This game has some very appealing points to it

#1NeutronStar256Posted 11/17/2012 9:58:51 AM
I just beat Paper Mario Sticker Star. I know many people believe to not be great and I understand their reasons; however, this game has a few things that I believe make it stand out.

First there is the puzzle solving. Many games in this generation have been making more and more use of hand-holding and/or "hint" systems to make everything easier for the player if that person desires(although the hand holding is sometimes forced example: Fi in Zelda Skyward Sword). This game has none of that and to top it off the in-game hints are not as obvious as usual, making you think a little bit.

Second is the strategic battles. I will agree that the battling in the first two Paper Marios is more fun, but I consider this installment to be a Strategy/Puzzle game rather than an Action/RPG title. You have a limited number of attacks and you must choose the move that will net the most results. Some fights such as bosses can be made easier if a certain sticker(s) is used. While many people believe this is a bad thing, having bosses be too hard or too easy, I think this is just part of the strategy. Bosses are just fights where it's more complicated to figure out how to win. If you think of this as an RPG and not a strategy game, then yes the boss fights will seem terrible. But that's the thing: I don't believe this game should be classed as an RPG, although many people do so.

The third is something you don't see often in Mario(and especially Paper Mario): this game is very non-linear. You are no longer forced to do a certain area first then move on to the next like in the other games. I got stuck in world 3 and did the whole world 5 before coming back to world 3(when I finally figured out what to do at Loop Loop River). If you get stuck somewhere you can do another area and come back later. There is some linearity; for example you have to get a certain item in world 3 to move to worlds 4 and 5. Of course this style of gameplay means there isn't much story, but I don't think that a deep storyline is what they were going for in this game. They were focusing more on gameplay: the strategy and puzzles.

In conclusion it comes down to what you classify Paper Mario Sticker Star as. If you think of it as an Action RPG and compare it to the others then you will be rather disappointed. This game is in a class of its own, being much different from the other Paper Marios. I do not think it should be compared because of this reason.

Remember that this is only an opinion, and if you disagree with it that is fine. I understand people's reasons for not being very fond with this game and I do not expect everyone to agree with me. Thank you for reading

P.S. I am not very talented in putting my thoughts in words so if my writing style appears a little elementary I apologize
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#2Adamario_129Posted 11/17/2012 1:02:14 PM
The puzzle element could have been good, but for me, the way experimentation is so discouraged kills it for me.

For example, when I got to the part in World 3 where I need to wake up Wiggler and Kersti says her voice isn't loud enough, I looked in my inventory and saw that I had a jackhammer sticker. I figure, oh, jackhammers are really loud, that should wake him up. So I stick the jackhammer sticker in the dotted box, and it just peels off and plays a "no" sound, and now I've lost my jackhammer sticker and I'm gonna have to go back to the thing-seller guy to buy another jackhammer for whatever puzzle later on eventually needs it (or I can just quit the game and restart). I'd be okay with the hints for which things you need for which puzzles being a bit obtuse if you weren't punished so much for using the wrong one.

Battles could also be good, but the combination of no experience points, consumable attacks, and the fact that the coins I get from a Perfect Bonus usually aren't even enough to pay for the stickers I had to use to get it, all combine to make the battles feel completely pointless, and I currently run away from about 90% of all battles. I've never run away from that many battles in a Paper Mario game, because they've always been so much fun (Also, a minor annoyance: Whether or not I'm successful in running away seems to have no real connection to how many times I press A. The run away system in TTYD was much better, combining skill and luck in a format that showed me why I was or wasn't successful, and felt much more fair. At least IS seemed to anticipate how much we'd be running away, as there is no consequence to running away like in PM and TTYD, where you'd lose coins (also in the M&L games)).

The dumb thing is, I run away from battles because I don't want to waste stickers that I should be saving for boss battles, but then the boss battles end up just being about using the one magic thing sticker anyway. This is not an RPG, this is a Sierra adventure game.

The non-linearity is cool, but the lack of story is too much for me. I don't play Paper Mario games for the gameplay (although they are very fun) or the graphics (although they are very pretty), I play because it makes Mario's world feel like a living, breathing world full of characters with their own lives and families and stories. I play Paper Mario games because they take place in a world where Goombas go to college.

I recognize that Miyamoto doesn't see Mario that way. Miyamoto sees Mario like Popeye, or the Muppets -- Mario and Bowser and Peach and Goomba and Birdo and Magikoopa are characters who are taking on a role in the game. In the original Super Mario Bros., "Hammer Brother" was not a species -- it was a pair of twin brothers who reprised their role as antagonists on multiple levels. Miyamoto thinks of it as a stageplay. I respect his vision, and think it fits very well for the main series games. But that is not the way Paper Mario is supposed to work.

Notice how no one has a name. Everyone is "Hi, I'm Snifit." "Hi, I'm Wiggler." "Hi, I'm Cheep Cheep." (Kamek does not count. This is not Kamek, the one named Magikoopa from Yoshi's Island, because his opening lines reveal that he has never met Mario before. He is not a Magikoopa; he is Magikoopa.) This is how Miyamoto sees characters, and it works great for platformers, but it is horrible for an RPG.

In an actual Paper Mario game, his name wouldn't be Snifit. He would be a Snifit named Biff.

For some reason, Miyamoto imposed his decidedly non-RPG non-story vision onto a game that is supposed to be a story-based RPG. (http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2012/11/interview_the_team_behind_paper_mario_sticker_star ) If we're going to take the story out of Paper Mario, it completely defeats the purpose of having Paper Mario.
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"An apostrophe does not mean 'uh-oh, here comes an s.'" - Dave Barry
#3quietisgoodPosted 11/17/2012 1:10:57 PM
This is not Kamek
pretty sure the game says he's kamek, and whether or not he mentions remembering mario has no bearing on this fact.
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#4phisho873Posted 11/17/2012 1:12:36 PM
Adamario_129 posted...
For example, when I got to the part in World 3 where I need to wake up Wiggler and Kersti says her voice isn't loud enough, I looked in my inventory and saw that I had a jackhammer sticker. I figure, oh, jackhammers are really loud, that should wake him up. So I stick the jackhammer sticker in the dotted box, and it just peels off and plays a "no" sound, and now I've lost my jackhammer sticker and I'm gonna have to go back to the thing-seller guy to buy another jackhammer for whatever puzzle later on eventually needs it (or I can just quit the game and restart). I'd be okay with the hints for which things you need for which puzzles being a bit obtuse if you weren't punished so much for using the wrong one.


You won't need the Jackhammer. There are 64 things and you use maybe 10 for puzzles.
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#5Adamario_129Posted 11/17/2012 1:51:29 PM
quietisgood posted...

pretty sure the game says he's kamek, and whether or not he mentions remembering mario has no bearing on this fact.

So if the game shows me a pink Yoshi wearing a monocle and says it's Luigi, that's Luigi?

When the manual and credits for SMB2 say that the pink ostrich thing is Birdo and the dinosaur that spits eggs at you is Ostro, is that right?

This is not Kamek, not as we know him, because when an American Mario player refers to "Kamek", they're referring to a specific character who was in Yoshi's Island.

In Japan, there was never a distinction between "Kamek" and "other Magikoopas". "Kamek" is just the Japanese word for "Magikoopa", and in Japan, they've always been referred to with the same word. Some English translations change "Kamek" to "Magikoopa", some leave it as "Kamek", and we read way too much into that. For example, in Superstar Saga, there's a Magikoopa in Little Fungitown named Psycho Kamek. Are we supposed to believe that this is somehow the same character as the caretaker of Baby Bowser, who is now down on his luck and working as a fortune teller in the Beanbean Kingdom and is helping Luigi? Or is it more likely that it should have been translated "Psycho Magikoopa"?

How about in Super Princess Peach, when one of the bosses is named "Giant Kamek" and the description of him is "A Kamek made giant by magic."

"Kamek" in Sticker Star is not what we are thinking of when we say "Kamek." Kammy Koopa is a Magikoopa named Kammy. She is a specific character, distinct from her species, with a unique name and a unique look and a unique personality, just like every other partner and NPC in an actual Paper Mario game.

The very phrase "Kamek is a Magikoopa", especially in reference to this Kamek, is a misunderstanding of the differences between American and Japanese sense of self and individualism. Think Pokemon. Cubone wears his mother's skull. You can catch Cubone. You can catch multiple Cubone. You can have a team of six Cubone. You can breed two Pokemon and get an egg, and Cubone can hatch from the egg. It's the same thing with Toad and Yoshi and Birdo and Kamek. Kamek is not a Magikoopa. Kamek is Magikoopa. And this Magikoopa is decidedly not the Magikoopa who fought Yoshi and Baby Mario in the past, and who has fought adult Mario multiple times (Partners in Time, the opening scene of Galaxy, the boss fights in NSMBWii, the fight at the end of Bowser's Keep in SMRPG), as he says "we've just met" and "you're as strong as they say."

The thing is, it's not really that this is a different Magikoopa -- it's that Miyamoto is imposing his Muppet-like lack of any semblance of continuity onto Paper Mario. In Miyamoto's mindset, Magikoopa is a character, not a species.
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"An apostrophe does not mean 'uh-oh, here comes an s.'" - Dave Barry
#6NeutronStar256(Topic Creator)Posted 11/19/2012 2:28:27 PM
Nice posts people. Bump so other people can see
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"For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord." Romans 6:23
#7klecserPosted 11/19/2012 3:02:55 PM
Adamario_129 posted...
mmer sticker in the dotted box, and it just peels off and plays a "no" sound, and now I've lost my jackhammer sticker and I'm gonna have to go back to the thing-seller guy to buy another jackhammer for whatever puzzle later on eventually needs it (or I can just quit the game and restart). I'd be okay with the hints for which things you need for which puzzles being a bit obtuse if you weren't punished so much for using the wrong one.


You are purposely leaving out the fact that you can carry things in your inventory before stickerizing them and that you can (quite quickly) go back to old levels to get the things from the level you found them in.

"I don't remember which level had which thing."

The museum tells you when you put a sticker in there.

Your entire argument is based off of a limited picture of how the game actually plays, and you're using that to further your side.

Going back to find stickers once you use them is pretty simple. The game does not "discourage" you from experimentation. That experimentation just takes time. If your goal in playing a game is to rush to completion, this game isn't for you. But don't claim that the game "discourages" experimentation, simply because you don't want to take the ten extra minutes to find a sticker again.
#8Hirokey123Posted 11/19/2012 3:05:06 PM
Not to mention the game does give hints. If you remember back when you got the trumpet a Gooomba had tried to wake up a bunch of Bob-ombs and had to resort to the trumpet to wake up the sleeping armada.
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#9SinfullyvannilaPosted 11/19/2012 3:07:12 PM
The non-linearity is cool, but the lack of story is too much for me. I don't play Paper Mario games for the gameplay (although they are very fun) or the graphics (although they are very pretty), I play because it makes Mario's world feel like a living, breathing world full of characters with their own lives and families and stories. I play Paper Mario games because they take place in a world where Goombas go to college.

For some reason, Miyamoto imposed his decidedly non-RPG non-story vision onto a game that is supposed to be a story-based RPG. (http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2012/11/interview_the_team_behind_paper_mario_sticker_star ) If we're going to take the story out of Paper Mario, it completely defeats the purpose of having Paper Mario.


I disagree, because of this point from the interview:

For some reason, Miyamoto imposed his decidedly non-RPG non-story vision onto a game that is supposed to be a story-based RPG. (http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2012/11/interview_the_team_behind_paper_mario_sticker_star ) If we're going to take the story out of Paper Mario, it completely defeats the purpose of having Paper Mario.

I thought they did a phenomenal job of making the world feel like paper, they did a great job of making that world feel believable through the commitment in the dialog.

PS: This site's post formatting tools suck. Is their any way to bold AND italicize?
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#10JalimePosted 11/19/2012 3:28:51 PM
Adamario_129 posted...
The thing is, it's not really that this is a different Magikoopa -- it's that Miyamoto is imposing his Muppet-like lack of any semblance of continuity onto Paper Mario. In Miyamoto's mindset, Magikoopa is a character, not a species.


This is the first handheld Paper Mario game. It shouldn't HAVE continuity. Think of it as Paper Mario Land if it makes you feel better.