Why blocks and not MBs?

#1Raider125Posted 8/7/2011 10:17:03 AM
I just got Let's Golf 3D and it seems like it took quite a lot of space on my SD card does anyone know what 1500 blocks translates to in MBs?
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#2goldenixPosted 8/7/2011 10:23:42 AM
Raider125 posted...
I just got Let's Golf 3D and it seems like it took quite a lot of space on my SD card does anyone know what 1500 blocks translates to in MBs?


On Wii (and probably on 3DS too), 1 block = 128kb

So 1500 blocks = 192 MB.
#3Happy Mask ManPosted 8/7/2011 10:25:38 AM
Each block is 128 kilobytes, which would make each block 1/8 of a megabyte. So dividing 1,500 by 8, it would be 187.5 megabytes.
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#4Megaman OmegaPosted 8/7/2011 11:11:43 AM
Yeah, it's pointless IMO. I'd like to have the option to display it in bytes.
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#5Nin3DSFanPosted 8/7/2011 1:24:39 PM
According to Google, 1500 * 128 kilobytes = 187.5 MB, which is 192,000 kilobytes -- so I can see where someone got 192 MB from.
Remember storage space uses the 1024-based system, i.e. 1 kilobyte = 1024 bytes, 1 Megabyte = 1024 kilobytes, 1 Gigabyte = 1024 Megabytes, etc.

But then, is it 128 kilobytes or 128 kilobits? If it's 128 kilobits, it'd be 23.4375 Megabytes.
#6panama_chiefPosted 8/7/2011 1:34:52 PM
Let's golf 2 on iOS is 307mb and that's non-retina. 192mb for the 3DS version sounds about right. Kind of bad if it's only part 1 though....why so big?
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#7MasterChef1121Posted 8/7/2011 1:51:56 PM
Megaman Omega posted...
Yeah, it's pointless IMO. I'd like to have the option to display it in bytes.

I thought the reason they display in blocks though, is because SD Cards store in "blocks"

Meaning any file that is 129-256 kB will take 2 blocks on the SD card. If they displayed "free memory" I think people might end up confused as to why they have memory, but can't put anything into it.

I could be wrong, but thats how I've always understood the technology
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#8Rune_SchismPosted 8/7/2011 4:16:16 PM
I'm pretty sure it is just to make it easier to understand for people who simply can't bring themselves to understand any term that sounds technical and conputer related. An arbitray, but even number of blocks is easier for people to take in.
#9goldenixPosted 8/7/2011 5:04:09 PM
Nin3DSFan posted...
According to Google, 1500 * 128 kilobytes = 187.5 MB, which is 192,000 kilobytes -- so I can see where someone got 192 MB from.
Remember storage space uses the 1024-based system, i.e. 1 kilobyte = 1024 bytes, 1 Megabyte = 1024 kilobytes, 1 Gigabyte = 1024 Megabytes, etc.

But then, is it 128 kilobytes or 128 kilobits? If it's 128 kilobits, it'd be 23.4375 Megabytes.


Thank you for correcting my mistake, sir.
#10Muljo StphoPosted 8/7/2011 5:21:00 PM
I'm pretty sure it is just to make it easier to understand for people who simply can't bring themselves to understand any term that sounds technical and conputer related. An arbitray, but even number of blocks is easier for people to take in.

That's pretty much what I was going to say. It's "user friendly".

I thought the reason they display in blocks though, is because SD Cards store in "blocks"

Meaning any file that is 129-256 kB will take 2 blocks on the SD card. If they displayed "free memory" I think people might end up confused as to why they have memory, but can't put anything into it.

I could be wrong, but thats how I've always understood the technology


I hadn't heard of that before but it's an interesting suggestion. I could see that being part of it too. (This wouldn't be a property of SD cards though. They'll display sizes in bytes, kilobytes, etc. on your computer, the same as any other storage medium you could possibly use. It's not like SD cards have some magic new way of storing data that doesn't involve some method of encoding a bunch of ones and zeros.)

Remember storage space uses the 1024-based system, i.e. 1 kilobyte = 1024 bytes, 1 Megabyte = 1024 kilobytes, 1 Gigabyte = 1024 Megabytes, etc.

Yep, everything is a power of 2 since it's all binary in computers. 2^10 = 1024

If anyone here doesn't know and is curious: a binary value (1/0, on/off, high/low, etc.) is called a bit and 8 bits make 1 byte.

But then, is it 128 kilobytes or 128 kilobits? If it's 128 kilobits, it'd be 23.4375 Megabytes.

As I understand it:
b = bits
B = bytes

And then to go off on a tangent here, I've also heard that:
K = kilo = 1024 scale
Ki = kibi = 1000 scale
M = mega = 1024 scale
Mi = mibi = 1000 scale

(So 1 KB = 1024 bytes while 1 KiB = 1000 bytes.)

And on that note, that is probably why they decided to just invent an arbitrary scale and call it "blocks". It bypasses the entire question over whether we're talking about bits or bytes and whether the prefix denotes 1000 or 1024.
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