since it uses a filtering barrier which can be adjusted it's filtering behaviour, or even be turned off to have 2D, which would explain the 3D slider on the 3DS.

According to some website (haha sorry, I forgot which one), the movies that were shown could not use the 3d slider. Instead, you would choose either 2d or 3d before they began, with no middle ground, because the movie only has two perspectives that you can't adjust. Adjusting the 3d slider only brings the perspectives closer together, and since the 3d movies aren't mapped out on a 3DS, you can only have one or the other. So wouldn't this mean that it doesn't have anything to do with a filtering barrier that can be adjusted to change 2d to 3d and back again, but rather that the program itself calculates its two perspectives differently depending on the slider's position? I don't think it would be a mechanical process.
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#8Satarack(Topic Creator)Posted 6/17/2010 5:18:13 PM

From: Wetterdew | #007
According to some website (haha sorry, I forgot which one), the movies that were shown could not use the 3d slider. Instead, you would choose either 2d or 3d before they began, with no middle ground, because the movie only has two perspectives that you can't adjust. Adjusting the 3d slider only brings the perspectives closer together, and since the 3d movies aren't mapped out on a 3DS, you can only have one or the other. So wouldn't this mean that it doesn't have anything to do with a filtering barrier that can be adjusted to change 2d to 3d and back again, but rather that the program itself calculates its two perspectives differently depending on the slider's position? I don't think it would be a mechanical process.


I do know that the filter layer in the Sharp technology can be turned off and on, I might have gotten the wrong impression about it but I do know for sure it is at least an on off system. But from what you're saying it sounds like you're right and that the slider affects the program and not the filter.
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#9Sarick_LyrePosted 6/17/2010 8:30:17 PM
I like this topic overall. Except that saying outright that there's no depth effect is wrong. You do get depth, you're looking at things similar to as if you were with two eyes within the screen, minus some of the natural aspects of eyes (like refocusing). If something is further away you get a more prominent sense of it. There will always be depth.

Also Wetterdew is closer on the 3D effect slider. The two images become a more similar perspective until when it's off they're showing identical images to each eye.
#10Satarack(Topic Creator)Posted 6/18/2010 1:29:02 AM

From: Sarick_Lyre | #009
Except that saying outright that there's no depth effect is wrong.


I didn't say there is no depth effect. What I meant is this isn't a head tracking 3D depth illusion where it looks like you are looking through a window. There was some speculation that they were going to use a camera to do head tracking to create a 3D illusion, but I clearly said that this is a stereoscopic effect, using two images; thereby I am stating that the 3DS has all the properties of true 3D technology (which it is), just like in a blockbuster 3D movie (which has depth).
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