Cartridge or disk?

#31VamphaeryPosted 6/23/2010 9:16:29 AM
I don't think that will happen.
*Buys OoT*
*Installs*
*Gives OoT to friend, and they install*
*They give OoT to their friend to Install*

Even if it's limited to a single install.
*Buys OoT and installs*
*Gives cartridge to friend*

They'd lose about half their profits that way.

The only other option I see is making the cartridge and installed version only operateable on a single 3DS system. But that really screw people over. Can't sell used copies. 3Ds breaks down? Enjoy having to repurchase all your games again as well as a new 3DS.

All in all, it doesn't look likely.


The carts contain eproms and/or flash mem for saving data. They could easily encode some sort of activation key, and then when you install the game, it could prompt you to create a unique password. That password could then be encrypted with the unique activation key on the eprom or flash, and then you could install that cartridge on any 3DS... but ONLY if you have the password. Which means the cart is still playable on any DS if resold, but not installable, and if your DS breaks, you have the password to install it on a new system.

That's the only way I see this working, but it is technically feasible.

As for the general topic of this thread: cartridges mean less heat, fewer moving parts, and solid state is fast and scalable in capacity.
#32XjphPosted 6/23/2010 9:55:30 AM

From: grans | #021
Except not, sound only sucks in DS games due to inferior sound hardware. Something the 3DS doesn't have to deal with. The games themselves are now just about at CD capacity. Cartridges have no impact on sound quality, unless they are too small to hold decent quality, which is not the case anymore.




From: Autumn_Hayabusa | #022
then why does it sound terrible with headphones?


Because he's wrong. The DS is capable of outputting CD quality audio. The audio in some games is low bitrate to save space. Proof: Use a DSi with headphones to listen to some music (mp4 or whatever it can play back), it sounds fine.
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#33gransPosted 6/23/2010 10:00:19 AM
Hate to say it, but the quality of the same audio file played on a DSi and then on a PC sounded a lot different. DSi was considerably worse. Not by enough for me to be bothered by it whatsoever, nor any sane person, but it was noticeable to someone with decent hearing.

But you are mostly right, the main factor IS indeed the cartridge capacity and bitrate.
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#34KogaSteelfangPosted 6/23/2010 10:08:27 AM
They could easily encode some sort of activation key, and then when you install the game, it could prompt you to create a unique password. That password could then be encrypted with the unique activation key on the eprom or flash, and then you could install that cartridge on any 3DS... but ONLY if you have the password.

I hadn't thought of that.
But wouldn't it still be too risky? I mean if give my friend the cartridge and password, they'd install it on their system. I get it back and let my other friend do the same. They'd be recieving free copies of the game, even with passwords. I wouldn't really be risking anything as long as I get my Kart back to continue the cycle. And even if I lose the kart, I'd still have the game, I just wouldn't be able to pass it on to others.

Heck, I even see people selling those.
"Want the newest game? Pay me $10 to install it."
*Someone gives $10 and hands 3DS over*
*Installs game and password to their 3DS*
"Thank you very much! Come back next week when I pick up the next hottest game."

It'd be too risky for Nintendo.
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#35TimohtepPosted 6/23/2010 10:10:09 AM
More durable.
Easy to bring with you.
No moving parts in system, therefore making it more durable.
It said 2GB max at launch. As with the original DS carts, their capacity will increase, maybe even quadruple, like the DS carts did.
No load times.

Discs are NOT suited for a handheld in any situation. People drop their handhelds all the time, and discs/moving parts will not be good for its impact, whereas cartridges are hunks of plastic and will not get hurt in a fall.

Give me one good reason to use a disc.
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#36VamphaeryPosted 6/23/2010 10:13:00 AM
Koga Steelfang: good point.

The only alternative is an online account-based system, and Nintendo seems to reject that notion.
#37Magic_KirbyPosted 6/23/2010 2:03:31 PM
an online account would work though...
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#38Endo_KenjiPosted 6/23/2010 2:18:44 PM
Online account is the only way to go, but it would make things too complicated for younger gamers if you ask me, who are a large chunk of the handheld market. It'd be nice to have all my games with me, but it's not a system seller.
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#39ozfunghiPosted 6/23/2010 2:33:07 PM
Ok TC, your topic started out ok, but now it seems you're just trolling and have no clue what you're talking about.

Why cards?

Better battery life (no moving parts)
smaller physical size
more durable (no scratches, no moving parts)
shorter load times (data can be accessed right away without a lens needing to be shifted and searching the correct data)
file size doesn't matter anymore (they'll start at 2gig, which is more than UMD, and might increase later on)

This isn't 1995 any more.

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