ok for 4 year old son?

#61Element_PearlPosted 1/26/2013 9:20:02 AM
From: stekim40 | #016
4 years old is too young to be playing this or any video game.

a recent study suggests that to aid development its best to keep them off games until they are 5-6. tbh I think 4 is far far too young, give him/her a colouring book and a set of felt tips. happy for hours :)



Link to study, please.
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#62TK-TonePosted 1/26/2013 9:20:33 AM
Gaming is wonderful for young children. Interaction helps build intelligence at that age which is why I would much prefer a child to play a game than watch TV. You obviously want to limit the time played, but gaming develops the mentality of cause and effect. The child's brain things, "Oh, if I hit this button, the guy on the screen does this!" An RPG may be a bit more difficult than Super Mario Bros, but I see no reason to avoid it if the child enjoys it. Bravo TC, I salute you.

Also, I hate to harp like an English teacher, but when you say things like...

stekim40 posted...
4 years old is too young to be playing this or any video game.

a recent study suggests that to aid development its best to keep them off games until they are 5-6. tbh I think 4 is far far too young, give him/her a colouring book and a set of felt tips. happy for hours :)


References or it didn't happen.
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#63KukaiDragonPosted 1/26/2013 9:21:09 AM
apacke09 posted...
Thanks for the continued input.

Regarding the game's difficulty and all of the reading that is involved with the game, if I wasn't clear before, I'll state it explicitly now - this is a game that my son and I would be playing together. At no point would I be switching it on and just leaving the room. He is still learning his letters and not reading yet, so I will be reading aloud whatever isn't spoken.


I think that's great. It's not only fun but it's quality bonding time with the boy. Good for you! ^^
#64moniewitchPosted 1/26/2013 9:24:34 AM
Or you can just have him watch Ghibli films like my neighbor totoro, Spirited Away, Howl's Moving Castle, Catle in the Sky, Kiki's Delivery Service, etc.

Their all excellent movies for children, teens, parents, families, etc.
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#65ajmrowlandPosted 1/26/2013 9:30:38 AM
Danmanstone posted...
Gaming is wonderful for young children. Interaction helps build intelligence at that age which is why I would much prefer a child to play a game than watch TV. You obviously want to limit the time played, but gaming develops the mentality of cause and effect. The child's brain things, "Oh, if I hit this button, the guy on the screen does this!" An RPG may be a bit more difficult than Super Mario Bros, but I see no reason to avoid it if the child enjoys it. Bravo TC, I salute you.

Also, I hate to harp like an English teacher, but when you say things like...

stekim40 posted...
4 years old is too young to be playing this or any video game.

a recent study suggests that to aid development its best to keep them off games until they are 5-6. tbh I think 4 is far far too young, give him/her a colouring book and a set of felt tips. happy for hours :)


References or it didn't happen.


It could also be a factor to diminishing "innocence" through the constant stimulation. Nobodys prepared for that these days.
#66KainSethPosted 1/26/2013 9:31:15 AM
RuneMaster no2 posted...
4 year olds can barely speak properly. They don't have the critical thinking ability to play this game, or understand what's going on and where to go next. Simple fact.


Where is your source backing up this "fact?"

My son collected 70 stars and beat Mario Galaxy 2 on his own by the time he just turned 4. He's been reading since he was 2 and a half. Any normal child has the capacity to learn anything at a young age. "Can't" is not in my child's vocabulary, because I raised him that way. He regularly watches more mature movies and games with me, because he understands that it's fake.

For the instance of Ni No Kuni, I look at it as a reading session with him. During the text heavy parts, we take turns reading the text.

You'd be amazed at what they are teaching Kindergartners these days. I'm 32, but I never learned half the stuff he's currently learning at that level.

let's give our children a little more credit please.
#67Nophoria88Posted 1/26/2013 9:41:22 AM
apacke09 posted...
Thanks for the continued input.

Regarding the game's difficulty and all of the reading that is involved with the game, if I wasn't clear before, I'll state it explicitly now - this is a game that my son and I would be playing together. At no point would I be switching it on and just leaving the room. He is still learning his letters and not reading yet, so I will be reading aloud whatever isn't spoken.


First off, that's really cool of you. Second, I highly suggest it that case, it's a great family friendly game. It should keep him interested as you play because it has a very colorful and vibrant world that's never boring to look at any given time.
#68mecha_mkIIPosted 1/26/2013 9:45:02 AM
KainSeth posted...
<You'd be amazed at what they are teaching Kindergartners these days. I'm 32, but I never learned half the stuff he's currently learning at that level.

let's give our children a little more credit please.


Or lets give children the time to be children when they still can.
#69wickdawg01Posted 1/26/2013 9:48:43 AM
apacke09 posted...
About 4 being too young for any video game, that is a good point, and one I take seriously. His game time if very limited and always supervised. To say that NO video game is good for a 4 year old, though, I would disagree. To see my kid at 2 years old, navigating a 3-d space in Ico, learning the area, climbing ladders, pulling switches, it was like I could see his brain expanding right before my eyes. I'm not saying my child is a prodigy or anything like that, I think any 2 year old could do it, I'm just saying I think it was immensely educational for him at that stage to learn how to navigate an abstract simulated 3-d space and manipulate objects on the screen in a simulated 3-d environment.

Obviously, nothing is going to replace or be better than playing with actual building blocks in reality, but games with educational value are just another tool in the toolbox and, with discretion and supervision, there's no reason to ignore that. Heck, he's learning his ABCs on my phone right now and that's more than I can say for the crap cartoons I watched all day on Saturdays when I was 4.


I agree with this^.

I have a 2 year old daughter and you should see her navigate my wifes ipod. Its crazy how early children will learn to do intricate things. We recently bought her, her own childrens tablet (one of those v-tech things). She loves it. Pokes around on the screen opening whatever games she wants to play and then plays them. Mostly just pick the right color or count out the right amount of birds games.
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#70TK-TonePosted 1/26/2013 10:09:40 AM
ajmrowland posted...
Danmanstone posted...
Gaming is wonderful for young children. Interaction helps build intelligence at that age which is why I would much prefer a child to play a game than watch TV. You obviously want to limit the time played, but gaming develops the mentality of cause and effect. The child's brain things, "Oh, if I hit this button, the guy on the screen does this!" An RPG may be a bit more difficult than Super Mario Bros, but I see no reason to avoid it if the child enjoys it. Bravo TC, I salute you.

Also, I hate to harp like an English teacher, but when you say things like...

stekim40 posted...
4 years old is too young to be playing this or any video game.

a recent study suggests that to aid development its best to keep them off games until they are 5-6. tbh I think 4 is far far too young, give him/her a colouring book and a set of felt tips. happy for hours :)


References or it didn't happen.


It could also be a factor to diminishing "innocence" through the constant stimulation. Nobodys prepared for that these days.


That's a good point. You certainly don't want to overwhelm the child. But the way I see it, a child can lose their innocence via school, peers, media, etc... Or they can begin to lose it in a controlled environment where you (as the parent) are ready and have the time and patience to explain new concepts.

You're right though - it depends entirely on the child. It depends on how much they can grasp before it just becomes too much to handle.
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