Stereoscopic 2D Graphics

#21xnamkcor(Topic Creator)Posted 7/12/2010 5:59:48 AM
How is Paper Mario proof? It's a 3D game and all 2D elements won't have two POV version. They will just look like they are 2D in a 3D space(this happens to be Paper Mario's motif, so it works well). The idea for the background is nice, but the game couldn't have a very serious tone, as the layers would look flat. Mario Kart and its mode7 are techically not 3D in that polygons are involved, but at the same time, there are zooming and translation effects at work that near it to 3D enough to be a bad example.

What is needed is a game where it uses 2D graphics and the entirety of the game's graphics include a version that acts as a POV for each eye. When each eye sees these two POVs at the same time, depth is created(or realised).
#22elheberPosted 7/12/2010 7:35:40 PM
Paper Mario is proof because the paper cut-outs will have a depth. For example, if there are multiple paper cut-outs layered over each other, the ones in front will be drawn in front using depth, even though they're 2D objects.

Just because something is a 2-dimensional plane, such as the objects on the HUD, doesn't mean they can't have depth. Imagine crosshairs on a FPS game that are positioned far "past the screen" while the rest of the HUD is placed directly at the depth of the screen.

So, what other 2D games can be given stereoscopic 3D elements of depth? Arcade scrolling shooters, for example, could draw the background ground at a high depth, the enemies on the ground at less depth, and all other in-air enemies and projectiles at varying depths. Any games with a background or parallax backgrounds could use depth for each layer, and also depth for foreground images. The solid ground on platformers could be drawn at a slightly closer depth than the player and enemy objects, and all other on-screen objects could have a depth between those two; even if shallow differences.
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#23xnamkcor(Topic Creator)Posted 7/13/2010 7:05:03 AM
"Paper Mario is proof because the paper cut-outs will have a depth. For example, if there are multiple paper cut-outs layered over each other, the ones in front will be drawn in front using depth, even though they're 2D objects."

They are 2D in an aspect inside the game itself, but they are polygonal objects. Being drawn to appear in front or behind has beed around since SNES. Even then the graphic that is drawn in the polygons of the "2D Object" still only contains one POV. While. through polygons, you can add depth to the placement, you won't be adding any depth to the graphic that makes the "2D Object". Like I said, this works fine for Paper Mario, it is its motif, but it is not an example of what I want.

"Just because something is a 2-dimensional plane, such as the objects on the HUD, doesn't mean they can't have depth. Imagine crosshairs on a FPS game that are positioned far "past the screen" while the rest of the HUD is placed directly at the depth of the screen."

Way to completely miss the point of crosshairs. Do you really think it changes anything to change the depth placement of a device that assists in aiming and, in game, has no physical presence? Change it to a dot and make it paste itself on targets so you can quickly identify their distance and you've got a good idea. Just making your floating graphic change forward depth? No.

"So, what other 2D games can be given stereoscopic 3D elements of depth? Arcade scrolling shooters, for example, could draw the background ground at a high depth, the enemies on the ground at less depth, and all other in-air enemies and projectiles at varying depths. Any games with a background or parallax backgrounds could use depth for each layer, and also depth for foreground images. The solid ground on platformers could be drawn at a slightly closer depth than the player and enemy objects, and all other on-screen objects could have a depth between those two; even if shallow differences."

These things could be done with mode7 or polygons. And all you are doing is giving depth of he placement of the 2D objects. In my idea, the graphics, including the objects themselves, all have depth. Giving depth of placement to 2D objects is old.
#24elheberPosted 7/13/2010 9:44:18 AM
Yo. The TC wanted to know if Stereoscopic 3D can be applied to 2D graphics. Many people in this thread gave examples of how it is possible. None of what you said right there proved any of it wrong.

*facepalm*
Suppose someone makes a 2D horizontal scrolling shooter (like R-Type). In this game, the player can travel between 2 depths to avoid enemy fire, obstacles, etc. Even with just 2D graphics, the game can draw objects in the farther depth further away from each other horizontally for each eye. Same sprites. No parallax. Just different depths.

I made an example on Paint to show you, but you need to use the parallel method (like with Magic Eye). Same sprites, no parallax, no 3D:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v53/elheber/stereoscop01.png

See? What more proof do you need?
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#25xnamkcor(Topic Creator)Posted 7/13/2010 10:45:30 AM
Who is TC?
#26elheberPosted 7/13/2010 10:50:19 AM
You.
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#27elheberPosted 7/13/2010 10:51:03 AM
Oh, I said "Yo" instead of "You". My bad.
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#28xnamkcor(Topic Creator)Posted 7/13/2010 11:04:19 AM
I always thought TC was one person who was an enourmous troll.

In any case, I apologise for being wrong about my own idea.

PS: If Konami makes a Castlevania game for 3DS, you will understand.