The revival of jrpgs

#41ArsenicSteelPosted 2/1/2013 8:20:45 AM
badboy posted...
Atlus and NIS release mediocre titles 90% of the time, or games that only appeal to their own tiny fanbase. There were, however, many good JRPGs on handheld platforms last gen by other companies like Level-5 itself (Dragon Quest IX).


Sturgeon's Law. There's no sense in just saying that 10% of Atlus or NIS games are extremely good when the really good products in any medium happen in low percentage with a large amount of mediocre or worse titles.

Stop acting like JRPGs need to make blockbuster after blockbuster in order not be seen as a dead area of gaming.
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A heretic among heretics.
#42Grey_TygrePosted 2/1/2013 8:32:40 AM
I dunno if I counted Fire Emblem as a JRPG in my head, though it surely fits the genre. For me it was always like.. really fancy chess. Ahem.

That and I divide tactics style RPGs (Tactics Ogre, Final Fantasy Tactics, Front Mission 3, Kartia etc.) into a distinct genre in my mind, where more traditional JRPGs (Final Fantasy [Number Here], Dragon Warrior/Quest, SaGa [Whatever Word], Persona, Xenogears, Wild ARMs etc.) into another.

Then there're Action RPGs (Dragonview, Threads of Fate, Muramasa: the Demon Blade, Odin Sphere etc.) that are further sectioned off.

Plus Simulation RPGs (Rune Factory, Pokemon, Digimon, Monster Seed, Monster Rancher etc.) get their own group...

But they're all RPGs and for the most part JRPGs. This generation's been lacking them yes, but weren't Infinite Undiscovery, The Last Remnant, Tales of Symphonia II and Resonance of Fate all JRPGs that got ported over?

Still, this one rocks and I definitely do love it. :D Hopefully we see more and more!
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#43ArsenicSteelPosted 2/1/2013 8:37:26 AM(edited)
The J in JRPG stands for country of origin and has no specific style, theme, or genre qualifiers other than that. It is not shorthand for combat style.

An ARPG(genre) that is made in Japan would still be a JRPG just as easily as any other RPG made in Japan.

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A heretic among heretics.
#44Grey_TygrePosted 2/1/2013 8:42:57 AM
Oh I'm aware of -that-. It just doesn't translate in a way that makes me list all possible RPGs that came outta Japan when someone asks me about/for one.
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3DS FC is 4081-5496-3902
#45MetalKeiyaPosted 2/1/2013 8:44:15 AM
badboy posted...
Atlus and NIS release mediocre titles 90% of the time, or games that only appeal to their own tiny fanbase. There were, however, many good JRPGs on handheld platforms last gen by other companies like Level-5 itself (Dragon Quest IX).


JRPG's are in and of itself a niche genre, especially now that games have become much, much, MUCH more mainstream. Back then, around 10-15 years ago, I'd think perhaps 60-70% of gamers were JRPG players. Due to a new generation of gamers growing up (and an older one, if we're to trust iOS and browser-based gaming), the gaming market has increased more than tenfold, and now that 60-70% rate is now much, much, smaller. In other words, the JRPG audience IS that tiny fanbase you speak of. For a gaming company, it's much more profitable to create a game that can appeal to the mainstream rather than please the JRPG fanbase. It's the reason why critics give awards and accolades to movies that no one watch, but they can make fun/critically insult summer blockbuster movies that move billions. It's the guiding principle behind Resident Evil 5 and 6 (whatever you thought of those 2 games). It's the reason why Square Enix has decided to go with the design choices they had for FFXIII, which was received with mixed reviews.

Rather than say that Ni no Kuni has "revived JRPG's", I think the better phrase would be that Ni no Kuni has "revived the idea that JRPG's can be made again without having to pander to the mainstream/casual crowd". Already, the game is getting reviews where critics say it's "boring, expected, unoriginal", but that's the point. Level-5 and Studio Ghibli want to show the bigger companies that it's alright to try to make JRPG's that are actually JRPG's again, and I think they succeeded with that regard.
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#46PrismsbladePosted 2/1/2013 8:46:03 AM
[This message was deleted at the request of the original poster]
#47noutBrPosted 2/1/2013 8:52:13 AM
MetalKeiya posted...
JRPG's are in and of itself a niche genre, especially now that games have become much, much, MUCH more mainstream. Back then, around 10-15 years ago, I'd think perhaps 60-70% of gamers were JRPG players. Due to a new generation of gamers growing up (and an older one, if we're to trust iOS and browser-based gaming), the gaming market has increased more than tenfold, and now that 60-70% rate is now much, much, smaller. In other words, the JRPG audience IS that tiny fanbase you speak of. For a gaming company, it's much more profitable to create a game that can appeal to the mainstream rather than please the JRPG fanbase. It's the reason why critics give awards and accolades to movies that no one watch, but they can make fun/critically insult summer blockbuster movies that move billions. It's the guiding principle behind Resident Evil 5 and 6 (whatever you thought of those 2 games). It's the reason why Square Enix has decided to go with the design choices they had for FFXIII, which was received with mixed reviews.

Rather than say that Ni no Kuni has "revived JRPG's", I think the better phrase would be that Ni no Kuni has "revived the idea that JRPG's can be made again without having to pander to the mainstream/casual crowd". Already, the game is getting reviews where critics say it's "boring, expected, unoriginal", but that's the point. Level-5 and Studio Ghibli want to show the bigger companies that it's alright to try to make JRPG's that are actually JRPG's again, and I think they succeeded with that regard.

I couldn't have said it better myself, best post I have read all day.
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m e g a m a n f o r e v e r
#48mattrogesisPosted 2/1/2013 9:12:04 AM
Xenoblade and ni no kuni is where its at for a modern jrpg experience.
#49statikcatPosted 2/1/2013 9:24:32 AM
Fire Emblem is a type of JRPG.

JRPG can be turn based, action based, strategy based. The word itself means Japanese RPG.. therefor a rpg made in Japan is a JRPG. Not that hard is it?
#50noutBrPosted 2/2/2013 2:23:06 AM
statikcat posted...
Fire Emblem is a type of JRPG.

JRPG can be turn based, action based, strategy based. The word itself means Japanese RPG.. therefor a rpg made in Japan is a JRPG. Not that hard is it?

There have been tons of discussions on this subject already;
- One person says that a JRPG is literally an RPG made in Japan.
- Another person says that a JRPG is a (sub)genre.

JRPG has no clear definition but I think it's safe to assume that the term JRPG is commonly used to describe the gameplay/game design. The problem with your explanation is that it does not describe genre but only the country where the game was made, that's not really helpful when discussing the games themselves now is it?

Bottomline, whenever someone says JRPG the majority of people will automatically think of a genre, not that the game was made in Japan.
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