THE MARIO SERIES CHARACTER GUIDE

- Compiled by the Space Pope (spacepope4u@gmail.com) -

- version 2.3 -

(last updated March, 11 2007)

           *****   *****  IMPORTANT NOTE!!!  *****  *****

Okay. The Mario Series Character Guide is finally back in the business 
of being regularly updated. I will be working my way through the last 
year and a half's worth of Mario and Mario-related titles, adding all 
appropriate characters. Continue to read this guide on GameFAQS and 
also posted on my personal site at the following URL:

         http://spacepope4u.tripod.com/mario_characters.txt

However, I am also informing you that I'm now keeping a Mario blog, 
Coin Heaven, in order to post breaking Mario news and elaborate on 
matters that aren't pertinent to this guide. For those interested, please 
check out my blog and help make it popular.

                http://spacepope4u.blogspot.com/

Now enjoy the guide and scan for updates by CTRL+Fing [new].

==T A B L E==O F==C O N T E N T S=======================================


- What the Hell? (an introduction)		
- What's New					[updates]
- What I Need (and lingering questions)		[questions]
- Legal Stuff					[legal]
- The Big List					[biglist]
- Mario Game Masterlist				[gamelist]
- Frequently Asked Questions			[faq]
- Miscellaneous Lists				[misc]
- Who Did This?					[author]
- Works Cited (and recommended reading)		[cited]
- Special Thanks				[thanks]
- Game Over

Find new or updated entries quickly by searching [new]. 

==W H A T==T H E==H E L L ?==(an introduction)==========================

Hi. This FAQ is an extensive guide to the characters of Nintendo's 
Mario games - all of the games, from the early days in the arcade to 
whatever sport Nintendo has Mario and his friends playing today. This 
guide also includes the series that have sprung up around other Mario 
characters - namely Yoshi, Donkey Kong and Wario.

Why?

Why not? A lot of downtime, that's why. 

Plus the fact that a whole slew of characters now populate the Mario 
universe, and I thought some other fans would appreciate the 
characters being catalogued in a single, quick-to-load and easy-to-read 
text document. 

And also because Nintendo and its affiliated developers have an 
tendency to populate new titles with "clone" characters - the likes of 
Waluigi and Toadette - at the expense of classic ones like Birdo or 
even Donkey Kong. I'd thought Mario fans might appreciate one more 
site commemorating bygone Mario characters.

This whole thing is pretty straightforward, but before we start, a few 
notes:

(1) Character profiles differentiate between starring roles and mere 
appearances. A starring role means that characters was (a) playable or  
(b) a boss. I had previously counted "damsel" appearances as starring 
roles, but I changed this when I realized that damsels don't usually do 
all that much. Also, I'm not detailing every appearance in a character's 
career. Instead, I focus on what I deem interesting. For the sake of 
being succinct, I lump especially minor characters in the profiles of 
major characters with whom they're associated. And I regard the 
appearance of the various WarioWare characters who have their own 
mini-game set as a sort of boss, thus their appearances being "starring 
roles" instead of just appearances.

(2) I do not believe that the creators of the Mario games planned for 
the various plotlines to stitch themselves into a neat, ordered universe 
with conscious continuity. Honestly, I think anyone who does think 
this is being naďve. These are just games, and forcing strict continuity 
rules on their plots would hinder their evolution, especially after 
twentysome years. Nonetheless, I honestly believe that it's the ill-
fitting patchwork of contradicting storylines that makes the Marioverse 
interesting. There's a reason some characters get pushed to the 
forefront and others get bumped into obscurity, and I'd like to explore 
that.

(3) Here, storylines are discussed in depth. This is your spoiler 
warning. But come on - do you really need a spoiler warning for a 
Mario game? I'll spoil it for you here: Mario wins, Bowser loses. 

(4) To differentiate between the Japanese and American versions on 
Super Mario Bros. 2, I refer to the Japanese one as The Lost Levels 
and the American one as Super Mario Bros. 2. 

(5) Because storylines get unreasonably complicated otherwise, the 
following characters each get their own separate bios: Mario, Baby 
Mario, Dr. Mario, Metal Mario, Shadow Mario, Luigi, Baby Luigi, 
Peach, Nurse Peach, Donkey Kong, Donkey Kong Jr., Cranky Kong, 
Bowser, Giga Bowser, Baby Bowser, Bowser Jr., Koopa Kid, 
Cackletta and Bowletta. Not to say that everything works out neatly 
this way. But it's easier for me to give these characters separate bios. 
On a similar note, I refer to the pink, pretty princess as Peach 
throughout this guide, even when discussing the games she technically 
appeared in as Princess Toadstool. The only exception is in her profile, 
specifically where I discuss how her name changed in the U.S.

(6) Please excuse redundancy. I try to avoid whenever I can, but since 
I wanted each bio to more-or-less be able to stand on its own, some 
plot threads get repeated. Thus, if you read the entire guide, you'll hear 
about how Kamek tried to kidnap both baby Mario Bros. about seven 
times - and now eight, counting here. Whoops.

(7) Unless otherwise noted, I've gotten all my Japanese names for 
Mario characters from the good people at the Mushroom Kingdom 
website. Thanks, fellas.

(8) A note about the Donkey Kong Country games: If I had made this 
guide a few years ago, I totally would have included Donkey Kong, 
D.K. Jr., Pauline, Stanley and then stopped. However, due to the 
schism between Nintendo and Rare and - judging by Diddy's 
appearances in Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour and Mario Kart: Double 
Dash!! - the gradual introduction of the Donky Kong Country 
characters into the Marioverse, I think they belong here after all. 
Characters introduced in Wario and Yoshi's series made it in, so I 
think it's only fair that the Donkey Kong Country characters be 
included as well, even if their games exist on the fringes of the 
Marioverse.

(9) Dates provided refer to American releases of games, except when 
said games were released only in Japan.

(10) Because the games clearly follow each other in a certain order, 
I'm considering the events of WarioWare: Twisted to occur before 
those of WarioWare: Touched, even though Nintendo biffed it and 
released the latter before the former in the United States.

And finally, (11) you might have noticed that I've so far, I've omitted 
profiles for certain staple characters like Goomba. At this point, I'm 
not compiling profiles for generic baddies. But Goombario, because 
he's a playable character, does get a profile. Characters like Koopa 
Troopa or Boo are included because, despite being generic characters, 
they're playable in games like Mario Kart or Mario Tennis. (It's 
entirely likely that I will one day reverse this decision, so please stop 
emailing me about it.)

==W H A T ' S==N E W ?============================================

[update]

Version 2.17 (PUT DATE HERE): New profiles for Wario-Man, 
Vanessa, Art and Decko, Garbage Boy, the Pizza Dinosaur goons, 
Mama T., Papa T., Jamie T., James T., Scratchy the Fro Bug, Sugar, 
Count Down, Paul, Noki Elder, Bobo, the Yum Yums, Sal Out, Luna, 
the Pork Loins, Sammy Rai, Bridget the Baker, Ashley, Red, Pyoro, 
the Diamond Troll, Space Monster Gabriel, Sugar, the Guru of the 
Sewer, Rocky the Reporter, Mike, Hen, Onnanoko, Oyazi, Akuman, 
De Buu, Dorago, Meidou, Goura, and Shiisa.

Updates to Wario, Mona, Jimmy T., Kat and Ana, Tiny Kong, the 
Koopa Bros, Reznor, Ken the Reporter, Dr. Crygor, Gelato Joe, 
Dribble and Spitz.

Minor tidbits added to E. Gadd, Bowyer, Exor, Sluggy the Unshaven, 
Yoshi, Katsini.

To help organize some of the longer articles, I've also added 
subheadings to the profiles for Peach, Luigi, Yoshi and Wario, Bowser 
and Donkey Kong.

I've also started posting links to images for some of the more obscure 
characters in the Marioverse. So far, these include Aqualea, Biff Atlas, 
Boom Boom, Booster, Boshi, Chauncey, Dangerous Duck, Frogfucius, 
Hammerbot, Hiyoihoi, Keyzer, King Totomesu, Scienstein, Spearhead, 
Spike, Syrup, Tatanga, Tumble, Valentina and Wanda. All appear at 
the wonderful Gamehiker image gallery. Enjoy! There's more to 
come.

==W H A T==I==N E E D=(and some lingering questions)====================

[questions]

Clearly, the list is not complete. If you think something is glaringly 
missing, please do write me at this following address: 
spacepope4u@gmail.com. Tell me what I left out, what I got 
wrong or what I could do better. I love being corrected, honestly. 
However, please do not write me to tell me that I left out your 
favorite character unless it's an especially obscure one that has 
somehow gone under my radar. Chances are, I've thought of this 
character but just haven't gotten around to posting a profile for 
them.

That said, I have a few random, unanswered Mario questions:

In Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins, who is the guy who 
operates the underground casino where Mario exchanges coins for 
lives?

Does anybody know the names of the remaining bosses from the 
first Wario Land game? Or Super Mario Land 2, for that matter?

[new]

The credits for WarioWare: Twisted! mention characters named 
"Ocktar" and "Pip Squeak." Does anybody know who these 
characters are? And who is the "Fligby" mentioned in the credits 
for WarioWare: Touched!?

==L E G A L==S T U F F==================================================

[legal]

The boilerplate: All trademarks and copyrights contained in this 
document are owned by their respective trademark and copyright 
holders.

Meaning...

Mario and every other character mentioned in this guide are 
trademarked by Nintendo, 1983 to present. In many cases, the 
characters may be partially owned by one or more of the many 
developers who have contributed to these games. These companies 
include Square-Enix, Camelot, HAL, Alpha Dream and others. This 
guide is copyrighted (c) to me and is my intellectual property, save 
the comments that I have attributed to other people. This guide may 
not be posted anywhere without my permission. If I find it 
somewhere I haven't permitted it to be, I'll ask you to remove it. But 
I'm not all that stingy about where it goes, so if you'd like to post it 
somewhere, go ahead and write me at the this email address: 

spacepope4u@gmail.com

Honestly, I'd love for this to be distributed widely. I made it to be 
read. But please, ask permission.

==T H E==B I G==L I S T================================================

[biglist]

All the Mario characters I've catalogued so far, listed alphabetically.

- 5-Volt
- 9-Volt
- 18-Volt
- Aerodent
- Akiki
- Akuman
- Alex
- Anti Guy
- The Ancient Ones
- Appleby
- Aqualea
- Arich				
- The Armored Harriers	
- Art and Decko
- Ashley
- The Axem Rangers		
- Azalea
- Baby Bowser	
- Baby Luigi
- Baby Mario
- Baby Yoshi			
- Bandit			
- Bandy Andy			
- Barbos		
- Belcha		
- Belome
- Biff Atlas
- The Big Bob-Omb
- The Big Boo		
- Big Bully		
- Big Lantern Ghost
- The Bigger Boo
- Biokinton
- Birdo
- Blablanadon
- Bleak
- Bloat
- Blooey		
- Bobbery		
- Bobo
- Boddle
- Bogmire
- Bombette
- Boneheads
- Bonetail		
- Boo		
- Boolossus
- Boom-Boom
- Boomer
- Booster	
- Bootler
- Boshi
- Bow			
- Bowletta	
- Bowser Koopa Jr.	
- Bowser Koopa 		
- Bowyer
- Bridget the Baker
- Brighton
- The Brothers Bear	
- Bruce
- Bubbles
- Bub-Ulber	
- Bundt
- Burt the Bashful
- Bumpty						
- Buzzar			
- Cackletta
- Candy Kong		
- Carlton
- Catbat
- Charlie
- Charlieton			
- Chauncey
- Chestnut King		
- Chet Rippo
- Chief Chilly
- Chuck Quizmo
- Chuckleroot
- Chuckolator
- Chunky Kong
- Clapper
- Clawgrip
- Cleftor
- Cloaker and Domino
- Clockwork Soldiers
- Cloudjin
- Cloud N. Candy
- Cork and Cask
- Cortez
- Count Down
- Cractus
- Cranberry
- Cranky Kong
- Crepe
- Croco
- Crump
- Crystal King
- Cuckoo Condor
- Culex
- Czar Dragon
- Daisy
- Dancing Whirlindas
- Dangerous Duck
- Darkly
- Dazzle
- De Buu
- Dedar
- The Diamond Troll
- Diddy Kong
- Dixie Kong
- Dodo
- Doll Man
- Dolphin
- Don
- Donkey Kong 		
- Donkey Kong Jr.
- Don Pianta (and other Piantas)
  - Francesca and Franky
  - Tony and Vinny
- Doopliss
- Dorago
- Dorrie
- Dour
- Dragohoho
- Dragonzamasu
- Dribble and Spitz
- Dr. Crygor
- Dr. Mario
- Dr. Payne
- Dr. Topper
- Dr. Wario
- Dupree
- Dumb Drum
- Dyna (and her family)
  - Mite
  - Ma'Mole 
  - Pa'Mole
- Eclair
- E. Gadd
- Ella
- Ellie
- Enguarde
- Eve
- Expresso
- Exor
- Fat Mouth
- Fava
- Fawful
- Fishmael
- Flapper
- Flavio
- FLUDD
- Flurrie
- Fly Guy
- Fret
- Frogfucius
- Fryguy
- Funky Kong
- Galrog
- Game Guy
- Garbage Boy
- Gargantua Blargg
- Garro
- General Guy
- General White
- Geno
- Giant Snake
- Giga Bowser
- Glimmer
- Gloomtail 
- Goldbob (and his family)
  - Sylvia
  - Bub
- Golden Diva
- Goomba King
- Goombario (and his family)
  - Goompa
  - Goombaria
  - Goompapa
  - Goomama
  - Gooma
- Goombella
- Goombob and Goombetty
- Goomfrey
- Gooper Blooper
- Goura
- Gourmet Guy
- Grace
- Grate Guy
- Grifty
- Grodus
- Grubba
- The Guru of the Sewer
- Gus
- Hamma Jamma
- Hammerbot
- The Hammer Bros.
- Hammerhead Bros.
- Harhall
- Harley Quin
- Harry Hare
- Harry (1)
- Harry (2)
- Hawkmouth
- Hayzee
- Heavy Zed
- Helio
- Hen
- Henry and Orville
- Hermie III
- Herringway
- Hiyoihoi
- Hizza
- Hoggle
- Hoohooros
- Hookbill the Koopa
- Hooktail
- Hoot
- Huff N. Puff
- Il Piantissimo
- Imajin (and his family)
  - Lina
  - Mama
  - Papa
- Inviso
- Ishnail
- Jagger
- Jamano
- Jarvis
- Jellybob
- Jellyfish Sisters
- Jerry
- Jimmy T. (and his family)
  - Mama T. and Papa T.
  - Jamie T.
  - James T.
- Jinx
- Joe
- Jojora
- Jolene
- Jonathan Jones
- Jr. Troopa
- Kamek
- Kammy Koopa			
- KAOS
- Kat and Ana (and their pets)
  - Shadow
  - Shuriken
  - Numchuck
- Kate
- Katsini
- Ken 
- Kent C. Koopa
- Keyzer
- Kezune
- Kid
- Kiddy Kong
- King and Queen Nimbus
- King Boo
- King K
- King Kalamari
- King Totomesu
- King Zing Sting
- Kleevar
- Klepto
- Klubba
- K. Lumsy
- Knife Guy
- Kolorado
- Koopa Bros.
- The Koopalings
  - Larry Koopa
  - Morton Koopa
  - Wendy O. Koopa
  - Iggy Koopa
  - Roy Koopa
  - Lemmy Koopa
  - Ludwig von Koopa
- Koopa Kid
- Koopa Koot
- Koopa the Quick
- Koopa Troopa
- Kooper
- Koopie Koo
- The Koopinator
- Koopley
- Koops
- K. Rool
- Kroop
- Krow
- Kudgel
- Krunch
- Lady Lima
- Lakilester
- Lakilulu
- Lakitu
- Lanky Kong
- Lava Piranha 
- Lee and Chan
- Lily
- Lizardon
- Luigi 				
- Lump
- Lumpy
- Luna
- Lunge Fish
- Lydia
- Mable
- Mack
- Madame Clairvoya
- Mallow
- Manglylox
- Marching Milde
- Mario 	
- Master Crash
- Master Necky
- McGoomba
- Megasmilax
- Meidou
- Melody Pianissima
- Merlon (and his family)
  - Merluvlee
  - Merlon
  - Merlee
  - Merle
  - Merlar
- Metal Mario
- Mike
- Millennium Star
- MIPS
- Miss Petunia
- Miss Warp
- Mom Piranha
- Mona (and her menagerie)
  - No. 1
  - No. 2
  - No. 3
  - 4.1 and 4.2
- Monsieur Boo
- Monstar
- Monty Mole
- Mouser
- Moustafa
- Mr. and Mrs. Mario 
- Mr. Luggs
- Ms. Mowz
- Mushroom Kings
- Nana
- Naval Piranha
- Neil
- Neville
- Nina
- Noki Elder
- Nurse Peach
- Octo
- Onnanoko
- Oosansho
- Orbulon
- Oyazi
- Pak E. Derm
- Pa-Patch
- Paragoom
- Parakarry
- Paratroopa
- Parrator
- Parry
- Paul
- Pauline
- Paw
- Peach 	
- Peasley
- Peeka and Lahla
- Pennington
- Petey Piranha
- Petunia
- Pine
- Pizza Joe
- The Pizza Dinosaur goons
- Plum
- Podley
- Popple
- Poochy
- The Pork Loins
- Posie
- Prince Froggy
- Professor Frankly
- Punchinello
- Punio (and other Punies)
  - Puniper
  - Puni Elder
  - Petuni
  - Pungent
  - Pungry
- Putts
- Pyoro
- Queen B
- Queen Bean
- Rambi
- Raphael the Raven
- Rattly
- Rawk Hawk
- Razor
- Really Gnawty
- Red
- Reznor
- Rip Cheato 
- Robirdo
- Roger the Potted Ghost
- Rocky the Reporter
- Rosie
- Rowf
- Rudy
- Sal Out
- Salvo the Slime
- Sam Spook
- Sammy Rai
- Sarissa
- Scienstein
- Scratchy the Fro Bug
- Screamy
- Sergeant Flutter
- Shadow Mario
- The Shadow Queen
- The Shadow Sirens
  - Vivian
  - Beldam
  - Marilyn
- Shaggy
- Shellshocker
- Sherry
- Shimi
- Shiisa
- Shivers
- Shokora
- Shoot
- Shy Guy
- Silky
- Sir Weston
- Slim Bankshot
- Sluggy the Unshaven
- Smithy (and his factory staff)
  - The Clerk
  - The Manager
  - The Director
  - The Factory Chief
- Smorg
- Snifits Three
- Sonny
- Space Monster Gabriel
- Spangle
- Spearhead
- Spike
- Spoiled Rotten
- Spooky
- Squawks
- Squirt
- Squitter
- Stanley the Bugman
- The Star Spirits
  - Eldstar
  - Mamar
  - Skolar
  - Muskular 
  - Misstar
  - Klevar
  - Kalmar
- Stewart
- The Stork
- Subcon
- Sue Pea
- Sugar
- The Sun
- Sugar
- Sushie
- Svën
- Swanky Kong
- Syrup
- Tad Rock
- Tap-Tap the Red Nose
- Tatanga
- TEC
- Thak
- The Three Musty Fears
- Thwomp
- Tiny
- Tiny Kong
- Toad (and miscellaneous Toads) 
  - The Chancellor of the Mushroom Kingdom
  - Chanterelle
  - Felissa T.
  - Fice T.
  - Gaz
  - Ghost T.
  - Grandma
  - Heff T.
  - Herb T.
  - Hinopio
  - Jolene
  - The Master
  - Minh T.
  - Miss T.
  - Montermama
  - Mr. E (1)
  - Mr. E (2)
  - Mrs. Shroomlock
  - Mushbert
  - Muss T.
  - Pine T.
  - Plenn T.
  - Prince Mush
  - Raz and Raini
  - Russ T.
  - Shroomlock
  - Starshade Bros.
  - Tayce T.
  - Toadia
  - Toadofsky
  - Toodles
  - Thriff T.
  - The Travelling Sisters Three
  - Vanna T.
  - Zess T.
  - Zip Toad
- Toadette
- Toadies
- Toadsworth
- Tolielip
- Tolstar
- Torque
- Torte
- Trunkle
- Tryclyde
- Tubba Blubba
- Tumble
- Tutankoopa
- Tuxie and Mama Penguin
- Twila
- Twink
- Ukiki
- Unagi
- Uncle Grimmly
- Undodog
- Valentina
- Vampire Wario
- Vanessa
- Very Gnawty
- Vincent van Gore
- The Viruses
- Waluigi
- Wanda
- Wario 			
- Wart
- Watinga
- Watt
- Webber
- Whacka
- Whomp
- Whomp King
- Wiggler
- Winky
- Wise Wisterwood
- Wonky
- Wrinkly Kong
- Yakkey
- Yaridovich
- Yoshi 			
- The Yum Yums

I know I'm behind on the Mario games of the past two years, but I am 
back in the business of updating regularly and will soon be compiling 
information for the following games, in order:

 - Donkey Kong: Jungle Beat 
 - Yoshi Touch & Go 
 - Donkey Konga 2 
 - Yoshi Topsy-Turvy 
 - Mario Superstar Baseball 
 - Donkey Kong Country 3 (Game Boy Advance)
 - DK: King of Swing 
 - Dance Dance Revolution: Mario Mix 
 - Mario Party 7 
 - Mario Kart DS
 - Mario and Luigi: Partners in Time 
 - Super Mario Strikers 
 - Dr. Mario / Puzzle League 
 - Mario Tennis: Power Tour
 - Super Princess Peach 
 - New Super Mario Bros.
 - Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis 
 - Yoshi's Island DS 
 - Diddy Kong Racing DS 
 - Wario: Master of Disguise 
 - WarioWare: Smooth Moves 
 - Mario Party 8

(If you can think of characters I should do who aren't presently in the 
to-do-soon list, please email me.)

=======================================================================

5-VOLT [new]
Occupation: Gaming mom
First appearance: WarioWare: Twisted! (2005)

Just as Mario's mommy is only glimpsed from the knees down, so too 
down 9-Volt's curiously named mother appear in WarioWare: 
Twisted! Aside from an order at 9-Volt's bedroom door to quit the 
gaming and hit the sack, 5-Volt is depicted only one other time - in 
silhouetted form at 9-Volt's door.

=======================================================================

9-VOLT [new]
Occupation: Retro gamer extraordinaire
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)

School gets out at Diamond Elementary and 9-Volt skates home to do 
what he loves best: spinning records and playing classic Nintendo 
games. He pops in a cartridge into a Game Boy from the creamed 
spinach-color era and goes to work. The game, a parody of the original 
NES Dragon Warrior, has players using hit points for chances to play 
classic Nintendo games.

9-Volt's series is actually a brilliant example of product placement; 
each microgame is based on a classic Nintendo game or product, such 
as the NES Balloon Fight or the Super NES F-Zero. Mario-related 
games referenced in 9-Volts series include the original Super Mario 
Bros., Mario Clash, the NES Dr. Mario, Mario Paint and the original 
Donkey Kong.

Ken the Reporter pops up to interrupt 9-Volt's epilogue with an 
important announcement: the new Game Boy Advance SP is now on 
sale in stores everywhere. Our tech tyke leaves in such a rush that his 
skateboard transforms into a hoverboard.

Chicken Race, an extra game players can unlock, also features 9-Volt. 
Two players control either of two feet, which kick 9-Volt or Shaggy 
on a skateboard. Whoever coasts the closest to the end of the cliff 
without sailing over it wins.

Doubtlessly one of the more popular members of Wario's Diamond 
City crew, it should have surprised no one that 9-Volt returned for 
WarioWare: Twisted. In this game, he's doing his student thing at 
Diamond City Elementary when his teacher introduces a new student: 
the hulking 18-Volt. "No relation to naughty 9-Volt," the snarky 
teacher explains. 9-Volt and 18-Volt become fast friends and spend the 
afternoon playing video games at 9-Volt's house, making for a kick-
ass game set, "Spintendo Classics," in which the rotating mechanism 
takes over as the primary control for great old Nintendo games. 
Eventually, 9-Volt's mother, 5-Volt, orders the two to break it up. Late 
at night, Mrs. 5-Volt checks in on her son, only to catch him furtively 
playing his Game Boy SP under the covers. "I saw that!" she yells.

When 9-Volt and 18-Volt return in WarioWare: Twisted!, they have 
newly purchased a copy of the hot new Gamecube game, 36-Volt 
Man. They rush home, pop it in their system and party the night away 
with 9-Volt's vast collection of Nintendo products. At this point, the 
player makes their way through the "Retro Action" game set. Upon 
completion, the player sees that the two have passed out. They wake 
up, check out the clock and speed off for school. Late again, those no-
goodniks. 

Microgames in 9-Volt's series that feature Mario characters:

  WARIOWARE, INC.

  - Donkey Kong (Mario leaps over a barrel.)
  - Super Mario Bros. (Mario must stomp Goombas.)
  - Fly Swatter (Swat minor baddies from the old Mario Paint 
    minigame.)
  - Dr. Mario (Match pills to viruses.)
  - Mario Clash (Knock out baddies with a Koopa shell, Virtual Boy-
    style!)

  WARIOWARE: TWISTED!

  - Super Mario Bros. 3-Lift (Steer Mario around a circular lift while   
    avoiding Bullet Bills, Cheep-Cheeps and Piranha Plants.)
  - Wrecking Crew (Help Mario Avoid Eggplant Men.)
  - Pinball (Mario and Pauline cameo as balls ping about.)
  - Golf (Mario swings on his own, but the player must steer the course 
    to catch the ball!)
  - Mario Bros. (Spin the Game Boy to right an upturned Koopa 
    Troopa or Buzzy Beetle.)
  - Donkey Kong Jr. (Help Junior save his pops from Mario.)
  - Donkey Kong 3 (Stanley aims insecticide at D.K.'s ass once again.)
  - NES Open Tournament Golf (Aim the ball while caddy Peach 
    watches pleasantly.)
  - Super Mario Bros. 3 (Pick the right power-up - Frog, Hammer 
    Bros., Tanooki, Fiery or Statue!)
  - Super Mario Bros. (Classic Super Mario Bros.-style levels are bent 
    into roundness, navigable only by rotating.)

  WARIOWARE: TOUCHED!

  - Super Mario Bros. (Bump the stylus against blocks to reveal coins.)
  - Super Mario Bros. (Give Goombas, Koopa Troopas and Spinys the 
    poke of death with the stylus.)
  - Mario Paint (Fill in the unpainted areas.)
  - 8-Bit Hero (Note which pixel doesn't belong. Pick correctly and the 
    screen zooms out to reveal Link, an Ice Climber or Mario.)
  - Donkey Kong 3 (Blow into the microphone to make Stanley's bug 
    spray shoot up at D.K.)

9-Volt's starring roles:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

Other appearances:
Wario World (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

18-VOLT [new]
Occupation: Overgrown funkster
First appearance: WarioWare: Twisted! (2005)

Looks like he's 30, but he's apparently an elementary school student. 
Either way, I felt a little nervous went 9-Volt invited this guy over to 
his house to play. Things turned out pretty well, though - his mixing 
on the turntable ends up being a good complement to the music 9-
Volt's 8-bit gaming experience. You can always pick 18-Volt out from 
the rest. He's the character who's taller than everybody else, shoulders 
like a linebacker, 3-D shades inexplicably on his eyes and a single 
mohawked spike on his head.

Since his introduction to the WarioWare series, 18-Volt has shown up 
in each of 9-Volt's cinema scenes.

18-Volt's appearances:
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=======================================================================

AERODENT
Occupation: Boss of the Topaz Passage
Only appearance: Wario Land Advance (2001)

A mouse riding an inflatable teddy bear - and only one of the many 
whacked-out bosses inhabiting the Golden Pyramid. If Wario can flip 
the teddy bear balloon upside-down, he can take a swipe at its mousy 
pilot.

=======================================================================

AKIKI 
Occupation: Ukiki cutie
Only appearance: Mario Party Advance (2005)

In Mario Party Advance, Ukiki the Grinder has a family that includes a 
tomboyish niece named Akiki - ostensibly making Ukiki a genuine 
monkey's uncle. In one of the game's mini-quests, Akiki seeks help in 
finding the kidnapped Ukiki.

=======================================================================

AKUMAN
Occupation: Worse than the Noid
Only appearance: Wario's Woods NES (1994) 

A fiendish gremlin creature with wings and a pitchfork. He wears a 
read outfit. Standard cartoon devil stuff here. He's the first boss Wario 
must puzzle-duel with, but only in the NES version of the game.

=======================================================================

ALEX
Occupation: Tennis player
Only appearance: Mario Tennis (2000)

A generic human netter that players could unlock by hooking their 
Game Boy Color versions of Mario Tennis to their Nintendo 64 
versions via a special cable. I, however, never had this cable and know 
nothing of Alex's appearance, behavior or tennis abilities.

=======================================================================

ANTI GUY 
[also known as Deadly Guy]
Occupation: The dark side of shyness
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A black-robed Shy Guy who tenaciously guards a chest in Shy Guy's 
Toy Box. Mario can fight him, but he's a tough cookie. Stomping Anti 
Guy earns Mario the Power Plus badge. Alternatively, Mario can buy 
off this Shy Guy by feeding him Lemon Candy.

=======================================================================

THE ANCIENT ONES [new]
Occupation: Stone idols
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

A pair of stone hands with an eye in the palm, these spirits call 
themselves "the ancient ones" and guard a star. Mario must pop them 
in the eyeball three times each. Then they hands will crumble and 
yield the star.

The Ancient Ones' starring roles:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=======================================================================

APPLEBY 
Occupation: Fruit-chucking tunneler 
Only appearance: Dr. Mario 64 (2001)

A strange, flesh-colored mole creature who pops up as a boss in Dr. 
Mario 64. Appleby is also a selectable character in the game's 
multiplayer mode. The character initially appeared, however, in Wario 
Land 3, where he'd toss the apples that transform Wario into Fat 
Wario 

Appleby's starring roles:
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001

Other appearances:
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000

=======================================================================

AQUALEA [new]
[Japanese name: Meidou]
Occupation: Angry mermaid
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A mermaid with a pink tail and blue hair. She's the boss of the eighth 
level in Wario's Woods. I'm fairly certain that a boss from the NES 
Wario Wood's, Meidou, is Aqualea without her name being translated 
into English. They look almost identical.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=177&pos=7

=======================================================================

ARICH 
Occupation: Sinister spider
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996)

A giant red spider who's not nearly as nice as Squitter. Arich is the 
boss of the game's second area, Kremwood Forest. 

Arich's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997

=======================================================================

THE ARMORED HARRIERS 
Occupation: Impermeable idiots
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Called "The Iron Adonis Twins" by their fans, the Armored Harriers 
sit pretty high on the Glitz Pit totem pole-o'-fightingness. They're a 
pair of king-sized Iron Clefts, those generic Paper Mario baddies that 
looks like walking rocks. You thought the little ones were tough? 
These guys are practically invincible. Only when a certain nameless 
Baby Yoshi join Mario's party can the Armored Harriers' heft be used 
against them. The little Yoshi swallows can swallow one and them spit 
it against the other. After toppling these two, Mario advances to the 
cleaner, newer major league locker room instead of the skuzzy minor 
league one.
 
And did you notice that one of the Armored Harrier brothers wears red 
shoes while the other wears green? And should that remind you of 
another pair of brothers?

=======================================================================

ART and DECKO [new]
Occupation: Hawt Slices guitarist and rapper, respectively
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2005)

We may never know how Mona ended up in a band with these two. 
Regardless, Mona + Art + Decko = the Hawt Slices, a rock band hot 
enough to displace Vanessa from the top of the pop charts. Art, the 
smaller of the two, appears to be a black, impish creature wearing 
something like a Santa Claus hat. Decko, conversely, is a fat, yellow 
creature who looks something like a bear with antlers. Decko also has 
a "D" on his chest.

In the same vein as the "Kat and Ana" pun, Art and Decko's names 
together make "art deco," an artistic, fashion and architectural 
movement in the early 1900s. The pun doesn't work as well as Kat and 
Ana's, though, since the art deco movement seems to have no relation 
to Art and Decko's appearance or behavior.

=======================================================================

ASHLEY [new]
Occupation: Dark-hearted cutie pie
First appearance: WarioWare: Touched! (2005)

A morbid little girl with a red witchy dress, two long, black pigtails, 
and a creepy headless doll, Ashley lives alone in a mansion in 
Diamond City. That the mansion bears a passing resemblance to 
Luigi's Mansion is probably no coincidence - both places seem to be 
the site of some creepy goings-on.

You see, Ashley doesn't just look like a witch. She is a witch. In fact, 
her story sequence in the game depicts her being in the middle of 
combining some ingredients in her cauldron one stormy night. The 
mixture, however, goes sour and belched us a cloud of smoke, and 
Ashley quickly realized that she's missing an ingredient. At the same 
time, space alien and WarioWare regular Orbulon is cruising over the 
sky when a lightning bolt zaps his ship and sends him crashing into 
Ashley just as she's leaving to look for the missing ingredient. Upon 
meeting the alien, Ashley realizes that he is the missing ingredient and 
she dispatches her impy cohort, Red, to chase after Orbulon.

The harried alien, of course, escapes, and Red returns to his mistress 
empty-handed. Ashley merely grins and tells him that she'll just use 
him instead.

Later, Ashley and Red go to the Hawt House to meet up with the rest 
of the WarioWare: Touched! cast. Notably, Ashley is the only 
character who does not dance. She's probably too busy being evil.

Ashley's game set, "Total Drag," features games that require the 
player to drag the Nintendo DS stylus in order to perform various 
actions: lighting a match, for example. The games pass to the tune of 
Ashley's theme song, making her one of the few characters in the 
Marioverse to have their own tune, complete with lyrics. The words to 
Ashley's theme are printed below. They come from Enigmapoeia's 
video game song lyrics guide at GameFAQs.com. Lyrics are sung by a 
mysterious group referred to in the credits as "Ashley's Creepy Crew." 
They're not seen in the game. Lyrics in the double brackets are spoken 
by Ashley herself.

  Who's the girl next door living in the haunted mansion?
  [[You better learn my name 'cause I am]] Ashley!
  She knows the darkest spells and she brews the meanest potions
  [[You might be the ingredient I seek]]

  Don't let yourself be fooled by her innocent demeanor
  [[You should be afraid of the great]] Ashley!
  She doesn't play with dolls, and she never combs her hair
  [[Who has time for girly things like that?]]

  [[Eye of newt, I cast a hex on you]]
  [[Grandma's wig, this'll make you big]]
  [[Kitten Spitz, soon your pants won't fix]]
  [[Pantalones Giganticus!]]

  [[Oh no, not again!)

  She could rule the world, and still finish all her homework
  [[Everyone knows that I'm the greatest]] Ashley!
  You better watch your step or she'll cast a spell on you
  [[I turned my teacher into a spoon]]

  [[I must flip through my spellbook, and yes it's true]]
  [[I don't have as many friends as you.]]
  [[But I think you're nice and maybe we could be friends]]
  [[And if you say no, you're toast]]

  Who's the girl next door living in the haunted mansion?
  [[You better learn my name 'cause I am]] Ashley!
  Just remember this when you see her on the street
  [[I'm the cruelest girl you'll ever meet]]

As Enigmapoeia also notes, the character Luna, who appears in 
Mona's prologue, has a number-four hit with her version of 
Ashley's theme. In her version, however, the second line is 
subbed for "You should be afraid of the great Ashley!" 
Enigmapoeia also notes that the "Kitten Spitz" mentioned is 
probably the WarioWare character Spitz, a feline taxi driver 
who had his own game sets in the first to entries in the series.

Ashley's not the first diminutive witch character in the Wario 
games. That would be Sarissa, a cuter, nicer looking sorceress 
who appeared in Wario's Woods. Also, Ashley's name is 
probably a pun on the word "ash," seeing as how she's all 
about fire and brimstone and all that.

=======================================================================

THE AXEM RANGERS 
[Japanese name: Kajidoh Sentai Onoranger]
Occupation: Smithy's minions
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

After Mario and his friends defeat the Czar Dragon in Barrel Volcano, 
these five color-coded criminals swoop in and steal the star. The Axem 
Rangers include Axem Red, the leader; Axem Black, the cool guy with 
the shades; Axem Pink, the cute one; Axem Green, the skinny one; and 
Axem Yellow, the fat one. The rangers, each of whom fight with a 
small handheld hatchet, attempt to escape on the Blade, their flying 
vehicle, which, of course, is shaped like an axe. When Mario's party 
fights the Axem Rangers, they one-by-one drop out of the rumble, 
each with his or her own lame excuse.

Axem Green: "I have a headache!"
Axem Pink: "My makeup's running!"
Axem Yellow: "I'm hungry!"
Axem Black: "I broke my shades!"

(A reader calling himself ON EI tells me that if you decide to take 
Axem Red out and leave one of the other rangers for last, he'll exclaim 
"Oh, my head is spinning!")

Axem Red eventually makes his teammates combine forces with the 
Blade to fire their powerful Breaker Beam, but the Axems fail anyway. 
Later, in the depths of Smithy's factory, Mario can see new Axem 
rangers being manufactured.

The Axem Rangers are a clear parody of the Mighty Morphin' Power 
Rangers, whose various incarnations enjoyed mid-90s popularity 
throughout the United States and Japan. The subsequent Mario RPG, 
Paper Mario, featured the Koopa Bros., who parodied the Teenage 
Mutant Ninja Turtles in similar vein.

(Editorial note: I was a little flattered when I was browsing through the 
Wikipedia and found that a user named Ciotti plagiarized this passage 
for an article on the Axems. Not only that, but another reader had 
recognized the text as mine and called him on it. I guess that's when I 
realized that people actually do read this guide!)

=======================================================================

AZALEA [new]
Occupation: Golfer
First appearance: Mario Golf (2000)

A track star now quickly accelling at golf. Azalea is one of the four 
generic humans players can chose to play as in the Game Boy Color 
version of Mario Golf, which allows players to build their stats 
however they chose. Azalea is also playable in the Nintendo 64 
version of Mario Golf if they have both versions, both systems and a 
transfer pak. Her stats are variable and her name can be changed to 
whatever players wish. 

There's a strange connection between Azalea and Daisy that I think 
merits a mention. The Smash Bros. Melee trophy info for Daisy claims 
that she was playable in the Nintendo 64 Mario Golf. She wasn't, but 
Azalea was. Azalea also happens to look exactly like Daisy. Same 
color clothes, same hair, and the exact same face. Odder still, when 
Azalea was still around, Daisy looked like old Daisy - that is, 
brunette hair and tan skin. Essentially, then, Nintendo gave Daisy 
Azalea's face.

Creepy, no?

Azalea's starring roles:
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

BABY BOWSER
[Japanese name: Kokuppa/Baby Koopa]
Occupation: Child-king of the Koopa
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 
1995

While Bowser and Baby Bowser's biographies don't conflict like 
Mario and Baby Mario's do, determining exactly who Baby Bowser is 
and what he should be called is nonetheless a pain in the ass.

Baby Bowser is Bowser's infant self. Baby Bowser is not Bowser Jr., 
who is the youngest of Bowser's offspring and a troublemaker in 
Super Mario Sunshine. Baby Bowser is also not one of the miniature 
Bowser clones that populate the Mario Party games (even though they 
have been referred to as Baby Bowsers at some point in that series). 
Those Mario Party cretins are either the Mini Bowsers (as I think 
they're called in Mario Party 5, in which you can play as one) or 
Koopa Kids (though, not to be confused with the seven of Bowser's 
children from Super Mario Bros. 3, who are called the Koopa Kids or 
the Koopalings, alternately). 

No, this is the crankiest, meanest baby in the whole Marioverse: the 
child king of the Koopa Kingdom, Baby Bowser.

This brat and his caretaker/foster parent, Kamek, are the central 
villains of Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island. After using his black 
Koopa magic to foresee all the trouble the Mario Bros. would one day 
cause Bowser and his crew, Kamek intercepts the Stork en route to 
delivering Baby Mario and Baby Luigi to their parents. Kamek snags 
Baby Luigi, but Baby Mario falls into the helping hands of the 
Yoshies.

Baby Bowser doesn't show up until the end of the game. The Yoshi 
clan's quest to reunite Baby Mario ends in Baby Bowser's playroom. 
The spoiled mini-monarch demands to ride Yoshi, calling him, "green 
donkey." But Yoshi instead stomps Baby Bowser. Kamek swoops in to 
magically meddle one last time. Abracadabra - Baby Bowser grows 
up. Not older, just bigger. Tyrannosaurus rex-size, which is big enough 
to destroy his entire castle. With glowing eyes, he bounds from the 
horizon, directly at Yoshi and Baby Mario - and your TV screen, too. 
A series of well-aimed eggs stops him in his tracks however, and 
Kamek zooms away with the battered boy king in tow.

Baby Bowser shows up on Yoshi's Island once more, sans Kamek, to 
stir up trouble in Yoshi's Story. Yoshi, sans Baby Mario, must rescue 
his homeland's most precious natural resource, the Super Happy Tree 
- also known as the Marvelous Tree of Mirth in the game's pre-
production days - from Baby Bowser's clutches. Fiendishly, Bowser 
has stolen the source of the Yoshies' happiness and flattened their 
world into a storybook. 

After embarking on an unusual quest of fruit-collecting, Yoshi finds 
Bowser waiting in the last room of one of his four castles: Mecha 
Castle, Lift Castle, Magma Castle or Ghost Castle, depending on the 
player's choice. Regardless of which castle chosen, the little king rides 
around on ghosts near the ceiling of the final room. Yoshi must chuck 
Bob-Ombs upwards, then tussle with Baby Bowser on the floor once 
he falls. The battle is not too difficult, especially since the Super 
Happy Tree is growing in the center of the room, giving Yoshi a 
healthy supply of fruit. Yoshi sends Baby Bowser packing once last 
time. Presumably, Bowser spends the next few years growing up and 
attacks the Mushroom Kingdom as an adult some time later.

Though he's probably not going to make a starring role in the near 
future, I've noticed that Baby Bowser is also part of the décor in the 
Yoshi's Island-themed Baby Park racetrack in Mario Kart: Double 
Dash!!

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BABY BOWSER***
Even as a youngster, Baby Bowser was already playing pranks and 
causing trouble for Baby Mario and his pal Yoshi. Even at this early 
age of his evil career, Baby Bowser had tons of henchmen at his 
disposal. Many experts speculate that Mario and Bowser have some 
sort of connection that can be traced back to their mutual births.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BABY BOWSER***

Baby Bowser's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

Other appearances:
Picross NP Vol. 2 (Super Famicom) - 1999
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

BABY LUIGI
Occupation: Overshadowed infant
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

If Luigi got the short end of the stick when it comes to starring roles in 
video games, then Baby Luigi had his stick stolen, stomped into pieces 
and then recycled. Baby Luigi doesn't show up in his debut game until 
the very end. Basically, he's the game's Princess Peach. Once Baby 
Mario and Yoshi trounce Bowser, they find Baby Luigi and the Stork. 
The Stork flies his bundle back to Mom and Dad. The last shot of the 
game is proud Mr. and Mrs. Mario holding the young heroes in their 
hands.

The little green guy floated around in Nintendo limbo until Mario 
Kart: Double Dash!!, in which he and his twin brother tore up the 
racing circuit in their turbo-powered prams.

Like his brother, Baby Luigi makes a split-second cameo in the 
opening cinema for Mario Power Tennis. During the match between 
the Marios and the Warios, Baby Luigi is that blurry green tot standing 
beneath Toadsworth's umpire chair.

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Baby Mario
Personal racecar: Rattle Buggy
Special weapon: Chain Chomp

Baby Luigi's starring role:
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003

Other appearances:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

BABY MARIO 
Occupation: Crybaby, future hero
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

In the beginning, Baby Mario makes sense. Kamek buzzes the Stork 
flying the baby Mario Bros. to their parents and makes off with Baby 
Luigi and Mr. Stork, but Baby Mario plummets to Yoshi's Island - 
and onto the back of an unsuspecting Yoshi. Baby Mario's adventure 
in Super Mario World 2 established three things: (1) the diaper-clad 
daredevil's lifelong propensity for adventure; (2) his friendly 
relationship with the Yoshies; and (3) his decidedly less friendly 
relationship with the Koopas.

Baby Mario doesn't do a whole lot in Super Mario World 2. If Yoshi 
takes a hit, Baby Mario gets bounced off Yoshi's back. He also 
becomes encased in a bubble, for some inscrutable reason, and will 
float about the screen until Yoshi can retrieve him. The bubble's no 
sound barrier, though; Baby Mario shrieks like a banshee when his 
separated from his steed. Super Mario World 2 actually marks the first 
time Mario had any kind of voice. 

If Yoshi snags a Super Star, however, Baby Mario becomes Super 
Baby Mario. Invincible and clad in the yellow cape from Super Mario 
World, Baby Mario could run at super speeds - even up walls and on 
ceilings. The effect was only temporary, but Baby Mario does get his 
own stage, "4-1: Go! Go! Mario!!," in which a string of Super Stars 
pits Baby Mario against classic foes from Mario's adult adventures: 
Koopa Troopas, Goombas, Piranha Plants and even the rarely seen 
post-cocoon form of the Wiggler: the Wigglerfly.

Proving true Kamek's predictions that Mario would be a headache for 
the Koopas, Baby Mario and his Yoshi companions trample Baby 
Bowser, setting the turtle folk up for many future losing interactions 
with the Mario Bros. The ending sequence that follows, however, 
begins to cause some head-scratchers for those of us looking for any 
shred of continuity in the Marioverse.

When the freed Stork finally delivers the infant brothers, he does so in 
a village in the Mushroom Kingdom - not Brooklyn, where the Mario 
Bros. supposedly originally came from. The game's text clearly says 
"Mushroom Kingdom" and the neighboring houses sport the fungus-
style look we Mario fans have come to know and love. With that, 
Nintendo established a difference between Baby Mario and his adult 
self.

A reader calling himself Tinus points out, however, that Mario's 
Brooklyn origin never shows up in the text of any game. He's right. 
The only actual mention of the Mario Bros. as Brooklynites is in the 
American instruction manual for the original Super Mario Bros. Still, 
that aspect of Mario and Luigi has shown up in so many adaptations of 
the Mario series, like the television shows and the movie, that I'd dare 
to call it canon. Initially, I'd say that being born in Brooklyn would 
account for Mario and Luigi's accents, but Tinus also points out that 
the brothers' accents are so thick as to suggest they came from Italy, 
not the United States. A valid point, I admit. (He also points out that 
many characters in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door speak with 
accents - like Dupree in his fake French, for example - and these 
characters most likely weren't born in the real world. Contradictions 
on top of contradictions. That's the Nintendo way. Nonetheless, I'd 
much rather just live with the continuity flaws than disregard original 
origin story altogether.) This debate is continued to some extent in 
Mario's bio, but I'll warn readers here that I make no attempt to settle 
it - just present the two sides of the issue.

Baby Mario would show up in subsequent Mario games, though 
clothed in a toddler version of Mario's overalls instead of just a diaper. 
Despite his tiny stature, Baby Mario can swing a golf club or drive a 
go-kart with the best of them. He cries less loudly now, which is a 
plus. However, his continued presence is a bit of a pain for Mario 
purists. Mario playing a tennis match against Bowser is enough of a 
stretch; Mario playing tennis against his own infant self is another 
matter altogether. 

It's quite possible that Camelot realized this: Baby Mario is nearly 
absent from Mario Power Tennis, the Gamecube sequel to the Mario 
Tennis that Baby Mario starred in. He's not playable, but he makes an 
ever-so-quick cameo in the game's intro movie. During the opening 
match between the Mario Bros. and the Wario Bros., look for this pint-
sized plumber standing beneath the umpire's chair. He's only there for 
a second or two, but I'm sure it's him.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BABY MARIO***
Long ago, when the stork was carrying Baby Mario and Baby Luigi to 
the Mario household, the stork was ambushed, causing Baby Mario to 
tumble onto Yoshi's Island. This marked the beginning of the Yoshies' 
adventure to deliver Baby Mario to his parents. Since then, Baby 
Mario's been spotted on golf courses and tennis courts.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BABY MARIO***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Baby Luigi
Personal racecar: Goo Goo Buggy
Special weapon: Chain Chomp

Baby Mario's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003

Other appearances:
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

BABY YOSHI
Occupation: Compulsive eater-in-training
First appearance: Super Mario World (1990)

Before Baby Mario or Baby Bowser or - I dread it - Baby Wario, 
Baby Yoshi showed up in Super Mario World. While the regular green 
Yoshi popped out of his shell fully grown, the special classes of 
Yoshies - red, yellow and blue - were little squirts whom Mario 
carried around and fed enemies until they matured. Additionally, each 
time Mario toppled one of the Koopalings' castles, he freed one of the 
captive Yoshi eggs. At the end of the game, when Mario and Peach 
return to Yoshi's house, the seven eggs hatched, producing seven baby 
Yoshies. (Curiously, while the eggs all had yellow spots, Yoshies of 
all four colors emerged. This flaw was fixed when Nintendo ported 
thew game to Game Boy Advance.)

The heroes of Yoshi's Story were also supposed to be juveniles - 
ones who hadn't yet cracked out of their shells when Baby Bowser 
zapped Yoshi's Island into storybook flatness. These eight Yoshi kids, 
however, didn't look any different than full-sized Yoshies.

In Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, Mario rescues a Yoshi egg 
from Hoggle, the porcine hotdog vendor who'd like to incorporate the 
egg into a new dish. Mario rescues the egg and it eventually hatches 
into a cute Baby Yoshi - complete with an eggshell diaper. This 
Baby Yoshi model seems to be based more off the anklebiter Yoshies 
from Paper Mario than the look of the original Baby Yoshies. This 
tagalong is more customizable than most. Players get the option of 
naming the little guy and colors varied from one game to another. (I 
got an orange one and named him Doshi.) 

Though tiny, this Baby Yoshi packs a punch. Mario can ride on his 
back to get around a little more quickly. And in battle, the Baby Yoshi 
can stomp and slurp as well as a full-grown one. His Slurp ability, 
which allows him to swallow one enemy and spit it at another, is 
instrumental in the defeat of the Armored Harriers, a pair of baddies 
made from the hardest substance in the Marioverse. In the game's 
epilogue, we find that Baby Yoshi has re-entered the Glitz Pit fighting 
circuit as a solo act. He fights under the name "The Great Gonzalez 
Jr."

Baby Yoshi's starring role:
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004 

Other appearances:
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Yoshi (NES) - 1992
Yoshi (Game Boy) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Mario's Picross (Game Boy) - 1995
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002

=======================================================================

BALL BUNNY 
[Japanese name: Shoot]
Occupation: Hare at the hoops
First appearance: Wario Land II (1998)

Ball Bunny is a basketball-loving rabbit whom Wario must fight in an 
unusual way: by shooting hoops. Ball Bunny will attempt to jump on 
Wario and turn him into Ball Wario, then shoot his newly round form 
into his basket. Alternatively, Wario will be trying to squash Ball 
Bunny into a make a basket with him on his side of the court.
 
Ball Bunny is the only boss from Wario Land II to show up in the 
sequel. There, he's the fourth boss in a stage called "A Town in 
Chaos." The rules are fairly similar, except that Ball Bunny and Wario 
are aided in their basketball efforts by a neutral third party: a happy 
little tortoise. 

Ball Bunny's starring roles:
Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000

=======================================================================

BANDIT
[Japanese name: Thief]
Occupation: Super-evolved Shy Guy
First appearance: Super Mario World: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Bandit, who looks like a taller, sneakier Shy Guy in a blue robe, is a 
generic enemy with a knack for thievery. He'll snatch Baby Mario 
right off Yoshi's back. Bandit has a profile here, however, because he 
is also Yoshi's opponent in a series of mini-games Yoshi can find 
during his adventure. Yoshi and Bandit square off in such 
competitions as Balloon Toss, in which they must key in a certain 
sequence to toss the gradually expanding balloon to their opponents, or 
Watermelon Spit, where they try to snipe each other with a high-speed 
stream of watermelon seeds.

Some players might not know that Bandit is also a playable character. 
While on the map screen, a player could hold select and then press X, 
X, Y, B and then A to unlock a special menu that allowed both 
practice sessions of the microgames and a two-player version of 
certain games. Whoever held the second controller played as Bandit, 
making him the first playable Shy Guy ever in a Mario game.

The generic Bandits showed up as minor villains in the Dry Dry Desert 
area of Paper Mario, as well as on the mean streets of Rogueport in the 
sequel, Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door.

Bandit's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 3: Yoshi's Island (Game Boy Advance) - 2002

Other appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

BANDY ANDY 
[Japanese name: Prots]
Occupation: Gossipy grunt
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A combatant in the Glitz Pit who fights on a team called the Hand-It-
Overs. Bandy Andy has been around long enough to learn a secret or 
two, and he'll blab if Mario gives him a chance. Loose lips sink ships, 
of course, and soon Bandy Andy vanishes, just like the other missing 
fighters he's warned you about. 

Bandy Andy is a particular member of the generic Bandit enemy class, 
as his name might imply.

=======================================================================

BARBOS 
Occupation: Irksome urchin
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996)

A giant spiny sea urchin and the boss of the game's sixth area, Razor 
Ridge. Dixie and Kiddy sit this fight out and leave the heroics to 
Enguarde, the smiling swordfish that has served the Kong family since 
the days of the original Donkey Kong Country. Enguarde must poke 
Barbos' soft body during the brief seconds in which his shell opens up.

Barbos' starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997

=======================================================================

BELCHA 
Occupation: Big-time barrel
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996)

And you thought Dumb Drum was an odd choice for a boss. Belcha is 
the boss of the game's first area, Lake Orangutanga. He's is a giant 
animate barrel that spits smaller, inanimate barrels. Dixie must crack 
open the barrels and throw the contents - beetles, unless I'm 
mistaken - into Belcha's mouth. Doing so causes the big guy to burp, 
which will send him rocketing backwards. Eventually, he'll burp 
himself right off the pier. The fight sounds a lot like Yoshi's against 
Roger the Potted Ghost in Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island.

Belcha's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997

=======================================================================

BELOME
[Japanese name: Berome]
Occupation: Sewer mutant
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

A big, four-eyed dog who lives in Kero Sewer. Before the much-
feared Belome goes down in the fight against Mallow and Mario early 
in the game, he predicts, "If you defeat me, you still won't beat me. 
Beware the flood!" His prophecy comes true when a huge wall of 
water knocks the heroes out of the sewer and into the cascades of the 
Midas River.

Mario and company fight Belome again in Belome Temple, the 
complex located beneath the shifting sands of the Land's End desert. 
This time, he's even stronger and he'll eat party members and generate 
clones of them. As a point of interest, Belome thinks Mario tastes sour, 
Geno tastes like wood, Peach tastes peachy, Bowser tastes worst,  and 
Mallow tastes the best.

In Japan, Belome's name can also be written as "Berome." Fellow 
Mario researcher TheKoopaBros. notes that "bero" means "tongue" 
and "me" means "eye." This makes sense, since Belome's two most 
outstanding characteristics are his big, lolling canine tongue and his 
four eyes.

=======================================================================

BIFF ATLAS [new]
[Japanese name: Maddi]
Occupation: Bodybuilder boogeyman
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

A muscular ghost who haunts the rec room in the haunted mansion. 
Though his body is gone, Biff still spends his time lifting barbells. If 
Luigi knocks one of the punching bags into Biff as he floats by, he'll 
be vulnerable just long enough for Luigi to suck him up with this 
vacuum. 

According to the Game Boy Horror on Biff, he likes weightlifting and 
lilies, the latter because they symbolize purity.

Image link: 
http://www.gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=64&pos
=7

=======================================================================

THE BIG BOB-OMB
[also known as the Bob-Omb King]
Occupation: Lord of all blasting matter
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

This stately bomb sits atop the hill in the middle of Bob-Omb 
Battlefield, the first area Mario encounters in Super Mario 64. He 
claims to be powerful and uses words like "methinks," but if Mario 
can pick him up and throw him three times, he'll explode and Mario 
will earn a star.

In Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour, the Big Bob-Omb appears atop a 
mountain in the Peach Castle grounds. According to reader Tinus, the 
Ring Golf mode makes players hit a ring that the Big Bob-Omb is 
wearing - a difficult task.

The Big Bob-Omb's starring roles:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

Other appearances: 
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

THE BIG BOO 
Occupation: Principal poltergeist
First appearance: Super Mario World (1991)

The Big Boo awaits Mario at the end of a hidden ghost house in the 
Donut Plains area of Super Mario World. He's a supersized version of 
the regular Boo ghosts, who made their debut in Super Mario Bros. 3. 
Unlike his underlings, however, the Big Boo doesn't shy away if he 
looks Mario in the face. Mario defeats him by kicking blocks upward 
into the Big Boo's face. Super Mario World also has a look-alike ghost 
in a later Ghost House on Chocolate Island. It's a blue-toned version 
of the same ghost - presumably the Big Blue Boo. 

In Super Mario RPG, a minor baddie called "The Big Boo" inhabits 
Kero Sewers. But because this ghost is anything but big, I'll assume 
this name was just given arbitrarily.

The Boo Mansion area of Super Mario 64 pits Mario against the Big 
Boo in a boss battle three separate times for three separate stars, as 
reader Tinus reminds me. "Scarier than ever," Tinus writes.

The Big Boo has recently seemed to lose his position as Boo boss to 
King Boo from Luigi's Mansion. Biggie did, however, show up in 
Game Boy Advance's Game & Watch Gallery 4, as the second-level 
boss in the boxing game. He even used a smaller Boo to "punch."

GameFAQs poster Kirby021591 theorizes that the Big Boo and King 
Boo are one in the same, as the character referred to as the Big Boo in 
Super Mario 64 DS wears a crown - though only in the stage "Big 
Boo's Haunt," which Nintendo created specifically for Super Mario 64 
DS. (The other Big Boo appearances in Super Mario 64 DS are sans-
crown.) A crown, after all, is the primary defining characteristic of 
King Boo aside from his size. This Big Boo also has a cackle that 
sounds more like King Boo's than that of the typical Super Mario 64 
Boo. (Though, again, the cackle only shows up in the Big Boo's Haunt 
stage.) Since the Big Boo had no crown in the Nintendo 64 incarnation 
of Super Mario 64, maybe the programmers just decided to place the 
game more on continuity with the current state of the Marioverse.

The Big Boo's starring roles:
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

Other appearances:
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002

=======================================================================

BIG BULLY
Occupation: Horny pusher
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

A boss Mario must fight in steamy, dreamy Lethal Lava Land. As 
Mario hops from one island to the next in a sea of lava, he eventually 
comes to one populated by three Bullies, minor baddies that look like 
Bob-Ombs with bull's horns. They'll try to knock Mario into the lava 
if he steps into their line of sight. Once the three Bullies are boiled, the 
Big Bully will drop down and take Mario on. He's no real threat, 
though. All Mario has to do is trick him into plunging into the lava and 
he'll earn a star.

Big Bully's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=======================================================================

BIG LANTERN GHOST
[Japanese name: Big Torch-kun]
Occupation: Brooder-in-the-dark
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

The Big Lantern Ghost is a mid-boss in Shy Guy's Toy Box. He loves 
the dark and hates the light, so the only way to defeat him is to attack 
his lantern to brighten the room - and weaken him. Once Mario 
stomps the Big Lantern Ghost, he can break open the lantern, revealing 
Watt, the source of the light and Mario's sixth companion.

Smaller Lantern Ghosts first showed up as generic baddies in Super 
Mario Bros. 2: Yoshi's Island.

Big Lantern Ghost's appearance:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

THE BIGGER BOO
Occupation: Plus-size poltergeist
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Boss of the third castle in Yoshi's Island. Pelting him with eggs make 
him grow bigger. Then he dies.

The Bigger Boo's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

BIONKINTON 
Occupation: Floating chicken hatchery
Only appearance: Super Mario Land (1989)

A mini-boss Mario fights in the final stage of Super Mario Land. 
Bionkinton is a fairly generic-looking cloud, from which helmet-
wearing chickens launch at Mario. When Bionkinton absorbs twenty 
shots from Mario's Sky Pop, the considerably more-menacing Tatanga 
appears. 

Oddly, while nearly every other enemy in Super Mario Land has a 
Japanese name, the chickens Bionkinton fires are simply named 
"Chicken."

=======================================================================

BIRDO 
[Japanese name: Catherine]
Occupation: Bazooka beak
First appearance: Doki Doki Panic (1987)

"That's as far as you'll go!"

Get it straight. It's not Ostro. It's not Birdetta. It's Birdo, and she's a 
girl.

Birdo first showed up in Doki Doki Panic, better known as Super 
Mario Bros. 2 with Arabian people. As far as I know, the Doki Doki 
Birdo was identical to her Super Mario Bros. 2 incarnation: a pink 
dinosaur - who looked like Yoshi even before there was a Yoshi - 
who spat eggs, wore a bow and guarded a crystal ball. (One should 
also note that Birdo's emblematic bow only showed up in the 
promotional artwirk initially. Nintendo didn't add it to her sprite until 
Super Mario All-Stars.) By hopping on her eggs and tossing then back 
in her face, Mario and his friends could beat Birdo and open the portal 
to the next level. Later in the game, Birdo got tougher, mixing fireballs 
into the stream of projectiles shooting from her cannon-shaped 
proboscis.

Unfortunately for Birdo, those behind Super Mario Bros. 2's 
translation made a few mistakes. In both the game's ending and 
instruction manual, Birdo's name shows up as "Ostro," which is 
actually the name of the ostrich-like baddie ridden by Shy Guys - 
that's Birdo as a beast of burden, which is another Yoshi-before-there-
was-a-Yoshi connection. Furthermore, some clown at Nintendo 
decided to decide that the bow-adorned Birdo was a transvestite - 
"He thinks he is a girl and likes to be called 'Birdetta,'" as the 
instruction manual put it. But that transvestite complication has since 
vanished, especially since Birdo is now a quasi-love interest for Yoshi, 
who also blurs the gender line by producing eggs. Weird! That's pre-
Yoshi connection number three. 

At first, it seemed Birdo would go the way of Stanley the Bugman, 
dropping out of sight after her fifteen minutes of video game fame. But 
then she made a cameo both in Wario's Woods and in the background 
of Kirby Super Star. She also appeared as a boss in Super Mario RPG: 
Legend of the Seven Stars. As one of Valentina's guards, Birdo shot 
eggs as fiercely as ever as a one of the many bird-pets skulking around 
the Nimbus Land Castle.

Birdo bounced from the fringes of obscure cameo land to the 
mainstream Mario crew in 2000 in Mario Tennis for the Nintendo 64. 
This game marked the first major addition to the "Big Eight" in years 
with the arrival of Birdo, Daisy, Baby Mario and Waluigi. Each have 
appeared regularly since. This also means that Birdo followed in the 
footsteps of Donkey Kong and Wario as a former foe that reformed 
into a friend.

Her popularity has grown in the past few years. In Mario Kart: Double 
Dash!!, Birdo and Yoshi raced together. Birdo's likeness even graced 
the box art for Super Mario Advance - which, interestingly, is the 
third remake of Super Mario Bros. 2 and the fourth remake of Doki 
Doki Panic. A giant robotic version of Birdo, Robirdo, even replaced 
the second Mouser, who had previously been boss of level 3-3. And 
players could now pluck the bow from Birdo's head if they wanted. 
The act does nothing to further their battles with Birdo, but it's a 
Mario first nonetheless. Birdo also has a voice in Super Mario 
Advance - an eloquent and evil sounding voice. In most games, 
though, she merely makes honking, quacking noises, with a 
vocabulary limited to her own name.

Birdo treads the line between goodie and baddie in Mario and Luigi: 
Superstar Saga. The Princess Peach who gets her voice stolen by 
Cackletta is actually a cleverly disguised Birdo. Later, the bazooka-
beaked one becomes an adoring apprentice to Popple after sense gets 
knocked back into the previous apprentice, an amnesiac Bowser. But it 
would seem the writers of the game's script decided to bring back 
Birdo's ambiguous gender. Popple pauses before referring to Birdo as 
a "dame," and Birdo insists that Popple call her the more feminine 
"Birdie." 

Birdo's small but dedicated following may have been disappointed to 
find out that she is not playable in Mario Power Tennis, despite having 
appeared in several previous Mario sports titles. What's interesting is 
that she appears in the intro sequence as a generic race. No Mario 
game has featured generic Birdos since her Doki Doki Panic/Super 
Mario Bros. 2 days, but check out the opening movie and you'll see 
scores of Birdos - orange ones, blue ones, yellow ones, green ones - 
trotting about the stadium, alongside other generic races like Pinatas, 
Nokies, Toads, Goombas and Koopas. Even more interesting: there's 
not a single pink Birdo.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BIRDO***
First seen in Super Mario Bros. 2, Birdo is known for shooting eggs 
and fireballs from her mouth. Mario and his friends would have to 
jump onto the eggs in midair, pick them up and throw them back at 
her. Long missing from the Nintendo scene, Birdo recently reappeared 
in Mario Tennis and Super Mario Advance.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BIRDO***

Note: the trophy bio for Birdo is technically incorrect, as Birdo 
appeared in Wario's Woods, Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven 
Stars and Kirby Super Star before returning full-force in Mario Tennis. 
She was never completely absent, just under the radar.

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Yoshi
Personal racecar: Turbo Birdo
Special weapon: Birdo Egg

Birdo's starring roles:
Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1987*
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988*
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993*
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994*
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001*
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

Other appearances:
Wario's Woods (NES) - 1994
Kirby Super Star (Super NES) - 1996
Animal Crossing (Gamecube) - 2001
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004*

* Because Birdo is both a unique character and a generic term for her 
whole race, I decided to differentiate between her appearances in this 
list. Entries with an asterisk mean that Birdo appears as a generic race 
- not as the specific pink egg-spitter we all know and love. (In Japan, 
I suppose, this unique Birdo the one they call "Catherine.")

=======================================================================

BLABLANADON
Occupation: Friendly neighborhood pterodactyl
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

This prehistoric anachronism waits at the foot of Hoohoo Mountain 
and to fly travelers to the mountain's summit. When Mario and Luigi 
travel through Hoo Hoo Village, however, Blabblanadon is nowhere to 
be found. Once Mario and Luigi ascend to the mountain's summit, 
they see him incubating an egg, the contents of which are, of course, 
evil. Once Mario and Luigi beat the hatchling, a nasty fire-breather 
named Dragohoho, Blablanadon returns to Hoohoo Village.

Much later in the game, Bowletta pilots Bowser's castle high into the 
sky, where she rains down fiery terror on the good people of Beanbean 
Kingdom. Mario and Luigi's only hope at getting high in the sky is, of 
course, Blablanadon, who waits at the castle entrance to fly the 
brothers back down again when they emerge victorious.

=======================================================================

BLEAK 
Occupation: Not-so-jolly snowman
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996)

A giant snowman who's not interested in spreading Christmas mirth 
- or any mirth, for that matter. Bleak is the boss of K3, the tallest 
mountain in the entire Northern Kremisphere and the fifth area of the 
game. The battle departs from typical boss fights, however. It's a 
snowball fight that plays more like Swanky's Sideshow, the mini-
games in which Dixie must throw balls at targets. 

Bleak's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997

=======================================================================

BLOAT
[Japanese name: Billy]
Occupation: Skele-glutton
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

A bony member of the skeleton crew of the S.S. Chuckola who, 
despite lacking flesh, has still managed to become obese and wedge 
himself in a doorway. Mario and Luigi must blast Bloat out of the way 
with dynamite.

=======================================================================

BLOOEY 
Occupation: Blooper buddy
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

Blooey, known to his friends as the "White Torpedo" is a feisty 
Blooper who joins Luigi on his quest to rescue Princess Eclair. Mario 
first meets them in the plaza in Rogueport, where Luigi details their 
escapades in Rumblebump Volcano. Blooey, sporting what would 
appear to be a golden tan, seems none too pleased with the adventure, 
however. He apparently got dunked in lava and, now crispy fried, 
blames Luigi.

He'd be playable if you could play Luigi's quest. But you can't.

=======================================================================

BOBBERY 
[Japanese name: Barel/Bareru]
Occupation: Salty sea dog
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Before Flavio will set sail to Keelhaul Key, he wants Mario to find 
Admirable Bobbery, the trustworthiest deckhands in Rogueport. 
Bobbery, however, isn't keen of being found. Once Mario stumbles 
upon the secret entrance into his locked house, he finds that Bobbery 
- a standard black Bob-Omb who sports with a big white moustache, 
a sailor's hat and a nautical steering wheel spinning about on his back 
- is completely unwilling to leave on a high-seas adventure.

Podley, proprietor of Rogueport's soda bar and the one guy privy to 
the inside scoop on Rogueport residents, explains that Bobbery's 
beloved wife, Scarlette, passed away from a sudden illness while he 
was away on a voyage long ago. Since then, Bobbery has been too 
depressed to do much of anything. Fortunately, Podley has an old 
letter that Scarlette wrote before she died and he asks Mario to deliver 
it. Upon reading the letter, Bobbery realizes that Scarlette would have 
wanted him to continue living. He merrily skips off to the S.S. Flavio 
to join Flavio's crew. 

Once on Keelhaul Key, Bobbery takes a licking from some pirate 
ghosts and seems nearly ready to kick the bucket. But a sip of 
Chuckola Cola fills the old guy with the life he needs to keep on 
fighting. Bobbery joins Mario's party.

Bobbery has similar talents as Bombette from the first Paper Mario. It 
makes sense, as both characters are Bob-Ombs. In battle, Bobbery 
explodes to harm enemies. Out of battle, he can explode to blast open 
secret passage ways. No matter how many times Bobbery explodes, he 
always reforms, good as new.

He's the second playable Bob-Omb ever in a Mario game. 

=======================================================================

BOBO [new]
Occupation: Black Sugar pirates mascot
First appearance: Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land

A giant pink bird and Capt. Syrup's personal pet. Wario first fights 
Bobo in the S.S. Teacup area of the original Wario Land. She swoops 
at Wario and sends smaller birds at Wario like projectiles. The 
oversized avian shows up again in the game's sequel, Wario Land II, 
as the boss of  the second area - again, the S.S. Teacup.

I'm actually not completely sure that "Bobo" is the character's name. 
Jay Mitchell, reader and self-described Wariologist, brought the 
character to my attention, but I have yet to verify it online. If another 
Wario buffs can help me check this out, I'd appreciate it.

Bobo's starring roles:
Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy) - 1994
Wario Land II (Game Boy Color) - 1998

=======================================================================

BODDLE
Occupation: Theatre owner
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

The eccentric brother of Bubbles, the inventor of Chuckola Cola. 
Boddle, the president of the Yoshi Fan Club, loves Yoshies so much 
that he wears a Yoshi egg like clothes. He even poured his money into 
constructing a theater so the Yoshies can come to Beanbean Kingdom 
and watch movies. When Mario and Luigi first meet Boddle, he's 
using a fragment of the shattered Beanstar to decorate the theater 
marquee. He's willing to lend the piece to the Mario Bros., but on one 
condition: they collect suitable replacement decorations.

Mario and Luigi have no choice but to search the world for Bean Fruit, 
a delicacy that grows underground. If they feed the Bean Fruit to the 
seven different colors of Yoshies - red, orange, yellow, green, azure, 
blue and purple - the respective Yoshies will lay a neon egg that 
Boddle will use in the sign.

(Together, the two brothers names are Bubbles and Boddle, which 
sounds just a bit like the classic Taito arcade game, Bubble Bobble. 
The resemblance is probably coincidental.)

=======================================================================

BOGMIRE
[Japanese name: Shadoma]
Occupation: Cemetery spook
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

A manifestation of the haunted mansion's collective fear and despair. 
A shapeless, grimacing ghost that Luigi must fight in the mansion's 
backyard cemetery. Once Luigi beats Bogmire, he can access the third 
wing of the mansion.

=======================================================================

BOMBETTE
[Japanese name: Pinky]
Occupation: Adorable explosive device
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Little Bombette is a pink Bob-Omb with an iron will - and a fiery 
temper. An outburst in front of her bosses, the Koopa Bros., sent her to 
the dungeon of the their fortress, so she's more than happy to help 
Mario fight them. All the other Bob-Ombs respect Bombette and many 
of the male ones seem to be head-over-heals in love with her. 
Bombette is the first playable Bob-Omb in any Mario game.

Despite her size, Bombette packs a lot of power. She can explode - 
though she re-forms after every explosion - or send her round little 
body careening into enemies. Her explosions can also break through 
walls to reveal hidden rooms and passageways.

Bob-Ombs have been a staple of the Marioverse since their 
introduction in Super Mario Bros. 2 (and before that, Doki Doki 
Panic). But those Bob-Ombs didn't show the personality Bombette 
does. They just mindlessly walked forward, stopped, and then 
exploded, taking out anyone - good guys or bad guys - who might 
be standing nearby. Bob-Ombs were actually the first Super Mario 
Bros. 2 baddie to show up in another game. Of all the baddies in the 
game, only they appeared in Super Mario Bros. 3. (Most, like Shy 
Guys and Snifits didn't appear again until Super Mario World 2: 
Yoshi's Island.)

Super Mario 64 introduced the friendly pink Bob-Ombs, the Bob-Omb 
Buddies. Unlike their nasty black-colored brethren, the Bob-Omb 
Buddies would help Mario and shoot him from their cannons to let him 
reach far-off ledges. Presumably, Bombette, whose Japanese name is 
"Pinky," is one of these friendly ones, thought the Paper Mario series 
offers many friendly Bob-Ombs of all colors.

=======================================================================

BONEHEADS
Occupation: Samurai demon
Only appearance: WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$

A giant skeleton clad in samurai armor who creeps into the castle 
where Prince or Princess Insert Your Five-Letter Name Here lives and 
promptly possess him or her. Ana and her troop of ninjas tries to kill 
him but fail. Kat and her dog Paw rush to Ana's rescue. Kat shred 
Boneheads into ribbons.

I have no idea why this guy's name is plural, but I'd presume it's a 
typo.

=======================================================================

BONETAIL 
[Japanese name: Zonbaba]
Occupation: Biggest, baddest dragon
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The third of the three pet dragons who once served the Shadow Queen. 
Bonetail is the older brother of Hooktail and Gloomtail. A skeletal 
beast, he awaits Mario at the bottom of the Pit of 100 Trials. The fight 
against him is purportedly the toughest in the game.

=======================================================================

BOO 
[also known as: Boo Diddly, Boo Buddy; Japanese name: Teresa]
Occupation: Shy spook
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. 3 (1990)

This shy little ghost originally appeared as Boo Diddly, another 
character in the Nintendo tradition of rock star namesakes. (Bo Diddly 
was a famous musician and singer.) Boo was a generic baddie who 
lived in fortresses and other dark places. Of the many, many new 
baddies introduced in Super Mario Bros. 3, Boo was one of the only 
ones to appear again in other games - Chain Chomps, Nipper Plants 
and Thwomps being among the others. Though their name changed to 
simply "Boo," their behavior has remained virtually identical: look at 
Boo, Boo won't move; turn away, he tries to bite you in the butt.

Boos have been popular ever since. They congregated in myriad forms 
in their own haunted houses in Super Mario World and appeared as 
items in Super Mario Kart that, when used, would render a character 
invisible and steal opponents' weapons.

This ghost wasn't so shy in Mario Tennis, the first game to feature a 
playable Boo. Apparently, phobia of looking people in the face fades 
when faced with athletic competition.

(I remember when the preview specs for Mario Tennis were released. 
Several websites listed Boo as being a female character because the 
Japanese version of the game listen the ghost's name as "Teresa." As it 
turns out, the reference wasn't to the common name but the Japanese 
name for the character, which can be also be Anglicized as "telesa." 
Boos, I'll wager, generally are gender ambiguous, with the exception 
of Bow, Bootler and King Boo. "Teresa," incidentally, seems similar 
to the Japanese word for "shy," "tereru.")

In his trek through the haunted homestead in Luigi's Mansio, Luigi 
gradually eliminates various lesser Boos before he finally defeats the 
King Boo. Before they attack, each introduces itself, so I hthought I'd 
list their names here: BamBoo, Boo B. Hatch, Boodacious, Boofant, 
Boogie, Boohoo, Booigi, Boo La La, Boolderdash, Boolicious, 
Booligan, Boolivia, Boomeo, Boomerang, Boonita, Boonswoggle, 
Booregard, Booris, Booscaster, Bootha, Bootique, Game Boo, Game 
Boo Advance, GumBoo, Kung Boo, LimBooger, Little Boo Peep, Mr. 
Boojangles, PeekaBoo, ShamBoo, TaBoo, TamBoorine, TurBoo and 
Underboo. The remaining twenty Boos have no names, and Luigi 
dispatches them in the form of the jumbo ghost, Boolossus.

A generic Boo also materialized as a playable character in Mario Party 
5, replacing the much-missed Donkey Kong. Boo had previously 
shown up in each of the Mario Party games as an instrument players 
could use to rob opponents of money or even stars. Though Mario 
Party 5's Boo lacked feet or a body, he competed in games with the 
rest of the characters.

Now that King Boo has risen to popularity, it will be interesting to see 
whether the generic Boo persists as a playable character. Camelot 
decided to inclue him in Mario Power Tennis, in which he could 
summon his spectral companions to help defeat his opponents. You 
haven't played real tennis until you see a wall of Boos materialize 
against you mid-match.

Much of the rest of Boo folklore is collected in the profiles for the Big 
Boo, the Bigger Boo, Bow and King Boo.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BOO***
These shy spirits inhabit Mario's world and have been known to vanish 
or freeze when met face-to-face. In recent years, they seem to have 
overcome their fears in order to pursue tennis and other social 
activities. They usually appear in groups and fly in formation. From 
time to time, giant Boos make surprise appearances.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BOO***

Boo's starring roles:
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Mario's Picross (Game Boy) - 1995
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Picross NP Vol. 2 (Super Famicom) - 1999
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Luigi's Mansion (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario vs. Donkey Kong (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

BOOLOSSUS
[Japanese name: Jumbo Teresa]
Occupation: Jumbo Boo
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

A conglomeration of twenty Boos mashed together into one big, fat, 
bouncing Boo. Luigi must trick Boolossus, the third boss in Luigi's 
Mansion, into popping itself on the horn of one of the unicorn statues 
on the balcony. Doing so will cause Boolossus to divide into its 
smaller members, whom Luigi can freeze with ice and suck into the 
Poltergust 3000.

=======================================================================

BOOM-BOOM [new]
Occupation: Fortress foe
Only appearance: Super Mario Bros. 3 (1990)

Basically, Boom-Boom is the Birdo of Super Mario Bros. 3. Scattered 
throughout the various kingdoms of the Mushroom World are 
fortresses Mario must conquer. In each of fortresses lurks Boom-
Boom, a brutish Koopa mini-boss who swings a pair of mighty biceps 
as he scuttles around the floor. If Mario stomps Boom-Boom three 
times, he drops a crystal that will unlock a door on the map screen.

In the final kingdom, Dark World, Boom-Boom appeared in Bowser's 
tanks, airships and boats as well. 

Image link: 
gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=74&pos=3

Boom-Boom's appearances:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

BOOMER
Occupation: Smithy's minion
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

An honorable fighter who duels Mario and his party on the chandeliers 
in Bowser's Keep, much as Mario and Bowser did at the beginning of 
the game. When beaten, Boomer performs a melodramatic death scene 
before plummeting off the chandelier and onto the floor.

=======================================================================

BOOSTER [new]
[also known as Booster the Seventh; Japanese name: Bukki]
Occupation: Crazed train enthusiast
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

During the quest to collect the Star Pieces and give Smithy the boot, 
Mario and company met Booster, the seventh in a line of Boosters. 
Booster lived in Booster Tower, which sat atop Booster Hill. 
Surrounded only by toy trains and his three beetle-collecting Snifit 
pals, Booster went quite mad.

Smithy first arrived in Mario's world by crashing through the roof of 
Bowser's Keep in his giant sword-shaped vehicle, Exor, during the 
middle of Mario and Bowser's umpteenth fight. Consequently, the 
three figures central to the brawl - Bowser, Mario, and Peach - 
went flying in three different directions. Peach happened to land on the 
balcony of Booster Tower.

A stranger to the interactions of normal humans, Booster decided to 
marry Peach despite her pleas of "MARIOHELPMEMARIOHELPME 
MARIOHELPME." Intent of making Peach his bride, Booster 
kidnapped her to the marriage resort, Marrymore. Mario and his crew 
intervened just in time, however; Booster ended up kissing Bowser 
and returning to his tower wifeless. (Technically, Booster could also 
end up kissing Mario. Different kissing variations depend on how 
quickly Mario collects Peach's various bridal articles: her shoes, her 
brooch, her ring, and her crown. I'm just going by the best-case 
scenario here.) Undaunted, Booster played with his trains until a 
second woman fell from the sky: Valentina, the villainess who had 
been plotting to overthrow the Nimbus Land royal family. Somehow, 
the two fell in love. Super Mario RPG's ending led one to believe 
Booster and Valentina eventually got married.

With his big red nose, bug eyes, and wild facial hair, Booster bore a 
more-than-passing resemblance to Wario. (Wario, however, had a 
much less prominent role in the Mario universe at the time Nintendo 
released Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars than he does 
now.) A painting of a guy who looks a lot like Wario - big nose, 
moustache, yellow hat - even hangs in the lobby of Booster Tower, 
in the wall of portraits showing Booster's ancestors. (Players can spot 
this one easily because the blue Snifit that casually peruses each 
painting, one by one, jumps back when he sees Wario's mug in the slot 
marked "Booster the Second.") 

Since Square owns the rights to all the characters unique to Super 
Mario RPG, Booster has yet to reappear. Too bad, because Booster is a 
kickass character, with kickass theme music to boot.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=46&pos=13

=======================================================================

BOOTLER 
Occupation: Spectral Smithers
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A minor character in Paper Mario, Bootler is Lady Bow's ghostly 
butler. This Boo serves as an advisor to Lady Bow and seems very 
protective of her. Much as the Chancellor of the Mushroom Kingdom 
does to Peach in Super Mario RPG, Bootler tries to persuade Bow not 
to journey with Mario. Bow and Bootler's exchanges, however, 
involve quite a bit more shouting that the polite ones in the Mushroom 
Kingdom court.

Apparently, Booter traveled the world with Goompa and Koopa Koot 
when they were younger. Various asides throughout the game 
reference Bootler's legendary status.

Bootler makes a cameo in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. 
After Mario vanquishes the Shadow Queen, he'll find Bootler and 
Lady Bow on vacation in Poshley Heights. Bootler is just as adoring of 
his mistress as ever.

Bootler's appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

BOSHI [new]
[Japanese name: Washi/Warshi/Warushi]
Occupation: Mushroom Derby champion
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

In Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars, the Yoshies reside on 
Yo'ster Isle. No, scratch that. A bunch of red and yellow Yoshies 
reside there, plus one green one - the Yoshi we all know and love - 
and one blue one - Yoshi's jerk of an alterego, Boshi. It's not evident 
in the English translation, but Boshi was conceived as a rival for Yoshi 
on the same lines as Wario and Waluigi were for Mario and Luigi. The 
Japanese root "warui," which means bad," got blended into Yoshi's 
name to turn "Washi" - or possibly "Warshi" or "Warushi." 

Nintendo of America apparently thought "Boshi" sounded tougher. 
Boshi certainly looks tough. He sports some wicked shades and a 
spiked choker. The other Yoshies resent Boshi because he dominates 
the Mushroom Derby, the Yoshi footrace, and will only take 
challengers on a one-on-one basis. Once Mario shows up, Yoshi 
schools Boshi and the races open up to everybody. Boshi reforms.

Since Square owns the rights to Boshi and all the other characters 
unique to Super Mario RPG, Boshi has yet to cause any more trouble.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=46&pos=14

=======================================================================

BOW 
[also known as Lady Bow; Japanese name: Resaresa]
Occupation: Poltergeist royalty
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

She'd be a great colleague for Peach and Daisy. Lady Bow is the 
reigning royalty for the Boo Kingdom. She oversees all matters ghost-
related. And unlike her shy brethren, haughty but well-intentioned 
Lady Bow does not shrink away from conflict.

Her deadly fan weapon in tow, this glamorous ghost joins Mario and 
his friends to help destroy Tubba Blubba, a lumbering, purple Koopa 
who's been snacking on Lady Bow's subjects in the desert town of 
Gusty Gulch. Lady Bow promises to give Mario the Star Spirit Skolar 
if he helps her find Tubba Blubba's hidden weakness. The weakness, it 
turns out, is that Tubba keeps his disembodied-yet-still beating heart in 
the basement of a locked shack in Gusty Gulch. After defeating Tubba 
Blubba and his talking heart, Mario and Bow emerge victorious. 
Tubba Blubba coughs up the ghosts he's eaten while Bow's butler 
Bootler materializes with the Star Spirit. Lady Bow decides to see 
Mario though his entire journey. She's a formidable fighter who can 
slap enemies or whack them with her war fan. Lady Bow can also 
make Mario become invisible.

In Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, Mario can meet up with 
Bow and Bootler after he beats the Shadow Queen. They're 
vacationing in Poshley Heights. 

Lady Bow's name keeps in synch with the tendency for Marioverse 
women to have names that are cute, sweet or diminutive objects. This 
is, of course, if you pronounce her name to rhyme with "foe" and 
"doe," instead of "cow" or "how." Either pronunciation makes sense; 
she does wear bows but also has a position of respect that would 
necessitate others to bow to her.

At the Mushroom Kingdom Squad's Domain, Luigi of the Pipes points 
out an interesting ambiguity about Boo royalty. Lady Bow's in charge 
in Paper Mario, but King Boo reigns supreme in Luigi's Mansion. And 
then there's the Big Boo - not to be confused with the Big Blue Boo 
- in Super Mario World. Just another example of Nintendo's "to hell 
with continuity" policy. Interesting, though. 

Bow's starring roles:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001

Other appearances:
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

BOWLETTA
[Japanese name: Gerakuppa]
Occupation: Hell-spawn he-she
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

An unholy union of Cackletta's evil magic and Bowser's brute 
strength. Bowletta is born when Mario and Luigi stomp Cackletta's 
body, displacing her angry spirit. Cackletta's assistant, Fawful, pumps 
her soul into Bowser's unconscious body. Tadah! - evil that bends 
gender. Ever wondered what Bowser would look like with breasts? 
Well go find a picture of Bowletta and you'll know. Everyone in the 
game seems to take to referring to this monstrous amalgam as 
Bowletta right away, too. Bowletta is the second-to-last battle in the 
game.

And, as any Mario fan would know, Bowletta is hardly the first 
gender-vague character in the series, what with Toad, Yoshi and Birdo 
and all.

=======================================================================

BOWSER KOOPA JR. 
[Japanese name: Koopa Jr.]
Occupation: Prince of the Koopa
First appearance: Super Mario Sunshine (2002)

The apple doesn't fall far from the tree - the overgrown, rotten, foul-
tempered tree.

This pipsqueak first stirred up trouble on Isle Delfino in Super Mario 
Sunshine. Initially, though, it's not Bowser Jr. who seems to be at the 
root of the island paradise's problems. It's Shadow Mario, Mario's 
shady doppelganger - as opposed to his twin brother Luigi or his 
alterego Wario or his infant self Baby Mario or his twin's alterego 
Waluigi or his doctor alterego Dr. Mario. Princess Peach first notices 
Shadow Mario during the in-flight movie promoting Isle Delfino. He's 
a Mario-shaped silhouette bounding behind a row of hula-dancing 
Pianta folk.

When the Isle Delfino police arrest Mario for vandalizing the buildings 
in Delfino Plaza, it's clear Shadow Mario painted the graffiti to frame 
Mario. Under a court order, Mario must postpone his vacation and 
clean up the graffiti with a water-powered jetpack design by the mad 
Dr. E. Gadd. Washing away graffiti means leaving Princess Peach 
behind. Surprising no one, she gets nabbed - this time, by Shadow 
Mario.

After a showdown at roller coaster funland Pinna Park, Shadow Mario 
removes his mask to reveal the face of young Koopa royalty. Bowser 
Jr. then drops two bombshells: that his graffiti paintbrush and Mario 
disguise were designed by the Gadd Science Corporation; and that 
Princess Peach is his mommy and this whole graffiti mess was just a 
ploy to have someone to tuck him in at night. 

In a few short minutes, this revelation changes a lot about the 
Marioverse, actually. Bowser Jr.'s presence apparently negates the 
existence of the Koopalings, Bowser's seven children who debuted in 
Super Mario Bros. 3. After all, why would Bowser wait until his 
eighth child to name one "Bowser Jr."? Bowser Jr. Certainly seems 
younger than the original brood. Furthermore, Bowser Jr.'s possession 
of the Gaddbrush also means that E. Gadd's inventions serve evil 
purposes as well as good. And finally, Princess Peach's apparent 
willingness to believe that she's Bowser's Jr.'s mother - you're your 
mommy?" - means that she is a complete idiot.

In the game's final battle, Mario duels Bowser and Bowser Jr. in a 
Koopa jacuzzi floating high above Corona Volcano. Naturally, he and 
Peach escape safely. Surprisingly, Bowser and his son seem to escape 
okay as well. They end up on some island near Isle Delfino, relatively 
unscathed. Proving Bowser Jr.'s a true heir to the Koopa line, he 
admits that though he knew Peach was not his mother, the lie does 
nothing to prevent father and son from gleefully readying their plot 
against Mario and Peach.

The little guy has yet to cause too much trouble, however. Bowser Jr. 
competed in the Toadstool Tour in Gamecube installment of Mario 
Golf. He even wore his mask from his Shadow Mario costume. He 
also raced with his father in Mario Kart: Double Dash!! - this time, 
without the mask around his face.

The young master Bowser appears alongside his pops in Mario Power 
Tennis, proving that he is quickly becoming a Mario series regular. He 
seems to have collected the old Gaddbrush for this appearance, as 
well, as both his super movers involve using that awful goopy paint to 
ensure a victory.

As a side note, it's obvious that while Bowser Jr. and Baby Bowser are 
separate characters, Baby Bowser - that is, the infant version of the 
Koopa king seen in games like Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island 
and Yoshi's Story - came first and clearly influenced the look of 
Bowser Jr. 

I recently came across an interesting point regarding the apparent 
paradox between Bowser Jr. and the seven other Koopalings. At the 
beginning of Super Mario Sunshine, FLUDD scans over Mario and, in 
processing his earlier exploits, briefly flashes a shot of Mario tussling 
with Larry Koopa. (Whether this fight is from Super Mario Bros. 3 or 
Super Mario World, I'm not yet sure.) Thus, this may be unintentional 
proof on Nintendo's part that Bowser Jr. and the other Koopa offspring 
do, in fact, exist in the same continuity. Otherwise, how could 
FLUDD's display and Bowser Jr. appear in the same game?

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Bowser
Personal racecar: Bullet Blaster
Special weapon: Bowser Shell

Bowser Jr.'s starring roles:
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

BOWSER KOOPA 
[also known as King Koopa, Big Devil Koopa; Japanese name: 
Koopa/Kuppa]
Occupation: Cantankerous King of the Koopa
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. (1985)

[bowser]


"KOOPAMACALLIT"


Easily the most famous turtle-dragon-king-grouch in video games 
today.

King Bowser Koopa, a spiked shell full of bad news, stomped into the 
Mushroom Kingdom in Super Mario Bros. Using that black Koopa 
magic, Bowser subjugated the Mushroom people, transforming them 
into bricks, stones and "field horsehair plants." He then locked away 
Princess Peach, the only one with the power to break his spell. He's 
tormented Mario, Luigi, and mushroom folk alike ever since.

The origins of Bowser's name are not as well-documented as other 
Mario characters'. I remember reading somewhere that Shigeru 
Miyamoto took the name Kuppa from a brand of Asian plateware, thus 
keeping within the theme of naming characters after food and food-
related stuff. However, I can't remember where I read this and 
researching it online hasn't turned up much. 

A Mario fan named LajosJancsi posted an interesting point at the SMB 
Info Station about "Koopa" also being the Japanese pronunciation of 
the Korean soupy rice dish gug-bab. (If you'd like to read this post in 
full, check the recommended reading section at the end of this guide; I 
put its address.)

Quite a few readers have also been lobbying the Koopa-Kappa 
connection as a possible explanation for Bowser's surname. In 
Japanese folklore, Kappa are water-dwelling creatures who prey upon 
humans somewhat like vampires do in western folklore. Kappas 
resemble turtles somewhat, and in some depictions they even have 
shells, much like the Koopas do. Kappas, however, also have the 
distinct trait of having hollow-bowl like heads filled with water. If the 
water spills out, the Kappa dies. No Koopas have this trait, though it 
did show in Super Mario World; on the climb up to the Yellow Switch 
Palace on Yoshi's Island, Mario passes through a small body of water 
on top of a hill. According to the American instruction manual, this 
geographical formation is called Kappa Mountain, though the game 
never mentions this. (An actual Kappa shows up in Animal Crossing 
as Kap'n, the seafaring, cucumber-loving turtle-looking thing, whom 
the American version never specifies as a Kappa. So clearly such a 
reference would not be out of place in a Nintendo game.)

If having three plausible origins didn't cloud the matter enough 
already, one of the Mushroom Kingdom's specials on the translation 
quirks of Japanese Mario games into English states that Bowser had no 
first name in the original Super Mario Bros. Whatever he was called in 
Japanese translated to "Big Devil Koopa." Subsequently, the games 
just called him "Koopa" or "Kuppa," the latter being a Japanese 
variant of the former.

Finally, Patrick Gremillion wrote in and informed me that Bowser may 
have gotten his doggy-sounding first name in a way similar to how the 
Koopalings got theirs. One of the members of the classic rock-pop 
group Shanana is nicknamed "Bowzer."
 

THE BIG BAD


Wherever his name might come from, Bowser's been causing trouble 
since his infancy, as seen in the prequel to the Mario saga, Super 
Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island. Under the guidance of the Magikoopa 
Kamek, an early Koopa Troop attacked the Stork that was delivering 
Baby Mario and Baby Luigi to their parents in the Mushroom 
Kingdom. Although this plot contradicted Nintendo's earlier story of 
the Mario brothers hailing from Brooklyn, the continuity works from 
Bowser's side. No matter where these Mushroom Kingdom-native 
babies fit into the Marioverse, it's the same Bowser who's been 
wreaking havoc, whether as a spoiled child king or a full-grown king. 
Bowser lost this first fight, as he would subsequent ones - and, hell, 
all future ones, too. Kamek whisked Baby Bowser into the sky, to 
grow up and devise future schemes for future games. (For certain 
reasons, arbitrary though they might be, the activities Bowser did as a 
baby in the Yoshi's Island games are listed in their own profile, under 
"Baby Bowser.")

In the original Super Mario Bros., Mario and Luigi could fight eight 
separate Bowsers. Every fourth level introduced the brothers to a 
different Bowser clone. Each could be defeated either by tagging - 
and apparently removing - the hammer that keeps Bowser's bridge 
from collapsing or by being sprayed with a volley of fireballs, which 
would reduce the clones to their original states and fall into the lava. 
(In order, these baddies-in-disguise are a Goomba, Koopa Troopa, 
Buzzy Beetle, Spiny, Lakitu, Blooper and Hammer Brother.) Each 
Bowser, notably, lacked his trademark fire-red mane in the game, 
though all the promotional art showed him with it.

Bowser wreaked similar havoc in The Lost Levels: breathing fire, 
tossing hammers, and blocking access to Peach and her Mushroom 
Retainers. And, once again, stages leading up to the last were marked 
by more decoy Bowsers - and in stages A through D, sometimes 
more than one Bowser in a stage.

The big guy sat out Super Mario Bros. 2, but showed up in the third 
NES outing flanked by his seven horrible children: Larry, Morton, 
Wendy, Iggy, Roy, Lemmy, and Ludwig. As per their father's 
instructions, the Koopalings had each raided the castles of various 
kingdoms in the Mushroom World, stolen the kings' magic wands, and 
transformed them into animals. A glaring, unanswered question Super 
Mario Bros. 3 poses is where these Koopalings came from. Although 
diehard Mario fans would probably be thrilled to meet her, Nintendo 
has yet to introduce Bowser's better half - the closest thing to a wife 
so far has been that old hag Magikoopa Kammy Koopa. 

But regardless of whether his wife lived there too, Super Mario Bros. 
3's take on Bowser resides in the Dark World, the gloomy but fiery 
final kingdom of the Mushroom World. (In the Japanese version of the 
game, this last kingdom was called "Koopa Kingdom," which would 
make Super Mario Bros. 3 the only game to depict the often-
referenced home of the Koopas.) After collapsing fortresses, legions of 
army tanks and fleets of airships, Mario or Luigi had to trick thudbutt 
Bowser into crashing through the brick floor of his throne room. 
Bowser's Super Mario Bros. 3 in-game appearance marks the first to 
feature his trademark red mane and yellow spikes.

Bowser got a bit craftier for Super Mario World. After the brothers 
survived the terrors of his neon fortress, the Mario Bros. had to duel on 
the rooftop with the Clown Car, a grinning quasi-helicopter in which 
Bowser kept himself, Peach, giant bowling balls, and dozens of 
mechanical replicas of himself. Some well-placed hits, however, sent 
the Koopa King hurtling into the night sky.

Hanging out with Mario and Peach in various spin-offs that began 
popping up after Super Mario World didn't change Bowser's nasty 
ways, however. The Mario series entered 64-bit territory with Mario's 
quest to break the curse Bowser places over the Mushroom Kingdom 
castle. A Koopa spell magically imprisoned Peach and her subjects in 
the castle walls unless Mario finds the 120 stars Bowser secreted away 
in the castle's various nooks. In Super Mario 64, Bowser brawled with 
Mario three times. Taller, fiercer, and more Godzilla-like than he'd 
appeared in earlier games, Bowser belched flames Mario could only 
douse by swinging him by the tail and tossing him into some ringside 
explosive devices a wiser king would not have installed.

At the end of Luigi's Mansion, the launch title for the Nintendo 
Gamecube, it wasn't Bowser who dueled with Luigi on the roof at the 
end of Luigi's Mansion. Instead, King Boo piloted a giant mechanical 
Bowser suit - the head of which could float off disembodied and 
expose King Boo to Luigi's vacuum. Spooky stuff.

The scheme Bowser hatches in Super Mario Sunshine is downright 
dastardly. Bowser fought Mario high atop Corona Volcano at the end 
of Super Mario Sunshine. Bowser Jr. and Peach float in the own lava-
proof boats. But what has drawn these characters together this time? 
Bowser cruelly has convinced Bowser Jr., the eighth Koopaling - 
whose origins are as mysterious as his older siblings' - that Peach is 
his mother. This lie prompts Bowser Jr.'s painty shenanigans all over 
Isle Delfino. When Mario tromps the junior and senior Bowsers in a 
duel in a volcano-heated bathtub in the sky, they end up on the shores 
of some island paradise. Bowser admits the lie; Junior seems okay 
with it. It's the closest to a happy ending Bowser's gotten yet.


ARCH-NEMESES LIKE TO PLAY, TOO


Back in the heyday of the Super Nintendo, Bowser appeared for the 
first time as a playable character in Super Mario Kart, the first-ever 
spin-off of the Mario platforming franchises. Yes, it's a little odd to 
see Bowser driving around in a miniature car with folks he usually 
tries to kill or kidnap. But his inclusion in this came has meant that 
he's playable in the vast majority of subsequent spin-offs - and each 
time he's the fatty. Like in his original Mario Kart incarnation, Bowser 
generally plays the slowest, strongest selectable character in whatever 
the Mario gang does. Tennis, golf, baseball - whatever.  

This trend continued in Super Smash Bros. Melee as well. Like Mario, 
Yoshi, Donkey Kong, Peach, and Dr. Mario, Bowser was a selectable 
character. This Bowser wasn't a bumbling grumblepuss; he was a 
snarling monster. A suped-up tyrannosaurus rex of angry called Giga 
Bowser even awaited skilled players who met special conditions. Giga 
Bowser was a monstrous amalgam of Bowser, Ganondorf, and 
Mewtwo - the three supervillains from the Mario, Zelda, and 
Pokémon franchises, respectively. He - it? - stood several times 
taller than Bowser in his normal form. 


THE LIGHTER SIDE OF BOWSER

 
It shouldn't be surprising that Bowser makes regular appearances in 
the Mario RPG series. What's puzzling about these games, however, is 
that they generally portray him as a much more likeable character than 
the regular games do. 

For example, Bowser kept unusually polite company in Super Mario 
RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars as well. As Bowser sees it, it's Mario, 
Mallow, and Geno who join the Koopa Troop. In truth, the union 
between Mario and Bowser is really Bowser's only means of stealing 
back his castle from the Smithy Gang, whose arrival has stricken him 
with a serious case of homeless. Bowser proved to be as worthy and 
ally as was an enemy; he brought brute strength to the group and could 
fling a mean Chain Chomp. Bowser's special moves included 
summoning his minions to attack.

Returning to the RPG format didn't cheer Bowser up. Bowser played 
the central villain in Paper Mario in 2001. The Koopa King seized the 
wish-granting Star Rod, an artifact from the astral paradise Star Haven, 
and then imprisoned the seven Star Spirits. Aided by Koopa witch 
Kammy - Kamek's replacement? - Bowser even hoisted the 
Mushroom Kingdom castle into space. Naturally, Mario eventually 
trekked all the way to Peach's doorstep in the sky, then fought and 
defeated a gargantuan Bowser. Still, his acts of villainy were intercut 
with scenes showing him squabbling with Kammy. Big bad or not, he 
had a human side to him.

He then suffered his worst indignation yet in Mario and Luigi: 
Superstar Saga. First, his plan to steal Peach gets inadvertently foiled 
by Cackletta, the Bean Witch, because Cackletta replaces Peach's 
voice with explosive expletives. Every time the fair princess speaks, 
her caustic words shake the room. Bowser agrees to fly Mario and 
Luigi to Beanbean Kingdom in the Koopa Cruiser to retrieve Peach's 
voice, but Cackletta destroys Bowser's aircraft and Bowser gets his fat 
butt stuck in a cannon. A pair of Toads named the Stardust Brothers 
fire the Koopa King into the stratosphere, but he later turns up with 
amnesia and a new job: apprentice to Popple the thief. Worst of all, 
Bowser regains his mind just in time to have his body possessed by the 
disembodied Cackletta. The result: Bowletta, Bowser's body with 
Cackletta's headdress and what would appear to be breasts. Bowletta 
even crosses his/her legs when perched on Bowser's throne. Bowletta 
was the second-to-last fight in this Game Boy Advance RPG.

Bowser supplied comic relief once again in the fourth Mario RPG, 
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. With the main villainy duties 
being performed by the Shadow Queen and the X-Nauts, Bowser 
merely bumbled about Rogueport and the outlying areas in a vain 
quest for the Crystal Stars. He and Kammy often arrive at areas just 
after Mario had stormed through and done anything worth doing. 
Humorous squabbling ensues.

He wasn't completely relegated to playing a bit part, however. Bowser 
fights Mario twice: once in a surprise Glitz Pit match and again at the 
end of the game, when Bowser is making a last-ditch effort to do 
something important. Occasionally, Bowser is even playable. His 
scenes even contain three recreations of original side-scrolling levels 
from Super Mario Bros. - specifically level 1-1, 2-2 and 1-4 - that 
Bowser can hop and bop his way through. The Koopa Troopas are 
replaced with X-Nauts and the mushrooms with chunks of meat, but 
it's all there, more or less accurate to how you remember it. It's damn 
cool, and the closest we've gotten yet to a Bowser solo adventure.


THE FUTURE


On that note, Bowser is the only one of the Big Eight to not yet get his 
own game. Will players ever get to play as the Koopa King and 
pummel those pesky plumbers?

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BOWSER***
Bowser has a long history of kidnapping Princess Peach to lure his 
nemesis, Mario, into traps. He leads an enormous group of 
mischievous creatures, not the least of which are his seven children. 
With outrageous strength, flammable breath, and more spikes than you 
can shake a Star Rod at, Bowser is a constant threat.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR BOWSER***

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR THE CLOWN CAR***
Bowser's single-seat, personal airship doesn't exactly handle like a 
dream, but it wasn't designed to be sporty. The Koopa Clown Car was 
made to carry Bowser's huge weight, not to mention a logic-defying 
arsenal of massive bowling balls. In Super Mario World, Mario busted 
the Koopa Clown Car by pelting it with Mecha Koopas.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR THE CLOWN CAR***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Bowser Jr. 
Personal racecar: The Koopa King
Special weapon: Bowser Shell

Bowser's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Game Boy) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1997
Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Luigi's Mansion (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

Other appearances:
Tetris (NES) - 1989
Alleyway (Game Boy) - 1989
F-1 Race (Game Boy) - 1991 
SimCity (Super NES) - 1991
Hotel Mario (CD-I) - 1992
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Super NES) - 1993
Game & Watch Gallery (Game Boy) - 1997
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy Color) - 1998
Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (Nintendo 64) - 1998*
Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (Nintendo 64) - 2000*
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Picross NP Vol. 6 (Super Famicom) - 2000
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

* as the Lon Lon/Romani Medallion and as a portait in Hyrule Castle

=======================================================================

BOWYER [new]
[Japanese name: Yuminpa]
Occupation: Smithy's minion
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

At the heart of the forest maze, Mario and Mallow meet the maniac 
whose rain of poison arrows has been terrorizing the residents of Rose 
Town. It's Bowyer, a living, talking bow. (And when I say talking, I 
mean in the most broken English in a Mario game - Yoda with a 
learning disability.) Bowyer and his team entered the forest in search 
of the "shooting star" the residents of Rose Town witnessed a few days 
earlier. Of course, it's the second Star Piece. When Mario and Mallow 
fight Bowyer, they join Geno for the firs time. Bowyer has a clever 
tactic in the fight: he can disable certain buttons to prevent the party 
from using regular attacks, special attacks or items.

By the way, "bowyer" is an archaic English term for a bowsmith.

=======================================================================

BRIDGET THE BAKER [new]
Occupation: Purveyor of sweet pastries
Only appearance: WarioWare: Touched! (2005)

A pleasant-looking lass who works at the Sweet Spot, Diamond City's 
bakery. Wario stops there on the walk back from a particularly nasty 
visit to his dentist, Dr. Payne, and buys some sweet baked good, only 
to undo all the work that Dr. Payne had done. Ouch.

Bridget looks remarkably like the pop singer Luna, who also debuts in 
WarioWare: Twisted.

=======================================================================

BRIGHTON 
Occupation: Solar manifestation
Only appearance: Mario Party 6 (2004)

The sun, though neither the Angry Sun from Super Mario Bros. 3 nor 
the imprisoned sun from Paper Mario. Brighton, who appears as a sun-
shaped head atop a red and white robed body, represents sunlight and 
daytime. His war with this friend Twila, the moon, will be settled 
somewhat nonsensically by Mario and his friends playing mini-games 
and filling up the Star Bank with stellar currency. 

Make sense? Didn't think so. 

Brighton and Twila's celestial popularity contest is a recurrent theme 
in Mario Party 6. Throughout the game, time passes from day to night, 
affecting game appearance and play.

=======================================================================

THE BROTHERS BEAR
Occupation: Just short of a jamboree
Only appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996)

Thirteen bear siblings scattered throughout the Northern Kremisphere. 
They can help Dixie out, but she'll need to find them various items or 
perform various tasks, RPG-style. You know the drill.

The Brothers Bear, listed alphabetically:

* Baffle, the puzzle aficionado
* Barnacle, the shell collector
* Barter, who runs a swap shop
* Bazaar, who sells items and information
* Bazooka, the gun enthusiast
* Benny and Bjorn, the twins who operate a set of chain lift
* Blizzard, a snowbound bear who needs Dixie to deliver a present for 
  him
* Blue, who's down in the dumps
* Blunder, the Nintendo Power subscriber
* Boomer, the explosives expert
* Bramble, who loves both flowers and Banana Birds
* Brash, the braggart

=======================================================================

BRUCE 
Occupation: Bombette's admirer, Kooper's subleaser
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A Bob-Omb who lives in Koopa Village in Kooper's house. Bruce 
loves Bombette so much he explodes for her - literally - but she 
doesn't return the affection.

=======================================================================

BUBBLES
Occupation: Chuckola Cola Inc. owner and proprietor
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

An older bean who founded the Chuckola Cola soda company. 
Bubbles makes his signature brew by brewing choice Chuckleberries 
and telling quality jokes to get the Chuckleberries to laugh and 
carbonate the beverage. He'll gladly donate a can of his mightiest 
brew, Chuckola Cola, to help save the ailing Queen Bean - but only 
if the brothers can best his brew in battle. 
=======================================================================

BUNDT
Occupation: Monster wedding cake
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

Initially, Chef Torte attacks Mario's party when he realizes that they 
have disrupted Booster and Peach's wedding. Shortly into the battle, 
however, the cake begins to rumble. Mario and his friends must then 
fight the living cake itself until all five of its candles have been 
snuffed. Eventually, all that's left of the Bundt is its raspberry base, 
which the three Snifits encourage Booster to swallow hole. He does.

Mario would fight feisty food again in the third Mario RPG, Mario and 
Luigi: Superstar Saga, when he and Luigi take on the Chuckolator, the 
living, fighting barrel of Chuckola Cola.

=======================================================================

BUB-ULBER 
[Japanese name: Flower-san/Mr. Flower]
Occupation: Anthropomorphic bulb
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A cheerful resident of Petalburg whom Mario and Goombella 
encounter.

Bub-Ulber is a Bub-Ulb, a rare plant character that figured into the 
plotline of the first Paper Mario. Bub-Ulbs look like an oversized bulb 
with a face and a flower growing out of the top. In Paper Mario, Mario 
had to collect seeds from red, blue, green and yellow Bub-Ulbs and 
then let Minh T. grow them into flowers in order to open the passage 
to Flower Fields. (Curious, since bulb plants don't grow from seeds.) 
Those Bub-Ulbs, however, did not have names. 

Obviously, the name "Bub-Ulb" is patterned after the name of the 
classic Mario baddie, "Bob-Omb."

=======================================================================

BURT THE BASHFUL
[Japanese name: Donburi]
Occupation: Nudity-shy rotundo
Only appearance: Super Mario World: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Burt is the boss of the first castle Yoshi and Baby Mario encounter. 
He's a round, bouncy and harmless-looking fellow whose pants fall off 
if Yoshi nails him with enough well-aimed eggs. He then turns red and 
deflates while buzzing around the room like a dying balloon. Bye bye, 
Burt!

Burt's Japanese name, "Donburi," refers to a Japanese rish-bowl 
entrée.

Bashful Burt's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

BUMPTY 
Occupation: Rubbery penguin
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

A penguin who will cause Yoshi to bounce backwards if they touch. 
The bounce itself won't hurt Yoshi, but he could rebound off a cliff or 
into another enemy. Like many of the cuter critters from Yoshi's 
Island, Bumpty shows up in Tetris Attack as a selectable character. He 
replaced the ice fairy Sherbet, who appeared in the game's original 
form, Panel du Pon.

All the penguins living in Shiver City in Paper Mario and Poshley 
Heights in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door look just like 
Bumpty, rather than like Tuxie and the more realistic penguins from 
Super Mario 64.

Bumpty's appearances:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================


BUZZAR 
[Japanese name: Geehaa]
Occupation: Bridge guardian
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Mario must fight Buzzar in order to pass a certain bridge at the end of 
Mt. Rugged. Goombario, noting that Buzzar sits in a nest all day, 
wonders if this buzzard is female. Oddly, Mario can completely bypass 
the fight with Buzzar by claiming that he's Luigi.

There's a Rogueport resident named Lumpy who travels to Dry Dry 
Desert to drill for oil during Mario's quest in Paper Mario: The 
Thousand-Year Door. Lumpy will let Mario read his diary of his 
travails in the desert, including an entry about Buzzar stealing his 
backpack. 

=======================================================================

CACKLETTA
[Japanese name: Geragemoona/Kikimona]
Occupation: Bean witch
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

The villain of Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga, Cackletta is one mean 
bean. Posing as a friendly ambassador to nearby Beanbean Kingdom, 
Cackletta strolls into Peach's throne room and, in front of an entire 
court of Mushroom Retainers, ambushes the princess. A rush of green 
gas to Peach's face steals her voice. Cackletta escapes.

But why would Cackletta need Peach's voice? As the adventure 
progresses, Mario learns that the legendary Beanstar, a wish-granting 
artifact kept by Queen Bean, can only be awakened by the voice of a 
pure and noble beauty. Since Peach has the purest soul in the world, 
Cackletta uses her voice to awaken the Beanstar and fulfill her every 
dark desire. Cackletta successfully steals the Beanstar and takes it to 
Woohoo Hooniversity, Beanbean Kingdom's scientific capital, but the 
plan explodes in her face - quite literally. Unbeknownst to Cackletta 
or Mario, Peach switched places with Birdo in a Peach getup. Birdo's 
quacks only enrage the Beanstar, which blasts into the sky and divides 
into four pieces.

Mario and Luigi promptly stomp Cackletta, but Fawful sneaks in at the 
last minute to suck up her broken body into his handy headgear 
contraption. Fawful carries his mistress across the world until he finds 
a suitable host: Bowser, battered once again and just freshly no longer 
amnesiac. Bowletta is born.

The final showdown with Bowletta in the throne room of Bowser's 
castle is surprisingly easy - too easy, in fact. Just when s/he has run 
out of energy, Bowletta sucks the Mario Bros. into her belly, where 
they must fight the vengeful spirit of Cackletta. Once the spirit is 
stomps, all traces of Cackletta vanish from poor Bowser's body. At 
present, it would seem that Cackletta is gone forever.

Cackletta is the second female character to be in the main villain in a 
Mario game, the first being Captain Syrup from Super Mario Land 3: 
Wario Land. After the release of Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga, 
however, Nintendo released Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, 
where Mario fought the game's ultimate battle against the Shadow 
Queen.

=======================================================================

CANDY KONG 
[alternate Japanese spelling: Kandii Kongu]
Occupation: Kong cutie
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

Ah, Candy Kong. I'd call her the apple of Donkey Kong's eye, but 
everybody knows that Donkey much prefers bananas. And a 
banana in the eye could be painful, I'd wager. Candy, the only 
member of the Kong clan with a decent figure, seems to be 
Donkey's answer to Mario's Peach. She's pink. She has blonde 
hair. Candy even seems more passive than Peach, as Candy doesn't 
seem to do much of anything - but at least she doesn't have to get 
kidnapped all the time.

In the first Donkey Kong Country, Candy operated the Save Barrel 
- a spot on the map where Donkey or Diddy could hop in and 
record the progress of their adventure. For the sequel, Rare 
dropped Candy entirely. She didn't show up again until Donkey 
Kong 64, where she operated some sort of store, I'm told, and 
played a pivotral role in providing Donkey, Diddy, Chunkly, 
Lanky and Tiny with magical musical instruments.

When Nintendo re-released Donkey Kong Country for the Game 
Boy Advance in 2004, the option to save at any point - even mid-
stage - rendered Candy's original role completely useless. To 
compensate the comely lass, Nintendo invented Candy Kong's 
Dance Barrel, a mini-game in which Donkey or Diddy have to 
master some of Candy's jazzy dance steps.

When Nintendo ported Donkey Kong Country 2 to the Game Boy 
Advance, they kindly inserted Candy into the background of the 
re-designed Swanky's Bonus Bonanza. She doesn't do much, but 
at least she's there.

I'm told Candy also appears in DK: King of Swing for the Game 
Boy Advance, but I haven't played the game and couldn't 
elaborate.

Candy Kong's appearances:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
DK: King of Swing (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

CARLTON
Occupation: Knight
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A knight in a suit of shiny armor. He's the fifteenth boss.

=======================================================================

CATBAT
Occupation: Boss of the Sapphire Passage
Only appearance: Wario Land Advance (2001)

A big purple cat with a bat growing out of its head. Wario must ride 
the waves Catbat creates when it crashes into the pool of water of the 
floor and stomp Catbat's head.


CHARLIE  
Occupation: Golfer
Only appearance: Mario Golf (1999)

One of the generic human characters competing in the Mushroom 
Kingdom golf tournaments. Rylle has the following to say about this 
character: "Charlie has brown hair and a yellow shirt (with a lighter 
yellow collar). Charlie has midnight blue pants, the same color as 
Harry's hat. Charlie too has brown shoes, and a white and red glove on 
his left hand."

So there you go.

=======================================================================

CHARLIETON 
[Japanese name: Damasu]
Occupation: Merchant
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A chubby fellow who peddles rare wares near the harbor in Rogueport. 
Mario should be careful spending money around Charlieton, however 
- his name seems like a pun on the word "charlatan." Charlieton also 
shows up sporadically in the Pit of 100 Trials, peddling items Mario 
may need to reach the pit's bottom level.

=======================================================================

CHAUNCEY [new]
[Japanese name: Bebira]
Occupation: Ghost baby
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

Yikes. If anyone thought Baby Mario was a pain, they should meet 
Baby Chauncey.

Chauncey, the ghost-son of Neville and Lydia, is the first major boss 
Luigi fights. He seems innocent enough, wiggling around in his cradle, 
but if Luigi sets Chauncey's rocking horse into motion with his 
vacuum, Chauncey will want to play. For ghost babies, playtime 
means zapping you away to some other dimension in a giant cradle 
while he hurls rocking horses and toy balls at you. By bopping 
Chauncey with one of his toys, Luigi can make him vulnerable for just 
enough time to suck him up into the vacuum.

But talk about creepy. Dead babies? Demon rocking horses? Yikes 
indeed.

Image link: 
http://www.gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=64&pos
=3

=======================================================================

CHESTNUT KING [new]
Occupation: Third-class supervillain
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The never-seen but often-mentioned villain who steals Princess Eclair 
from Waffle Kingdom. Luigi treks to Hatesong Tower to fight the 
fiend, whom Luigi describes as "dripping with toxic goo." Anyone 
who reads the novelization of Luigi's adventures, however, knows that 
the Chestnut King isn't all that bad. He's actually Princess Eclair's 
boyfriend, transformed by the black magic of Waffle Kingdom 
Minister Crepe, who summoned Luigi on his journey in the first place. 

In other countries, the Chestnut King is called the "Goomba King." 
This is probably because the Japanese name for the Goomba, 
"Kuribo," is derived from the Japanese name for the chestnut, "kuri." 
Though the Marioverse already has a Goomba King - notably, one 
that debuted in the first Paper Mario - they character has been called 
"Goomboss" lately, so whether Luigi's Chestnut King and this 
character are the same is debatable. 

=======================================================================

CHET RIPPO 
[Japanese name: Rebeera]
Occupation: Huckster
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

His name is a clue to his criminal activities. This seedy-looking bird 
lurks around Toad Town and will offer Mario a chance to boost his 
either a certain set of his stats - health, power or magic. Mario 
shouldn't take Chet up, though, because allowing Chet to raise one set 
of stats will lower the others. 

Chet shows up again in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, but I 
can't say it's the same guy. He performs the same function, but he 
looks a lot more like a member of Merlon's clan than the chubby bird 
guy we saw in the first game. Maybe he lost weight and bought a 
stupid lampshade hat?

Chet Rippo's appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

CHIEF CHILLY 
Occupation: Surly snowball
Only appearance: Super Mario 64 DS (2004)

A well-chilled brute whom Luigi must fight in order to free Wario. He 
prides himself on his moustache and even insults Luigi's spindly 
moustache, figuring that someone with facial hair that pathetic must be 
the sidekick, not the hero. Luigi then must show Chief Chilly that 
sidekicks can fight too and promptly bumps Chief Chilly over the edge 
of the platform they fight on.

Chief Chilly looks like a modified version of the Big Bob-Omb's 
sprite, but he acts more like the Big Bully boss. He's also the only 
wholly original character in this remake of the original Super Mario 
64. 

=======================================================================

CHUCK QUIZMO
[Japanese name: Hatena Worm]
Occupation: Game show host
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A worm dressed like Willy Wonka, Chuck pops up all over the world, 
eager to challenge Mario to a trivia contest. If Mario answers the 
question correctly, Chuck gives Mario a star piece and then vanishes 
into the brim of his brightly colored hat. Strange guy, that Chuck 
Quizmo.

Chuck has an assistant, the lovely Vanna T.

=======================================================================

CHUCKLEROOT
Occupation: Chuckleberry guard
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

The Chuckleroot is a large, gnarled tree that will only let Mario and 
Luigi pass to the Chuckola brewery if they collect three specially 
colored Chuckleberries. He also has a granddaughter, also a gnarled 
tree, who will teach Luigi how to collect beans growing underground.

=======================================================================

CHUCKOLATOR
[Japanese name: Gerane Konti]
Occupation: Sword-bearing soda pop
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

The warrior form of Chuckola Reserve, the choicest soda made by the 
Chuckola Cola soda company. The soda has squarely beaten Popple 
and Bowser by the time Mario and Luigi arrive, and they too must 
tangle with him. When subdued, Chuckola Reserve cures Queen 
Bean's belly worm infection.

=======================================================================

CHUNKY KONG 
Occupation: Girthy gorilla
Only appearance: Donkey Kong Country 64 (1999)

One of the new Kong heroes introduced for the Donkey Kong Country 
series' only Nintendo 64 foray and the older brother of Kiddy Kong 
from Donkey Kong Country 3. As his name might imply, this meek 
gorilla is a big load of muscle. In fact, he's the biggest member of the 
entire Kong clan. Chunky can even make himself grow to supersized 
proportions and crush pesky baddies underfoot. 

=======================================================================

CLAPPER 
Occupation: Controller of water, lava
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

An affable seal who pops up in a few levels. He sits there, barks and 
claps. Diddy and Dixie can't ride him, but if they jump on his head, 
the water level will rise or sink. Or he'll turn lava to water. How, I 
couldn't imagine. Seal magic, I guess.

Clapper's appearances:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

CLAWGRIP
[Japanese name: Chokey]
Occupation: King-sized crab
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. 2 (1988)

Apparently unsatisfied with a third, albino Mouser as the boss of Super 
Mario Bros. 2's fifth world, the game's American developers created 
Clawgrip, a rock-throwing crab who waits atop a giant hollow tree for 
a showdown with whichever dreaming hero you chose to play as. 
Clawgrip, whose name is misspelled in the game's end credits as 
"Clawglip," replaces Doki Doki Panic's the original game's fifth boss. 
Clawgrip has remained a part of the game ever since, even in its 
Japanese reincarnations - Super Mario USA, Super Mario All-Stars 
and Super Mario Advance - so it would seem that Clawgrip is the 
first-ever American-created Mario character.

In the Super Mario Advance remake, Nintendo gave Clawgrip a pirate 
voice. The fight also begins with him looking just like the generic crab 
baddie from the original Mario Bros. game until a bubble - one of 
Wart's? - transforms him into the decidedly nastier Clawgrip.

Clawgrip's appearances:
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=======================================================================

CLEFTOR 
[Japanese name: Gan Gan]
Occupation: Glitz Pit competitor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A green Cleft who hangs out in the minor league locker room at the 
Glitz Pit. He doesn't respect Mario initially, but after his team, the 
Punk Rocks, experience a sound stomping beneath Mario's boots, 
Cleftor changes his attitude.

=======================================================================

CLOAKER and DOMINO 
Occupation: Smithy's minions
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

A pair of puppets who confront Mario and his friends in Smithy's 
factory. Cloaker swings a mean sword, while Domino casts magic 
spells against Mario's crew. If Mario's party defeats Cloaker first, 
Domino escapes to the Mad Adder, a giant snake puppet that Mario 
and his party must fight as well. If Domino falls first, Cloaker 
electronically attaches himself to Earth Link, another snake puppet that 
is a palette swap of the Mad Adder.

=======================================================================

CLOCKWORK SOLIDERS
[Japanese name: Puppet Army; alternate spelling: Papetto Ami]
Occupation: Robo-ghosts
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

I didn't know robots could become ghosts, but nonetheless that seems 
to be the case with the Clockwork Soldiers, a trio of life-size wind-up 
toys who no longer need to be wound up in order to play. Luigi can 
wake them up by setting off all the clocks in their room. Once up and 
about, they'll try to plug Luigi with their toy guns.

I'm not sure, but I think the Clockwork Knights might be a reference 
to the short-lived series Clockwork Knight, which showed up early in 
the career of the Sega Saturn. That game starred a mustachioed toy 
soldier who bore a slight resemblance to Mario.

=======================================================================

CLOUDJIN
Occupation: Hot air-containing mid-boss
Only appearance: Yoshi's Story (1998)

A semi-transparent genie who blows flames at Yoshi, who must also 
contend with teetering platforms and spikes balls falling all around him. A 
few well-placed eggs make Cloudjin evaporate.

=======================================================================

CLOUD N. CANDY
Occupation: Easily licked mid-boss
Only appearance: Yoshi's Story (1998)

Horribly, horribly named character. A big yellow puff of something - 
whether it's a cloud or cotton candy, I don't know. However, I do know 
that it's one of the most easily beaten bosses in a Mario game. All Yoshi 
must do to conquer Cloud N. Candy is lick him repeatedly. Eventually, 
there'll be nothing left to lick, and Yoshi will win.

=======================================================================

CORK and CASK
Occupation: Vintners
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

Twin bean brothers who work at Chateau de Chucklehuck, the 
headquarters of the Chuckola Cola Inc. If Mario and Luigi can 
decipher the brothers' thick French accents, they'll learn how to do 
some new special moves with their hammers. 

=======================================================================

CORTEZ 
Occupation: Skeletal spirit of the pirate king
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Mario first hears of Cortez in the legends recalled by the residents of 
Rogueport - a great pirate king whose spirit lingers somewhere in 
Keelhaul Key, near his long-lost treasure horde. Naturally, Mario 
meets Cortez head-on when he ventures through Pirate's Grotto, a 
series of caverns that lead to a graveyard of all the ships sunk near 
Keelhaul Key.

A cackling spectral skull with a variety of ghostly appendages at his 
command, Cortez awaits Mario in the treasure room of the Black 
Skull, his ship and the first vessel to ever sink near Keelhaul Key. 
Thinking that Mario has come to plunder his vast stores of treasure, 
Cortez engages Mario in battle. In a fight, this pirate poltergeist can 
strike at Mario with his four arms, morph into a bony snake or even 
levitate four weapons - a saber, a cutlass, a hook and a rapier, each 
ready to poke, slash or otherwise strike Mario. Even an undead spirit 
like Cortez eventually gives up in a physical fight with Super Mario, 
and soon Mario wins the Sapphire Star. Cortez is genuinely surprise 
when he realizes that the star is all Mario comes for. Among all his 
piles of gold and jewels, the Sapphire Star is one of his least prized 
treasures. He doesn't even really mind that Mario takes it.

When the X-Nauts attack Mario and the other shipwrecked souls 
stranded on Keelhaul Key, Mario and Flavio turn to Cortez for help. 
Offering the Skull Gem, Flavio's treasured family heirloom, as 
payment, Cortez agrees to sail the group back to Rogueport. He even 
helps them battle the X-Nauts forces. Later, Cortez and the Black 
Skull wait for Mario in the Rogueport harbor, in case they ever want to 
travel back to Keelhaul Key.

Kirby021591 points out that Cortez is probably named after famous 
and infamous Spanish explorer Herndando de Cortés, who 
"discovered" many parts of the New World in the 1600s. Kirby021591 
also notes that the notion of a pirate turning good after Mario stomps 
him appeared previously in Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven 
Stars. See the bio for Jonathan Jones for more details.

=======================================================================

COUNT DOWN [new]
Occupation: World's biggest alarm clock
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

A large, silly clock tha Mario fights in the lower levels of Smithy's 
factory. As Count Down cycles through the hours, unleashing 
chronologically appropriate attacks. It also has two bells mounted on 
it, both named "Ding-a-Ling," which also attack Mario's party.

=======================================================================

CRACTUS
Occupation: Boss of the Emerald Passage
Only appearance: Wario Land Advance (2001)

A cracked-out cactus whose drool can turn Wario into a zombie. 
Wario can put the crackdown on Cractus by slamming into its head 
from above.

=======================================================================

CRANBERRY 
Occupation: Last of the Luffs
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A sleeping boy who happens to be the last remaining member of the 
Luffs, an ancient but advanced race. Luigi sneezes and awakens 
Cranberry, and suddenly Luigi can understand the Luff language. 
When Luigi leaves the Rapturous Ruins, they disappear, presumably 
whisking Cranberry away with them.

=======================================================================

CRANKY KONG 
[alternate Japanese spelling: Kurankii Kongu]
Occupation: Embittered video game icon
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

"Back in my day, games were only black and white, and we were 
lucky just to get one shade of gray!"

Depending on how you look at this bearded Kong, he's either Donkey 
Kong's grandfather, Donkey Kong's elderly father or a grizzled senior 
member of the Kong clan who's not officially related to Donkey but 
maintains a grandfatherly relationship nonetheless. Yikes.

Hunched over and gray-haired, Cranky Kong doesn't look like an ape 
that could cause too much trouble. Nonetheless, he claims he was the 
original barrel-tosser - the first Donkey Kong. If what he says is true, 
then the family moniker eventually got passed onto the hero of the 
Donkey Kong Country games sometime around 1994. The senior 
Donkey Kong got stuck with the nickname Cranky, which seems all-
too-appropriate, given his nasty disposition. 

As my good friend Tinus points out, there's actually legitimate reason 
to doubt Cranky's claims about his former stardom. Other than the fact 
that he seems senile sometimes, Cranky is a bit of a joke character in 
that he's the only guy in the entire Marioverse I can think of who 
repeatedly breaks the fourth wall - that is, Cranky seems to know 
he's in a video game. (Tinus also reminds me that Cranky is a spot-on 
parody of retrogamers - people like me who love to claim that video 
games were so much better back in the old days.)

When Cranky isn't lecturing Donkey about how much better video 
games were before the advent of the 3D model, he'll actually drop 
hints about where to find secrets in levels Donkey and Diddy have 
already passed through. In Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong 
Quest, Cranky hangs out in the Monkey Museum, a shrine to the video 
games of yore - or at least the ones Nintendo and Rare made. He still 
shells out hints, but he charges this time. He finally gets a more active 
role in Donkey Kong Country 3. As Dixie travels around on her own 
adventure, she can compete with Cranky in Swanky Kong's various 
sideshow mini-games. If Dixie or Kiddy beat him, he'll get angry and 
chase them off. And in Donkey Kong 64, Donkey's new crew can visit 
Cranky and exchange coins for potions that allow them to use new 
moves. If given enough coins, Cranky will allow you to play Jetpac, 
one of Rare's first-ever titles.

Cranky nearly got a chance at being a playable character in Diddy 
Kong Pilot, the now-defunct Game Boy Advance flying game that 
Rare no longer seems to be developing. Too bad. To my knowledge, 
Cranky Kong has not yet been a playable character.

Cranky cameos in the background of Donkey's "Jungle Japes" stage in 
Super Smash Bros. Melee. You can see his silhouette moving around 
the cabin. He never actually comes out, though, and maybe that's why 
there's no Cranky Kong trophy available in the game.

I should also point out that Cranky was married to Wrinkly Kong for 
some time, but Rare killed her off in Donkey Kong 64. The poor old 
guy's a widower now - the first in the Marioverse - though the 
persistant presence of Wrinkly's ghost seems to keep him from getting 
too lonely.

Cranky Kong's appearances:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001 
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

CREPE 
Occupation: Minister of Waffle Kingdom
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Waffle Kingdom's counterpart to Toadsworth, I'm assuming, who 
summons Mario in order to rescue Princess Eclair. Crepe would seem 
to be a completely insignificant character to anybody who doesn't buy 
all the volume's of the novel based on Luigi's adventures. Those who 
picked up the last installment, however, learn that the story's true 
villain is not the Chestnut King but Crepe, who transformed the king 
into a beast in order to steal Princess Eclair for himself. Crepe is the 
last boss Luigi fights. But, of course, it's only an "as told to" 
adventure. We see neither the fight nor any of the members of the 
Crepe-Chestnut-Eclair love triangle.

=======================================================================

CROCO 
Occupation: Thief
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

A purple crocodile with a top hat and a penchant for speaking like a 
bad gangster movie, Croco steals anything he can get his claws on. 

Mario first meets him in the Mushroom Kingdom, where Mallow is 
pursuing Croco in hopes of retrieving the coin Croco stole from him. 
Croco can jump a lot better than pudgy little Mallow can, however, 
and Mario must help Mallow catch Croco on Bandit's Way. They 
eventually fight, and Croco tries to defend himself by throwing 
whatever he's got in his sack of plundered goods.

Croco shows up again in the Moleville Mines. When Mario thumps his 
head on a low ceiling, Croco and his thuggish chums rob Mario of all 
his money. Once caught, Croco fights again. As a victory prize, Mario 
and company get the Bambino Bomb, which they can use to blast 
away rocks blocking the passage to a different part of the mines.

The purple one shadows Mario through most of his adventure. In 
Bowser's Keep, Croco shows up twice, though for a different purpose: 
he sells Mario items at a surprisingly reasonable price. In the game's 
epilogue, Croco seems to have taken residence as a competitor in the 
footraces on Yo'ster Isle.

According to Jellysoup's comprehensive Mario series ending FAQ, 
Croco cameos in the Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX as a 
crocodile character named Sale. Readers of this guide disagree on 
whether this statement is accurate. I've never played this particular 
game, so I can't say for sure. But it seems unlikely to me that such a 
minor Marioverse character would earn a cameo in a Zelda game, 
especially when that Zelda game was released two years before the 
game that introduced Croco.

=======================================================================

CRUMP 
[also known as Four Eyes; Japanese name: Peckda]
Occupation: X-Naut lieutenant 
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The first enemy Mario encounters in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year 
Door is also a high-ranking officer in the X-Naut army, the 
technologically advanced group of soldiers intent on collecting the 
Crystal Stars. Despite his rank, Crump is a bit of a bumbler. Head X-
Naut Grodus himself admits that Crump is "out there" and sends the 
Shadow Sirens to ensure an X-Naut victory on Crump's mission to the 
Boggly Woods. Mario beats the Shadow Sirens anyway and eventually 
must fight Lord Crump in a folding, spinning, transforming robotic 
contraption called Magnus von Grapple. Once trounced, Crump yields 
the Emerald Star.

Crump later poses as a member of Flavio's crew, "Four Eyes," in order 
to steal the Sapphire Star from Mario during the daventure on 
Keelhaul Key. He's using a pretty lousy disguise to it, too. Even 
Crump seems to realize how obvious his true identity is. He even 
addresses you, the video game player - "you behind the TV screen" 
- and asks you not to rat him out to Mario. Once Mario stomps 
Cortez, Crump drops his "Four Eyes" disguise and attacks Mario, 
Flavio's crew and some other shipwrecked souls with all the firepower 
of an X-Naut battleship. While pirate ghosts tackle the X-Naut 
soldiers, Mario and Crump square off once more. Crump eventually 
falls, and later Grodus promises Crump only one more chance at 
stopping Mario.

He makes good on that promise when Mario reaches the last room of 
the X-Naut base on the moon. There, Crump fights Mario with 
Magnus von Grapple 2.0, a supposedly glitch-free upgrade to the 
original Magnus von Grapple. When Mario beats Crump, his new 
contraption explodes, sending Crump into outer space. 

With his squat frame and pointy beard, Lord Crump looks a bit like a 
disguised version of Booster from Super Mario RPG. You can pick out 
Crump from the other X-Nauts easily because Crump wears a purple 
horned hat.

=======================================================================

CRYSTAL KING
Occupation: Bowser's goon
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

The Crystal King resides in the Crystal Palace. Though the palace was 
built to venerate the Star Spirits, the Crystal King and his gang of 
Duplighosts had no problem moving in and causing trouble. Mario 
battles the Crystal King, who shoots jewel shards and creates illusion 
doubles of himself.

=======================================================================

CUCKOO CONDOR
Occupation: Boss of the Ruby Passage
Only appearance: Wario Land Advance (2001)

A hovering clock that will attempts to snatch Wario up in a clamp and 
drop him onto a sharp gear to hurt him. If Wario knocks the clamp 
around into the clock, the wood frame will crumble, revealing an 
angry egg-dropping bird.

The Cuckoo Condor may be a variation on a minor baddie that 
originally appeared in Virtual Boy Wario Land, Coo Coo. It was also a 
boy that lived in a clock and dropped eggs on Wario.

=======================================================================

CULEX 
[Japanese name: Crystal Monster]
Occupation: Dark knight of Vanda
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

If Mario brings a mole girl in Moleville some fireworks, she'll trade 
him a mysterious shiny stone. And if Mario takes this shiny stone to a 
sealed door in Monstro Town, he and his party will be pulled into an 
alternate dimension inhabited by Culex. A monstrous looking fighter 
flanked by four elemental crystals, Culex asks to challenge the 
dimension's most valiant knight.

Culex doesn't especially look like he belongs in the Marioverse. He's 
not supposed to. Since Square, the RPG kings behind the Final Fantasy 
series, helped Nintendo develop Mario's first RPG outing, they 
included Culex as a nod to the Final Fantasy series. Culex doesn't 
come from any specific game, but he does look and act like a character 
who would. The four crystals that accompany Culex into battle are 
also staple features of the Final Fantasy series: the crystals of fire, 
earth, air and water. Even the battle music is from the boss battles of 
Final Fantasy 4.

Oddly, "culex" is the genus for the common mosquito.

=======================================================================

CZAR DRAGON
[Japanese name: Kaizaa Dragon/Kaiser Dragon]
Occupation: Lava dweller
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

The boss of Barrel Volcano and the first of two major obstacles 
standing between Mario and the sixth Star Piece. The Czar Dragon 
sinks into the hot stuff again once his HP is depleted, only to emerge 
again as Zombone, a skeletal version of his former self. Once Mario 
and his party destroy that form of the Czar Dragon, they must still 
square off with the Axem Rangers.

The Czar Dragon looks a lot like Blargg, a lava-dwelling dinosaur 
from Super Mario World. It also looks like the dragon Hooktail from 
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, as several readers have 
pointed out. 

=======================================================================

DAISY 
Occupation: Reigning monarch of Sarasaland
First Appearance: Super Mario Land (1989)

If Peach is Barbie, then Daisy is Midge - a body double with 
different hair. 

In her first appearance in Super Mario Land, Daisy was pretty 
much just that: a red-haired version of Peach in a yellow dress. As 
Mario ventured through each of the four kingdoms of Sarasaland 
- the Egyptian-like Birabuto Kingdom, the seaside Muda 
Kingdom, the Easter Island-like Easton Kingdom, and the Asian-
themed Chai Kingdom - he would rescue a fake Daisy who 
would transform into a monster and bound away. These monsters, 
in order, include a Fly (a generic, hopping bug baddie), Gunion (an 
octopus baddie) and Kumo (a hopping spider baddie).

After blasting Tatanga out of the sky, Mario rescued the real Daisy 
and the two sped away in Mario's mini-plane. Eleven years later, 
Daisy got a second appearance in Mario Tennis for the Nintendo 
64. This time, Nintendo seemed to be posing her as a match for 
Luigi instead of the trollop who broke up whatever Mario and 
Peach had going on.

As any princess of a desert kingdom would, Daisy sported a nice 
tan. Nintendo also differentiated her face somewhat, to visually 
distance her from Peach. Daisy's evolution wouldn't complete 
until Mario Party 3. Daisy, with shorter hair and cuter than ever, 
competed in mini-games with a tomboyish toughness. (The 
instruction manual made a point of referring to Daisy as "a bit of a 
tomboy" and depicted her swinging a baseball bat. I guess she's a 
tomboy. She no longer wears a flower in her hair like she did in 
Super Mario Land. But honestly, anybody would seem tough 
compared to that frilly cake-baker Peach.)

The age of the Gamecube has included Daisy in most Mario-
related outings, including Super Smash Bros. Melee, in which 
Peachy could wear Daisy's duds - and her tan - as an alternate 
costume. Daisy herself got an alternate costume in 2003's Mario 
Golf: Toadstool Tour. On the links, she wears short-shorts - a 
first in the Marioverse, I believe. 

A few people have written in asking me to note the change in 
Daisy's appearance from her Nintendo 64 days to her Gamecube 
days. Originally, Nintendo kept Daisy looking more like she did in 
the art for Super Mario Land - a desert princess. Daisy looked 
appropriately tan and her crown was red. In Mario Party 4, 
however, Nintendo rejiggered her look a bit. Instead of tan skin, 
she now has pale white skin, which makes sense because people 
with red hair can hardly ever sport a tan. Beyond that, Nintendo 
also restructured her face. I'm guessing they did so make her look 
less like Peach and more like the spunky tomboy character they'd 
like her to be. The Mushroom Kingdom website discussed this 
very subject in its March 2005 mailbag and you can check out a 
side-by-side comparison of new and old Daisy here: 

http://www.classicgaming.com/tmk/mailbag_050324.shtml 

Oddly, Nintendo also gave the new Daisy a bit of a pot belly, too. 
Apparently Nintendo didn't want anybody mistaking Daisy for 
being the cuter of the too. You can check this out at a screenshot 
posted by Mushroom Kingdom regular MEGA߼TE, who was 
kind enough to note the princesses' difference in stomach size: 

http://www.classicgaming.com/tmk/images/mailbag/20050130_bellies.jpg 

The difference in appearance between Daisy and Peach is 
especially interesting when you remember that Peach's first 
appearance at the end of the original Super Mario Bros. looked a 
lot more like Daisy than the Peach we know. Check out 
screenshots: she has Daisy's red hair and a white dress.

http://www.vgmuseum.com/end/nes/a/smario.htm

Bosom buddies Peach and Daisy raced alongside each other in 
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! They were the only all-female team. 
Interestingly, the instruction manual for this game played up 
Daisy's cuteness, saying her popularity had made her "something 
of an idol." For this Mario fan, she was something of a pain in the 
ass, what with her constant need to introduce herself every time 
she dove into the driver's seat. "Hi! I'm Daisy!" Indeed.

Love her or hate her, let's hear it for Daisy for evening out the 
male-to-female ratio. But will Nintendo ever let her appear in 
another game that's not some Mario equivalent of a day at the 
country club? Gof? Tennis? Go-kart racing? The Mario Party 
series? Will Daisy ever get another appearance in a genuine Mario 
game?

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR DAISY***
The princess of Sarasaland. Daisy met Mario when he helped 
defeat the evil alien Tatanga in Super Mario Land. Princess Daisy 
is a bit of a tomboy when compared with her counterpart, Princess 
Peach. After her appearance in Mario Golf, some gossips started 
portraying her as Luigi's answer to Mario's Peach.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR DAISY***

NOTE: The information in her Smash Bros. trophy bio is incorrect. 
Daisy did not appear in Mario Golf until its Gamecube installment 
in 2003. Daisy's trophy, by the way, has a semi-famous flaw. If 
you zoom the hair on the back of her head, you'll see she has a 
third eye there.

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Peach
Personal racecar: Bloom Coach
Special weapon: Heart

Daisy's starring roles:
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Super Mario Land (Game Boy) - 1989
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001

=======================================================================

THE DANCING WHIRLINDAS 
[Japanese name: Darutten Man and Wife; alternate spelling: Darruten 
Fusai]
Occupation: Ghost waltzes
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

Mr. and Mrs. Whirlinda are a husband-and-wife dancing team. Trouble 
is, they're dead. According to info from E. Gadd's Game Boy Horror, 
they can no longer compete in dancing competitions because their feet 
no longer touch the floor. The Whirlindas mark the fourth portrait 
ghost battle in Luigi's Mansion.

This couple's name is an allusion to the Flying Wallendas, a legendary 
family of circus acrobats.

=======================================================================

DANGEROUS DUCK [new]
[also known as D.D.]
Occupation: Wariophobic waterfowl
First appearance: Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land

This boomerang-tossing duck initially appears as a generic baddie in 
the first Wario Land adventure. In the sequel, Dangerous Duck appears 
as both a generic baddie and as the main character of Flagman D.D., a 
mini-game players can unlock by finding all the game's hidden 
treasure. The game is a remake of Flagman, a Game & Watch title.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=103&pos=1

Dangerous Duck's starring roles:
Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy) - 1994

Other appearances:
Wario Land II (Game Boy Color) - 1998

=======================================================================

DARKLY 
Occupation: Seeker of back alley shadows
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Twilighter who hangs out in the shady alleys of Rogueport. This 
grandson of the Twilight Town mayor kindly writes his name on 
Mario so as to allow him to access Twilight Town. Darkly also has a 
good chuckle when he learns that Dour spent some time in pig form as 
a result of the Twilight Town curse.

=======================================================================

DAZZLE 
Occupation: Star Piece collector
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

An obsessive Twilighter who lives in the ruins beneath Rogueport. He 
loves Star Pieces more than anything and will trade Mario rare badges 
for them. Basically, Dazzle performs the same service as Merlow did 
in the first Paper Mario.

=======================================================================

DE BUU
Occupation: Thuggish swine
Only appearance: Wario's Woods NES (1994)

The game's second boss, De Buu is a large hog dressed up like a 
barbarian and carrying a knife and fork. He does not appear in the 
SNES version of Wario's Woods.

=======================================================================

DEDAR
Occupation: Sprite
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A green gremlin character wearing a red hat. For some reason, he 
reminds me of the Poppy Bros. characters from the Kirby games. 
Dedar is a boss.

=======================================================================

THE DIAMOND TROLL [new]
Occupation: Overgrown funkster
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted! (2005)

While spending the day on a field trip at Diamond Knoll, Kat and Ana 
encounter a swarm of bees and therefore flee into a nearby hut. Little 
do they realize that the hut is inhabited by the Diamond Troll, a ogrish-
looking dude with buff arms and a scary Japanese-style mask. If 
players successfully complete Kat and Ana's game set, they see the 
girls beat the Diamond Troll with the help of Shadow and Shuriken.

=======================================================================

DIDDY KONG 
[alternate Japanese spelling: Didii Kongu]
Occupation: Potassium lover
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

Like Luigi to Mario or Donkey Kong Jr. to... um, the other Donkey 
Kong, this little guy plays sidekick in the Donkey Kong Country 
series, the games that took the classic villain Donkey Kong in a bold 
new direction. 

According to the game's instruction manual, little Diddy is guarding 
Donkey's bananas one stormy night as part of his hero training. 
Suddenly, out of the darkness emerge the Kremlings, a band of 
reptilian evildoers. The fiends nab the stash and then stuff poor Diddy 
in a barrel. The next morning, a horrified Donkey finds only empty 
space where a small mountain of bananas once sat. Determined to 
reclaim his property, Donkey Kong smashes open the barrel containing 
his friend and the two set out across Kong Island to fight them and get 
those nanners back.  

(Some sources identify Diddy as Donkey's nephew, others as his little 
friend. The Donkey Kong 64 instruction manual identifies Diddy as 
Donkey's "little nephew wannabe," but that can be interpreted as 
meaning that Diddy is both Donkey's nephew and a wannabe or a 
Kong who has a "little buddy" nephew-like relationship with Donkey. 
Since Diddy has a prehensile tail, he's clearly not an ape. Maybe he's 
really not related to Donkey. But then again, he does have the Kong 
surname. One thing's for sure: he's neither Donkey's son nor Donkey 
Kong Jr.)

Diddy's name works as a code in the original Donkey Kong County. 
By pushing down, Y, down, down, Y - D-Y-D-D-Y - during the 
intro sequence in which Cranky cranks his gramophone, the player can 
unlock a special area in which he can practice the various bonus 
chances located throughout the game. Whether Diddy was assigned a 
name with the intention of its letters spelling out a code, I'm not sure. 
But curiously, the same thing exists in the sequel with Dixie's name.

Unlike the Mario games, in which Mario and Luigi must alternate 
stage-by-stage through the game, Donkey and Diddy share the 
adventure. With a high five, the two simians slap hands and switch 
places, letting the player control Donkey or Diddy at any given point. 
Whereas Donkey's specialty lies in his brute strength, Diddy is far 
more nimble. Together the two progress all the way to King K. Rool, 
the Kremling overlord. When K. Rool falls, D and D celebrate the 
return of the prized banana hoard.

The climactic fight on K. Rool's pirate ship, the Gangplank Galleon, is 
a mere glimmer of the adventure yet to come: Donkey Kong Country 
2: Diddy's Kong Quest.

Shortly after rescuing the bananas from the Kremlings' scaly hands, 
Donkey Kong vanishes. Where could he be? All becomes clear when 
Diddy discovers a note from the Kremlings - who have now become 
a band of pirates. K. Rool demands that the Kongs hand over their 
prized banana collection in exchange for Donkey's safe return. At 
once, Diddy sets out to rescue his mentor; but this for adventure, 
however, he has his little gorilla-friend Dixie accompany him. The two 
trace a trail of bananas. Rare left Diddy essentially unchanged from the 
first game, with the exception of yellow stars on his shirt and the 
ability to throw his partner to hard-to-reach platforms.

Though Diddy and Dixie eventually emerged victorious, the 
Kremlings struck a third time. For the third Super NES installment of 
Donkey Kong Country, the Kremlings nab both Diddy and Donkey. 
Cute-as-a-button Dixie shines as the star of that game as she wanders 
in search of the two missing guys.

Diddy finally reunited with Donkey Kong in their only Nintendo 64 
joint venture, Donkey Kong 64. Players could play as the bigger or the 
smaller D.K. as well as Chunky Kong, Lanky Kong and Tiny Kong. In 
this game, Rare outfitted Diddy with a special peanut gun, which 
Diddy could use both for fighting and for reaching areas other 
characters couldn't.

So while Donkey Kong 64 marked the only action-adventure outing of 
the Donkey-Diddy duo, sneaky little Diddy made his own game on the 
side: Diddy Kong Racing. Essentially a much-improved, much-
innovated spin on the Mario Kart engine, Diddy Kong Racing had the 
little monkey racing an assortment of furry critters in karts, planes and 
even hovercrafts. The game's plot involved Diddy traveling to a far-
off land to help Prince Timber rid his homeland of the evil Wizpig. 
Other drivers included such one-hit-wonders as Pipsy the mouse and 
Bumper the Badger, but also certain Rare originals who would later 
get their own series: Banjo, sans Kazooie, and Conker, sans rudeness. 
Enjoy it while you can - I doubt you'll ever see Nintendo characters 
hanging out with the likes of Banjo or Conker again.

In Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour, Diddy finally crossed over in the 
mainstream Marioverse, where Donkey Kong had been appearing 
since Mario Kart 64. Most recently, Diddy got to use his Diddy Kong 
Racing-honed driving skills in Mario Kart: Double Dash!!, where he 
and Donkey Kong menaced other drivers with some gargantuan 
banana peels.

Diddy is the only non-Japanese-created character in the extended 
Marioverse in Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour and Mario Kart: Double 
Dash!! If these games are any indication, I'd say he stands a good 
chance to being assimilated into the regular Golf/Tennis/Party/Kart 
crew, a rarity for a character born outside of Japan. (Since Rare works 
out of Britain, I guess Diddy's a British lad.)

Answers.com points out an interesting transformation Diddy 
underwent when he transitioned from being a Rareware-only character 
to a Mario mainstay - he grew an extra finger. Previous to his entry 
into the Mario Golf and Mario Kart series, Diddy - and, I'm 
assuming, the rest of the Kongs - had only four fingers, a common 
characteristic among western cartoon characters. Whoever wrote 
Diddy's profile, however, notes that Japan has a taboo about four-
fingered characters, so Diddy apparently gain the extra digit as a 
result. (Answers.com, by the way, has some cool profiles about other 
major Marioverse characters, and I heartily encourage you all to check 
the site out.)

At one point, Rare release some preliminary shots of a Game Boy 
Adance title called Diddy Kong Pilot, which I'd guess would have had 
Diddy and his friends revisiting the plane-racing action from Diddy 
Kong Racing. Alas, though Rare still seems intent on developing titles 
for Nintendo's portable systems - case in point, the puzzle game Mr. 
Pants - I doubt they'll be starring any sort of Kongs. Unless I'm 
mistaken, Diddy Kong Pilot given a makeover and now exists as Banjo 
Pilot.

Diddy employs his monkey madness for his appearance in Mario 
Power Tennis: as super moves, he can either transform his racquet into 
a curve-ball slicing banana or simply strap on a jetpack from Donkey 
Kong 64 and soar over to the far side of the court in order to snag the 
ball.

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Donkey Kong
Personal racecar: Barrel Train
Special weapon: Big Banana

Diddy Kong's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Diddy Kong Racing - Nintendo 64) - 1997
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Donkey Konga (Gamecube) - 2004
Donkey Konga 2: Hit Song Parade (Gamecube) - 2004
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996

=======================================================================

DIXIE KONG
Occupation: Hairy heroine
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

Dixie Kong's quite a little lady, when you think about it.

She may look girly. In fact, I'm pretty sure she's one of the girliest-
looking characters in the Marioverse, even more so than the I-can't-
do-anything-but-hang-out-at-the-Save Barrel doily, Candy Kong. 
What with her long blonde ponytail, stylishly knotted shirt and jaunty 
pink beret, you might expect that Dixie couldn't do much besides sell 
girl scout cookies. You're way wrong, though her beret is ridiculously 
cutesy - did you notice the golden Rare "R" pin on it?

Dixie and Diddy together made a decent team in Donkey Kong 
Country 2. Though a bit slower than her partner, Dixie could spin her 
ponytail around helicopter-style to slow her descent and allow her to 
cross wide gaps. Dixie could also whip her hair as an attack, much like 
Diddy's cartwheel. And man, she'd shake that ponytail all over when 
she cleared a stage - whereas Diddy would pop out his boom box, 
Dixie would jam on an electric guitar.

(I'm not entirely clear on the nature of Diddy and Dixie's relationship. 
I believe there's a few references - both in the games and in their 
instruction manuals - that they're boyfriend and girlfriend, but we 
never see them canoodling. Besides, they have the same last name. In 
fact, I'm not even sure whether Dixie is a monkey, like Diddy, or an 
ape, like Donkey. Her tail may very well be tucked inside her shirt.)

Once Diddy and Dixie rescue Donkey from the evil K. Rool, it's only 
a matter of time before those Kremlings return for a third time, during 
which they ditch the bananas and take Donkey and Diddy instead. 
With the series two main male heroes out of commission, who will 
rescue the day? Who indeed! Dixie Kong, who's busy babysitting 
brawny baby Kiddy Kong, leaps into action and chases down the 
Kremling crew for the third and final Super NES Donkey Kong 
Country game.

Now this is the big deal. Think about it: Dixie gets her own game. Her 
name is even in the title: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's 
Double Trouble - the "double trouble," I'm guessing, either referring 
to the dual disappearance of Donkey and Diddy or the seemingly 
impossible task of defeating the Kremlings and still babysitting her 
baby cousin, Kiddy Kong. Dixie and her pajama-clad charge venture 
all about the Northern Kremisphere until they track down K. Rool and 
KAOS - a robotic contraption powered by Donkey and Diddy's 
stolen brain energy.

This makes Dixie the only female character in the entire Marioverse to 
carry her own game. And at that, she does it at a time when Nintendo 
didn't seem particularly interested in evening out the gender ratio. 
Princess Peach, though nearly ten years older than Dixie, still hasn't 
starred in her own game. And in 1996, the year Nintendo released 
DKC3 released, Peach was regularly the solitary female character in 
any Mario game. 

Because Dixie rocked so much, many players were peeved to see her 
needlessly replaced in Donkey Kong 64 with Tiny Kong, her kid 
sister. The future looked pretty grim for Dixie. In the preliminary shots 
from the now-defunct Donkey Kong Racing, you could see Tiny, not 
Dixie, racing rhinoceroses with Diddy. 

I'm fairly certain a saw a blonde ponytail trailing behind one of the 
planes in Diddy Kong Pilot, so Rare may have intended to have Dixie 
back in that game. But as I explained in Diddy's profile, that game 
seems dead in the water. And if I'm not mistaken, the upcoming Rare 
release Mr. Pants was originally a puzzle game titled Dixie Kong's 
Coconut Crackers. But oh well.

Oddly, Dixie scored an appearance in Super Smash Bros. Melee as a 
trophy, while Diddy, Tiny or many of the other Kongs did not. And 
more happily, she cameos in the later entries of the Donkey Konga 
series as well..

(Like Diddy's name, Dixie's works as a code. If a player pushes down, 
Y, X, Y - D-Y-X-Y - on the Donkey Kong menu screen, they can 
unlock the game's hidden features. But whether Dixie was named with 
the intention of her name being code, I'm not sure.)

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR DIXIE***
Dixie Kong is also a fearless adventurer and a reliable team player. 
She earned her wings helping Diddy rescue Donkey Kong from the 
clutches of King K. Rool. Dixie's amazingly quick and nimble, and 
she's even able to twirl her ponytail in order to float slowly through 
the air.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR DIXIE***

Dixie Kong's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

Other appearances:
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001

=======================================================================

DODO
[also known as Prince Mallow, Tubby]
Occupation: Toucan toadie
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

Dodo does Valentina's bidding, though one could infer that Dodo's 
not too happy with his job. (Actually, Mallow does just that - using 
his Psychopath mind-reading technique, Mallow hears Dodo think the 
sentence "She's not paying me enough for this.") One of Super Mario 
RPG's more interesting scenarios involves Dodo pecking various 
statues in the Nimbus Land gallery to determine which is actually 
Mario in disguise. Eventually, Dodo escapes with Valentina in tow. 
Dodo drops Valentina, apparently fed up with her demands. The two 
end up together again, however. In the game's ending sequence, Dodo 
seems to be acting as the minister for Booster and Valentina's 
wedding.

Dodo looks a bit like an overgrown Pidgit, but then again so does 
Raphael the Raven. And Dodo and Raphael look nothing a like. So 
there.

=======================================================================

DOLL MAN 
Occupation: Hammer-throwing doll
Only appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

The first boss in Wario Land 3, Wario fights Doll Man in the 
Volcano's Base stage. Apparently Doll Man's hammers turn Wario 
into Bouncy Wario.

I haven't played this game and don't know much about Doll Man other 
than what Shdwrlm3 posted in his Wario Land 3 guide at GameFAQs. 
Anybody with further information will be greatly appreciated.

=======================================================================

DOLPHIN 
Occupation: Bottlenose stepping stone
First appearance: Super Mario World (1991)

A blue dolphin that pops up in a few stages in Super World, 
particularly the stage Vanilla Secret 3. Dolphin often appears in packs. 
Some leap vertically into the air, while others bound over the waves in 
along the horizon. Though Yoshi could eat Dolphin in the Japanese 
version of Super Mario World, Nintendo removed this from the 
American translation, perhaps to make Dolphin seem like less of an 
enemy.

Although I initially objected to including Dolphin as a character in this 
guide, Kirby021591 reminded me that I included Heavy Zed from 
Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins. Dolphin and Heavy Zed serve 
essentially the same function: animate, cuddly lifts that Mario can use 
to get from place to place. Thus, the profile you're reading now. It's 
just too bad that Nintendo stuck the character with such a boring name.

Dolphins - as in the generic species and not this particular character 
- have a bit of a history with the games on the Gamecube. The 
system was initially codenamed Project Doplhin, and Nintendo has 
reflected this in dolphin cameos in many games. Notably, Super Mario 
Sunshine takes place on Isle Delfino - Italian for "dolphin" - and 
dolphin helpers appear in the seaside board in Mario Party 4. 
However, these dolphins are consistently realistic-looking ones, none 
the ones drawn in the Super Mario World style. The Dolphin 
character, as far as I know, never appeared beyond Super Mario World 
and its various reincarnations.

Dolphin's appearances:
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991 
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002 

=======================================================================

DON
Occupation: Messenger bird
Only appearance: WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$

Don is a small brown bird who accompanies Ana into battle with 
Boneheads. When Ana is captured, she attached a note asking Kat for 
help to Don, who flies away.

=======================================================================

DONKEY KONG 
[also known as D.K.; alternate Japanese spelling: Dokii Kongu]
Occupation: Banana consumer
First appearance: Donkey Kong (1981)

[donkey]


STUPID MONKEY


Oh, headaches. The Donkey Kong continuity is nearly as complicated 
as the whole thing with Mario and Baby Mario. Before I delve into 
that, though, there's a good story behind how D.K. got his name. As 
far as video game urban legends go, this one's widely believed to be 
true. Apparently, back in the planning stages for the original Donkey 
Kong, Shigeru Miyamoto thought "donkey" meant "stupid" or 
"stubborn" in English. The second part comes from the famous movie 
about a stupid ape, King Kong. And it's stuck all these years.

Well, at least I can explain one thing.

Now for the hard part: Even though the name Donkey Kong has been 
used continually in Mario games for years, it hasn't always referred to 
the same simian. This FAQ will try to sort all this out.

Undeniably, the first Donkey Kong was the ape who in 1981 nabbed 
Mario's first girlfriend, Pauline, dragged her to the top of various 
construction sites and chucked cascades of barrels at any intrepid 
heroes wanting to rescue her. Big and brawny, D.K. could only be 
defeated by collapsing the entire site. Tables turned in the 1982 sequel. 
Guarded by the cruel Mario, Donkey Kong sat in a cage and waited for 
his son, D.K. Jr., to swing from vine to vine and rescue him. In 1983, 
Nintendo fazed Mario out of the Donkey Kong franchise altogether. 
Also fazed out: barrels, D.K. Jr., and vines. The new direction Donkey 
Kong 3 took involved a greenhouse and a determined insect 
exterminator named Stanley the Bugman. Donkey Kong, apparently 
intending to raise all manner of hell among the potted flowers, would 
slowly lower himself on two poles in the center of the playing field. 
Stanley, his trusty gas gun in hand, sprays insecticide up Donkey 
Kong's ass.

How successfully was this new direction received by fans? Well, 
Stanley never appeared again. And Donkey Kong was relegated to 
cameos until a little company called Rare gave him an extra life.


A MORE WELL-ROUNDED APE


Rare, the second-party developer behind the Battletoads and Killer 
Instinct franchises, completely revamped Donkey Kong's appearance 
and backstory. (According to the now-defunct Donkey Kong Megasite, 
Rare chose to develop a Donkey Kong series because the paltry 
backstory allotted to the original D.K. gave Rare a lot of leeway with 
the games' plots.) Donkey Kong Country was one of the most 
successful games released on the Super NES. It pitted Donkey Kong 
and his monkey cousin Diddy Kong against the Kremlings, a race of 
villainous lizards intent on taking over the lush, banana-rich paradise 
called the Kong Isle. They even stole D.K.'s banana horde, the jerks. 
Donkey and Diddy set out together to crunch that evil King K. Rool 
and his band of Kremlings.

This Donkey Kong looked different, and not just because Rare created 
his model using 3-D rendering. While still the muscle-bound stud 
players new in the series' arcade days, Donkey was sleeker and 
sported a sharp-looking red necktie with his initials. The new Donkey 
Kong could run, jump, and stomp enemies just as well as his old 
nemesis Mario could. He even had his own blonde-haired, pink-suited 
girlfriend: Candy Kong, who ran the Save Barrel Booth.

The drastic change was explained by the new D.K. being the grandson 
of the old Donkey Kong. This Donkey Kong became Cranky Kong, a 
creaky old grump who whiled away his days mocking his younger 
associates from his rocking chair throne. (It should be noted, however, 
that various Donkey Kong Country games have changed the familial 
relationship between Donkey and Cranky. Some have Donkey being 
Cranky's son, while others have Donkey as the grown-up version D.K. 
Jr., which would make him Cranky's grandson. Different aficionados 
have different theories, but one thing's for sure: regardless of their 
specific relationship, the Donkey from back then and the Donkey we 
have today are not the same ape.)

The new Donkey Kong got his whole mini-universe: lots of Kongs, but 
lots of Kremlings as well. D.K. himself didn't star in another Donkey 
Kong Country game until Donkey Kong 64; sidekicks Diddy and 
Dixie Kong starred in the second and third games, respectively, while 
Donkey Kong played captive. (Donkey Kong did make a cameo, 
however, in the 3-D modeled world of Super Mario RPG: Legend of 
the Seven Stars as the generic "Chained Kong" enemy and later as the 
generic "Guerilla" enemy.)

So fine. Old Donkey Kong replaced by his kid, who now gets the 
Donkey Kong mantle. Seems simple, but that's not how the 
Marioverse treated it.


IT GETS BANANAS


As Donkey Kong's Smash Bros. bio below indicates, the remodeled 
Donkey Kong was the same as the original, meaning the rift caused by 
Donkey Kong Country seems largely forgotten - sorta. The new 
Donkey Kong became one of the core eight Mario characters that 
populated all the spin-offs: the Mario Party series, Mario Kart, Mario 
Tennis, and Mario Golf. Yet in Super Smash Bros., Donkey Kong 
fights under his own logo - the DK barrel - and not the Mushroom 
that Mario, Luigi, Bowser and Peach fight under.

This zigzag between the separate D.K. universe and the Marioverse 
continues. Donkey Kong teamed up with Diddy, Chunky Kong, Lanky 
Kong, and that shameless Dixie King knock-off Tiny Kong in Donkey 
Kong 64, yet a year later in the Nintendo 64 installment of Mario 
Tennis, Donkey Kong showed alongside D.K. Jr., who by now 
shouldn't exist. Or something. 

In the days when the Nintendo Gamecube was still being called 
Project Dolphin, Rare showed some very exciting screenshots of a 
game called Donkey Kong Racing, which involved Donkey, Diddy 
and other Kongs racing such series staples as Rambi the Rhino, 
Espresso the ostrich and Zinger the killer bee. Unfortunately, Rare and 
Nintendo called it quits. While it's likely that Donkey Kong Racing 
died altogether, the game may one day surface with characters not 
owned by Nintendo. Pity - it's always the children who lose in 
divorces.

Possibly because Rare became a free agent and no longer develops 
games with characters from the Donkey Kong Country series, 
Nintendo may be inching closer towards a joined Mario-Donkey 
Kongverse, much to the relief of overly anal fans like me. Donkey 
Kong's partner in Mario Kart: Double Dash!! was Diddy Kong and 
thankfully not D.K. Jr. Since Diddy also hit the links the same year in 
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour, maybe more of the crew from Kong 
Island will make it in future games.

Of course, in that tradition of fazing out elements of the Donkey Kong 
series, Nintendo fazed Donkey Kong out of the pool of selectable 
characters in Mario Party 5, to make room for Toad, Bowser Jr., and a 
Boo. Lameness. Hudson Soft at least gave D.K. a paltry game space. 
Landing on the D.K. space summons the big ape and triggers random 
mini-games.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR DONKEY KONG***
While he now prefers the laid-back jungle lifestyle to construction site 
mischief, DK is often forced back into action by the Kremling Krew. 
The great ape is quite fast despite his burly physique, and he keeps his 
strength up with a steady diet of his favorite food: bananas. His one 
extravagance (and only piece of clothing) is a monogrammed necktie.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR DONKEY KONG***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Diddy Kong
Personal racecar: DK Jumbo
Special weapon: Big Banana

Donkey Kong's starring roles:
Donkey Kong (Arcade) - 1981
Donkey Kong (Atari 2600) - 1981
Donkey Kong (NES) -1985
Donkey Kong 3 (Arcade) - 1986
Donkey Kong Classics (NES) - 1988
Donkey Kong Classics (NES) - 1989
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong '94 (Game Boy) - 1994
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario vs. Donkey Kong (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Donkey Konga (Gamecube) - 2004
Donkey Kong 2: Hit Song Parade (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade) - 1982
Donkey Kong Jr. Math (NES) - 1983
Donkey Kong Jr. (NES) - 1986
Donkey Kong Jr. (Intellivision) - 1988
Donkey Kong Jr. (Colecovision) - 1988
Donkey Kong Jr. (Atari 7800) - 1988
Tetris (NES) - 1989
Earthbound (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996*
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Game & Watch Gallery (Game Boy) - 1997
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Banjo-Tooie (Nintendo 64) - 2000**
Animal Crossing (Gamecube) - 2001***
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Donkey Kong Jr. (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

* as generic baddie Guerilla in the Mushroom Forest and as generic 
baddie Chained Kong in Barrel Volcano
** as a plush doll in Bottles' house
*** As Louie, an ape character that wears a Luigi-themed t-shirt, but 
looks just like Donkey Kong. Also, the rest of the ape characters also 
seem to be based on the basic D.K. design.

=======================================================================

DONKEY KONG JR.
[also known as D.K. Jr.]
Occupation: Second banana
First appearance: Donkey Kong Jr. (1982)

Like father, like son. Junior might not have equaled his dad in terms of 
size, but that didn't stop him from being the star of the first sequel to a 
Mario game. He even got his name in the title.

It's odd when you really think about it: the second Mario game 
features Mario as a villain and the son of the previous game's villain 
as the hero. But it's true: Donkey Kong Jr., the young ape who wears a 
bib with a big J, is the second playable character ever in a Mario game. 
The game premiered in arcades and had D.K. Jr. swinging vine-to-vine 
to pop D.K. Sr. out of the slammer. Mario, toting a whip instead of a 
hammer, stood guard in front of the cage.

Nintendo later released a dreadful edutainment title, Donkey Kong Jr. 
Math, based on the original game's engine. In fact, this edutainment 
version of Donkey Kong Jr. appeared in the life of the NES and three 
years before Nintendo ported the actual arcade version. In it, D.K. Jr. 
must solve math problems to advance up a vine in competition with 
the computer or player two, who controls a pink version of D.K. Jr.

As a likely result of the game's mathematical flair, the little guy 
disappeared for a while. His career revived, however, with Super 
Mario Kart. Racing alongside the likes of Mario, Bowser, Toad, and 
Yoshi, D.K. Jr. represented the early days of Mario's video game 
career. He also represented the heavy class of the Marioverse; junior 
though he may be, the ape's hefty frame placed him in the same slow-
but-powerful weight class as Bowser. Aside from his weight, D.K. Jr. 
brought something else to the racetrack: banana peels. Every character 
had a special item, and the ape's was an endless supply of those 
yellow, smiling traffic hazards that have continued to plague Mario 
Kart racetracks, even in D.K. Jr.'s absence.

The same core eight characters from Mario Kart showed up in the 
Virtual Boy installment of Mario Tennis - minus Bowser, however 
- but Donkey Kong Jr.'s days were numbered. Aside from 
appearances in the Game Boy's Game & Watch Gallery series, 
Donkey Kong Jr. basically got edged out of the video game scene by 
the Donkey Kong Country series.

Although players argue over exactly how the Kong family tree grows, 
an idea propagated in several games in that series states that the young 
ape who was Donkey Kong Jr. grew up into the remodeled tie-wearing 
Donkey Kong we now see in games like Mario Kart 64 and the Mario 
Party games. Junior's daddy grew up into Cranky Kong, the grizzled, 
bearded old ape who now rocks chairs rather than chucks barrels. 

(Conversely, the other camp of overzealous Donkey Kong fans 
believes that today's remodeled Donkey Kong is the son of D.K. Jr. 
and therefore the grandson of Cranky Kong/the original Donkey Kong. 
Sigh. Continuity blues.)

In either case, the new Donkey Kong doesn't need a junior because he 
has Diddy, a tagalong monkey who fits better into Donkey Kong 
Coutnry's rendered world.

Initially, it seemed that Diddy Kong would stay in the Donkey Kong 
Country universe, apart from Mario and his tennis-playing, party-
having, kart-driving friends. When Donkey Kong needed a partner in 
the Nintendo 64 installment of Mario Tennis, the developers elected to 
assign him to Donkey Kong Jr., rather than have Diddy intrude into the 
Mushroom Kingdom.

That idea has seemingly been abandoned. Likely prompted by Rare's 
decision to develop for non-Nintendo systems, the Donkey Kong 
Country cast has started to pop in games a lot of fans - me, for one 
- wouldn't have expected them to. Diddy Kong, not Donkey Kong 
Jr., hit the links with the Mario crew in Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour. 
And Diddy was also the senior D.K.'s racing partner in Mario Kart: 
Double Dash!!, as well as a netter in Mario Power Tennis, the follow-
up to the Nintendo 64 tennis title that featured Donkey Kong Jr.

Does this mean the end of Donkey Kong Jr.? Has the second ever 
playable character in a Mario game been bumped off by a 
monkeyfaced replacement? 

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR D.K. JR.***
Donkey Kong Jr. came to the rescue when Mario imprisoned his 
father. DK Jr.'s challenge was to collect the keys to Donkey Kong's 
cage, all the while dropping fruit on the enemies from high above. 
He was able to climb faster by using two ivy vines at once. This 
ape is also quite skilled at kart racing, tennis, and mathematics.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR D.K. JR.***

Donkey Kong Jr.'s starring roles:
Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade) - 1982
Donkey Kong Jr. Math (NES) - 1983
Donkey Kong Jr. (NES) - 1986
Donkey Kong Jr. (Intellivision) - 1988
Donkey Kong Jr. (Colecovision) - 1988
Donkey Kong Jr. (Atari 7800) - 1988 
Donkey Kong Classics (NES) - 1989
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Donkey Kong '94 (Game Boy) - 1994
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Game & Watch Gallery (Game Boy) - 1997
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Donkey Kong Jr. (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

Other appearances:
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001 
Animal Crossing (Gamecube) - 2001

=======================================================================

DON PIANTA (and other Piantas) 
[Japanese name: Don Monteone]
Occupation: Macho mafioso
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

You might call Don Pianta a goomba, if that didn't mean something 
else in the Marioverse. Yes, as if Mario wasn't enough of an Italian 
stereotype, Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door gives us Don 
Pianta, the leader of the Pianta mafia. He talks just like you'd expect a 
mafia honcho to talk, too - and with a nickname like "The Don of 
Untimely Death," you know he means business. (My, the Marioverse 
has gotten a shade darker these days, hasn't it?)

Don Pianta, a big orange Pianta with sunshades and a black suit, 
controls tickets to the Cheep Cheep Blimp, which ferries travelers 
between Rogueport and Glitzville. The don will only allow Mario a 
pass if Mario can locate his daughter, Francesca, who has run away 
with her beau, Frankie. Don Pianta promises Mario help if he can 
locate the two - and very bad luck if Mario can't. Mario reunites the 
don with his daughter.

Eventually, Mario's required him to score some tickets for the Excess 
Express, which connects Rogueport with Poshley Heights. Only Don 
Pianta can procure such tickets, but Mario first needs to fetch 
Francesca and Frankie from Keelhaul Key to alleviate the don's grief 
sickness. When his daughter and son-in-law return, Don Pianta 
immediately recovers and retires from the Pianta Syndicate, passing on 
the leadership to Francesca and Frankie.

Piantas are the indigenous people of Isle Delfino. They first appeared 
in Super Mario Sunshine, where they all wore hula skirts and enjoyed 
a laid-back, tropical lifestyle. Piantas are plump by nature and each has 
a small tree growing from the top of his or her head. Oddly, not a 
single one of the scads of Piantas in this game ever had a name. Don 
Pianta is the first Pianta with a name.

=====

FRANCESCA and FRANKIE 
[Japanese names: Moni and Piton]
Occupation: Lovebirds on the lam
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

Two of Don Pianta's favorite people - his only daughter and his 
trusted henchman. They nearly lose his favor when they try to make 
off to elope, however. Only Mario's intervention can earn them Don 
Pianta's blessing. The two lovebirds eventually end up in Keelhaul 
Key, the pirate paradise, when they shipwreck there. 

Mario must eventually travel back to Keelhaul Key and convince 
Francesca and Frankie to ditch their island digs when Don Pianta 
becomes sick with grief for his missing daughter. When he finds them, 
however, they're busy searching for Francesca's missing wedding 
ring. Once Mario finds that, the two will happily return to Rogueport. 
A recovered Don Pianta forgives his daughter and son-in-law for 
eloping, then passes leadership on to both Frankie and Francesca.

Though Mario offers to take them back to Rogueport with him, 
Francesca and Frankie refuse. They'd rather stay on the island and try 
to start their lives together. Touching, really.

=====

TONY and VINNY 
[Japanese names: Henchman and Henchman]
Occupation: Hired goons
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

Twin brothers in the service of Don Pianta. Though loyal to their boss, 
the plea for him to spare Francesca and Frankie from his anger. They 
seem genuinely happy with the little soap opera works out tidily. 

=======================================================================

DOOPLISS 
[Japanese name: Ranperu/Odoron Temple Ghost]
Occupation: Duplicitious doppelganger
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A stage curse befalls the already-gloomy citizens of Twilight Town. 
Every time the church bells ring at Creepy Steeple, the residents turn 
into pigs. (Truthfully, they turn into Li'l Oinks, the pet pigs Mario 
could hatch in the first Paper Mario. They're also the only characters 
in this game who look wholly three-dimensional.) When Mario climbs 
to the top of Creepy Steeple to stop this porcine magic, he finds the 
belfry is being occupied by a Duplighost - a minor baddie from the 
first Paper Mario that looks like a dude in a sheet and take on the 
appearance of other characters. This particular Duplighost wears a 
party hat, so you know he's special. Curiously, his name won't show 
up in Goombella's book of baddies. Even more curiously, this 
anonymous foe falls pretty easily, even when he transforms into a 
Mario look-alike. 

Once Mario wins, he leaves with his companions back to Twilight 
Town with the Ruby Star in hand. The screen, however, lingers on the 
collapsed Mario clone. Eventually, the player gets control of this 
purple shadow. But he has Mario's stats, Mario's coins, Mario's 
badges... It's Mario. The shape-changer somehow switches places 
with Mario post-fight and heads back to Twilight Town to back in 
Mario's glory. (He also has an annoying habit for using the word 
"wrongamundo.") Once Mario learns Doopliss' real name, he can 
trounce him for good. 

Once Vivian joins Mario's party, Doopliss joins the Shadow Sirens in 
her stead. Mario meets Doopliss again aboard the Excess Express, 
though Doopliss is disguised as the famous movie actor Zip Toad. 
Mario eventually deduces that Doopliss-as-Zip Toad is mystery 
terrorist who threatens to derail the train with a bomb made from a 
prototype Ultra Honey Syrup, the plans for which are being carried by 
a businessman on the train. Excess Express staff ake Doopliss into 
custody when Mario fingers him as the culprit, but he escapes. 

Mario allows Doopliss to lure him through the Thousand-Year Door 
when Doopliss poses as Professor Frankly near the end of the game. 
Later, Mario sees him having fully taken Vivian's place in the Shadow 
Sirens: as "Freak Sheet," the butt of Beldam's endless insults. 

In the game's epilogue, we learn this shapeshifter makes a living for 
himself as an actor in Flurrie's new play.

=======================================================================

DORAGO
Occupation: Big green dragon
Only appearance: Wario's Woods NES (1994)

Nothing much to say about Dorago other than that he's the third boss 
in the NES version of Wario's Woods.

=======================================================================

DORRIE 
Occupation: Lake monster
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

A blue, Nessie-like creature residing in the lake in the Hazy Maze 
Cave. She'll let Mario climb on top of her and ride he as she swims 
from one hard-to-reach ledge to another. If Mario stomps on her 
back, she'll whimper, lower her head and give Mario and 
opportunity to jump to even harder-to-reach platforms.

Dorrie re-appears in Mario Party 3 in an item-fetching mini-game 
called Dorrie Dip. Players can again stomp poor Dorrie's head to 
make her get an item. The blue sea serpent continues to elicit my 
sympathy in Mario Party Advance, where one of the game's mini-
quests involves finding her a friend with whom she can share 
lonely Loch Dorrie

In Super Mario 64 DS, Nintendo seems to have restyled Dorrie to 
look like a cross between Yoshi and the Dolphins from Super 
Mario World.

Dorrie's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

DOUR 
Occupation: Mayor of Twilight Town
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Mayor Dour oversees the goings-on in Twilight Town, a little village 
that sits in permanent dusk. He's not such a hands-on mayor, though. 
When the chiming of the bells in Creepy Steeple start turning the 
Twilighters into pigs, he can only ask Mario to intervene - then 
promptly turn into a pig himself. Later, he can't tell the difference 
between Mario and the evil imposter Doopliss disguised as Mario. Oh 
well, Dour's not such a bad guy, I guess. And he seems to have some 
head honcho camaraderie with Kroop, mayor of Petalburg, and the 
Puni Elder.

Dour is the grandather of Darkly, a Twilighter who hangs out in 
Rogueports shady backalleys.

=======================================================================

DRAGOHOHO
[Japanese name: Ohohoragon]
Occupation: Huffy hatchling
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

When Mario and Luigi scale Mt. Hoohoo, they find Blablanadon the 
pterodactyl sitting on an egg. The egg hatches and out comes 
Dragohoho, a foul-tempered dragon. Once the bros. stomp the dragon, 
they find he's actually the missing Prince Peasely, who was hexed by 
Cackletta, transformed into this monstrous shape and trapped in an 
eggshell.

=======================================================================

DRAGONZAMASU 
Occupation: Sea dragon guardian
Only appearance: Super Mario Land (1989)

The boss of Super Mario Land's second world, the watery Muda 
Kingdom. The third and final stage of this world departs from the 
usual hop-and-bop action for a shooter stage. Mario, in his Sea Pop 
submarine vehicle, has to fire missiles at Dragonzamasu in between 
the protective bubble enemies - called "Tamao" - that circle this sea 
beast. 

The battle against Dragonzamasu in level 2-3 is the first shooter battle 
in a Mario game.

=======================================================================

DRIBBLE and SPITZ [new]
Occupation: Taxi drivers
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)

Dribble, a big bulldog, and Spitz, a little cat, work for Diamond Taxi. 
One rainy day, they pick up Bill or Bob or Fifi or whatever name you 
chose to call yourself under the bright lights of downtown Diamond 
City. As they drive, they change the radio station to an ingratiating, 
poppy tune. At this point, the player starts Dribble and Spitz' sci-fi 
games, a wacky collection that seems drawn from action movies of all 
types, as players will shoot UFOs, dodge ninja darts and fight an 
Ultraman-style Bowser-versus-Mario fight.

When the player beats Dribble and Spitz's games, he or she gets to see 
them delivering their character to their destination: the beach. With a 
flash, the passenger transforms into a mermaid - or merman - and 
leaps into the ocean. Dribble and Spitz forget to collect their fare.

The mechanics show up again in WarioWare: Twisted!, again in their 
taxi cab. They're driving down Route 310, which apparently cuts right 
through Diamond City when Spitz turns on the radio as a means of 
staying awake. The action takes a drastic toll on the cab, however, 
which promptly blows a gasket. In the meantime, the player takes over 
and plays Dribble and Spitz's set, "Steer Clear," which has the player 
both tilting the Game Boy and pressing the A button. In the end, 
Dribble fixes the cab, which blasts into space. Up in the stars, an alien 
hops in. "Where to?" they ask, to which the alien promptly responds 
with "Take me to Club Sugar!"

Dribble and Spitz do not have their own game set in WarioWare: 
Touched!, however they do make cameo appearances in other 
characters story scenes. Also, it's their taxi cab - still in hover mode 
- that delivers new characters to the screen where players select 
whose games they'd like to take on.

Dribble and Spitz's appearances:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

Other appearances:
Wario World (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=======================================================================

DR. CRYGOR [new]
Occupation: Mad scientist
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)

A bald guy who looks to be part robot, Dr. Crygor would be in great 
company with Dr. Scienstein and Prof. E. Gadd. They're all mad 
scientists. This one, however, wears a yellow jumpsuit and works on 
an island laboratory off the coast of Diamond City.

Dr. Crygor gleefully dances around his lab, which sits just of the coast 
of Diamond City. He's invented some new potion which surely had an 
intended effect different from what it does when Crygor ingested it. 
Immediately, he doubles over in pain and hops to the bathroom. That's 
where Dr. Crygor's series of games begins. With every flush of the 
toilet comes a new reality-based game, whether its sawing through a 
sirloin steak with a knife or getting a white cat to sleep by closing its 
eyes at a precise moment.

Having voided his system of the noxious substance, Dr. Crygor breaths 
a sigh of relief - until the toilet starts spewing forth blue liquid. He 
tries to swim for it, but a geyser of mystery fluid shoots Dr. Crygor 
high into the sky. Luckily, Ana's messenger bird Don catches him and 
he gently descends to the gelateria, where he meets everybody else.

Dr. Crygor also competes with Orbulon in the unlockable microgame 
"Versus Hurdle."

In WarioWare: Twisted, the good doctor appears initially in the 
game's intro sequence. Wario, infuriated at losing while playing on his 
Game Boy Advance, smashes the game system by throwing it across 
the room. He then takes the broken Game Boy Advance to Dr. Crygor, 
who repairs it by tossing it into a converted washing machine that 
seems to cause all manner of scientific innovations. The system is 
repaired, but without buttons, and Dr. Crygor must explain that Wario 
must rotate the system in order to play. Mona and 9-Volt trot on over 
and immediately take to the unusual game play. Immediately, Wario 
gets dollar signs in his eyes and decided to market the game. So, 
ostensibly, Dr. Crygor is supposed to be the one responsible for the 
tilt-and-turn gameplay you're doing as you play WarioWare: Twisted!

In his own story scenes, Dr. Crygor is seen once again inventing. He 
manages to rig the same washing machine to affect gravity, hence his 
game series title, "Gravitator," which has the player tilting the Game 
Boy at all angles to win. Once the games are completed, the Gravitator 
ruptures and a powerful mechanical suit pops out. Naturally, Dr. 
Crygor jumps in and takes off into the sky. He soars until he comes 
into contact with Shuriken, Kat's bird. The super suit disassembles, 
but Shuriken swoops back and snatches up Crygor before he hits the 
ground. Safe and on the ground, Crygor meets up with his friends at 
Club Sugar. 

Crygor gets an upgrade, of sorts, in WarioWare: Touched!, which 
features him testing out a new machine that converts old, crappy things 
into shining new ones. He tosses in an apple core, for example, twists a 
crank and voila! - a brand new apple. Crygor steps into the machine 
to fetch the fruit, but the door closes on him. The player, this time, 
must twist the crank using the Nintendo DS stylus, and out steps Dr. 
Crygor 2.0 - more metal, more machine and now complete with 
jetpack. Dr. Crygor's games fall into the set "Slightly Unscrewed," as 
all of them necessitate the same circular stylus motion the player 
performed in the intro.
 
Once the player beats Crygor's games, he or she sees the doctor 
blasting into space - complete with cameos from the Space Bunnies. 
Then, curiously, he heads back to Earth, to the Hawt House to jam 
with the rest of the crew.

Dr. Crygor's starring roles:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

Other appearances:
Wario World (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

DR. MARIO
Occupation: Medical doctor
First appearance: Dr. Mario (1990)

What if, instead of a plunger, Mario's tool of the trade was a 
stethoscope? What if Mario cured people instead of pipes? Then 
you'd have Dr. Mario, a twist on the usual Mario persona that 
spends his days wiping out red, blue and yellow-colored viruses 
with the appropriately colored megavitamins. Dr. Mario may seem 
improbable at first, but when you remember that Mario has worked 
at everywhere from a cookie factory to a construction site, the job 
makes a little more sense. It's unclear whether Mario and Dr. 
Mario are even the same person, but the good doc is a staple of the 
Marioverse regardless.

Dr. Mario usually shows up in variations on his debut game, a 
Tetris-like puzzler involving germs and pills. The Nintendo 64 
version of the game, however, pitted him against Wario and Dr. 
Scienstein in an actual plot: Scienstein nabs the good doctor's 
megavitamins and the height of flu season, and Dr. Mario races 
Wario to see who can get them first.

The good doctor even got a role in Super Smash Bros. Melee as a 
slight variation on the regular Mario. Dressed in a white lab coat, 
Dr. Mario hurled bouncing megavitamins when normal Mario 
would shoot fireballs.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR DR. MARIO***
Immaculate in his medical garb, Dr. Mario destroys killer viruses 
with his amazing vitamin capsules. With his dedicated nurse, 
Princess Peach, at his side, Dr. Mario spends day and night in his 
laboratory working on new miracle cures. Somehow he's managed 
to keep up with all the new viruses that have arisen over the years.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR DR. MARIO***

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR MEGAVITAMINS***
Megavitamins come in six color combinations of red, blue, and 
yellow. Dr. Mario uses these capsules by tossing them into 
contaminated bottles to destroy viruses. The origin of these wonder 
pills is a mystery, but the most likely theory is that they're the 
result of Dr. Mario's lifelong efforts to find a cure for the common 
cold.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR MEGAVITAMINS***

Dr. Mario's starring roles:
Dr. Mario (Game Boy) - 1990
Dr. Mario (NES) - 1990
Versus Dr. Mario (Arcade) - 1990
Dr. Mario (Bandai Satellaview) - 1998
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
Dr. Mario (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

DR. PAYNE [new]
Occupation: Saddistic dentist
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted! (2005)

Diamond City's resident practicioner of pokey, injurious dental 
surgery. After gorging on sweets, Wario must visit Dr. Payne. The 
player even gets to simulate actually painful dentistry in the prologue 
by using the stylus to poke away Wario's various cavities.

For whatever reason, Dr. Payne looks almost exactly like The Guru of 
the Sewer.

=======================================================================

DR. TOPPER 
[Japanese name: Karudi]
Occupation: Quizmaster
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

A lone Hammer Brother who resides in Bowser's Keep during 
Smithy's occupation. He asks Mario to call him "Dr. T." and forces 
him to participate in puzzles and trivia games. 

One of Dr. Topper's challenges involves a word problem of sorts in 
which Mario must sort out the rankings of a race held between four 
characters: Goo (a Goomba), Boo (a Boo), Bones (a Dry Bones) and 
Kipp (a member of the fish enemy race called "Mr. Kipper").

=======================================================================

DR. WARIO
Occupation: Thinly veiled parody
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003) 

A parody of Dr. Mario. A fully playable version of the NES Dr. Mario 
is unlockable in WarioWare, but it's fat old Wario who plays doctor.

Dr. Wario's appearances:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

DUPREE 
Occupation: Wandering hipster
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

An afro-sporting hipster who seems to have raided the wardrobe of 
Jimmy T. from WarioWare. Mario meets him on the streets of 
Petalburg, where Dupree hits on Goombella, calling her a "leetle 
cabbage." Goombella rebuffs his advances. This pseudo-francophone 
shows up again in every city Mario stops at during his adventure. 
Dupree looks like a blue-colored Doogan, the race that Rowf and Ruff 
and other rhino-horned dog-looking dino-types belong too.

=======================================================================

DUMB DRUM 
Occupation: Industrial waste disposal unit
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

Certainly not a character in the traditional sense, this inanimate keg is 
nonetheless the boss of the game's fifth, Kremcroc Industries, Inc. 
Donkey and Diddy have to kill the monsters Dumb Drum spews out in 
order to kill it.

Dumb Drum's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

DYNA (and her family)
Occupation: Babysitting big sister
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

Dyna, a cute mole girl with a big polka dot bow, takes her baby 
brother Mite into the Moleville Mines just before the third Star Piece 
crashes into Mole Mountain. Dyna's parents are worried sick about her 
and Mite. Once Mario and company beats Punchinello, they find little 
Dyna trying to dislodge a mine cart to escape on. Mario helps. He, 
Dyna and Mite ride the cart throughout the mines, off the mountain 
and directly through the roof of Dyna's house.

Though Dyna's family and all the residents of Moleville are moles, 
they don't look much like Monty Mole, the staple mole character of 
the Marioverse.

=====

MITE

This infant mole doesn't speak much. He seems young enough that 
any big sister would have realized taking him into a dangerous 
abandoned mine would have been a bad idea. Maybe Dyna's just not 
such a great babysitter.

=====

MA'MOLE

Dyna's mom. Like all the moles in Moleville, she speaks in a quaint 
backwoods dialect. She "reckons that Dyna's taken a likin' to Mario." 
Apparently she always warns her daughter that venturing through the 
mines by herself is not a good idea.

=====

PA'MOLE

Friendly Pa'Mole is so happy to have his children back that he doesn't 
mind the giant hole Mario's mine cart crash landing left in the roof.

=======================================================================

ECLAIR 
Occupation: Princess of Waffle Kingdom
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Yes, Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door denies Luigi another 
opportunity for heroism. And yes, Luigi's appearance amounts to an 
extended cameo. However, Luigi does get to see some action, in a 
way. While Mario is following Peach's map in search of the Crystal 
Stars, Luigi gets a letter bidding him to rescue Waffle Kingdom's 
Princess Eclair from the evil Chestnut King. 

In true RPG fashion, Luigi sets out on his own adventure, collecting 
the pieces of the Marvelous Compass, which Eclair broke into pieces 
and scattered about the world before she was kidnapped. Only by 
finding the broken pieces will Luigi learn where the Chestnut King is 
keeping Éclair: Hatesong Tower, where the allegedly fiendish 
Chestnut King awaits.

It would seem, alas, that Luigi's adventure only reunites Eclair with 
her boyfriend, the Chestnut King, whom the treacherous Minister 
Crepe transformed into a monster. Don't feel too bad for Luigi. He sill 
has Daisy, right?

=======================================================================

E. GADD [new]
[also known as Elvin Gadd; Japanese name: Professor Oyama]
Occupation: Mad scientist
First appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

The laboratory of Elvin Gadd, better known as E. Gadd, lies just down 
the hill from Luigi's Mansion. He's worked there for twenty years, 
studying ghosts and ghost-hunting technology. The stooped, buck-
toothed old inventor proved to be Luigi's most powerful ally in this 
Gamecube launch title. He would pop up via his Game Boy Horror 
communication device to give Luigi pointers whenever he could. 
(He'd also give Luigi less helpful information, such as his favorite 
homemade dish - pickled dandelions with barnacles in a diesel 
marinade, in case you were wondering.) As Luigi dispatched the 
various humanoid ghosts inhabiting the haunted mansion, Gadd would 
convert them back into the portraits that once hung in his gallery.

Curiously, not all E. Gadd's have been used for good, as the Poltergust 
vacuum cleaner was in Luigi's Mansion. In Super Mario Sunshine, 
Bowser Jr. claims an old man with glasses created the paintbrush he 
uses to splatter Isle Delfino with evil graffiti. Fortunately, Gadd is also 
F.L.U.D.D.'s daddy, so his creations both cause and solve Isle 
Delfino's hardships.

While Gadd didn't join the ranks of Mario regulars who populate the 
Mario Party and Mario Kart games - his non-playable cameos so far 
include his own board, E. Gadd's Garage, in Mario Party 6 - this guy 
snagged a cameo in Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga, as the proprietor 
of the Starbeans Coffee Company. His likeness even popped up in 
Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, as one of Tetra's pirates.

A bit of trivia: There's a rumor that Gadd's wizened appearance is a 
caricature of a certain older Nintendo executive.

Gadd's inventions:

-	POLTERGUST 3000 (Luigi's Mansion) 
Sucks stuff up: dust, money, and mansion-haunting ghosts; can 
also blow out ice, water and fire.

-	GAME BOY HORROR (Luigi's Mansion) 
Provides a map of the mansion; also allows E. Gadd to 
communicate with Luigi.

-	THE PORTRIFICATIONIZER (Luigi's Mansion) 
Transforms ghosts into paintings of said ghosts; also 
transforms a painting of Mario back into the real deal.

-	THE GADDLIGHT (Mario Party 4) 
      Scares away meddlesome Boos.

-	F.L.U.D.D. (Flash Liquidizer Ultra Dousing Device) (Super 
Mario Sunshine) 
Cleans graffiti with a concentrated stream of water; also blasts 
off like a rocket or propels its user across the water with a jet 
stream.

-	THE GADDBRUSH (Super Mario Sunshine) 
Paints horrible graffiti that brings to life evil gloopy paint 
monsters. Why the hell would Gadd make such a thing?

-	BEANBEAN MACHINE (Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga) 
Allows customers to mix different types of coffee beans to 
make caffeinated drinks with various effects. The lynchpin 
invention of the Starbeans Coffee Franchise.

-	GAMEBOY HORROR SP (Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga) 
When Mario or Luigi equip this accessory, enemies drop rare 
items more often.

-	GADDGETS (Mario Party Advance) 
      Items with varying effects.

-	CAPSULE CHANGER (Mario Party 6) 
   Switches items with those of other characters.

-	FINANCIAL VENTILATOR (Mario Party 6) 
Creates a gust of wind that focuses on a certain character and 
blows their spare change out of their pockets.

-	TELEPOTER (Mario Party 6) 
   Allows to characters to switch places on the game board.

A friendly Austrian reader named Klaus Kloss tells me that in his 
country, E. Gadd is named I. Gidd - a pun on his language's word for 
"ugly."

E. Gadd's appearances:
Luigi's Mansion (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (Gamecube) - 2002* 
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

* as Mako, a member of Tetra's crew

=======================================================================

ELLA 
Occupation: Golfer
Only appearance: Mario Golf: Advance Tour (2004)

One of the generic human characters whose stats you pick at the 
beginning of the game, this cute strawberry blonde is Kid's apprentice. 

=======================================================================

ELLIE 
Occupation: Friendly firehose
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996)

A young elephant who will happily let Dixie or Kiddy ride on her 
back. She handles a bit like Rambi, but instead of goring enemies with 
a horn, Ellie's specialty is sucking up water in her trunk and blasting it 
at enemies. She's a great help, of course, but she's terrified of mice 
and will freak out if she happens upon any during her adventures.

A slightly more grown-up looking Ellie also pops up in the 
background of Donkey Konga.

Ellie's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997

Other appearances:
Donkey Konga (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

ENGUARDE 
[alternate Japanese spelling: Engaado]
Occupation: Ichthyoid instrument of pain
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

A cheerful looking blue swordfish who has the honor of being the only 
animal buddy to be playable in every installment of the Donkey Kong 
Country series. Enguarde's role is essentially identical in each. 
Various Kongs can ride him in underwater levels for better 
maneuverability and a chance to poke away at baddies. In later 
Donkey Kong Country games, certain stages allow the player to play 
as Enguarde - that is, sans Kong.

Enguarde's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

EVE 
[also known as Purehearted Eve; Japanese name: Diana]
Occupation: Hausfrau
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A resident of Twilight Town. She's the one who gets transformed into 
a pig in front of her three children. Later, in non-pig form, Eve will ask 
Mario to find her lost love, Podley, with whom she once dreamed of 
becoming a star of the theater. (Her stage name, she tells Mario, was 
"Purehearted Eve.") Eve and Podley parted ways, but just hearing that 
Mario spoke to Podley breathes life back into her heart.

=======================================================================

EXPRESSO 
[Japanese name: Ekusupresso]
Occupation: High-octane ostrich
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

A sneaker-wearing ostrich that can take Donkey or Diddy on a 
rocketing ride through a level - provided he doesn't get hit any 
enemy. Expresso can also flip his wings and slowly glide to the 
ground, allowing him to cross wide gaps that other characters couldn't. 

After his appearance in the Game Boy installment of his Super NES 
adventure, Expresso dropped off the radar. I could have sworn I 
remember seeing Expresso as one of the animal "vehicles" in the 
promos for Donkey Kong Racing, the now-cancelled Gamecube title. 
Fortunately, Nintendo decided to pop Expresso back into the Game 
Boy Advance rejiggering of Donkey Kong Country 2. Diddy and 
Dixie can collect golden feathers to bolster the stats of the plucky 
ostrich in special Expresso mini-races players can engage in by 
visiting Cranky's cabin.

Take away those fancy sneakers and slap a Shy Guy on his back, and 
Expresso will transform into Ostro, a generic baddie from Super Mario 
Bros. 2.

Expresso's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

EXOR [new]
[Japanese name: Karibaa]
Occupation: Giant talking sword
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

We meet Exor, the giant sword as big as a building, when it crashes 
through the roof of Bowser's Keep during a duel between Mario and 
Bowser, both of whom go flying to other regions of the world. When 
Mario attempts to return to the Keep, he finds Exor firmly stuck 
through its center. Neosquid, the quizzically named talking hilt on the 
sword, explains that the keep now belongs to Smithy, then shakes so 
hard he destroys the only bridge connecting it with the rest of the 
world. Exor thrust into Bowser's Keep becomes the game's iconic 
image.

Much later in the game, after Mario beats Boomer, his party must fight 
Exor on the roof of Bowser's Keep. Once defeated, Exor opens his 
mouth and sucks the party into the dimension inside - a sprawling 
factory where Smithy creates the weapons with which he hopes to take 
over the world.

As fellow Mario researcher TheKoopaBros. notes, Exor's Japanese 
name, "Karibaa" is derived from the last half of "Ikusukariba," the 
Japanese translation of the name for the legendary Excalibur. I would 
guess that "Exor" comes from the first part of the same word, 
translated back into English.

=======================================================================


FAT MOUTH 
Occupation: Fishy boss
Only appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

The ninth boss in Wario Land 3, whom Wario fights in the stage called 
"Bank of the Wild River." Fat Mouth apparently looks like a cross 
between a fish and a mouse. Wario must beat him by tricking him into 
eating green cheese. Very odd, even for a Wario game.

I haven't played this game and don't know much about Fat Mouth 
other than what Shdwrlm3 posted in his Wario Land 3 guide at 
GameFAQs. Anybody with further information will be greatly 
appreciated.

=======================================================================

FAVA
Occupation: Egg enthusiast, architect
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

Fava hangs out at the brand new Yoshi Theater, in the northern part of 
Beanbean Kingdom. This bean designed the theater himself, but his 
true passion is for neon eggs, and he's willing to tell Mario and Luigi 
where to find the buried Bean Fruit that will prompt the Yoshies to lay 
some. He'll mark the brothers' map so they can collect the fruit.

=======================================================================

FAWFUL
[Japanese name: Gerakobittsu]
Occupation: Henchbean
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

"I have fury!"

With a rather loose grip on the English language and a propensity for 
talking about mustard, Fawful is one of the odder villains in the 
Marioverse. He's Cackletta's bean toadie and follows her around 
throughout Beanbean Kingdom. He's a mean green bean, too, just like 
Cackletta, with a wide grin and rocket-powered headgear.

Fawful assists Cackletta throughout the game, until his defeat by the 
Mario Bros. in Bowser's Castle. Even in the game's final battle, 
however, against the ghost of Cackletta in the pit of Bowletta's 
stomach, Cackletta summons an apparition of Fawful to attack Mario 
and Luigi.

=======================================================================

FISHMAEL
Occupation: Dock-sitter
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A fisherman who hangs out at the docks in Toad Town. At one point, 
his bait, a Fuzzipede, gets caught in the stomach of a whale. Mario and 
Watt have to fight the Fuzzipede. The grateful whale will then 
transport Mario to Lavalava Island, where the fifth Star Spirit awaits.

=======================================================================

FLAPPER 
Occupation: Crappier, flappier parrot
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

An alternate version of Squawks. And by "alternate," I mean "worse." 
Picture Squawks, only blue and unable to really fly. Flapper can carry 
Diddy or Dixie or whomever, but he can't actually move up. Instead, 
Flapper can only move forward. Flap though he might, he will slowly 
drift towards the ground. Often, Flappers show up in flocks. 

A improved version of Flapper shows up in the sequel, Donkey Kong 
Coutnry 3. Now purple instead of blue, this bird can pick up things 
with his (her?) talons and carry them around.

Flapper's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

FLAVIO 
[Japanese name: Marco]
Occupation: Trader and nutcase
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

He dresses like a sea captain and claims to own many ships - so why 
does this grinning screwball spend all his time singing to himself in 
Podley's soda bar? Because he's too hung up in his own grandeur to 
do anything else. Fortunately, Flavio starts getting a hankering for 
adventure around the same time Mario needs to sail to Keelhaul Key to 
find the Sapphire Star in a legendary pirate treasure horde. Flavio's 
goals: money, romance, adventure and thrills.

En route to Keelhaul Key, however, a small army of pirate ghosts sink 
the S.S. Flavion and strand Mario, Flavio and the entire crew. Flavio 
immediately begins shouting orders in an especially haughty manner. 
He is, after all, the editor of Foppish Gourmet Weekly magazine. 
Flavio briefly joins Mario, but he refuses to fight. 

After Mario infiltrates Pirate's Grotto and retrieves the Sapphire Star, 
however, Flavio has a change of heart. The X-Nauts attack and Flavio 
decides that the crew's only means of escape is to use ghost ship of the 
legendary pirate king, Cortez. Flavio bravely approaches Cortez and 
offers the Skull Gem - his priceless family heirloom - as payment 
for use of Cortez's ship. Cortez agrees and the group successfully 
fends off the X-Nauts and sails back to Rogueport. In the end, Flavio 
admits that he enjoyed the trip to Keelhaul Key. Even if he didn't 
collect any riches, he at least got the money, romance, adventure and 
thrills he'd been hoping for.

Flavio bears a slight resemblance to Prince Pine, the foppish he-
damsel from Yoshi's Safari. Compare for yourself:

Prince Pine: www.vgmuseum.com/end/snes/a/yoshisafari.htm

Flavio: www.smrpglegacy.com/PM%20TTYD%20Artwork/flavio.jpg

=======================================================================

FLUDD 
[Japanese name: PUMP]
Occupation: Talking power-up, graffiti cleaner
First appearance: Super Mario Sunshine (2002)

The second E. Gadd invention to aid one of the Mario Bros. in their 
quest to conquer evil, FLUDD is a high-pressure water pump that 
Mario can use to hover, blast-off rocket-style or skip across the water's 
surface like a human jet ski. FLUDD is also an acronym for "Flash 
Liquidizer Ultra Dousing Device" and, I might add, a much better 
name that its Japanese counterpart, PUMP. (I have no idea what 
PUMP stands for, if anything.)

While not a character per se, FLUDD speaks to Mario throughout his 
quest in Isle Delfino. Sometimes, at critical junctures, FLUDD will 
give advice, much in the manner Navi does to Link in Legend of 
Zelda: Ocarina of Time. FLUDD is less annoying, however.

Personally, the only reason I'm even including FLUDD in this list is 
for one specific moment, during Super Mario Sunshine's ending 
sequence, that totally humanizes the thing. After destroying Bowser's 
bathtub in the sky, Mario, Peach, Bowser, Bowser Jr. and FLUDD 
each go plummeting back to the earth. There, Mario pulls a sputtering 
FLUDD out of the sand. After viewing Mario through its sputtering, 
fading camera display, FLUDD asks, "Mario... was I... of... 
assistance?" Touching stuff for a Mario game. Of course, a moment 
later FLUDD is seemingly healed. "Now the vacation begins," 
FLUDD announces. Everybody rejoices.

Incidentally, FLUDD may have unintentionally proved that Bowser Jr. 
exists in the same continuity as the other seven Koopalings. When 
Mario first encounters FLUDD, it scans over Mario and flashes 
through some clips of his earlier exploits, including a fight with Larry 
Koopa from Super Mario World. One could argue that this is proof of 
all the Bowser offspring existing in the same universe, since Bowser 
Jr. plays such a central role in Super Mairo Sunshine. 

FLUDD appears as again as a minor character in Mario Power Tennis. 
Multiple FLUDD units are stationed around the Delfino Isle Plaza 
Court, as are paint-vomiting Piranha Plants. As the baneful buds puke 
goo over the court, players must step on switches to activate the 
FLUDD units into clearing the court.

FLUDD's appearances:
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

FLURRIE 
[also known as Madam Flurrie; Japanese name: Clouda/Karauda]
Occupation: Retired actress
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Ever the drama queen, Flurrie refuses to emerge from her bedroom 
without her treasured necklace. She simply can't have her adoring 
public see her sans-accessories. Mario must then return to the Shadow 
Sirens, whom he overheard arguing about a necklace, and retrieve it 
for Madam Flurrie. Necklace in place, the former stage actress 
emerges. Little Punio explains how he needs her help to reveal the 
secret entrance to the Great Tree and Flurrie joins out of her deep love 
for the Puni clan, her only friends since she retired from acting and 
became a recluse long ago.

Once Mario defeats the Shadow Queen, Flurrie returns to acting. Her 
new play - "Paper Mario," starring herself and Doopliss - becomes 
a hit.

Flurrie is a wind spirit and whose powers combine with her feminine 
wiles to make her a formidable ally for Mario in battle. Out of battle, 
Flurrie can blow a gust of air that can reveal hidden passages - such 
as the secret entrance to the Great Tree - or stun enemies.

There's no award for bustiness in a Mario character - thank god - 
but if there were, it might go to Flurrie. (Actually, it might go to 
Queen Been, but Flurrie would give her a run for her money.) She's a 
big lady, who's essentially walking around naked.  But she's made out 
of air or clouds or something, so I guess that makes it okay. 
(According to the mouse at Podley's bar, Flurrie didn't used to be so 
zaftig. I guess she did quite a bit of snacking while in seclusion.)

This character is a bit of an oddity. As Masamune points out at the 
Hitchhiker's Guide to Video Games, Flurrie is the only buddy in either 
Paper Mario game who doesn't belong to any specific race. Others you 
can pick out readily - Goombario is a Goomba, Koops is a Koopa 
Troopa, whatever - but Flurrie doesn't seem to belong to the same 
race as either Mallow, that other weather controlling cloud-buddy from 
a Mario RPG, or Huff N. Puff, the blustery boss from Flower Fields in 
the first Paper Mario. She's a wind spirit or something. Let's leave it at 
that.

Flurrie is also interesting in her resemblence to Ludwig von Koopa, 
the oldest Koopaling. Looking at the preliminary screenshots for Paper 
Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, some other gamers and I thought the 
character might have been the long-missing wife of Bowser - or 
because of her airy build and lack of feet, perhaps the ghost of this 
character or something. No dice, it seems. Flurrie does have Ludwig's 
exact hairstyle and color, though. I also thought her lips looked a lot 
like Wendy O. Koopa's. 

Finally, Flurrie is not the first Mario character with that name. Flurries 
were generic baddies in Super Mario Bros. 2 - little puffs of snow 
who slid around haphazardly in the ice world. They never appeared 
again. 

In meteorological terms, a flurry is a brief bout of light rain or snow.

=======================================================================

FLY GUY 
Occupation: Airborne shyness
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

A variant on the regular Shy Guy model, the Fly Guy has a little 
propeller on his noggin that allows him to fly. Fly Guys appear less 
requently than regular Shy Guys, except in Super Mario 64, where 
they're the only Shy Guy in the entire game. 

A propeller-topped little Fly Guy is an unlockable character in 
Mario Power Tennis.

Fly Guy's starring roles:
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=======================================================================

FRET
Occupation: King of Jewelry Land
Only appearance: Yoshi's Safari (1993)

When Bowser and his children steal Jewelry Kingdom's twelve 
protective magical gems, natural disasters imperil the area's once-
happy citizens and the land divides into dark and light halves. Princess 
Peach asks Mario and Yoshi to retrieve the gems as a favor to her 
friend, King Fret, and his son, Prince Pine. Once Mario and Yoshi 
defeat the Koopalings in the Light World, King Fret helps Mario enter 
the Dark World, where Bowser is holding Prince Pine captive.

King Fret is an appropriately regal looking king, with a robe, a white 
beard and a mighty crown.

=======================================================================

FROGFUCIUS [new]
[Japanese name: Frog Mountain Wizard]
Occupation: Sagacious amphibian
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

Frogfucius is Mallow's adoptive grandfather. He lives as Tadpole 
Pond, where he instructs young tadpoles in the ways of philosophy. He 
also likes to appear to levitate, though it's fairly obvious that a Lakitu 
with a fishing rod is creating the effect. When Mallow returns from his 
errand to the Mushroom Kingdom with a piece of Cricket Pie, 
Frogfucius explains that Mallow is not actually a tadpole and should 
partake in Mario's quest in order to find his true homeland.

Frogfucius also has pupil who begins the game as a tadpole and 
matures into a full-fledged frog by the end of the game. Mario meets 
him is Seaside Town, where the pupil has gone to ponder the meaning 
of life. He's the only person who's not kidnapped and locked up when 
Yaridovich's gang invades.

I feel silly even mentioning this, but I suppose some younger Mario 
fans may not realize that Frogfucius' name is a play on that of the 
famous Chinese philosopher, Confucius. 

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=46&pos=38

=======================================================================

FRYGUY
[Japanese name: Hiibooboo/Hibobo]
Occupation: Hothead
First appearance: Doki Doki Panic (1987)

Oddly, the fiery Fryguy is the boss of the icy fourth world of Super 
Mario Bros. 2. Even more oddly, he can only be extinguished by 
dropping wooden blocks on him.

Fryguy's appearances:
Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1987
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=======================================================================

FUNKY KONG 
[Japanese name: Fankii Kongu]
Occupation: Ambassador to barrel travel
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

He's the main monkey.

Well, he's not, really. That's Donkey Kong. But Funky's still pretty 
damn cool. Funky Kong operates Funky's Flights, a service that allows 
Donkey and Diddy to travel back to previously conquered words via 
the Funky Barrel - a regular barrel decked out with wings and a 
propeller. Doing so allows them to rack up extra lives in the easy 
stages before tackling some of the more taxing ones.

In Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble, Funky 
provides a slightly modified version of his usual service. If Dixie 
delivers the proper items, Funky can forge new vehicles, like a 
hovercraft. Dixie can use these to travel to new areas.

Funky apparently opens up Funky's Armory for Donkey Kong 
Country 64. This new shop will sell the various shooting devices 
characters might use in this game: the Coconut Cannon for Donkey, 
the Peanut Popgun for Diddy, the Pineapple Launcher for Chunky 
Kong, the Feather Bow for Tiny Kong and the Grape Pipe for Lanky 
Kong.

Players can finally play as Funky in the Game Boy Advance title, DK: 
King of Swing. He's not the titular swinger, sadly, but an optional 
character in the game's Jungle Jam mode, in which Donkey, Diddy, 
Dixie, Funky and others can compete in mini-games. If I remember 
correctly, Funky was going to be one of the selectable Kongs in this 
game, which, alas, never saw the light of day.

Remember: whatever game he's in, Funky always has the best theme 
song.

Funky's starring role:
DK: King of Swing (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

Other appearances:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Donkey Konga (Gamecube) - 2004
Donkey Kong 2: Hit Song Parade (Gamecube) - 2004
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

GALROG
Occupation: Cyclops
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A gray brute with a single eye in the center of his head. He's the 
second boss. His name sounds like a cross between "gray" and 
"Balrog," the beastly monster from the Lord of the Rings books - 
and, also, the boxer from Street Fighter II.

=======================================================================

GAME GUY 
Occupation: Master of the odds
Only appearance: Mario Party 3 (2001)

A Shy Guy with a bowtie. Players landing on his space during the 
game get the luxury of playing games of luck in which they must 
wager all their coins.

=======================================================================

GARBAGE BOY [new]
Occupation: Music-lover and garbage-lover
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2005)

Almost a non-character, really, Garbage Boy lives in a trash can in the 
back of the stage at the Hawt House, the venue where Mona's band 
place. During performances, he periodically peeks his head out from 
beneath the lid and grins.

=======================================================================

GARGANTUA BLARGG
[Japanese name: Unbaba]
Occupation: Fire beast
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

A giant fire beast that rises from the lava and will block Yoshi's 
pathway unless Yoshi can fire an egg at him. (Smaller forms, called 
just Blarggs, also pop around in lava pools. Also, a blue version of the 
Gargantua Blargg - Nep-Enut - also shows up in the game's early 
stages.) A Gargantua Blargg appears in Tetris Attack as a playable 
character. The blobby guy replaces Flare, the fire fairy from the 
game's original Japanese version, Panel du Pon.

Though he has the same name as the Blargg enemy in Super Mario 
World, none of Yoshi's Island Blarggs look much like that monster. 
The Super Mario World Blargg looks more like a dinosaur - like the 
Czar Dragon boss in Super Mario RPG.

Gargantua Blargg's appearances:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
Picross NP Vol. 2 (Super Famicom) - 1999
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

GARRO
[Japanese name: Garo]
Occupation: Sculptor
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

One of the cloud-shaped residents of Nimbus Land, Garro creates 
statues in his studio in Nimbus Land. When Mario and Mallow first 
arrive at the studio, they notice what appears to be a statue of Mallow. 
Garro explains that the statue is actually of Nimbus Land's present 
king when he was a boy. Mario and Mallow conclude that Mallow is 
actually the rightful heir to the Nimbus Land throne.

In order to sneak into the Nimbus Land castle, Garro disguises Mario 
and his latest work of art by spraying him gold. Garro tells Valentina's 
guards, who normally only allow statues of Valentina though the gates, 
that the statue is of Valentina's nephew, Mariotta. When Valentina 
balks at the decidedly un-elegant Mario statue, Garro bluffs that it's an 
sculptural ode to the plight of the working class - "The Plumber's 
Lament." Mario gets in, and once he skillfully dodges a pecking by 
Valentina's henchman Dodo, he set his sights on Valentina.

=======================================================================

GENERAL GUY
[Japanese name: General Heihoo]
Occupation: Shy Guy Commander
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A militant Shy Guy in a military uniform. He's the boss of Shy Guy's 
Toy Box.

=======================================================================

GENERAL WHITE 
Occupation: Cannon operator
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004) 

A white Bob-Omb with a moustache who mopes around Petalburg 
until Mario renews his interest in life by asking him to operate the 
giant cannon at Fahr Outpost. General White hops into action and soon 
the cannon is blasting Mario and pals to the moon.

=======================================================================

GENO
Occupation: Living doll
First appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

When Smithy's sword-shaped ship, Exor, fell from the sky and 
skewered Bowser's Keep, it also punctured the Star Road, a celestial 
passage vital to the granting of wishes. Seven star pieces scattered 
throughout the world. Mario, accompanied by his new friend Mallow, 
had just begun their around-the-world trek to collect the missing star 
pieces when they stopped in Rose Town. Since Smithy stormed into 
Mario's world, the people residing in Rose Town couldn't leave their 
houses safely because a mysterious sniper has been assailing them 
with a rain of paralyzing arrows. 

The owner of the inn there has a small child named Gaz - a devout 
fan of his Geno doll - who insists Mario play dolls with him. Gaz, 
picking his favorite doll Geno, gets a little too excited a knocks Mario 
out cold with Geno's Super Star Shot. That night, while Mario 
recuperates, a single star floated down from the sky and -taking a 
page from the story of Pinocchio - settles into the Geno doll. 
(Apparently, he deems Gaz's Mario, Bowser, and Peach dolls 
unworthy of inhabiting.)

The next morning, Gaz tells his mother and Mario that Geno walked 
into the Forest Maze all by himself. He's not fibbing. Mario and 
Mallow tail him throughout the woods, joining him just as they find 
the one firing the poison arrows - Bowyer, one of Smithy's minions. 
When Bowyer falls, Geno joins Mario and Mallow, asking them to 
simply call him Geno, as his actual name would be impossible for 
earth tongues to pronounce. (Specifically, the game's text represents 
Geno's name as the following characters: heart-musical note-
exclamation point-question mark.) He fights enemies with the flashy 
dazzle of star power, proving to be one o f Mario's strongest allies.

Once Mario's party defeated Smithy, the star traveler left Geno's 
body, reducing the doll to a lifeless toy once again. 

Although Square, the developers of Super Mario RPG, own the rights 
to Geno and all the other characters unique to the game, the living doll 
showed up in again in the Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga, as the host 
of Star 'Stache Smash, a video game-within-the-video game in the 
Little Fungitown arcade. The game's ending credits, however, clearly 
list Geno as property of Square now Square-Enix.

Geno's starring roles:
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996

Other appearances:
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

GIANT SNAKE
Occupation: A snake... that's giant
Only appearance: Wario Land II (1998)

A large boss that lives in the caverns beneath Wario's castle. He's the 
first boss. I'm not sure if "Giant Snake" is his official name, the most 
obvious description of him or how his name is translated from 
Japanese. 

If you know, shoot me an email.

=======================================================================

GIGA BOWSER 
Occupation: Amalgamated menace
Only appearance: Super Smash Bros. Melee (2001)

What if Bowser could power-up, too? Giga Bowser is a towering freak 
with a mean streak. You can fight him at the end of adventure mode if 
you don't use any contiues and get there in eighteen minutes or less.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR GIGA BOWSER***
An even more imposing figure than the original King of the 
Koopas, Giga Bowser is roughly twice the size of his scaly, fire-
breathing, spike-studded Super Smash Bros. Melee 
counterpart.  Predictably, this monstrous creature's offensive and 
defensive powers are a grade higher than those of regular 
Bowser.  Good luck defeating this colossus! 
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR GIGA BOWSER***

=======================================================================

GLIMMER 
Occupation: A light in the dark
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

An angler fish who shows up in a few underwater levels in Donkey 
Kong Country 2. Much like Squawks in the first game, Glimmer 
hovers behind your characters, lighting the way in dark areas.

Glimmer's appearances:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996 
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

GLOOMTAIL 
Occupation: Bigger, badder dragon
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Hooktail's older brother, whom Mario fights near the end of the game 
in the Palace of Shadow.Gloomtail, who looks like a black version of 
Hooktail, has apparently been napping there since the last time the 
fortress was opened a thousand years ago. He's incensed that Mario 
beat his little sister and puts up quite a fight with his poison breath 
attacks. 

=======================================================================

GOLDBOB (and his family) 
[Japanese name: Goldman]
Occupation: Aristocratic artillery
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

He's so wealthy he wears a monocle. The president of 
Goldbobbington's, a succusseful but otherwise mysterious company, 
Goldbob first pops up in Glitzville, where he, his wife and son have 
arrived to watch some world-class fighting. He becomes a big fan 
there and will forever after refer to Mario as the "Great Gonzales."

Mario meets Goldbob again aboard the Excess Express. It's his son's 
birthday and Goldbob and his wife can't decide what to get him as a 
present.

=====

SYLVIA 
[Alternate Japanese spelling: Silvia]
Occupation: Rich man's wife
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A white Bob-Omb with a stylish pink hat. She's as elegant as artillery 
can be, but she'll put up her dukes to fight for what's best for her son, 
Bub. She argues that the best birthday present for her son is a primer 
for proper Bob-Omb etiquette. She's wrong, of course. 

In the end, Sylvia needs to be rescued along with the rest of the 
passengers from the Excess Express when they are abducted by 
Smorg, the dust bunny monster. Once rescued, Sylvia and family 
return to their home in Poshley Heights.

=====

BUB 
[Japanese name: Konarikin]
Occupation: Spoiled son
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The spoiled son of Goldbob and Sylvia. One day, he'll take over 
Goldbobbington's, but until then Goldbob and Sylvia will fight over 
what they think is best for him. Both miss the point. Little Bub loves 
trains, but his parents don't know. For example, neither one can guess 
that he wanted the autograph of a train conductor most.

=======================================================================

GOLDEN DIVA
Occupation: Vanity spirit
Only appearance: Wario Land Advance (2001)

Jeez. I don't know what to call the Golden Diva. The best way to 
describe her, I guess, is if an evil female genie wearing a sort of 
Kabuki mask and holding a lady's fan. Oh, and she's totally evil.

Once Wario defeats the bosses of the Ruby, Emerald, Sapphire and 
Topaz passages of the Golden Pyramid, he can access the Golden 
Passage. The diva assumes the several different forms throughout the 
fight, many of them mimicking the attacks of the other pyramid 
bosses. When Wario wins, however, he reclaims all of the treasure that 
the greedy Golden Diva plundered from Princess Shokora.

The Golden Diva has the dubious honor of being one of the four 
female bosses of a Mario - or Mario-related - game: her, Syrup (in 
Wario Land and Wario Land II), Cackletta (in Mario and Luigi: 
Superstar Saga) and the Shadow Queen (in Paper Mario: the 
Thousand-Year Door).

=======================================================================

GOOMBA KING 
[Japanese name: Kuri King; also known as Goomboss]
Occupation: Regal Shroom
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A jumbo Goomba with a crown, The Goomba King blocks the bridge 
leading from Goomba Village to Toad Town. He's flanked by his two 
underlings, the Red Goomba and the Blue Goomba. He's one of the 
game's first boss battles.

The Goomba King makes an unexpected second appearance in Super 
Mario 64 DS as the boss of new area hidden behind a painting of 
Mario. Referred to for some reason as "Goomboss," beating this 
character unlocks Mario as a playable character. This Goomboss is 
considerably bigger than the Goomba King, but looks identical 
otherwise.

Goomba King's appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=======================================================================

GOOMBARIO (and his family)
[Japanese name: Kurio]
Occupation: Mario's no. one fan
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Early in his quest to retrieve the Star Rod from Bowser's dirty mitts, 
Mario crash lands in the house of a family of Goombas. One of 
Mario's oldest foes, Goombas are described in the instruction manual 
of the original Super Mario Bros. as "mushrooms that defected from 
the Mushroom Kingdom." Not all Goombas are so bad, however. 

As his name might suggest, Goombario is Mario's biggest fan. He 
even has a blue cap with a G on it, much like Mario's - or Luigi's or 
Wario's or Waluigi's or doubtlessly anybody else joining the super 
plumber club. Goombario lives with his mom and dad, Goomama and 
Goompapa; his grandparents, Goompa and Gooma; and his kid sister, 
Goombaria.

A battle with the Star Rod-powered Bowser sends Mario crashing into 
a shady glen in Goomba Village. After the resident Goomba family 
helps Mario smash through a magic block Kammy Koopa creates to 
hinder Mario's progress, wise and learned Goompa instructs 
Goombario to accompany Mario. Years of listening to Goompa's 
stories have filled Goombario with useful knowledge, and allow him 
to act as of guide on Mario's journey. (Come to think of it, what 
Goombario does isn't all that different from what I'm doing with this 
guide.) Eager little Goombario can also help Mario in fights by 
bonking enemies with his head or by using his skills as a tattletale to 
reveal enemies' weaknesses.

Goombario is the first Goomba a player could control in a Mario game 
- or any video game, for that matter. In the sequel to Paper Mario, 
Mario met Goombella, who was basically a female version of 
Goombario: a chatty head-bonker who'd explain the world with just a 
hint of cynicism.

=====

GOOMPA 
[Japanese name: Kurijii]

A wise, old, mushroom with a bad back. Goompa taught Goombario 
everything he knows about the way the world works, so he requests 
that Goombario travel with Mario. Technically, Goompa - not 
Goombario - is the first friend to join Mario's party. At the beginning 
of Paper Mario, Goompa tails Mario in the woods near Goomba 
Village and explains the basics of the game's battle system.

Kirby021591 informs me that Goompa probably gained his extensive 
knowledge of the world through his youthful journeys with two other 
old fogeys, Koopa Koot and Bootler. Apparently, the three were quite 
the adventurers in their younger days.

=====

GOOMBARIA
[Japanese name: Kuriko]

Goombaria is Goombario's little sister. She does three things, 
basically. (1) She stumbles upon Mario after he falls from the sky. (2) 
She refers to Kammy as a "weird flying thing." And (3) If you find her 
missing Princess Peach doll, she gives you a star piece. She's 
otherwise unremarkable, except that she's the cutest Goomba in the 
whole damn world. 

=====

GOOMPAPA

Goombario's dad. He has a moustache. Early in the game, he's trying 
to repair the family's front gate when Kammy smashes it to bits with a 
giant block.

=====

GOOMA

Goombario's kindly grandmother.

=====

GOOMAMA

Goombario's mom. She wears a housewife's headwrap that looks a lot 
like the one worn by Mamar, the motherly Star Spirit. Apparently 
that's how Paper Mario's developers represent maternity.

=======================================================================

GOOMBELLA 
[Japanese name: Christine/Kuristinu/Kurisuchiifu]
Occupation: Archeology student
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Did I say Goombaria was the cutest Goomba ever? Scratch that.

Mario meets this pink ponytailed Goomba in the harbor at Rogueport, 
just as he steps of his ship. She's arguing with a man named Lord 
Crump who is seeking answers about the Crystal Stars. Mario valiantly 
steps in and stomps Crump. 

The scarf and pith helmet are dead giveaways that Goombella loves 
exploring. In fact, she's a junior archeology major at Goom University 
studying under the brilliant Professor Frankly. One look at the ancient 
treasure map is motivation enough for her to join Mario's adventure.

Goombella functions much like Goombario in the first Paper Mario. 
Like Goombario, Goombella is Mario's personal tour guide, 
explaining where they are or what enemy they're fighting. And 
Goombella does it with her own dry brand of humor. Typically, her 
most barbed retorts are directed at the many lowlifes who hit on her 
during the adventure. In battles, Goombella fights also just like 
Goombario - primarily though a lot of headbonking.

A bit of trivia: Goombella's Japanese name seems to be Christine. 
That might seem like an oddly common name for a Marioverse 
character, but it's actually quite appropriate. The first two syllables of 
the Japanese name for the Goomba, "kuribo," blend perfectly into the 
Japanese pronunciation of the western name "Christine" - 
"kuristinu."

=======================================================================

GOOMBOB AND GOOMBETTY 
Occupation: High school Goombhearts
Only appearance: Mario Party Advance (2005)

A pair of would be Goomba lovers. One of the game's mini-quests 
involves getting this two crazy kids together. Goombob is a rich kid 
with a big house. Goombetty is a talented violinist. 

=======================================================================

GOOMFREY 
[Japanese name: Kuriido]
Occupation: Problem solver
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A shady Goomba who hangs out on the streets of Rogueport, near 
Professor Frankly's house. He eliminates problems, whether those 
problems be a who or a what. When Mario needs to dispose of a load 
of dirty boxer shorts of Glitz Pit fighters, Goomfrey's the only guy to 
do it. 

=======================================================================

GOOPER BLOOPER 
Occupation: Enraged ink squirter
First appearance: Super Mario Sunshine (2002)

A big squid with whose tentacles Mario must tangle in the Ricco 
Harbor area of Isle Delfino. After Mario crushes each of Gooper 
Blooper's arms individually, he must grab hold of its snout, stretch it 
like a rubber band and then let it snap back in the face of the six-armed 
menace.

Gooper Blooper, who gets his name from his fondness for the icky 
paint goop Shadow Mario/Bowser Jr. has dripped all over Isle Delfino, 
is a boss version of the Blooper, a generic seafaring foe that has made 
swimming dangerous since the original Super Mario Bros. While 
Cheep Cheeps would stupidly swim about without regard to Mario, 
these squids were swarm directly towards him. They've appeared in 
nearly every Mario game with an underwater stage.

Gooper Bloober reappeared as a boss, of sorts, in Mario Power Tennis. 
This ten-tentacled monster owns the Gooper Bloober court, a place for 
tennis right on the docks of Ricco Harbor. He takes up nearly his entire 
half of the court, and any netter brave enough to challenge him must 
contend with the swinging racquets in all of his tentacles.

Gooper Bloober's starring roles;
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

GOURA
Occupation: Lumpy goem
Only appearance: Wario's Woods NES (1994)

A large, earthy-looking creature who appears as a boss in the NES 
Wario's Woods. And then no one ever sees him again.

=======================================================================

GOURMET GUY
[Japanese name: Gourmet Heihoo]
Occupation: Glutton
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

An obese Shy Guy whose girth blocks the path in Shy Guy's Toy Box. 
He demands food, and only Tayce T.'s cake will send him through the 
roof. Upon exiting, he drops a cookbook that Mario can give to Tayce 
to improve the quality of her cooking. Later, Gourmet Guy shows up 
in Peach's Castle, where Peach is being held hostage. If Peach bakes 
him a strawberry cake, he'll drop a hint about the location of the next 
Star Spirit.

=======================================================================

GRACE
Occupation: Golfer
First appearance: Mario Golf (2000)

"The Queen of the Course." Tall, beautiful Grace is one of the 
experienced golfers than players can challenge.

Grace's starring roles:
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

GRATE GUY 
Occupation: Ballsy jester
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

One of Booster's goons. Mario and company fight him and his partner, 
Knife Guy, on the balcony of Booster Tower after Booster splits with 
Peach for Marrymore, the marriage resort. Grate Guy is the one of the 
pair balancing on a circus ball a la Lemmy Koopa. Despite what his 
name might indicate, Grate Guy isn't affiliated with the Shy Guys; 
instead, he's a scary clown. 

Later in the game, Grate Guy opens a casino where Mario can gamble. 
It's well hidden in Bean Valley and Mario will need a special pass to 
enter. There, he'll challenge Mario to a rather difficult game of chance 
called Look the Other Way, in which Mario must anticipate which 
direction Grate Guy will look and, as the name would suggest, look the 
other way. If Mario plays a hundred rounds of the game, Grate Guy 
will reward Mario with the Star Egg, and item whose effects are like 
those of the Rock Candy item: pain for Mario's enemies.

For a long time I wondered where Grate Guy might have got his name 
from. He rides a ball, so why not Ball Guy? Lots of readers wrote in 
and pointed out that a grater - as in a cheese grater - is a kitchen 
appliance, much like a knife I don't buy it, even with Nintendo's 
propensity for naming characters after food and food-related products. 
Joe Etienne and Richard Gallivan both wrote me with a better 
explanation. He says that Knife Guy and Grate Guy's names are puns 
on "nice guy" and "great guy." This is still a stretch, but I think it 
works better than the kitchen explanation.

=======================================================================

GRIFTY 
[Japanese name: Teiruwaasu]
Occupation: Rooftop storyteller
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

An odd, crocodile-looking fellow who hangs out high above 
Rogueport. For a fee, he'll tell Mario about the legends behind 
Rogueport, the Crystal Stars, the Thousand-Year Door and what might 
be behind it. 

Grifty's story (a synopsis):

Long ago, a great city stood where Rogueport does now. A great 
demon, the Shadow Queen, emerged and pulled the city beneath the 
earth. Her armies plundered the various cities of the world. In order to 
make herself more powerful, the Shadow Queen created the Crystal 
Stars and placed them in special castles - the only surviving one of 
which is Hooktail's Castle in Petal Meadows - to extend its evil 
influence. Four heroes eventually arose to defeat the demon: a shy 
Toad from Petalburg, a learned Goomba from Boggly Woods, a 
wandering Koopa warrior and a powerful Boo magician. They 
succeeded in nabbing the Crystal Stars and scattered them around the 
world, knowing that the demon would be sealed unless somebody ever 
collected the stars. The Goomba took her star to the Boggly Woods. 
When it started drawing monsters, she hollowed out the tree so the 
Punies might live peacefully. The Boo hid hers in Creepy Steeple. The 
Koopa fought with the pirate king Cortez, lost and was imprisoned in a 
chest. Before the Toad passed away, he entrusted his star to a holy 
man who promised to stow it where no one would ever find it. In 
death, each of the four heroes' souls were stolen and magically 
imprisoned due to a latent curse cast by the demon they had 
imprisoned. 

=======================================================================

GRODUS 
[Japanese name: Lord Batsugaruf]
Occupation: Captain of the X-Nauts
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A dome-headed figure who commands the X-naut soldiers. Grodus is 
taller than the rest of the X-Nauts and carries a glass scepter.

For being one of the main villains of Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year 
Door, Grodus doesn't actually appear in much of the game. More 
often, he summons Lord Crump or the Shadow Sirens to do his 
bidding while he watches from the X-Naut fortress on the moon. The 
only villainy we see him perform before he confronts Mario at the end 
of the game is his cruel pulling of TEC's plug. 

When Mario and company reach the end of the Shadow Palace, they 
meet Grodus for the first time and learn that Grodus tricked Mario into 
collecting the seven Crystal Stars for him and opening the Thousand-
Year Door so he could awaken the Shadow Queen. Mario beats 
Grodus, but Grodus escapes to the Shadow Queen's chamber while 
Mario tussles with Bowser and Kammy. There, he successfully opens 
the Shadow Queen's tomb. Reborn, however, the Shadow Queen isn't 
keen on taking orders and swiftly zaps Grodus into oblivion.

Judging from Grodus's appearance, I'd wager his at least part 
computer, if not a computer entirely. Through his glass dome, you can 
see all manner of blinking circuitry. Also, after the Shadow Queen 
zaps him into the void, he winds up living the rest of his life as just a 
head - and I'm pretty sure most living things need a body.

=======================================================================

GRUBBA 
[Japanese name: Gansu/Guns]
Occupation: Crooked fight promoter
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

This shady character comes off as a friendly guy, what with his affable 
Foghorn Leghorn speech patterns and all. And he seems more than 
happy to dub Mario "The Great Gonzales" and enter him into 
Glitzville's central fighting arena, the Glitz Pit.

As Mario advanced through the Glitz Pit ranks, however, he and his 
buddies begin to suspect foul play. Combatants have a knack for 
disappearing, it seems. And someone may be using the prized Gold 
Star for other sinister purposes. Could it be Grubba's efficient but curt 
assistant, Jolene? Or the obnoxious champion fighter, Rawk Hawk? 
And is that a real Crystal Star on his belt?

No and no. It's Grubba.

Mario - or, I guess, the Great Gonzales - eventually finds out that 
Grubba, a former fighter, has been maintaining a youthful appearance 
by sapping the energy out of former prize fighters. Grubba powers up 
and takes Mario on as Macho Grubba. 

Grubba appears to be a slightly altered version of Clubba, a minor 
Koopa foe from the first Paper Mario. Whereas Clubbas have green 
skin and white hair, Grubba is orange. He also carries no club. He's a 
complex guy, that Grubba. And yes, as a reader calling himself 
KWS369 points out, both Grubbas and Clubbas are modified versions 
of the minor Super Mario Bros. 3 baddie, Spike. (Though, don't 
confuse him with the non-generic character Spike, who's included in 
this guide.)

=======================================================================

THE GURU OF THE SEWER [new]
Occupation: Yuck-smelling yogi
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted! (2005)

An old man who, despite his alleged wisdom, lives in the sewers 
beneath Diamond City. Wario is happily walking down the street with 
a stolen Game Boy Advance in one hand and a Game Boy Advance SP 
in the other when he trips and accidentally drops both systems down a 
manhole. The Guru of the Sewer emerges, all sagacious and saintly, 
and offers Wario the choice of his two old systems or a shiny new one 
with two screens - the Nintendo DS. Wario cleverly hops into the 
sewer and steals all three from the guru. The old man gets his revenge 
in the game's epilogue when he knocks Wario over the head.

The Guru of the Sewer has the unique honor of being a character from 
the story cinematics who also shows up in a microgame. In "Light 
Sleeper," he's snoozing in the air. The player must blow into the 
Nintendo DS microphone in order to keep him aloft. The Guru shows 
up once again in "Snore Rope," a minigame unlockable in WarioWare: 
Twisted's Toy Room feature. In this version, he's still asleep, and the 
player must blow him through a skipping rope being swung by 
giggling giant women. Yes, I just wrote that sentence.

=======================================================================

GUS 
Occupation: Westside bouncer
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A bird who guards the entrance to the western Rogueport. He's also a 
member of the Robbo band of thieves, all of whom work for Ishnail. 
Mario can either pay Gus ten coins to pass or fight him and his pointy 
spear. Either way, Gus isn't too big a deal.

=======================================================================

HAMMA JAMMA 
Occupation: Glitz Pit competitor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Hammer Brother who can't wait to test the strength of his hammer 
against Mario's in the Glitz Pit. When he fights, he fights with 
Bamma, a Boomerang Brother, and Flare, a Fire Brother. Together, 
they're Hamma, Bamma and Flare, and beating them earns Mario a 
ranking of four on the Glitz Pit roster. Outside of the ring, Hamma 
Jamma will mention that fights with the hammer he inherited from his 
grandfather, a Hammer Brother Mario tangled with all the way back in 
level 8-1 from the original Super Mario Bros.

=======================================================================

HAMMERBOT [new]
Occupation: Robo-masher
First appearance: Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000

Just like his name implies, Hammerbot is a little robot with a big 
hammer. You'd think people would avoid such a contraption, but Dr. 
Mario and Wario both have to fight Hammerbot in the Dr. Mario 64 
story mode. Hamerbot previously bam-bam-bammed as a minor 
baddie in Wario Land 3. 

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=105&pos=3

Hammerbot's starring roles:
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001

Other appearances:
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000

=======================================================================

THE HAMMER BROS.
Occupation: The other brothers
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. (1985)

The Hammer Bros. first caused trouble in the original Mario Bros., 
though they were only a minor enemy. In Super Mario RPG, however, 
these twin Koopas were the first boss Mario faces. They are roughing 
up poor Toad and blocking the path between Mushroom Way and the 
Mushroom Kingdom. Defeating them earns Mario one of their 
hammers.

Long a part of the Marioverse, the Hammer Bros. have shown up in 
many variations: the Boomerang Bros., the Fire Bros., the Sledge 
Brothers., the Sumo Bros., the Limbo Bros., the yo-yo-swinging Yo 
Bros., the Chain Chomp-Swinging Chomp Bros., and even the 
Amazing Flying Hammer Bros. A Hammer Brother suit was even one 
of Mario's power-ups in Super Mario Bros. 3. In it, Mario could toss 
hammers and hide in his fireproof shell. And in Paper Mario, a 
Hammer Brother is actually playable - kinda. Using her magical 
transformation umbrella, Peach can disguise herself as a number of 
different enemies: an armored Koopa Troopa, a Clubba or a Hammer 
Brother. She can't fight in her Hammer Brother guise, but she can 
stroll about her castle freely looking every bit like a Hammer Brother.

The Hammer Bros.' appearances:
Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

HAMMERHEAD BROS.
Occupation: Hammersmiths
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

Twin brothers who forge hammers in their shop in Hoohoo Village 
who are also two of the first residents of Beanbean Kingdom to help 
Mario and Luigi on their quest. Their name isn't a coincidence, either; 
both of the Hammerhead Bros. have hammer-shaped heads. If Mario 
and Luigi can find them a special stone, they'll create a set of hammers 
the heroes can use throughout their quest. Sledge is the brother with 
green eyebrows, while Mallet has red eyebrows.

=======================================================================

HARHALL
[Japanese name: Kyahaaru]
Occupation: Fashion genius
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

A fussy, huffy clothes designer whose temperament makes keeping an 
assistant difficult. He's at the forefront of splart - splatter art - and 
he'll grant Mario and Luigi a piece of the Beanstar if they help him 
design some new shirts.

=======================================================================

HARLEY QUIN
Occupation: Jester
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A clown. He's the third boss in Wario's Woods. Like the Batman 
villain Harley Quinn, a harlequin is a clown character from old 
pantomime comedies. You know, from yore.

=======================================================================

HARRY HARE
Occupation: Suit-wearing bunny
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

He's, um, a suit wearing bunny. He's also the seventeenth boss in 
Wario's Woods.

=======================================================================

HARRY (1) 
Occupation: Golfer
Only appearance: Mario Golf (1999)

A pudgy golfer with blonde hair, sideburns and a beard. He's a 
different character than the Harry who appearsin Mario Tennis for the 
Nintendo 64.

Harry's starring roles:
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999

=======================================================================

HARRY (2) 
Occupation: Tennis player
Only appearance: Mario Tennis (2000)

A beefy, tall netter with dark spiky hair and a goatee, this Harry is one 
of the players made unlockable by connecting the Game Boy Color 
Mario Tennis to the Nintendo 64 version. He's a different character 
than the Mario Golf Harry.

Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000

=======================================================================

HAWKMOUTH
[Japanese name: Door Guard]
Occupation: Angry aperture
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. 2 (1988)

A surprise boss and the last obstacle before our heroes can fight Wart 
and his bad dream machine. Hawkmouth is actually just the bird-
shaped gate players enter at the end of every level in Super Mario 
Bros. 2. Pick up Birdo's crystal ball and voila! - Hawkmouth opens 
wide and you hope in. In the final stage, however, picking up the 
crystal ball makes the bird's face pop off the wall and chase our hero 
around the room. Tossing a few mushroom blocks at him stops 
Hawkmouth in his tracks and opens the way to Wart's chamber.

It's not a typo that Hawkmouth's first appearance is listed as Super 
Mario Bros. 2 and not Doki Doki Panic; in the original version, the 
ending gate looked like a human's face or an African mask. 
Hawkmouth was an original creation for the American version of the 
game.

Hawkmouth's appearances:
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=======================================================================

HAYZEE 
Occupation: Drama pansy
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The fourth of Luigi's traveling buddies. He meets Hayzee, producer 
from far-off Jazzafrazz Town, as he's looking for the fourth piece of 
the Marvelous Compass, which will point him towards Princess Eclair. 
It turns out the compass piece is incorporated into the Dramalala 
Plaque, which is awarded to the winner of the annual Jazzafrazz Town 
Drama Slam. Hayzee throws together a winning play titled "The 
Mystery of the Fiery Hat of Social Awareness," in which Luigi plays 
grass - as in, a patch of inanimate green stuff. He somehow wins the 
slam anyway and Hayzee accompanies Luigi back to Rogueport. And 
Hayzee has... green petals? Seriously, what kind of flower has green 
petals?

Hayzee is a Crayzee Dayzee, a rather innocuous-looking generic 
baddie who first appeared in Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island. 
They're basically a grinning little flower who sings. That's it. Nothing 
too scary. They're pushovers in Yoshi's Island, but they're quite more 
formidable in the Paper Mario's games, where their singing attacks are 
hard to block.

=======================================================================

HEAVY ZED
Occupation: Beast of burden
Only appearance: Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (1992)

A sleepy owl who wakes up and gives Mario a ride when Mario jumps 
on him.

=======================================================================

HELIO  
[Japanese name: Balloon Spirit]
Occupation: Hot-air boss
First appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

The seventh boss in Wario Land 3, Helio is a difficult character to 
decsribe. Picture two red balloons that got attached to each other, kind 
of in a figure eight. Now imagine the top balloon wasn't happy about 
it. Many people also claim Helio looks a little like Mr. Hanky from 
"South Park." They're right, though please remember that Helio is a 
balloon and not poop. Anyway, there you have Helio. Wario fights 
him in a stage called "The Desert Ruins."

Helio pops up again - excuse the pun - in Dr. Mario 64. He's a boss 
as well as a playable character in the game's multiplayer mode. He's 
cooler than most of the Wario Land imports in Dr. Mario 64, if you 
want my opinion. And he makes a cool "ffft" noise whenever he 
makes a smooth move.

Helio's starring roles:
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

HEN [new]
Occupation: The Camilla to Wario's Gonzo
Only appearance: Wario Land II (1998)

This one slipped past me completely. I only realized that this female 
chicken character figured into the Marioverse after reading her profile 
on the Super Mario Wiki. 

Apparently, Wario has a pet hen in Wario Land II. The hen's name is 
"Hen." (I know. Seems lame, but after all, Yoshi's name is "Yoshi.") 
Anyway, one story in chapter two of the game apparently revolves 
entirely around returning Hen to her nest, from which she was 
apparently roused when the Brown Sugar Pirates attacked Wario's 
hideout. Shockingly, Wario seems to care more about Hen than money 
- a first! - but the profile also notes that Hen repeatedly tries to 
escape Wario while being delivered back to her nest. Thus, one could 
assume the affection Wario has for Hen is not necessarily returned. 
And really - could you blame her?

=======================================================================

HENRY and ORVILLE
[Japanese name: Juan and Ted]
Occupation: Hide-and-seek haunts
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

Twin brothers named after two figures known for their historical 
contributions to transportation: Henry Ford, inventor of the 
automobile, and Orville Wright, half of the aviating duo that 
performed the first successful human flight. Luigi can summon them 
by spinning the airplane mobile in their bedroom. They'll want Luigi 
to play hide and seek, though if he wins he'll have to fight them. 
Orville flies a toy plane that drops bombs, while Henry drives a little 
car. If Luigi can displace them from their rides, though, he can suck 
them up into his vacuum.

Since Henry and Orville's room is in the same wing of the house as 
Neville, Lydia and Chauncey's rooms, I'd assume they're supposed to 
be the older sons in this ghost family.

=======================================================================

HERMIE III
Occupation: Decorator crab
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

Hermie the lisping hermit crab gets his claws on the Beanstar piece 
that floats to Gwahar Lagoon. Dazzled by its glow, he puts it atop his 
shell, which he has stylishly decorated like a Christmas tree. When the 
Mario Bros. first arrive to retrieve the Beanstar piece, Hermie first 
mistakes Mario for Santa Claus - or more properly, "Thanta Clauth" 
- then challenges Mario and Luigi to a fight.

Hermie is aided in his aesthetic efforts by three sunbathing fishgirls, 
none of whom I believe have names.

=======================================================================

HERRINGWAY 
Occupation: Mystery novelist
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A penguin who lives in snow-covered Shiver Town and writes murder 
mysteries. Herringway, whose name is a play on that of novelist Ernest 
Hemmingway, is a bit of a recluse, but Mario must find him when the 
wife of the Shiver Town mayor accuses Mario of murdering her 
husband. (Honestly, I never thought I'd see the word "murder" pop up 
in a Mario game.) In the end, the mayor revived from having fainted, 
Herringway clears Mario's name and the mayor's excitable wife 
decides not to read Herringway's novels anymore.

Herringway, the mayor, his wife and all the other residents of Shiver 
Town are modeled on Bumpty, a penguin character from Super Mario 
World 2: Yoshi's Island. This model is distinctly different from that of 
Tuxie and the other penguins in Super Mario 64.

This character doesn't show up in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year 
Door, but that doesn't stop the penguins of Poshley Heights from 
dropping his name. Most of them even claim to be a relative of 
Herringway's.

=======================================================================

HOGGLE 
Occupation: Hotdog vendor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A pig who runs a hotdog stand outside the Glitz Pit in Glitzville. 
Shortly into Mario's Glitzville adventure, he gets word that Hoggle 
has a new item on the menu: the Southern Fried Egg Dogg of 
Tastiness, made with a special egg imported from a faraway land. 
When Mario goes to check out this new product, he finds Hoggle 
chasing what is clearly a Yoshi egg. Mario catches the egg and Hoggle 
agrees to let him keep it, as people generally don't like eating food that 
moves.

=======================================================================

HIYOIHOI [new]
Occupation: Stony guardian
Only appearance: Super Mario Land (1989)

Fitting in perfectly with the Easter Island-like scenery of Sarasaland's 
Easton Kingdom, Hiyoihoi is a living stone head whom Mario must 
beat in order to advance the game's fourth and last world. Hiyoihoi 
hurls boulders - generic enemies called "Ganachans" - at Mario, 
but Mario can leap on top of them and peg the fiend with Superballs.

Hiyoihoi evolves from the generic Tokotoko baddie, which also looks 
like a living Easter Island stone head.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=77&pos=23

=======================================================================

HIZZA 
Occupation: Eater of maidens
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A two-headed snake that Luigi fights during his adventures on the 
Strudel Continent. Luigi wears the dress of the mayor's daughter in an 
effort to dupe Hizza and then fight him. Defying physics, Hizza's two 
heads eat each other. Luigi wins.

Of course, since we only hear of Luigi's adventures, Hizza is never 
seen. I wonder if he'd look like a two-headed version of Triclyde from 
Super Mario Bros. 2.

=======================================================================

HOOHOOROS
[Japanese name: Ufurosu]
Occupation: Stone idol
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

A stone guardian of Hoohoo Mountain that was built an ancient 
civilization.  When Mario and Luigi fight him, he evades their attacks 
by ducking behind huge stone pillars.

=======================================================================

HOOKBILL THE KOOPA
[Japanese name: Big Nokonoko]
Occupation: Overgrown Koopa Troopa
Only appearance: Super Mario World: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Hookbill waits Yoshi and Baby Mario on a cloud-shrouded platform 
high above the final stage of the fourth world. He's really nothing 
more than a normal red Koopa Troopa pumped up by Kamek's steroid 
magic. Despite his average nature, Hookbill keeps showing up. He's a 
boss in Tetris Attack and part of the festive décor in the Baby Park 
racetrack in Mario Kart: Double Dash!!

Hookbill's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Tetris Attack - (Super NES) - 1996
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

Other appearances:
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

HOOKTAIL 
[Japanese name: Gonbaba]
Occupation: Big bad dragon
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A massive red dragon who patrols the skies above Petalburg and 
snacks on hapless passers-by, including Koops' father, Koopley. She's 
easily one of the biggest enemies Mario's ever fought, but that does 
not deter Mario from marching into her castle and putting up his 
dukes.

Fortunately, Mario learns Hooktail's secret weakness: she hates "the 
thing that begins with 'cr' and ends with 'icket.'" Apparently, Hooktail 
ate a bad cricket once and got some nasty food poisoning. Now, just 
the mere sound of a cricket chirping puts knots in her stomach. Mario 
cleverly equips the Attack FX R badge, which makes Mario's hammer 
sound like crickets, and begins pounding away. Hooktail proves to be 
a bit of a pushover - until she leaps towards the audience watching 
the battle and starts gobbling up Toads.  Eventually, Mario stomps him 
for good and Koops' father emerges from Hooktail's belly to present 
the Diamond Star, the first of the Crystal Stars.

Keeping with the papery theme of the Paper Mario series, Hooktail 
seems to be composed entirely of origami. And Mario doesn't actually 
learn Hooktail's true gender until he fights her older brother, 
Gloomtail, in the Palace of Shadow at the end of the game.

Several readers have noted that Hooktail bears a passing resemblance 
to the Czar Dragon from Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven 
Stars.

=======================================================================

HOOT 
Occupation: Nocturnal owl
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

If Mario jumps into one of the trees at the base of Whomp's 
Fortress, he'll wake Hoot, a sleeping owl. Since he's awake, Hoot 
will offer to give Mario a lift to the top of the castle. By holding 
the A button, Mario can stay airborne with Hoot as long as he 
wants, though he should let go at the height of the flight to make 
getting the star in this level much easier. 

A down-on-his-luck Hoot also appears as a gambler in Super 
Mario Advance.

Hoot's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Verson (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

HUFF N. PUFF
Occupation: Rambunctious rain cloud
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Huff N. Puff is Bowser's minion in Flower Fields. He would like to 
block the sun out forever, transforming Flower Fields into a cloud's 
paradise - and a flower's nightmare. Once Mario destroys the Puff 
Puff Machine, the clouds vanish and Mario can grow a beanstalk into 
an area called Cloud Climb. There, he fights Huff N. Puff and frees the 
sixth star spirit.

=======================================================================

IL PIANTISSIMO
[Japanese name: Monteman]
Occupation: Runner
Only appearance: Super Mario Sunshine (2002)

A dude who will race Mario at several points in Super Mario 
Sunshine. When and if Mario wins, Il Piantissimo will cough up a 
Shine Sprite, much as Koopa the Quick does with stars in Super Mario 
64. Perhaps to mask the shame of losing a footrace to an overweight 
plumber, Il Piantissimo wears a disguise. He looks human - notably, 
with darker skin than most human-types in the Marioverse do - but 
he wears a purple Pianta mask, gloves and boots, none of which I'd 
think would make him a better competitive runner.

Though he's a minor character, the game's closing image (for players 
who haven't got all the Shine Sprites or blue coins) is one of Il 
Piantissimo standing on the beach, looking pensively at Bowser Jr.'s 
discarded Gaddbrush. Whether the resident runner is considering a life 
of crime, we never find out.

In Italian, Il Piantissimo's name means, as best as I can translate it, 
"the most plant." "Pianta" means "plant," but it's also the name of the 
tree-headed residents of Isle Delfino. 

A reader calling himself TSPhoenix points out that Il PIantissimo 
looks a lot the running man from Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. 
Same white clothes. Same dark skin. Same laugh. He's just wearing a 
Pianta mask. And we all know how popular masks are in Hyrule.

=======================================================================

IMAJIN (and his family) 
Occupation: Heroic brother
Only appearance: Doki Doki Panic (1987)

Although not officially a Mario character, Imajin appears in Doki Doki 
Panic, the Japanese from which the American Super Mario Bros. 2 
was born. Kacy Shelley tells me that Imajin and his family are actually 
the mascots of Fuji TV's annual Yume Kojo festival. Doki Doki Panic 
was released to promote the 1987 festival, and, most interestingly, 
Shelley claims that Shigeru Miyamoto had more involvement with the 
programming of Doki Doki Panic than he did with Super Mario Bros: 
The Lost Levels - the "other" sequel to the original Super Mario 
Bros.

Imajin most likely ended up becoming Mario in the transformation, 
though the turban and blue pants in Imajin's sprite make him look 
more like Toad than Mario. In the story, Wart - called "Mamu" in 
Japan - nabs two children through a magical storybook and the kids' 
family sets out to rescue them: big brother Imajin, big sis Lina, Mama 
and Papa. The family is dressed in traditional Arabian garb - or at 
least as close as 8-bit graphics let the designers approximate - and 
this fits in with Doki Doki Panic's general Arabian feel. Much of this 
atmosphere was lost in the translation. Things like the Arabian lamps 
that opened the door to subs-space were replaced with the bubbling 
potions familiar to American gamers. However, certain elements 
remained, like the presence of the red-striped jars and Pidgit's magic 
carpet.

Imajin's family:

LINA
[alternate spelling: Lina]

Lina is clearly the analogue for Princess Peach; she wears pink and can 
glide through the air.

=====

MAMA

The tall, skinny mother character clearly became Luigi, though Mama 
lacks Luigi's signature bicycle kick when she jumps.

=====

PAPA

Stout and squat, Papa became the heavy-lifting Toad. His turban 
transformed nicely into Toad's mushroom cap.

=======================================================================

INVISO
Occupation: Transparent tough
Only appearance: Yoshi's Story (1998)

One of the four mid-bosses Yoshi may face, depending on which 
stages he challenges. True to his name, Inviso cannot be seen. 
However, he can be pelted with eggs. Yoshi should do so.

=======================================================================

ISHNAIL 
Occupation: Boss brigand
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

Chief of criminal operations on Rogueport's east side and the chief 
rival to Don Pianta, who oversees the west side. The two factions are 
waging a small-scale gang war for control of Rogueport. Ishnail 
actually seems like a nice enough guy though. Once Mario finds the 
hidden entrance to Ishnail's hangout, he helpfully explains to Mario 
the easiest way to contact Don Pianta, from whom Mario needs a 
favor.

Though he looks an awful lot like a Koopa Troopa, Ishnail is, in fact, a 
snail. You can tell by his shell. Since Rogueport is a maritime city, I'd 
guess his name is supposed to be a pun on "Ishmael," the name of the 
narrator from Moby Dick. The first Paper Mario made a similar pun 
with "Fishmael," the name of the character who fished in Toad Town 
harbor.

=======================================================================

JAGGER
[Japanese name: Nokoyan]
Occupation: Martial arts student
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

Jinx's student, whom Mario must fight before he can fight Jinx. Jagger 
is a Koopa Troopa who fled the Koopa Troop when Smithy's gang 
proved to tough. In the vein of the Koopalings and Reznor, Jagger 
likely takes his name from a singer: Rolling Stones frontman Mick 
Jagger.

=======================================================================

JAMANO 
Occupation: Salty boss
Only appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

The eighth boss in Wario Land 3, Jamano is a pirate ghosts who 
attacks with a barrage of glowing skulls. I haven't played this game 
and don't know much about Jamano other than what Shdwrlm3 posted 
in his Wario Land 3 guide at GameFAQs. Anybody with further 
information will be greatly appreciated.

=======================================================================

JARVIS
[Japanese name: Shibon]
Occupation: Pottery ghost
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

When Luigi stumbles into the ceramics studio, he finds Jarvis, the jar-
loving ghost. Jarvis asks Luigi to play a whack-a-mole style game 
before he'll let Luigi fight him. According to his bio on Luigi's Game 
Boy Horror, Jarvis likes his jar collection so much that he now lives 
inside a jar.

=======================================================================

JELLYBOB 
[Japanese name: Ikukakotengu]
Occupation: Well-gelled boss
First appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

The fifth boss in Wario Land 3, Jellybob is an electric jellyfish that 
Wario fights in the stage called "Sea Turtle Rocks." The same 
character shows up again as a boss in the story mode of Dr. Mario 64. 
Players can also select him in the game's multiplayer mode.

Jellybob's starring roles:
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

JELLYFISH SISTERS
[Japanese names: Eren and Ganton]
Occupation: Masseuses
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

Twin sisters who own the Relaxation Room at Gwarhar Lagoon. 
They're beautiful and use words like "wowser" and "super duper." 
Gigi wears the red dress; Merri wears the green one. For two hundred 
coins, they'll give Mario and Luigi a massage, but when the brothers' 
hands ignite, Gigi and Merri will realize that the brothers are masters 
of the Firebrand and Thunderhand techniques, respectively. 

They take Mario and Luigi to a lair beneath their massage parlor and 
teach them two special hand techniques: Luigi learns to electrically 
bond with Mario and move in unison, while Mario learns to use fire to 
send Luigi dashing across the room. They then demand that Mario and 
Luigi fetch them the Pearl Beans, a red and green pair of special beans. 
If Mario and Luigi refuse, the sisters will charge them ten thousand 
coins.

=======================================================================

JERRY 
Occupation: Bob-Omb buddy
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The second of the traveling partners Luigi picks up during his never-
seen quest to rescue Princess Eclair. Jerry accompanies Luigi to 
Plumpbelly Village, where he suffers the indignity of seeing Luigi 
dressed up as a bride. Then they fight a two-headed snake or 
something. The details aren't that clear to me anymore.

Jerry's a fruit red color and it place of his fuse he has a stem. Get it? 
Jerry? Cherry? Cherry bomb? You got it, right?

=======================================================================

JIMMY T. (and his family) [new]
[also known as Jimmy]
Occupation: Disco king
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)

Jimmy T., a hip dude with a Wario nose and a perfect blue afro, is 
dancing at Diamond City's disco, Club Sugar, when his phone rings. 
Bam! - welcome to Jimmy's sport-themed games. Every time the 
player loses a game, Jimmy's cell battery depletes just a little. No 
more battery and you've lost Jimmy's games. Jimmy's series of games 
are the second one players take on in WarioWare, after an introduction 
from Wario, though Jimmy shows up twice more to challenge the 
player with remixes of other characters' microgames. 

Eventually, the player can unlock Chiritorie, a game based on a 
remote-controlled vacuum cleaner that Nintendo released in Japan in 
1979. In the Chiritorie microgame, one player controls the Game Boy 
Advances L button and another controlled the R button and each 
directs a vacuum cleaner toward crumpled-up paper wads. Whoever 
gets a hundred points first wins, but he or she will have to avoid 
Jimmy, who wanders onscreen to clog up the vacuums.

Jimmy shows up again in WarioWare: Twisted, in which he seems to 
have never left the dancefloor at Club Sugar. Now, however, he's 
busting a move with his folks, Mama T. and Papa T., much to the 
annoyance of the club owner, who just wants them to eat their dinner 
and go home. Jimmy's microgame set, Big Tipper, demands that the 
player drastically rotate their Game Boy Advance to win.

In WarioWare: Touched, Jimmy and his family return once again to 
the dance floor - cell phones in tow, no doubt - but Jimmy's 
groove-busting is interrupted by an unfriendly beetle referred to in the 
credits as Scratchy the Fro Bug. True to his name, Scratchy irritates 
Jimmy something awful, but his family merely mimics his itch-
generated gyrations, thinking they're new dance moves. Scratchy's 
nuisance then spawns Jimmy's microgame set, Dance Club Rub, in 
which the player must make short, quick movements with the 
Nintendo DS stylus to win. On the walk home, Scratchy strikes again, 
but his family doesn't notice. "There he goes again," they comment.

With his giant afro and superior sense of style, this guy is easily my 
favorite addition to Mario mythos in a long time. I'd like nothing 
better than to see him absorbed into the Mario Party-Tennis-Golf-Kart 
circuit, but we'll just have to wait and see.

Jimmy T.'s starring roles:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003

Other appearances:
Wario World (Gamecube) - 2003

=====

MAMA T. and PAPA T. [new]
Occupation: Matriarch and patriarch of one groovy family
First appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2005)

Mama T.'s the one with the orange dress and apron. Papa T. sports a 
green pin-stripe business suit. I don't know if Jimmy inherited his 
funky sense of style from his folks or if they're just biting his style, but 
Mama T. and Papa T's cotton candy afros and 3-D glasses are a dead 
giveaway of the family resemblance. 

Jimmy's folks debut in WarioWare: Twisted, where they party with 
their son at Club Sugar. Later, the player can unlock Mama and Papa 
in their own set of microgames: the Family Scramble, which tosses out 
random games from other characters' sets.

In WarioWare: Touched, Mama and Papa cameo again in Jimmy's 
story sequence, but they sit out when it comes to microgames, instead 
allowing their younger children to party.

Mama T. and Papa T's starring role:
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

Other appearances:
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=====

JAMIE T. [new]
Occupation: Jimmy's disco-fabulous sister
Only appearance: WarioWare: Touched (2005)

A dance floor cutie in a mini-skirt, Jamie T. is just another entry in a 
long-line of T family hipsters. Her microgame set, Jamie's Mix, 
features snippets from Wario, Mona and Jimmy's sets.

=====

JAMES T. [new]
Occupation: Self-described chick magnet
Only appearance: WarioWare: Touched (2005)

Portly James T., who just might be the youngest member of Jimmy's 
family, doesn't let his gut stop him from grooving along with the rest 
of his family. His microgame set, James' Mix, challenges the player 
with random games from Crygor, Ashley and Kat and Ana's sets.

It's probably a case of the cultural disconnect between Japan and the 
United States, but I'll bet whoever created this character didn't realize 
that "Jimmy" is a nickname for "James." Or maybe Mama and Papa T. 
were just too busy dancing to ever notice. 
 
=======================================================================

JINX
[Japanese name: Jackie]
Occupation: Sensei
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

This flea-sized sensei operates a dojo in Monstro Town. If Mario can 
beat him three times - and Jinx hits harder each time - Jinx will 
award Mario his karate belt, the emblem of his power. He also declares 
Mario the new sensei and Mario Style the dojo's new in-house martial 
art.

In Japan, Jinx was called Jackie. I'd guess that that name - like the 
name of the martial arts student Chan in Paper Mario - is a reference 
to martial arts superstar Jackie Chan.

=======================================================================

JOE 
Occupation: Golfer
Only appearance: Mario Golf (2000)

A dancing machine and one of the generic human characters can chose 
when they embark on a new golfing quest.

Like Azalea, Joe is also playable in the Nintendo 64 version of Mario 
Golf for players with the proper equipment. His name and stats, 
however, are variable.

Joe's starring roles:
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

JOJORA
Occupation: Ice spirit
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

A blue spirit who inhabits the icy fortress at Joke's End, Beanbean 
Kingdom's version of Antarctica. Jojora claims Joke's End is the 
playground of people like her, though there doesn't seem to be that 
many people hanging around to play with. She then taunts Mario and 
Luigi throughout the fortress that they'll never be able to figure out its 
mazes and puzzles. They prove Jojora wrong, of course, and 
eventually fight her and one playmate of their choosing: Chucklissa, 
Oholina, Hoohoolia and Teeheena. (Whichever playmate the player 
chooses has not effect on the ensuing battle; the four girls are just 
palette swaps of the same hulking freight train of a girl.) The 
playmate's the one to look out for, too. Jojora may try to strike Mario 
or Luigi with her vanity mirror, but a well-timed counterattack will 
send Jojora away crying.

Once beaten, Jojora will deem Mario and Luigi "uncool" and flee for 
good.

=======================================================================

JONATHAN JONES
[also known as Johnny]
Occupation: Pirate captain
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

Jonathan captains the ship that holds a most valuable treasure: the fifth 
Star Piece. I doubt the ship will travel very far, seeing as how it's a 
sunken wreck at the bottom of the sea. In any case, this shark pirate 
and his band will challenge Mario to a duel before he'll relinquish the 
prize. At first, Mario and two of Mario's allies fight Johnny and four 
of his pirate chums. Midway through the fight, Johnny will challenge 
Mario to go one-on-one - Mario's hammer versus Johnny's trident.

Beating Johnny earns Mario his respect. When Mario gets duped by 
Yaridovich, one of Smithy's cronies, into giving up the Star Piece, 
Johnny and his pirates prevent Yaridovich from escaping.

=======================================================================

JR. TROOPA
[Japanese name: Kowappa]
Occupation: Hatchling hell-raiser
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Though he's not even fully hatched from his shell yet, Jr. Troopa's 
already starting trouble. He's the local bully in the woods near 
Goomba Village. Mario and Goompa show him what's for, though 
he's not much of a match for Mario's might. Goombario explains that 
one of Jr. Troopa's hobbies is ordering things by mail. That's probably 
where get gets all the gadgets he uses in each subsequent, increasingly 
harder battles: a harder shell, a spike top, wings and a wand that 
produces a Magikoopa-type hex attack. 

Jr. Troopa never seems to learn his lesson. By following Mario all over 
the world - even Bowser's castle! - for a rematch, he ends up 
fighting Mario seven different times.

The little guy seems persistant enough to even cameo in Paper Mario: 
The Thousand-Year Door. He's lurking in the background of the photo 
Zip Toad emails Mario.

Jr. Troopa's starring roles:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001

Other appearances:
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

KAMEK 
[Japanese name: Kame]
Occupation: Head Magikoopa
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island

"The babies are mine!"

A cackling Koopa wizard who molded Bowser into the menace he is 
today - and one of the most neglected characters in Mario mythos.

When you think about it, it's Kamek - not Bowser - who sparked 
the feud between the Koopa Kingdom and the Mario Bros. Kamek, the 
head of the bespectacled, blue-robed Koopa Troopa wizards called 
"Magikoopas," foresees all the trouble Mario and Luigi would cause 
for the Koopas and intercepts the Stork carrying Baby Mario and Baby 
Luigi to their parents. A blue blur on a broomstick, Kamek buzzes the 
stork but botches the kidnapping by missing the stork instead of the 
baby with the red hat. 

With the help of the Yoshies, Baby Mario treks across Yoshi's Island 
to find his brother. Kamek, however, doesn't make the journey any 
easier. He routinely shows up at boss battles to either make monsters 
grow to a gigantic size - as he does with most enemies - or make 
Yoshi and Baby Mario shrink to flyspeck proportions - as with the 
battle against Prince Froggy.

Since Kamek shadows the Yoshies throughout the game, he's really 
the game's true villain, even if he never confronts the heroes directly. 
In the end, Kamek's magic explodes the game's final fight into goliath 
proportions. Baby Bowser, magically supersized, bounds from a 
distance towards Yoshi and Baby Bowser, but Kamek's charge falls all 
the same. Kamek swoops in on his flying magic wand, snatches up 
Baby Bowser and zooms away, swearing revenge and still cackling.

(In fact, Kamek actually does get his revenge. Players can unlock 
secret stages by getting perfect scores in all stages in a given world. 
The secret stage in the fifth world is titles "Kamek's Revenge." Yoshi 
must hop across a broken bridge and Kamek buzzes through, trying to 
knock Baby Mario off Yoshi's back.)

Kamek's appeared next in Tetris Attack, a puzzle game based on the 
pixie-populated Panel du Pon. Kamek was one of the four bosses, 
alongside Hookbill the Koopa, the Naval Piranha and a noticeably 
adult Bowser.

Save a brief flyby over one of the Bowser Castle tracks in the Game 
Boy Advance version of Mario Kart, Kamek's basically disappeared 
from the video game scene - even Yoshi's Story, the direct sequel to 
the game in which he debuted. And at that, the Magikoopa in that 
stage could honestly be any Magikoopa. 

Early screenshots from Mario Kart 64, however, showed a 
bespectacled Magikoopa in the spot that the remodlled Donkey Kong 
eventually occupied. None of the screenshots I ever saw actually 
labeled this character as Kamek, though considering the short span of 
time between Kamek's debut in Super Mario World 2 and Mario Kart 
64, it wouldn't be entirely unrealistic to think this was Kamek. It's a 
moot point now, of course.

There's actually a trend in Mario-related storylines to show Bowser 
being close with a certain Magikoopa that seems more powerful than 
the rest. In the Super Mario World comics that ran in Nintendo Power 
a few years back, for example, Bowser clearly had a bearded confidant 
Magikoopa whom he trusted more than the rest of the Koopa Troop. A 
similar thing happens in Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars. 
When Mario, Bowser and company storm Bowser's Keep, he 
encounters a certain Magikoopa who seems especially close to 
Bowser. He doesn't have a name, but you could draw some parallels 
with Kamek if you wanted to.

Nowadays, Kamek seems to have been semi-retired, though he 
appeared briefly - and unexpectedly - in Mario and Luigi: Superstar 
Saga. He wore a white robe and lived in Little Fungitown, where he 
performed hypnosis on Luigi to give him the courage to infiltrate 
Guffawha Ruins on his own. The Little Fungitown residents called 
him "Psycho Kamek."

The position of Bowser's confidant has otherwise been filled Kammy, 
a female Magikoopa who could well be Kamek's wife or sister.  In 
fact, Kamek and Kammy would have been great as a team in Mario 
Kart: Double Dash!! - much better than, say, Baby Mario and Baby 
Luigi. But hey, that's just me. And on that note, I thought I'd mention 
that Wario765, a sharp-eyed gamer posting at the GameFAQs board 
for Mario Kart: Double Dash!!, brought to my attention that one of the 
attractions in the background of the Baby Park stage is "Kamek's 
Magic Show." Neatness.

In Mario Party 5, Kamek appears as a capsule event item, the 
activation of which allows Kamek to magically shuffle all the player's 
other capsule event items. Hudson Soft saw fit to differentiate Kamek 
from a normal Magikoopa, apparently, as there's a separate capsule 
event for a generic Magikoopa in the same game.

And in Mario Party Advance, Kamek appears as the leader of a band, 
the Kamek Krew. One of the game's mini-quests involves finding the 
band a place to play.

Kamek's Japanese name translates as "turtle."

Kamek's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

Other appearances:
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996 (?)
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003 
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

KAMMY KOOPA 
[Japanese name: Kamebaba]
Occupation: Koopa consort
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Evil rides a purple broomstick.

Kammy, who introduces herself to Mario as a "beautiful Koopa 
with a beautiful name," makes life difficult in Paper Mario. 
Conceivably Kamek's successor as the top advisor and black 
magician to Bowser, Kammy buzzes around throughout Paper 
Mario, always causing trouble and trying to prematurely end 
Mario's quest to retrieve the Star Rod.

Kammy, whose last name "Koopa" makes her relationship to 
Bowser ambiguous, looks a lot like Kamek with pointier glasses, a 
purple hat and a white witch hair. Her personality isn't that much 
different either, always ready with a cackle or a spell to harm 
Mario and his friends. (In fact, it's also not that different from that 
of Koume and Kotake, the twin pint-sized witches who flank 
Ganondorf in Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time.) Whenever Mario 
tromps another one of Bowser's goons, Kammy's there to reassure 
her boss that the next foe will be even more invincible.

Before the final showdown between Mario and Bowser, Peach gets 
a chance to take on Kammy, whose method of attack consists of 
teleporting large blocks and then dropping them on Peach's buddy 
Twink. Because stars are powered by people's wishes, however, 
Peach's prayers give Twink just the boost he needs to knock 
Kammy off her broom. When Bowser's castle destructs, it would 
seem that Kammy got her just deserts, yet she shows up for the 
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. In fact, she's the only 
character introduced in the first Paper Mario to have a significant 
role in the second. Kammy shows up in amusing cutscenes with 
Bowser. They're trying to figure out who has kidnapped Peach and 
how they might get their hands on a Crystal Star of their own, only 
they're completely incompetent at it. They finally meet up with 
Mario at the end of the game. Kammy and Bowser together mark 
the second-to-last battle in the game. While Mario's stomping 
them, in fact, Grodus makes off with Peach to the chamber of the 
Shadow Queen.

Kammy's Japanese name roughly translates as "old lady turtle" or 
"turtle witch." GameFAQs user, ShinigamiMaxwell, informed me 
of an interesting connection between Kamek and Kammy and a 
plotline in the original Dragonball series. In it, Goku meets a 
character named Kame Sen'nin - or in English, the Turtle Hermit. 
That character has a fortune teller sister named Kame Baba.

Kammy's starring roles:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

KAOS 
Occupation: Rampaging robot
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996)

A giant contraption created by K. Rool. It's the last obstable in the 
Mekanos area of Donkey Kong Country 3. Dixie can conquer KAOS 
easily, but she'll encounter it again in the final confrontation with K. 
Rool's mad scientist personaility, Baron K. Roolenstein. Once Dixie 
busts KAOS open, she'll find that K. Rool is using the brain power of 
the kidnapped Donkey and Diddy to power it. 

KAOS's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997

=======================================================================

KAT and ANA (and pets) [new]
Occupation: Ninjas
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)

A pair of adorable but fearsome ninja girls. You can tell them apart 
easily by noting tha Kat has a single, erect ponytail while Ana has 
pigtails. According to in-game dialogue in WarioWare: Touched!, the 
two are sisters.

Late one night, a skeletal samurai demon named Boneheads descends 
on the local pagoda and possesses its owner - who is, of course, you. 
Immediately, Ana and her band of ninjas rushes to dispatch 
Boneheads, but the demon makes quick work of them, tying Ana up 
and leaving her hanging. Ana's only hope is her messenger bird, Don, 
with whom she sends a note: "Ninja girl, save me!" The recipient is 
her friend Kat, who then travels from her homeland - which looks a 
lot like Japan but couldn't be, because Japan shouldn't exist in Wario's 
world - to kill Boneheads and free Ana. 

Kat and her dog, Paw, enter the pagoda and the player can begin Kat 
and Ana's series of nature games. Like the rest, they're strange, so be 
prepared to play a snail trying to eat a leaf or a cute little girl with a 
watering can trying to hydrate a potted flower.

When victorious, players get to see Kat's dog transform into a might 
blade, which Kat uses to cleave Boneheads into pieces. She and Ana 
then go for a well-deserved snack at the gelateria. Later, players can 
also unlock a special game featuring the two ninja girls: Jump Forever. 
In it, players Wario must jump over a jump rope as Kat and Ana, 
dressed in kimonos, turn it more and more quickly.

The twosome appear again in WarioWare: Twisted. Their game set, 
Tap Out, demands the player to make subtle movements with the 
Game Boy Advance will simultaneously tapping the A button. Kat and 
Ana's cut scene story involves them straying from the group during a 
Ninja Elementary School field trip. Kat happens onto a bee hive, 
which chase both girls into an abandoned cabin, whereupon they are 
ambushed by an angry goblin. Soon enough, Kat and Ana's respective 
pets tumble into the cabin and KO the goblin, installing just enough of 
a false sense of security for the girls to step outside - and once again 
into the swarm of bees, which chases them back to Diamond City.

More hijinks abound in WarioWare: Touched!, as the girls chase down 
an apparent banana thief. With Shadow and Shuriken in tow, the girls 
corner the person who stole Ana's bananas: a cute monkey. The girls 
gush and decided to name the simian "Numchuck" and take him home. 
This little storyline gives way for Kat and Ana's microgames, which 
are grouped under the title "Ninja Scribble." Appropriately, all of them 
require writing-type movements with the Nintendo DS stylus.

Incidentally, Kat and Ana's names together form the word "katana," a 
traditional Japanese sword.

Kat and Ana's appearances:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

Other appearances:
Wario World (Gamecube) - 2003

====

SHURIKEN
Occupation: Attack bird
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)
[also known as Don]

Shuriken, the pet hawk who in the first WarioWare game is called 
"Don," belongs to Ana and aides her in her adventures. Shuriken is the 
counterpart to Kat's pet, Shadow.

Technically, Shurkien looks a little fiecer than Don, but I assume since 
both serve as Ana's stalwart animal companion, they're the same 
character and that Nintendo just chose to rename  and remodel the 
original bird seem cooler. The name is appropriate as shurikens, like 
the bird, are airborne attack weapons.

Shuriken's appearances:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

====

SHADOW
Occupation: Faithful dog
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)
[also known as Paw]

While Ana has a hawk, Kat has this canine character along for her 
adventures. Originally called "Paw" in the first WarioWare, the 
revamped Shadow seems to be the same character, if slightly redrawn. 

Shadow's appearances:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

===

NUMCHUCK
Only appearance: WarioWare: Touched! (2005)

A sweet little monkey who steals Ana's bananas. Upon realizing his 
cuteness, the girls give him a name and make him their pet.

=======================================================================

KATE
Occupation: Tennis player
Only appearance: Mario Tennis (2000)

Like Alex, Kate is a generic human netter that I players could unlock 
by hooking their Game Boy Color versions of Mario Tennis to their 
Nintendo 64 versions via a special cable. I, however, never had this 
cable and know nothing of Kate's appearance, behavior or tennis 
abilities. Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

=======================================================================

KATSINI [new]
Occupation: Purple... thing
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A purple monster with big red eyes and a little suit like a magician's. 
He's the first boss in Wario's Woods. Many have noted that Katsini 
seems like he may be a member of whatever race Tatanga belongs to. 
This claim, of course, is unsubstantiated.

=======================================================================

KEN [new]
[also known as Ken the Reporter, Ken the Veejay, Anchorman Ken]
Occupation: Diamond City talking head
Only appearance: WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$

A dog in a fez who works for the Diamond City news. He delivers the 
report about the fad surrounding Pyoro, the hit Game Boy Advance 
game-within-a-game. Later, he reports on the success of Wario's 
game. In WarioWario: Twisted!, Ken has taken a desk job at the local 
news agency, hence his new name, "Anchorman Ken." On-the-scene 
reporting is handled by a Dalmatian named Rocky. In WarioWare: 
Touched!, Ken apparently takes a job hosting "Ear Candy," a "TRL"-
style show on Diamond City's local music network.

Pizza Joe. Ken. Dribble. Rocky Anybody notice that there's a lot of 
dogs living in Diamond City?

=======================================================================

KENT C. KOOPA
Occupation: Roadblock
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A giant Koopa Troopa - though not as big as Hookbill - who blocks 
Pleasant Path, which leads from Toad Town to Koopa Village. Kent's 
toll: one hundred coins. He seems like a tough fight, but if Mario 
stomps his tail rather than his body, he's a pushover.

=======================================================================

KEYZER [new]
Occupation: Living key
Only appearance: Wario Land Advance (2001)

A living, bird-like key Wario must snag to escape any level.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=106&pos=0

=======================================================================

KEZUNE 
Occupation: Foxy boss
Only appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

A sorcerer fox whom Wario must fight at the end of the stage called 
"The Pool of Rain." Kezune is the third boss in Wario Land 3.

I haven't played this game and don't know much about Kezune other 
than what Shdwrlm3 posted in his Wario Land 3 guide at GameFAQs. 
Anybody with further information will be greatly appreciated.

=======================================================================

KID  
Occupation: Golfer
First appearance: Mario Golf (2000)

A ten-year-old golf whiz. Players can chose to play as Kid when they 
start a new quest in the unique golfing sim-RPG. Kid is also playable 
in the Nintendo 64 version of Mario Golf for players with the proper 
equipment. His name and stats, however, are variable.

Kid appears again in Mario Golf: Advance Tour as the instructor of 
Neil and Ella, the two generic characters whose stats you build by 
playing golf. Apparently, some accident has rendered Kid unable to 
golf anymore. But you still have to beat him. In a game of golf. Yeah, 
you heard right.

Kid's starring roles:
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

KIDDY KONG 
[Japanese name: Dinky Kong]
Occupation: Brawny baby
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble 
(1996)

A big baby.

Kiddy Kong accompanies Dixie Kong through the third Donkey Kong 
Country adventure. He's a hefty toddler who looks nearly as big as 
Donkey Kong himself. Clad in a light blue pair of footie pajamas, 
Kiddy Kong is the brawn to Dixie Kong's brain. He also has a snazzy 
attack move in which he snaps the feet of his pajamas at enemies. 
Sources vary on exactly how Kiddy Kong is related to Dixie, but I've 
heard he's her baby cousin. I've also read that Kiddy is the little 
brother of Chunky Kong, one of the simian heroes from Donkey Kong 
64. 

Technically, Kiddy's only appearances are Donkey Kong Country 3 
and its Game Boy incarnation, Donkey Kong Land 3. He popped up in 
the promo shots for the now-cancelled Donkey Kong Racing, but we'll 
just have to wait and see if he becomes a permanent part of the 
Donkey Kong Country continuum.

In Japan, Kiddy Kong is known as Dinky Kong. In fact, the Japanese 
name for Donkey Kong Land 3 is "Dixie Kong and Dinky Kong." I 
think this name is much better, honestly. It keeps with the theme of all 
the heroes from the Super NES Donkey Kong Country games having 
the initials "D.K." Also, it helps him sound like a mini version of 
Donkey Kong, which he essentially is, as far as muscle goes. Oh well.

Kiddy Kong's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997

=======================================================================

KING and QUEEN NIMBUS
[Japanese name: Papa Mallow and Mama Mallow]
Occupation: Puffy, fluffy monarchs
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

The rightful rulers of Nimbus Land. Once freed, they gladly welcome 
Mallow back into their family, though no explanation is given for 
Mallow's adoption by Frogfucius. 

=======================================================================

KING BOO 
[Japanese name: King Teresa, Boss Teresa; alternate spelling: Kingu 
Teresa]
Occupation: Supreme spook
First appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

When Luigi gets a special letter in the mail notifying him of having 
won his own mansion, he was a bit suspicious - especially since he 
never entered a contest to win one. The mansion, which materializes 
mere days before Luigi arrived to check it out, is merely a ploy to 
transform both Mario and Luigi into paintings. The ringleader of the 
gang is a crown-wearing tongue-lolling ghost with a monarch 
complex: King Boo. Luigi doesn't encounter King Boo until the 
game's last battle. He pilots a Bowser robot and only shows his pale, 
translucent face when Bowser's head pops off. 

King Boo shows up again in Super Mario Sunshine in the casino of the 
ghost-ridden Hotel Delfino on beautiful Sirena Beach. To defeat King 
Boo, Mario has to toss King Boo's hot peppers into the ghost's mouth 
and then pelt him with fruit while his ectoplasmic body is engulfed in 
flames.

Subsequntly, King Boo appeared as a playable character in Mario 
Kart: Double Dash!! He and his partner, Petey Piranha, were both 
heavyweights who could use other characters' special weapons.

Ousting the Big Boo and Lady Bow as the senior specter, King Boo is 
the most recent spin on the Boo character. Generic Boos have been 
playable in Mario Party 5 and the Nintendo 64 version of Mario 
Tennis. King Boo is just the second major Boo character since Bow to 
actually have a name and a personality.

As Kirby021591 King Boo points out, King Boo and the Big Boo may 
or may not be the same character. In Super Mario 64 DS, the Big Boo 
apparently wears a crown, making him look a lot like King Boo. He 
also has the King Boo cackle, which sounds lower and more raspy 
than the regular Boo's cackle. Since Nintendo refers to them 
differently and because King Boo was established as a character with a 
name and personality and all that in Luigi's Mansion, I'm going to 
continue to treat them separately, however.

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Petey Piranha
Personal racecar: Ghost Pipes
Special weapon: Anything! (King Boo and Petey can both use any 
character's special moves.)

King Boo's starring roles:
Luigi's Mansion (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

KING K 
[Japanese name: Michael]
Occupation: Kingly competitor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

He may not be all that regal, but this yellow-shelled Koopa Troopa 
sure is friendly. When Mario first joins the Glitz Put fighting circuit, 
King K offers some advice. King K is so nice that he doesn't even 
seem very upset when Mario beats his team, the KP Koopas, in the 
Glitz Pit. 

Later, King K vanishes altogether. It seems he has fallen victim to 
Grubba's energy sucking device and zapped into flatness, though he 
somehow revives for Glitz Pit rematches.

=======================================================================

KING KALAMARI
[Japanese name: Takotsubagessoo]
Occupation: Ship-sinking squid
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

The super-sized squid responsible for sinking the ship that Jonathan 
Jones and his band now reside in. Mario's party must first tackle King 
Kalamari's tentacles individually before fighting the big guy himself.

=======================================================================

KING TOTOMESU [new]
Occupation: Sphinx guardian
Only appearance: Super Mario Land (1989)

This sphinx is the boss of Birabuto Kingdom, the Egyptian-themed 
area of Sarasaland. He spits fire, but he shouldn't be too much trouble 
for Mario.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=77&pos=49
=======================================================================

KING ZING STING 
Occupation: Hum-dinger of a Zinger
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

Presimably the husband of Queen B/Bumble B Rumble, a boss from 
the first Donkey Kong Country. King Zing Sting awaits in a giant 
honeycomb at the end of Krazy Kremland, the fourth area of the game. 
Diddy and Dixie actually sit this bout out while Squaks steps in, 
hocking nuts at the king's stinger.

King Zing Sting's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

KLEEVAR 
Occupation: Sentient sword
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

This floating sword may not have eyes, but it doesn't let that stop it 
from trying to skewer Diddy and Dixie. He waits for them in the final 
area of Crocodile Cauldron, the lava-bubbly second area of the game. 

Kleevar's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

KLEPTO 
[Japanese name: Jango]
Occupation: Hat-snatcher
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

A desert condor who will try to gank Mario's cap in Shifting Sand 
Land. Mario can attack Klepto to knock him away, but Klepto won't 
take any damage and will just jeep coming after that hat. Without his 
hat, Mario takes more damage from enemies.

Hudson Soft rescued Klepto from obscurity with the Mario Party 
games. The buzzard appears in some random mini-game in Mario 
Party 4, I'm told. He also appears in Mario Party 5 as a capsule event 
item; employing his services means getting an airlift to a spot on the 
game board occupied by another player.

Klepto's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Verison (Nintendo 64) - 1997 
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

KLUBBA 
Occupation: Doorman to the Lost World 
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

A hulking Kremling who, true to his name, carries a giant club. He 
won't shy away from swatting Diddy or Dixie with it unless they can 
pay the fee to enter into the prehistoric Lost World. There, they can 
challenge the game's hardest levels.

Don't confuse this Klubba with Clubba, the generic baddie from Paper 
Mario.

Klubba's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

K. LUMSY 
Occupation: Kremling klutz
Only appearance: Donkey Kong 64 (1999)

Let's just say that K. Rool and K. Lumsy aren't on good terms like 
Mario and Luigi. When Donkey Kong first meets K. Rool's younger, 
nicer brother, the poor guy's been imprisoned in a metallic box. That's 
just not nice. 

And just like K. Rool's name is a pun on "cruel," K. Lumsy is a pun 
on "clumsy" - which he is.

=======================================================================

KNIFE GUY 
Occupation: Edgy jester
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

One of Booster's goons. After Booster, Peach and the Snifits split for 
Marrymore, Mario's party must fight Knife Guy and his partner Grate 
Guy on the balcony. Despite what their name might indicate, these two 
aren't Shy Guys; they're freaky clown jesters.

Later in the game, Mario can find Knife Guy hanging out in one of the 
hallways in Booster Tower. He'll ask Mario to play a game in which 
he will juggle some balls and then ask which hand holds the yellow 
ball. If Mario wins on the highest level of difficulty, Knife Guy will 
give him the Bright Card, which grants Mario access to Grate Guy's 
Casino.

=======================================================================

KOLORADO  
[Japanese name: Charles]
Occupation: Archeologist, explorer and adventurer
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A resident of Koopa Village. Kolorado is a famous archeologist and 
Kooper's hero. Mario first meets Kolorado in Dry Dry Desert, where 
Kolorado's crew searches for the entrance to Dry Dry Ruins. Later, 
Kolorado follows Mario through the volcanic Mt. Lavalava. The 
professor valiantly tries to help Mario defeat the Lava Piranha, but 
burns his butt and runs away.

Kolorado, who has a worrisome wife in Koopa Village, is a bit of a 
bumbler and refers to Mario as "old boy." He also mistakes a whale 
for a tuna and the Star Spirit Misstar for a starfish. (And it's not the 
only time someone suffers from such confusion; check out Spangle 
and Monstermama's profiles for more on this.)

In Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year door, Kolorado makes a cameo of 
sorts. While venturing the skeleton strewn halls of Hooktail's Castle, 
Mario and Koops happen upon a pile of bones that Koops immediately 
recognizes as those of his father, who went to defeat Hooktail long ago 
and never returned. When Koops reads the note attached to the 
skeleton, however, he finds that its now-dead author addressed his son 
as "Kolorado" and not "Koops." Indeed, Koops later finds out that his 
father is alive. Kolorado's father, it seems, was not so lucky.

Later, Lumpy mentions having met Kolorado during his oil drilling 
adventure in Dry Dry Desert.

Kolorado's appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

THE KOOPA BROS. [new]
[Japanese name: Noko Bros.]
Occupation: Ninja turtle quartet
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Four Koopa Troopas in ninja suits. They're the guardians of the first 
Star Spirit, Eldstar and the bosses of the first chapter of Paper Mario.

Each wears a different colored bandana - red, black, green or yellow 
- and they're martial artist turtles. Clearly, the Koopa Bros. are a 
parody of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. (And not the first Mario 
RPG bosses to poke fun at a children's superhero team - don't forget 
the color-coded Axem Rangers from Super Mario RPG: Legend of the 
Seven Stars.) When they're not masquerading as Toads, the Koopa 
Bros reside in a fortress near Koopa Village. They've enslaved some 
Bob-Ombs to work for them, and one of them - Bombette - is more 
than happy to join Mario to stop them.

Later, in Bowser's Castle, Mario once again faces the Koopa Bros., 
only to have Jr. Troopa run in and knock them down, accidentally 
defeating the foursome for Mario, who must now fight Jr. Troopa 
instead.

Kirby021591 points out that the brother's colors match the Axem 
Rangers perfectly, save for the exception of pink.

=======================================================================

THE KOOPALINGS  
[also known as the Koopa Kids]
Occupation: Second-generation Koopa chaos
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. 3 (1990)

"We just love being mean!"

After his hiatus in Super Mario Bros. 2, Bowser returned with a 
vengeance. Instead of merely overtaking the Mushroom Kingdom, his 
hordes invaded the entire Mushroom World. And instead of solo 
villainy, Bowser brought along his seven horrible Koopa children, the 
Koopalings: Larry, Morton, Wendy, Iggy, Roy, Lemmy and Ludwig. 
(Notably, Bowser seems to have spawned these kids without the aid of 
a wife. Though fans would love to see Mrs. Bowser, the Koopa King 
has inexplicably remained a single father.) Each child stole the magic 
wand of the Mushroom King ruling a different land of the Mushroom 
World. And each Koopaling used that wand to transform them into an 
animal, rendering that land's throne up for grabs. Mario or Luigi 
would venture through each world and eventually board the 
Koopaling's airship, where one of the Koopalings would be waiting to 
duel with him one-on-one.

The Koopalings appeared again in Super Mario World. They had 
apparently followed dear old dad to Dinosaur Land, where they each 
set up a castle from which they waged their war on Yoshi and his 
friends. This time, they ditched their airships, though according to the 
Super Mario World instruction manual, the wreckage of one of them 
lay in the center of the ocean, now inhabited by Boos.

The Koopalings share attack patterns. Though Nintendo shuffled the 
order Mario encounters the Koopalings from Super Mario Bros. 3 to 
Super Mario World, the Koopalings who fought alike in the first game 
continued to do so in the second. (Larry always fights like Iggy, Roy 
always fights like Morton, Lemmy always fights like Wendy, and 
Ludwig, the oldest, always does his own thing.)

The seven Koopa children started to show up regularly. They were 
end-level bosses in the Super Scope 6 shooter Yoshi's Safari and they 
were villains again in all versions of Mario's Missing. They even 
showed up in all incarnations of the Mario comic books and cartoon 
shows. (In the cartoon, though, they were called different names. See 
the Frequently Asked Questions section for more on this.) However, 
Nintendo apparently tired of their antics, because the Koopalings 
promptly vanished from any further games.

Nonetheless, an interesting bit of proof may indicate that the 
Koopalings and Bowser Jr. may exist in the same continuity after all. 
When Mario first encounters FLUDD, it scans over Mario and flashes 
through some clips of his earlier exploits, including a fight with Larry 
Koopa. One could argue that this is proof of all the Bowser offspring 
existing in the same universe, since Bowser Jr. plays such a central 
role in Super Mairo Sunshine. 

Nintendo threw them a bone in Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga. The 
kids showed up at the end of the game as minor bosses in the last 
dungeon. Strangely, they had a non-speaking role. Since then, their 
future is indefinite. A younger and cuter pint-sized Koopa, Bowser Jr., 
has since been following Bowser around. Has this eighth Koopaling 
ousted his older brothers and sister forever?

Rotten as they are, each Koopaling has his or her own individual 
personality. Also, each draws their name from a real-life musician or 
celebrity. (I've read that the Koopalings didn't actually have names in 
the original Japanese release of Super Mario Bros. 3. This might 
explain why their names are mostly drawn from American celebrities 
and none from Japanese celebrities.)

I've read several places online - the Mushroom Kingdom among 
them - that the Koopalings were nameless in the Japanese Super 
Mario Bros. 3. Eventually, they got the names they have here in the 
states, but the American translators were the ones to invent them.

=====

LARRY KOOPA

Larry, who overthrew the king of Grass Land, is the Koopaling with a 
green shell and a blue mohawk. He's quite easy to beat in Super Mario 
Bros. 3 - three stomps and he's gone, though Mario must dodge the 
smoke rings Larry shoots from the magic wand he stole. Bowser 
apparently promoted Larry in Super Mario World; instead of the first 
boss he's the seventh and last, and his castle is the last major obstacle 
before Bowser's neon palace in the Valley of Bowser.

Larry gets a small cameo in Super Mario Sunshine - an honor he 
would surely lord over his brothers and sister. When FLUDD is 
scanning Mario, a small video screen briefly plays clips from some of 
Mario's previous adventures, including one of Mario's duel with Larry 
in Super Mario World.

I'm not sure which celebrity Larry's name is a reference to, because 
there's a lot of Larrys out there. There's an article at Super Mario 
Infostation conjecturing that Larry gets his name from CNN talk show 
host Larry King. Initially, I didn't believe it, but seeing as how Morton 
is named after a talk show host, it's not impossible. Anybody have any 
other guesses?

The address to the very cool Super Mario Infostation is located at the 
bottom of this guide, by the way. Check it out.

Larry's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991 
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002 
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

Other appearances:
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2001

=====

MORTON KOOPA JR.

Morton is the brown Koopaling who looks like he likes to eat. He also 
has a weird star-shaped birthmark on his face. In both Super Mario 
Bros. 3 and Super Mario World, Morton is the boss of the second 
world: Desert Hill or the Donut Plains, respectively. Also in both 
games, Morton fights just like his brother Roy. Mario finally frees the 
Donut Plains of this overweight menace by literally stomping 
Morton's castle into the ground.

With the possible exception of Larry, Morton is the only Koopaling 
whose name isn't a reference to musician. Instead, it's Morton 
Downey Jr., who was a popular but controversial talk show host in the 
late eighties. Though it may seem unlikely, Nintendo Power magazine 
ran a headline "It's the Morton Koopa Jr. Show!" in an article 
mapping out the path through Morton's airship.

Morton's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991 
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002 
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=====

WENDY O. KOOPA

Bowser's only daughter. But don't let that big pink bow fool you - 
she's as much trouble as her brothers. In Super Mario Bros. 3, Wendy 
conquers the island kingdom of Sea Side. She's the third boss Mario 
fights and she attacks by hurling peppermint candy rings (or old-
fashioned floatation devices - I'm not sure which). In Super Mario 
World, Wendy gets promoted to the sixth boss. Since she's such a 
sweetie, she's the boss of Chocolate Island. When Mario fights Wendy 
in her castle, he must also fight two Wendy dummies created to dupe 
him. Once Mario stomps the real Wendy, he literally wipes out her 
castle with a giant mop.

Wendy gets her name from Wendy O. Williams, late singer from the 
eighties punk band the Plasmatics.

Wendy's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991 
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002 
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=====

IGGY KOOPA 

The taller, skinnier Koopaling with thick glasses and a rainbow 
mohawk. Iggy, who's the boss of Super Mario Bros. 3's fourth world, 
the Isle of Giants, fights a lot like Larry. They fight similarly in Super 
Mario World, as well, though in that game Iggy has been demoted to 
being the boss of the castle on the first world, Yoshi's Island. The fight 
takes place on a platform teetering in lava; Mario must kick Iggy over 
the side to win. Once Iggy's gone, Mario takes dynamite his castle.

Iggy most surely takes his name from Iggy Pop, the legendary singer 
of the band Iggy Pop and the Stooges. He's an icon of the late 
seventies and if you don't know his music, you should.

Generally, whenever one Koopaling shows up, the other six aren't too 
far behind. But Iggy has the honor of having one more title under his 
belt than all of his siblings except Larry. In Type A mode of the Super 
Scope Six game LazerBlazer, Iggy will occasionally glide through the 
screen, riding a missile. You can shoot him down for points.

Iggy's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991 
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002 
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

Other appearances:
Super Scope 6 LazerBlazer (Super NES) - 1992

=====

ROY KOOPA 

He may be as pink as Wendy, but Roy is the toughest of the 
Koopalings. In both Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World, Roy 
is the boss of the fifth world. In the first game, this means he waits for 
Mario in the sky kingdom. In the next, his castle is at the end of the 
Forest of Illusion. In a fight, Roy likes to throw his weight around.

Roy's sunglasses are a dead giveaway to his musical namesake. It's 
the late Roy Orbison, a talented crooner who composed a lot of great 
rock songs, including "Pretty Woman." Roy Orbison, like Roy Koopa, 
always wore sunglasses.

Roy's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991 
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002 
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=====

LEMMY KOOPA

Judging by the way Nintendo depicts Lemmy in all the official art, I 
think were supposed to realize there's something wrong with the guy. 
He's much smaller than his siblings and his eyes always point different 
directions. Like Iggy, he sports a rainbow mohawk. You can always 
pick Lemmy out because he's depicted balancing on a ball.

In both his major appearances, Lemmy fights just like Wendy. In 
Super Mario Bros. 3, where Lemmy is the boss of the ice kingdom, he 
sends several of his circus balls bouncing around the room. In Super 
Mario World, where Lemmy is the boss of the cavernous Vanilla 
Dome, he tries to trick Mario by popping out of pipes alongside two 
Lemmy dummies. Once Mario beats Lemmy, he destroys his castle 
with a hammer.

Lemmy shares his name with the lead singer of the heavy metal band 
Motorhead.

Lemmy's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991 
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002 
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=====

LUDWIG VON KOOPA

Bowser's oldest and second in command. The wild-haired Ludwig is 
the boss of the seventh kingdom, the great Pipe Maze. In Super Mario 
World, Ludwig's castle sits at the end of the fourth area, Twin 
Bridges, which includes the Butter Bridge, the Cheese Bridge, Cookie 
Mountain and Soda Lake. Ludwig is the only Koopaling in Super 
Mario World with an attack pattern not shared by one of the siblings; 
he spits fireballs (just like his father) and ducks into his spiked shell. 
Once Mario beat Ludwig, he rockets the Koopaling's castle into a hill 
on the horizon.

Ludwig takes his name from Ludwig von Beethoven. They even share 
the same hairdo.

Ludwig's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991 
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002 
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

KOOPA KID 
[also known as Mini-Bowser, Bowser Jr., Baby Bowser]
Occupation: Party crasher
First appearance: Mario Party (1999)

One of the hardest characters to explain in the whole Marioverse.

This little guy, a staple of the Mario Party franchise who has yet to 
break into other Mario games, has quite a few names. I fairly certain 
the games refer to him as both Koopa Kid and Mini-Bowser. He's also 
been called Bowser Jr. and Baby Bowser - perhaps also in the games 
themselves but definitely by players and my fellow FAQ-writers. 
These last two are wrong for sure because those names refer to other 
characters - Bowser's son from Super Mario Sunshine and Bowser's 
infant self from the Yoshi games, respectively. 

Even the name I chose to stick with in this guide, Koopa Kid, is 
problematic because Bowser's seven children from Super Mario Bros. 
3 are sometimes called the Koopa Kids. 

Beyond that, Kirby021591 points out that the name of this character 
changes depending on which Mario Party you're playing. In the first 
three, it's "Baby Bowser." In Mario Party 4, he's "Mini-Bowser" It's 
only in Mario Party 5 and 6 that he is referred to as "Koopa Kid."

Yikes.

I believe that Koopa Kid has no real identity. He's just a little 
character made up by Hudson in the development of the first Mario 
Party. Scads of Koopa Kids show up in the game's final board in place 
of Toad, who normally sells stars to characters. Once approached, the 
Koopa Kid makes two dice blocks appear - one cycling between one 
and ten above his head and another cycling between eight and ten 
above the head of the potential star-purchaser. Whoever gets the 
higher number gets the star.

Koopa Kid showed up in various other supporting roles - scurrying 
obsequiously around Bowser, running an item shop in opposition to 
Toad's - until Mario Party 5, when diehard Mario fans were shocked 
to find that Hudson had kicked Donkey Kong out to the curb and 
replaced him with Toad (yay!), Boo (meh) and the irrepressible Koopa 
Kid. In the same game, red, green and blue versions of Koopa Kid also 
shows up as the main villains in the story mode.

Koopa Kid reappears as a selectable character in Mario Party 6 as 
well. One can only hope this walking plotline contradiction will soon 
go the way of Donkey Kong Jr. and Baby Mario.

Koopa Kid's starring roles:
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

KOOPA KOOT  
[Japanese name: Nokojirou]
Occupation: Curmudgeon
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Koopa Koot is the oldest resident of Koopa Village, Kooper's 
hometown. He asks Mario to do him certain favors, then rewards him 
- often with a single, paltry coin. Cheapskate.

In his youth, Koopa Koot went on a world-spanning adventure with 
Goompa and Koopa Koot. Kirby021591 informs me that his is why 
one of the twenty favors he asks of Mario is to fetch his picture from 
Boo's Mansion.

=======================================================================

KOOPA THE QUICK 
Occupation: Runner
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

A fleet-footed Koopa who will challenge Mario to a footrace. If Mario 
wins, Koopa the Quick will give him a star. In Super Mario 64 DS, 
he'll challenge Mario to a re-match. This time, he's wearing Supa 
Koopa Sprint sneakers instead of the Koopa Mach 1 Sprints he wore in 
the first game.

Koopa the Quick's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Verison (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=======================================================================

KOOPA TROOPA 
[Japanese name: Nokonoko]
Occupation: Koopa foot soldier
First appearance: Mario Bros. (1983)

They were the turtle menace before there even was a Koopa Troop. 

The generic Koopa Troopa was the first enemy Mario and Luigi ever 
faced together. As they scrambled to collect coins in a leaky, pipe-
riddled sewer, the Koopa Troopa - then known as the Shell Creeper 
- would emerge from pipes. If the brothers touched the Shell 
Creeper, they'd die, as they also would if they jumped on it. No, to 
combat the little critters, Mario and Luigi had to bop the ground below 
where the Shell Creeper was walking to flip him onto his back. Only 
then could they kick him off the screen.

(In more recent incarnations of the Mario Bros. game on the Game 
Boy Advance, Nintendo's substituted the Koopa Troopa-looking 
enemy with a Spiny, so players would resist the urge to stomp the 
Shell Creeper.)

When Mario and Luigi passed through the warp pipe and into the 
Mushroom Kingdom, they found that land filthy with turtles once 
again. This time, however, they were the Koopa Troopas. Green 
Koopa Troopas would charge blindly right at Mario - and right off a 
cliff, if he'd let them. Red ones were smarter and would pace back and 
forth on a platform, avoiding the edges. Both colors also appeared in 
winged form, the Paratroopa. (He gets his own profile.) Any of the 
Koopa Troopas could now easily be stomped - as they would in all 
future Mario games - and their shells kicked as a weapon.

Curiously, while Koopa Troopas did not appear in Super Mario Bros. 
2/Doki Doki Panic, their shells did. Mario - or Imajin, depending on 
what you're playing - could pluck the shells out of the ground and 
use them to plow through enemies, just like in Super Mario Bros.

The Koopa Troopa appeared relatively the same in Super Mario Bros. 
3 as it did to its Super Mario Bros. incarnation, though in Super Mario 
World they changed a bit. Bowser's new and improved army included 
blue Koopa Troopas, which would kick shells at Mario, and yellow 
ones, whose shells could be turned into near-invincible weapons that 
could take out Mario and enemies alike. Also, Koopa Troopas now 
walked upright rather than on all fours as they had previously and, 
once deprived of their shell, would run around in undershirts.

Perhaps the most interesting incarnation of this enemy appeared after 
Mario conquered the last level of the Special World - an ultra-
challenging set of eight levels that, once beaten, would cause Dinosaur 
Land to change. Spring became autumn, Bullet Bills became Pidgits 
and Koopa Troopas now wore strange Mario masks.

The green-shelled Koopa Troopa got his day in Super Mario Kart, in 
which he was the very first generic Mario baddie to be playable. Sadly, 
he'd lose his spot to Wario for the next Mario Kart. (In fact, the 
instruction manual for Mario Kart 64 claims Wario stole the little 
guy's kart.) Though he remained a staple of the series - his shells 
even wound up as weapons in the Nintendo all-star bash, Smash Bros. 
- he wouldn't pop up again as a playable character until Mario Golf: 
Toadstool Tour for the Gamecube. Again, he had a green shell, as 
would all generic playable Koopa Troopas, it would seem. (Generic, 
playable Paratroopas, it seems, have a red shell.) He was the smallest 
character, but he swung his club with the best of them.

(Tragically, Nintendo dropped Koopa Troopa from the Game Boy 
Advance of Super Mario Kart, which was an unlockable feature in 
Mario Kart: Super Circuit. In the little guy's place, again, was Wario.)

Nintendo thankfully restored the Koopa Troopa's spot in the Mario 
Kart circuit by making him a playable character in Mario Kart: Double 
Dash!! His partner was Paratroopa and they steered little cars made of 
the shells of their fallen comrades, which is quite morbid, when you 
think about it.

In Mario Power Tennis, an oddly water-powered Koopa Troopa 
appears as a playable character. This is especially notable because he 
did not appear in the Nintendo 64 installment Mario Tennis, and 
several characters who did - Toad, Birdo, Baby Mario and Donkey 
Kong Jr. among them - are not playable in Mario Power Tennis. The 
little guy adorably tucks into his shell to zoom around the court, His 
super moves include a water-powered drop shot and a cool slide move 
where Koopa Troopa coasts on a film of water.

(In Super Mario RPG, Mario can kick Koopa shells at enemies as a 
basic attack. The first shell he gets is the Noknok Shell, whose name 
comes from "Nokonoko," the Japanese name for the Koopa Troopa.)

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Paratroopa
Personal racecar: Koopa Dasher
Special weapon: Triple Green Shell

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR KOOPA TROOPA***
Common soldiers in Bowser's army, Koopa Troopas can retreat into 
their shells. Unbelievable as it may seem, they're clearly unaware of 
being kicked and sent sliding when in this position. There are many 
Koopa types, each with a different shell color and unique traits. They 
all wear T-shirts and shorts under their shells.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR KOOPA TROOPA***

Koopa Troopa's starring roles:
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Atari 2600) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Atari 5200) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Commodore 64) - 1984
Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
Mario Bros. (Atari 7200) - 1985
Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
Mario Bros. (NES) - 1986
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
Return of Mario Bros. (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992
Mario Paint (Super NES) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Mario Clash (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996 
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Picross NP Vol. 6 (Super Famicom) - 2000
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=======================================================================

KOOPER
[Japanese name: Kameki]
Occupation: Koopa comrade
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

On their way to the fortress of the Koopa Bros., Mario and Goombario 
come across Koopa Village, a tiny burg besieged by Fuzzys, the 
hairball-looking baddies that originally appeared in Super Mario 
World. The mischievous Fuzzys have stolen the shells of the resident 
Koopas and Mario must retrieve them. One of the Koopas rendered 
nude is Kooper. Once Mario snags Kooper's blue shell, Kooper joins 
the party to follow in the footsteps of his childhood hero, the Koopa 
archeologist Kolorado. 

Kooper's fighting talents involve his shell, which he can shoot at 
enemies at high speeds. Kooper can also use his shell to get items on 
ledges Mario could not otherwise reach.

While the first playable Koopa Troopa appeared in Super Mario Kart, 
he was a generic one. Kooper is the first playable Koopa Troopa to 
have a name and a personality. Koopa Troopas are Mario's oldest 
generic foe; they've been a part of Mario's life since the original 
Mario Bros., when they were known as "Shellcreepers."

=======================================================================

KOOPIE KOO 
[Japanese name: Nokorin]
Occupation: Half-shelled sweetheart
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A ponytailed resident of Petalburg who initially opposes Koops' plans 
to venture with Mario to Hooktail's Castle. When Koops returns 
unscathed, however, Koopie Koo changes her mind and supports her 
boyfriend's heroic pursuits. I don't know much about Koopa Troopa 
beauty, but Goombella claims Koopie Koo is cute and had a good head 
on her shoulders.

=======================================================================

THE KOOPINATOR 
Occupation: Glitz Pit competitor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Koopatrol, the spiky armored Koopa Troopas who work in 
Bowser's Castle in the first Paper Mario. This foot solider seems to 
have traded in his military duties for the glamor of the Glitz Pit, 
however. He's a tough customer and he's has a surly attitude.

=======================================================================

KOOPLEY 
Occupation: Hard-to-swallow hero
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Koops' father, presumed dead long ago when he ventured to 
Hooktail's Castle and never returned. Once Mario and Koops stomp 
Hooktail, however, Koopley emerges, as fit as ever and with the prized 
Diamond Star in his hand. Afterwards, Koopley waits in Petalburg for 
his son to return once Mario's quest has finished.

=======================================================================

KOOPS 
[Japanese name: Nokotaro]
Occupation: Timid turtle
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A resident of Petalburg and the second buddy to join Mario's 
adventure for the Crystal Stars. Koops is a green-shelled Koopa 
Troopa who sports a black eye and dresses like he's training for a 
boxing match - which is odd, since Koops seems like a bit of a 
coward. After approaching Mario twice and then chickening out twice, 
Koops finally joins Mario on Petal Path, much to the dismay of his 
girlfriend, Koopie Koo. Koops claims he wants revenge on the dragon 
Hooktail for eating his father.

Once Mario and Koops beat Hooktail, however, Koops' father 
emerges safe and sound - and carrying the Diamond Star, the first of 
the Crystal Stars. With new confidence, Koops continues with Mario 
for the remainder of the adventure. The game's epilogue reveals that 
Koops returns to Petalburg and thinks about becoming the mayor.

Koops is nearly identical in nearly every way to Kooper, his 
counterpart in the first Paper Mario. Only Koops doesn't have a cool 
blue shell; he has a generic green one. I'd venture to say he's the least 
original of the buddies in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. In 
battle, Koops even has most of Kooper's old moves. 

=======================================================================

K. ROOL 
[also known as Kaptain K. Rool. Baron K. Roolenstein]
Occupation: King of the Kremlings
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

Bowser, reconfigured as a crocodile instead of a turtle, more or less. 

K. Rool and the reptilian creeps called the Kremlings were designed 
by Rare for a different game that was released, but they seem perfectly 
at home tormenting the lives on the Kong clan. But I have to wonder: 
what does a crocodile want with a bunch of bananas, anyway?

When Donkey and Diddy emerge from the Chimp Cavers, they find K. 
Rool's ship, the Gangplank Galleon, waiting for them at the shore. On 
board, they duel with K. Rool. The wily king of the Kremlings will try 
to nail the simian heroes with his spiky crown, which he throws like a 
Frisbee, or splatter them with a cannonball shot from his blunderbuss 
gun. Once beaten, K. Rool's troops withdraw from Kong Island, return 
the stolen banana horde to Donkey Kong and sail away.

The pirate motif established in the last battle of the first Donkey Kong 
Country carries over throughout the enter sequel, in which Diddy and 
Dixie Kong chase down the Kremlings - now in pirate get-ups - in 
order to rescue the kidnapped Donkey Kong.

Diddy and Dixie trace the banana trail all through the Kremlings' 
homeland and eventually step on board the Flying Krock, Kaptain K. 
Rool's personal aircraft. If they can dodge the cannonballs, bombs and 
spiked balls K. Rool shoots from his gun, Diddy and Dixie will rescue 
Donkey Kong, who punches K. Rool so soundly that he flies all the 
way to the swamps of the Lost World, a prehistoric region of Kremling 
Island. Though Donkey Kong is already rescued, intrepid heroes can 
follow K. Rool to the heart of the Lost World, Krocodile Kore, and 
fight him, now dripping wet and considerably angrier than ever, one 
more time.

The third Donkey Kong Country takes place in an alpine region of the 
Kongs' world called the Northern Kremisphere. The game seems to 
posit a new Kremling named KAOS as the primary villain, but Dixie 
soon finds that KAOS is merely a mechanical contraction designed by 
the evil Baron K. Roolenstein, the same old K. Rool re-imagined as a 
mad scientist. KOAS is powered by the brain energy of the kidnapped 
Donkey and Diddy Kong, whom Dixie must free by breaking the 
contraption apart. Dixie eventually clocks both K. Roolenstein and 
KAOS, but she can still travel to Krematoa, this game's version of the 
Lost World, to challenge K. Roolenstein to another fight. In the end, 
K. Roolenstein will try to escape on a hovercraft, but he gets crushed 
beneath a giant egg laid by the Queen Banana Bird.

K. Rool's only Nintendo 64 appearance hinged around his scheme to 
annhiliate Kong Isle with the Blast-o-Matic, a high-powered and aptly 
named ray gun mounted to his ship. Kidnapping D.K.'s friends and his 
Golden Bananas is just a diversionary tactic to ready the Blast-o-
Matic. The final shodown involves five separate rounds in a boxing 
ring. Each of the game's five heroes must separately triumph over K. 
Rool in order to beat him for good. 

E-107 Sigma tells me that Donkey blasts from Barrel Cannons to 
attack K. Rool, Diddy flies high enough with his jetpack to drop 
lighting fixtures on K. Rool. Lanky Kong must trick K. Rool into 
slipping on banana peels. Tiny Kong must shrink small enough to 
sneak into K. Rool's shoes and shoot his toes. And Chunky Kong must 
grow large and pummel K. Rool. Finally, Funky Kong steps in and 
knocks him square with a boxing glove, sending him into the sunset.

And, obviously, K. Rool's name is pun on the word "cruel."

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR K. ROOL***
The demented head of the Kremlings and big boss in the Donkey Kong 
series. K. Rool is a giant, greedy glutton with a serious eye tic. While 
he fits the evil boss mold nicely, he's just enough of a bumbler to have 
gained a few fans over the years. His plan to blow up the DK Isles 
with his Blast-o-Matic shows how unbalanced he is. 
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR K. ROOL***

K. Rool's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004 

Other appearances:
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001

=======================================================================

KROOP 
[Japanese name: Hanahana Village Elder]
Occupation: Petalburg elder
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Kroop, the oldest and therefore the wisest resident of Petalburg, helps 
Mario find his way to Hooktail's Castle. This bushy-eyebrowed elder 
sure shows his age. He can't seem to remember Mario's name and 
repeatedly calls him "Murphy."

Kroop looks a lot like Koopa Koot, a similar character who was the 
elder of Koopa Village in the first Paper Mario. 

=======================================================================

KROW 
Occupation: Seafaring squawker
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

Avian confusion. Krow wears a pirate hat, but she's not a parrot. Krow 
lives in the crow's nest of the Kremling pirate ship, but she's not a 
crow. She's a buzzard and the first boss of the game. Splatter Krow 
with eggs until she hits the deck. Krow pops up again later as a ghost. 
She's the boss of Gloomy Gulch, the fifth area of the game.

(I'm assuming Krow is female because she's always guarding a next. 
And more often than not, it's the Missus Bird who sits on the eggs.)

Krow's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

KUDGEL 
Occupation: Klumpy Kremling
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

A heavyweight Kremling who's boss of Krem Quay, the third area of 
Donkey Kong Country 2. He's a gray palette swap of Klubba, the 
semi-friendly chap who guards the entrance to the Lost World. 

Kudgel's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

KRUNCH
Occupation: High-revving Kremling
Only appearance: Diddy Kong Racing (1997)

This tough-looking crocodile snarls through races with Diddy's crew. 
As the heaviest of the bunch, he takes as the slow-but-powerful racer: 
the Bowser, essentially.

On the advice of a reader calling herself Mega Rose, I included a 
profile for Krunch. I had excluded all the other characters introduced 
in Diddy Kong Racing because seemed more like Rareware types and 
they hadn't appeared in a game since. However, Mega Rose points out 
that Krunch is a Kremling and therefore part of the Donkey Kong 
canon.

=======================================================================

LADY LIMA
Occupation: Queen Bean's advisor
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

Looking just a bit like Impa, Princess Zelda's nursemaid from the 8-bit 
Legend of Zelda days, Lady Lima helps Mario and Luigi on their 
adventures through Beanbean Kingdom - until the brothers prove 
they live up to their superstar status by fixing the leaky plumbing in 
Beanbean Castle. 

Once the pipes are tightened, Mario and Luigi find a second Lady 
Lima in the basement. Surely enough the Lima who plunked the 
brothers into the sewers is Cackletta's servant Fawful in disguise - 
and, strangely, the key to disarming the castle's security is fixing the 
plumbing. Eventually, Mario and Luigi restore order in Beanbean 
Castle and the real Lady Lima assists the brothers however they can.

She's a tiny, old confidante to a ruler in the tradition of Toadsworth or 
Kammy Koopa. In fact, Toadsworth and Lady Lima tearfully embrace 
at the end of the game, before he and the regular crew head back to the 
Mushroom Kingdom.

=======================================================================

LAKILESTER
[Japanese name: Pokopi]
Occupation: Rebel with a lame name
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Initially, Lakilester appears as one of Bowser's agents, introduces 
himself as Spike and then attacks. When Mario trounces him, his 
girlfriend Lakilulu arrives and begs Mario to forgive Lakilester, calling 
him by that instead of Spike even though Lakilester hates his given 
name. When Mario does, this mohawk-and-shades dude joins the party 
to atone for his crimes in Flower Field. As a Lakitu - the cloud-
riding, Spiny-tossing Koopas who have plagued Mario since the 
original Mario Bros. - Lakilester can fight enemies by throwing 
Spiny eggs or help Mario by letting him ride on his cloud.

Once Mario defeats Huff N. Puff, the one behind all the cloud-covered 
mayhem, Lakilester realizes that helping people isn't so bad. He 
reforms and pledges to help Mario through the rest of his quest. 

=======================================================================

LAKILULU
[Japanese name: Pokona]
Occupation: Worried girlfriend
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

With Lakilester's rebel attitude and Lakilulu's overprotective nature, 
the couple seems like a teenager movie from the fifties. Lakilulu has a 
red ponytail and demands that Mario forgive Lakilester for his crimes, 
lest she bop Mario with a Spiny egg.

=======================================================================

LAKITU
[Japanese name: Jegum/Jegumu]
Occupation: Cloud-riding, Spiny-groomer
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. (1985)

Lakitu, the bespectacled Koopa riding a cloud, debuted as a minor 
villain in the original Super Mario Bros. He'd cruise the sky and pelt 
Mario with eggs that would hatch into Spinys, dim-witted baddies with 
spiked shells.

More and more often, however, Lakitu helps Mario and his friends 
rather than Bowser. In Super Mario Bros. 3, players could use his 
cloud as an item to pass over a stage without having to play it. In 
Super Mario World, Lakitus would dangle tempting items from 
fishhooks. Even Mario knocked Lakitu out of his cloud, Mario could 
actually ride in the cloud for a short time. Lakitu always appears as the 
race master in the Mario Kart franchise. He holds the start light, marks 
how many laps you've driven and snatches you out of a hole or water 
with his fishing pole. In Super Mario 64, a team of photojournalist 
Lakitus filmed Mario's progress and controlled the camera angle from 
which the player viewed Mario.

Many players might think Paper Mario's Lakilester is the first-ever 
playable Lakitu, but Lakitu technically first showed up a few years 
before in Tetris Attack. When Nintendo remade Panel du Pon as Tetris 
Attack, they replaced all the fairies with Yoshi's Island characters. 
Probably because Lakitus have that cloud motif, a generic Lakitu 
replaced the air fairy Windy.

(SiR6 pointed out to me that Spinys are not actually Koopas in the 
turtle sense. They're actually kin to Buzzy Beetles and Spike Tops. It 
actually makes sense if you look at the sprite. Furthermore, Spiny 
seems to share a bit of programming with Buzzy Beetle in Super 
Mario Bros. 3. SiR6 tells me that a debug mode proves the connection 
because the Kuribo's Shoe item appears graphically distorted in any 
level not featuring a Spiny, which makes sense, since this rare power-
up only appears in the Spiny-populated level 5-3. The exception is any 
level featuring Buzzy Beetle. Thus, the two baddies use the same 
template sprite. Off subject, I realize, but this will just have to wait 
here until I compose a profile for Spiny.)

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR LAKITU***
These airborne menaces used to ride their clouds exclusively as 
Bowser's henchmen. They typically hover just out of Mario's reach and 
hurl Spinys with irritating precision. More recently, however, they've 
been known to take on less evil tasks, such as doing camera work for 
sports events and even helping Mario on his quests.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR LAKITU***

Other appearances:
Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Picross NP Vol. 6 (Super Famicom) - 2000
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

LANKY KONG 
Occupation: The long arm of the Kong
Only appearance: Donkey Kong Country 64 (1999)

The only orangutan in the Kong clan - or at least the only one we've 
met so far. A distant cousin to the Kong clan, Lanky Kong fights like 
an orange-furred fury. Lanky has the unique ability of stretching his 
arms to reach out-of-the-way objects and enemies.

Lanky's status as an orangutan brings up an interesting question about 
the Kong family. Donkey is an ape. Chunky is a gorilla. Diddy and 
Tiny seem to be monkeys. Perhaps the Kongs are a family only in the 
extended sense? The mind boggles.... In the end, though, it may be a 
moot point, as Lanky and the other characters who debuted in Donkey 
Kong 64 seem to have vanished since Rare left Nintendo.

=======================================================================

LAVA PIRANHA
Occupation: Hot-tempered weed
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

The boss of Mt. Lavalava, a volcano on the verge of eruption. The 
Lava Piranha is just an overgrown Piranha Plant that's adapted to 
living in the boiling hot lava.

=======================================================================

LEE and CHAN
Occupation: Martial arts students
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

The Master's two students at the dojo in Toad Town. Lee is a Buzzy 
Beetle. Chan is a Duplighost. Their names reference those two famous 
martial artists, Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan. Nintendo made a similar 
reference in the Pokémon series with two martial arts Pokémon: 
Hitmonlee and Hitmonchan.

=======================================================================

LILY
[Japanese name: Suireen]
Occupation: Bathing beauty
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A scatterbrained water lily growing in Flower Fields. Her pond has run 
dry, however, and only the missing Water Crystal can end the drought. 
Mario must retrieve the crystal from selfish Rose to save Lily.

=======================================================================

LIZARDON
Occupation: Dino guy
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A purple dinosaur. He's the twelfth boss.

=======================================================================

LUIGI [new]
[also known as Luigi Mario, Player Two, Mr. Green; alternate 
Japanese spelling: Ruiji]
Occupation: Heroic Plumber's Little Brother
First appearance: Mario Bros. (1983)

[luigi]


GREEN GREENS


Green fireballs and green-striped raccoon tails aside, this lean, 
mean stringbean has been playing second fiddle to Mario since his 
introduction in Mario Bros. At least in his first appearance, Luigi 
shared screen time with Mario. The two battled for coins and high 
scores in the Brooklyn sewers. In most subsequent games, he'd be 
relegated to Player Two.

Like the whole Mario-"marui" thing, the explanation for Luigi's 
name may lie in the native language of the guys who invented him. 
Japanese has the word "ruiji," meaning "similar." Since Luigi was 
originally a palette swap, this connection also makes sense. Of 
course, Luigi's also just a common Italian name - and, also, 
allegedly a pizza parlor near Nintendo of America's original 
headquarters - so maybe this is just a meaningless coincidence 
after all.

As far as most of the games storylines go, Luigi is Mario's 
younger, taller, thinner brother. The Nintendo Database points out 
that although Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island indicated that 
the brothers were twins, games before or since have stated 
otherwise. Thus, for the purposes of this guide, Baby Mario and 
Baby Luigi are being treated as separate characters and given 
separate bios. Screw continuity.

In Super Mario Bros., you can tell the difference between Mario 
and Luigi because Luigi sported white and green duds. (His 
moustache is also a bit green, thanks to lousy 8-bit color 
restraints.) He wore the same shirt and overalls in the Japanese 
sequel too, but it's The Lost Levels that differentiated Luigi from 
his brother in a much more important way: Luigi could jump 
higher. Aside from hair-pulling difficulty, booby-trap poison 
toadstools, and heavy winds that affected on-screen movement, 
The Lost Levels threw Luigi's superior jumping ability into the 
mix. Players could choose to rescue Peach as Mario, who had 
tighter controls, or Luigi, who could leap higher and farther but 
tended to slide a bit when he got going too fast. Luigi would 
continue to out-jump Mario in the American Super Mario Bros. 2, 
the Game Boy advance versions of Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super 
Mario World, and both Smash Bros. games.

Logically, when Nintendo revamped the Doki Doki Panic engine 
with Mario characters for the American sequel, Luigi took the 
place of high-jumping - but slow-digging and slow-turnip 
plucking - Mama character. Inexplicably, his legs made a bicycle 
kick ever time he jumped. This adventure allowed Luigi his own 
sprite, so he looked taller and thinner than Mario.


IN HIS BROTHER'S SHADOW


As time passed, however, Luigi's role in the canon series of Mario 
games diminished. For example, in Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super 
Mario World, Luigi once again was a palette swap of Mario, a 
slight that wouldn't be corrected until the two games' respective 
Super Mario Advance updates. Although he raced his friends in 
Super Mario Kart, Luigi would be further ignored in later Super 
NES games. 

In 1993, Luigi starred in Mario Is Missing!, an "edutainment" title. 
For the uninitiated, edutainment games teach children about 
geography or math. They also suck balls. In this game, Bowser 
nabs Mario for a change, so Luigi sets out to rescue Mario by 
learning about geography. And no, not Mushroom Kingdom 
geography - ours. Like, Paris and London and stuff. And there's 
something about Bowser wanting to melt Earth's polar ice caps. 
Totally lame. So sure, Luigi gets to be the main character, but this 
game's innate crappiness this starring role ultimately a slap in his 
mustachioed face.

No matter what people decide the "L Is Real 2041" inscription on 
the castle courtyard fountain might mean, Luigi got screwed out of 
appearing in Super Mario 64 altogether. 

Luigi's Mansion, the title that launched the Gamecube in late 2001, 
finally permitted the green guy the lead in a game that doesn't 
suck. This is especially notable in that Luigi's co-star is a vacuum 
cleaner. In the game's set-up, Luigi wins a contest he doesn't 
remember entering. The prize: a giant mansion. Around the same 
time, Mario goes missing. Geography won't help Luigi this time, 
however. His mansion is full of ghosts. With the help of a 
flashlight, the ingenious Professor E. Gadd, and the Poltergust 
3000, a spook-sucking vacuum cleaner. The gameplay is a 
departure from typical Mario antics, as its overhead view, search-
and-explore interface owes more to the Legend of Zelda games 
than the hop-and-bop mechanics of the Mario games. Nonetheless, 
it's populated with Mario series mainstays like Boos enough that 
it's unmistakably part of the family. 

Luigi's Mansion helped may have ushered in a new generation of 
Mario games on the Gamecube, but Nintendo still neglected to 
include the other brother in Super Mario Sunshine, which most 
gamers recognize as the next canon Mario game in the series 
following Super Mario 64. 

The injustice of being shut out of the Nintendo 64 version of Super 
Mario 64, however, was righted with the game's port to the 
Nintendo DS. Players could finally choose to play as Luigi - but 
only after Mario frees him. Fittingly, the key to poor Luigi's door 
was secreted away in the Boo's Mansion stage, keeping up with 
Luigi's feud with ghosts. Once out and about, Luigi proves to be 
the most nimble of the four heroes in Super Mario 64 DS. He can 
perform some floaty acrobatic moves and can also sprint across 
water for short distances. Futhermore, Luigi can also touch the 
Power Flower to gain the invisibility power-up. This would mark 
the first-ever instance of a Luigi-specific power-up in a Mario 
game.


A LITTLE MORE GREEN IN THE MIX


So while the mainstream Mario games might have started to shun 
Luigi more and more, the RPG series has become quite a bit kinder 
to the green guy, especially in recent years. 

Luigi is basically absent from Super Mario RPG: Legend of the 
Seven Stars, save for a few blink-and-you-miss-it cameo in the 
ending as the leader of a parade of the game's cast and, as the 
Sunset Kid points out, in an obscure "non-corporeal" cameo on 
Star Hill. Mario and company can walk about the hill and overhear 
the different wishes characters have made by checking out fallen 
wishing stars on the ground. One star was wished upon by 
somebody who wants to be "a great plumber like my brother, 
Mario." Clearly, it's the L man.

The sequel to Super Mario RPG, Paper Mario, offered Luigi a bit 
more to do than merely be neglected. He sulked. While Mario 
ventured around the world to stop Bowser and rescue Peach, 
homebody Luigi hung out at the brothers' pad and made humorous 
observations. Mario could peek at Luigi's diary now and then for 
some insight into his shy brother. Luigi had confided in his diary 
that although he enjoyed the go-kart racing and golf and tennis and 
parties, he maybe enjoyed letting Mario hog the spotlight. Maybe, 
he wondered, he could have his own game one day. A short time 
later, Luigi's Mansion debutted on the Gamecube.

Luigi finally got to share the top billing with Mario in Mario and 
Luigi: Superstar Saga, their first RPG for the Game Boy Advance. 
The two brothers took turns leading one another through Beanbean 
Kingdom, a neighboring land to the Mushroom Kingdom. Only by 
constantly switching into the leader position and using their 
various skills in combination could the brothers triumph over the 
evil witch Cackletta. Luigi's participation in this trip is initially 
involuntary. He's serenely hanging his laundry to dry when Mario 
races out to rescue Peach from Cackletta's attack. Luigi, and the 
laundry, get tangled up with Mario as he races to the Mushroom 
Kingdom castle.

At one point in the quest, Luigi goes solo. The prize for trying a 
new game at the video arcade in Little Fungitown is an 
Invincishroom - a scientific revolution that combines a 1-up 
mushroom with a invincibility-granting Super Star. Mario chows 
down, but promptly falls ill. A doctor diagnoses Mario's illness as 
Bean Fever, which often befalls travelers not accustomed to 
Beanbean cuisine and can - if not properly treated - transform 
its victim into a bean. The only cure: Crabbie Grass, which grows 
in Guffawha Ruins. Peach, visiting from the Mushroom Kingdom 
begs Luigi to go. Only hypnotizing Luigi into thinking he's his 
more courageous brother get him to stop shaking cowardly and 
trek through the ruins. (Later in the game, that gloryhog Mario 
thanks Luigi by flattening him and riding him as a makeshift 
surfboard.) 

Luigi shines once again, near the game's end, when he dons a wig 
and a dress of Princess Peach's to fool Cackletta into thinking he's 
the real monarch. The ruse works, momentarily, and Cackletta 
drops the real Peach and grabs Luigi. A short time later, however, 
Cackletta wonders why "Peach" covers her nose and mouth. She 
shouts that a cockroach is right behind "Peach," tricking "her" into 
revealing the schnoz and moustache formerly covered by hands. 
Open fire on poor Luigi, but he escapes with the Beanstar. 

The Mario RPG series proved to be kinder to Luigi again with its 
latest installment, Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. 
Although Luigi's appearance essentially amounted to an extended 
cameo, Luigi purportedly went on his own quest throughout the 
game, collecting pieces of the Marvelous Compass in an effort to 
locate and rescue Éclair, the never-seen princess of Waffle 
Kingdom. (A very Zelda-esque plot, if you ask me.) Between the 
various chapters of the game's main, Mario-centric quest, Mario 
could find his brother hanging around the streets of Rogueport, 
eager to introduce his new partners - Blooey, Jerry Torque, 
Hayzee and Screamy - or relate his recent escapades. Eventually, 
Luigi's adventures are published in book form and sold at the 
Rogueport general store at the multi-volume "Super Luigi." 

Throughout the game, Luigi and various other characters wonder if 
Luigi will ever get his own game - "Paper Luigi," perhaps? 
Seeing as how the first Paper Mario alluded to Luigi's Mansion 
being a solo-Luigi title, one has to wonder if perhaps the man in 
green will one day claim the RPG series from his brother. I could 
happen.


KING OF THE EXTRACURRICULARS


Mario may take precedence over Luigi in the games that require 
somebody to fight a bad guy, but in the other Mario games - the 
ones where the crew is driving go-karts, playing sports or attending 
unusual parties - Luigi always shows up. Sure, it may be for no 
other reason than to round out the cast, but he's there as a 
selectable character all the same.

Luigi, for example, was playable right from the get-go in Super 
Mario Kart, the game that launched the Mario spin-off craze. Its 
sequel, Mario Kart 64, marks Luigi's first appearance on the 
Nintendo 64. For the first time, also, Luigi gets a racetrack named 
after himself. It's the first track and the most basic one. It sucks. 
But hey - it's there.

Nintendo graciously allowed Luigi into Super Smash Bros. as a 
secret character, in the ranks with Ness, Captain Falcon, and 
Jigglypuff. Luigi shared the spotlight with the rest of the crew 
through the Mario Party and sports games during the last days of 
the Nintendo 64. In Mario Tennis, notably, he even got his own 
versions of Wario and Peach with the introduction of Waluigi as 
Luigi's rival and the reintroduction of Princess Daisy, this time as 
a potential love interest for Luigi.

He returned for the second Smash Bros., as well as the seemingly 
endless Mario Party sequels. He and Mario even teamed up for the 
Gamecube's go-kart outing, Mario Kart: Double Dash!! Their 
special weapon, of course, was their trademark fireball. Luigi's 
fireballs were green.

Luigi also appeared alongside his brother and the usual Mario crew 
in Mario Power Tennis. All the characters could wow their 
opponents with super moves, but Luigi's were perhaps the most 
interesting. In addition to an offensive shot the employed a plastic 
squeaky hammer, Luigi's repertoire also included a defensive shot 
wherein he sucked up the ball using his Poltergust 3000 and then 
fired it back.

Nintendo has apparently tried to right the wrong that has so long 
cast Luigi to the side. Who knows where he'll be as the Mario 
franchise forges onto the next generation of consoles? 

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR LUIGI***
Although Mario's younger brother has always played second 
fiddle, Luigi finally garnered the spotlight with his very own game, 
Luigi's Mansion. Things are looking up for the eternal understudy; 
he's even picked up his own rival in Waluigi. The day he's 
referred to as the "lean, mean, green machine" may not be too far 
off.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR LUIGI***

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR VACUUM LUIGI***
In a strange twist of fate, Luigi wins a huge mansion in a contest 
he didn't even enter, and the place turns out to be haunted! After 
meeting a weird professor named Elvin Gadd, Luigi enters the 
place armed with a flashlight and a ghost-sucking vacuum cleaner. 
Mario's trapped somewhere in there! Can Luigi save him?
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR VACUUM LUIGI***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Mario
Personal racecar: The Green Fire
Special weapon: Green Fireballs

Luigi's starring roles:
Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Atari 2600) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Atari 5200) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Commodore 64) - 1984
Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
Wrecking Crew (NES) - 1985
Mario Bros. (Atari 7200) - 1985
Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
Mario Bros. (NES) - 1986
Mario Bros. 2 (Commodore 64) - 1987
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
Return of Mario Bros. (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
NES Open Tournament Golf (NES) - 1991
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Yoshi (Game Boy) - 1992
Yoshi (NES) - 1992
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Hotel Mario (CD-I) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1996
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 2 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1996
Game & Watch Gallery (Game Boy) - 1997
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1997
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Wrecking Crew '98 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1998
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Luigi's Mansion (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
NBA Street V3 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

Other appearances:
Tetris (NES) - 1989
F-1 Race (Game Boy) - 1991 
Mario Teaches Typing (PC and Mac) - 1991
Mario Paint (Super NES) - 1992
Mario & Wario (Super Famicom) - 1993
Stunt Race FX (Super NES) - 1994
Mario Clash (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (Nintendo 64) - 1998*
Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (Nintendo 64) - 2000**
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Animal Crossing (Gamecube) - 2001
Pikmin 2 (Gamecube) - 2004***
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

*as Ingo and as a portrait in Hyrule Castle
** as Gorman
*** as Louie

=======================================================================

LUMP 
Occupation: He's in my head
First appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

A fat, gray toad who looks more like a rock than an amphibian. Lump 
appears in Wario Land 3 and an enemy that obstructs Wario's path. He 
also croaks his way into Dr. Mario 64's story mode as a boss and into 
the multiplayer mode as a selectable charactet. 

Lump's appearances:
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001

=======================================================================

LUMPY 
[Japanese name: Mokorimu]
Occupation: Entreprenuer
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004) 

Lumpy hangs out around the Rogueport Harbor during the first few 
chapters of the game. He'll ask Mario for a loan - whatever he can 
spare to lend out, as long as it comes in multiples of a hundred. Much 
later, Lumpy will return from a successful oil drilling venture in Dry 
Dry Desert, an area Mario ventured through in the first Paper Mario. 
There, Lumpy tangles with Buzzar, Merluvlee, Moustafa and 
Kolorado, each of whom appeared in the first Paper Mario.
 
Lumpy is a Ratooey, a species introduced in Paper Mario: The 
Thousand-Year Door. They look like tall rats that sit on their hind legs. 
Curiously, only two appear in the entire game: Lumpy and the 
nameless businessman who rides the Excess Express.

=======================================================================

LUNA [new]
Occupation: Blue-haired pop sensation
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2005)

With a modest hit ranking fourth on the Diamond City's pop charts, 
you'd think Luna would be a recognizable face. I, however, can 
honestly not tell the difference between her face and that of Bridget the 
Baker, another Diamond City resident. Is this a result of lazy 
programmers or secret identities? I suppose we'll have to wait until the 
next WarioWare for an answer.

=======================================================================

LUNGE FISH
Occupation: Pond-dwelling snacker
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

A fish. He's a lot like Boss Bass, the Super Mario Bros. 3 baddie who 
will attempt to eat Mario whole. True to his name, the Lunge Fish 
pops out of the water in hopes of a Yoshi snack. He also is easily one 
of the ugliest fish in a Mario game.

The Lunge Fish is a selectable character in Tetris Attack, where he 
replaced the sea fairy Neris from the game's original Japanese version.

Lunge Fish's appearances:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

LYDIA
[Japanese name: Mamara]
Occupation: Ghost mother
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

Lydia is the second portrait ghost Luigi fights. She's Neville's wife 
and the mother of Chauncey, Henry and Orville. She's a self-absorbed 
woman who constantly brushes her hair in front of her vanity mirror. 
By pulling open the bedroom curtain, Lydia will notice a draft and go 
to close it. That's Luigi's moment to suck her up into his vacuum.

=======================================================================

MAPLE 
Occupation: Golfer
Only appearance: Mario Golf (1999)

Of the four generic human golfers in this game - Sonny, Charlie, 
Harry, Plum and Maple - only Maple really stands out in my mind. I 
remember she was a typical looking lady with short hair and a visor. If 
my memory serves, she was also one of the later players to be 
unlocked and therefore one of the best.

I'd almost put money on Maple's name somehow being a 
mistranslation of the more common girl's name "Mable," but there's 
always that tendency to name female characters after objects in the 
Marioverse. Then again, a witchy character named Maple shows up in 
Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons and Legend of Zelda: Oracle of 
Ages for Game Boy Color.

=======================================================================

MACK
Occupation: Smithy's minion
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

One of Smithy's henchmen, Mack hops around on a giant knife. Mario 
meets him when he returns to the Mushroom Kingdom from Bandit's 
Way, where he helped Mallow fight Croco. Mario and Mallow find the 
town overrun by Mack's horde of Shysters, pogo stick-mounted Shy 
Guys. Once Mario and Mallow fight and defeat Mack in the throne 
room of Peach's Castle, they earn their first Star Piece.

Mack's name is probably a reference to the old song "Mack the 
Knife."

=======================================================================

MADAME CLAIRVOYA
[Japanese name: Madam Mieru]
Occupation: Fortune teller
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

What would a mansion be without a fortune teller's room? And what 
would a fortune teller's room be without a fortune teller? 

The haunted mansion has both. Madam Clairvoya's specializes in 
reading fortunes by examining personal affects. As such, it's in Luigi's 
interest to bring Madame Clairvoya the five items Mario dropped on 
his way through the mansion - his hat, his shoe, his glove, a letter he 
wrote and a star. Once Luigi's shows her all of Mario's lost items, 
Madam Clairvoya decides she's done speaking with the spirits. 
Instead, she's ready for the next astral plain - or at least the comfort 
of her oil paint prison in a picture frame. She won't even attempt to 
resist him. 

According to Madame Clairvoya's bio on the Game Boy Horror, her 
crystal ball only lets her see forty-nine days into the future.

Most people probably realize that Madame Clairvoya's name is an 
obvious pun on the word "clairvoyant," which refers to the ability to 
see things beyond the normal range of perception.

=======================================================================

MALLOW
Occupation: Not a tadpole
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

When the promotional material for Super Mario RPG first showed up 
Nintendo Power, I was confused. It introduced Mario's partner 
Mallow as a tadpole. Mallow looks like a ball of cotton with pants. I 
just assumed tadpoles looked different in Japan.

Mario bumps into the marshmallow-like Mallow, a white pile of puffy 
with a tiny shock of pink hair, just as his only coin has been stolen by 
the crocodile bully Croco. Poor little Mallow breaks into tears and 
immediately a rainstorm drenched the Mushroom Kingdom. Mario 
agrees to help Mallow and the two crush Croco.

When Mario accompanies Mallow back to his home, Tadpole Pond, he 
meets Mallow's "grandfather," the wise frog sage Frogfucius. 
Frogfucius advises the pair as to the location of Bowser, Peach and the 
Star Pieces. He also reveals that Mallow is not a tadpole - a 
revelation that anybody with a brain should have seen coming a mile 
away. Mallow starts crying again and the weather turns to rain.

The journey to find the star pieces eventually takes the pair to Nimbus 
Land, the city in the clouds. The buildings are clouds. The ground is 
clouds. And all of the people are made of fluffy white clouds - just 
like Mallow. Here, Mario and Mallow also arrive just in time for a 
royal proclamation: the return of the long-lost Prince Mallow! Only 
the Prince Mallow introduced is an overweight toucan. The phony 
prince proposes to a birdbrained ditz named Valentina, making Mario 
and Mallow suspicious of the state of Nimbus Land.

In the studio of the famed sculptor Garro, Mario and Mario find what 
appears to be a statue of Mallow. Garro, however explains that the 
statue is of Nimbus Land's present king as a child. Figuring that 
Mallow is almost certainly the kingdom's rightful prince. With Garro's 
help, Mario and Mallow infiltrate royal palace and eliminate Valentina 
and the fake prince. Tossing Valentina's butt out of the clouds means 
freeing the rightful king and queen. Mallow has a naturally tearful 
reunion with his parents and with his new royal title Mario's group 
gets access to the formerly off-limits Barrel Volcano.

As the prince of Nimbus Land, Mallow can control all matter of 
weather phenomena. He can use this power to shock and freeze his 
opponents or heal them with a refreshing shower. Mallow's magic is 
so powerful that during his spells, Mallow literally jumps out of his 
pants. He's also skilled in hand-to-hand combat with Frogfucius' staff 
or a pair of cymbals.

Because Square owns the rights to the characters created for Super 
Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars, Mallow has yet to reappear. 

=======================================================================

MANGLYLOX
Occupation: Orange thing
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

You could have fooled me, but the Mushroom Kingdom website's 
Mariopedia describes this boss as a hairy, orange dragon.

========================================================================

MARCHING MILDE
[Japanese name: Puchipuchi]
Occupation: Placid Puffball
Only appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island

Easily one of the friendliest-looking bosses in a Mario game, 
Marching Milde is a giant pink puffball who bears a more-than-
passing resemblance to that other Nintendo mascot, Kirby. Milde isn't 
nearly as cool as Kirby, though. He (she?) doesn't do much besides 
slowly trudge forward. Yoshi must perform his hip drop stomping 
move onto Milde's head, which causes him/her to divide into two 
smaller Mildes. Keep stomping until Milde is no more.

Milde is a giant version of a smaller but equally harmless baddie in 
Yoshi's Island called Mini Milde.

Marching Milde's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

MARIO 
[also known as Mario Mario, Jumpman, the Great Gonzales]
Occupation: Heroic plumber
First appearance: Donkey Kong (1981)

[mario]


IT'S-A ME, JUMPMAN!


If you've reading video game FAQs and still need to read this to find 
out who Mario is, you must be from Mars - in fact, a cave in one of 
the more remote parts of Mars. But hey. We're not all perfect.

Mario, the Italian stereotype we all know and love today, is the 
product of the gaming genius of Nintendo pioneers Shigeru Miyamoto 
and Gunpei Yokoi. In the early days of Nintendo's arcade business, 
Mr. Yukoi dreamed up a nifty little game where a jump-happy hero 
could dodge rolling obstacles and save his sweetheart from a big 
brutish bad guy. Donkey Kong, right? 

Not yet.

The preliminary Donkey Kong engine originally was designed with 
Popeye characters; Mario was originally Popeye, Pauline was Olive 
Oyl, and Donkey Kong was supposed to be Bluto. However, Nintendo 
couldn't snag the rights to the Popeye characters, so in 1981 the guys 
at Nintendo re-designed the game with a different starring trio: a 
mustachioed hero, a red-dressed damsel, and a big brutish ape. Only 
Donkey Kong had an actual name at this point, though; Mario was 
instead referred to as "Jumpman." This proto-Mario was not even a 
plumber in his earliest incarnation, but a carpenter. Could the pink 
scaffolding Mario climbs to rescue Pauline presumably be some 
building Jumpman is working on?

The programming limits of the early video game age dictated 
Jumpman's appearance. Hair was hard to animate, so programmers 
gave him a hat. Mouths, apparently, were too hard to animate back 
then, so Jumpman got a moustache. Those suspenders helped give 
Jumpman's body a crude suggestion of arm movement. And sideburns 
helped differentiate his ears. Jumpman jumped over endless volleys of 
barrels all the way to the game's sequel the following year.

According to video game folklore, it's during this interim that 
Nintendo of America president Minoru Arakawa coined the name 
"Mario" when he saw Jumpman for the first time. Arakawa decided 
Mario bore a resemblance to NOA's landlord Mario Segali. It stuck. 

On a side note, Mario's name may also have some relevance in 
Japanese as well. In Japanese the word "marui" means "round" or 
"ball-like." Those who've played Metroid might remember that the 
item that allows Samus to transform into a ball is called the Maru 
Mari. Anyway, of the two Mario brothers, Mario is certainly the fatter 
and rounder one. But though he already looked portly in his early days, 
whether his pudge had any bearing on his name has yet to be verified.

He might have gotten himself a name, but Mario lost his spotlight to 
his old nemesis' son in Donkey Kong Jr. in 1982. Donkey Kong now 
awaited a rescue in a cage, Mario stood guard with a whip, while DK 
Jr. swung from vine to vine to rescue his dad. Quite odd to think of 
Mario as the villain, but I guess that's the case sometimes - 
especially if your last name is "Koopa" or "Kong" or "the Hedgehog."


INTO THE PIPES


Nintendo released another sequel to Donkey Kong in 1983, but this 
installment did not star Mario. Instead, a different release that same 
year put the "brother" in Mario Bros. with the introduction of Mario's 
younger brother Luigi: Mario's sprite with red overalls replaced with 
green ones. And yes, Luigi's last name is Mario. So is Mario's. Hence 
the name "Mario Bros." In this game, the boys battled monsters - and 
each other - in the leaky pipes of the sewers. 

Presumably, these sewers are in Mario's alleged homeland, Brooklyn, 
New York, and not the Mushroom Kingdom, but the truthfulness of 
this backstory is questionable - more a product of Nintendo of 
America's repackaging of the title that was further perpetuated by 
Mario-related books and cartoons released in the U.S. Honestly, if you 
think about in-game text - that being the info most highly prized in 
this guide - there's no mention of Mario and Luigi existing in this 
world. So we could just as easily assume that Mario has always lived 
in the Mushroom Kingdom. Yes, being Italian-American is an integral 
part of his appearance - thick, black moustache as an Italian-
American man could have -  and his heavily accented speech - what 
with his "Mama mias" aplenty. But Nintendo may just as easily have 
retconned this element out of existence, while preserving the look and 
the accent. It's a tough one, with good arguments either way. I'm not 
intending to settle it here, since I think it's good for fans to judge for 
themselves.

The one thing Nintendo did set in stone was Mario's profession as a 
plumber. Miyamoto has said in an interview that the he wanted Mario 
to have a solid, hard-working occupation. Mario Bros. also introduced 
a slew of gaming elements that became trademarks of the series. Aside 
from Luigi's status as Player Two, Mario Bros. introduced jumping as 
the brothers' primary method of attacking their enemies. Fireballs 
bounced across the playing field and POW blocks only needed one 
knock to send enemies tumbling. Most interestingly, the Koopa 
Troopa basically made its entrance in Mario Bros. as the Shellcreeper. 

With all the basics pretty well established, Mario made the transition 
from the arcade to the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1985. Some 
faulty plumbing warped Mario and his brother to the Mushroom 
Kingdom just in time to rescue Princess Peach (then Toadstool) from 
the clutches of Bowser, the King of the Koopa. On this adventure (and 
pretty much every subsequent one) Mario could power-up by snagging 
items. Interestingly, this power-up system inferred that Mario's shorter 
form was his natural one. Mario started the game little - half the size 
of Super Mario. Indeed, Miyamoto has said in interviews that "[the 
designers] wanted him to be shorter than the enemy characters and 
princesses he rescues." 

As many players already know, the details surrounding the first 
follow-up to Super Mario Bros. are quite complicated. 

In 1986, Japanese Nintendo players got what amounts to an extreme 
version of the original Super Mario Bros. - the same sprites and 
music with only slight modifications. Frustratingly hard levels and the 
choice between playing with Mario or Luigi set it apart from its 
predecessor, but Nintendo of Japan apparently decided American 
players would not be interested in this adventure. Instead, Nintendo 
monkeyed with the programming of the 1987 Japanese release Doki 
Doki Panic and replaced its heroes - a quaint Arabian family - with 
Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Peach. The American version 
eventually did hit Japanese shores in 1992 as Super Mario USA; The 
Lost Levels was featured on both ubercollection Super Mario All-Stars 
in 1993 and Super Mario Deluxe in 1999. 

In the American Super Mario Bros. 2, Mario and crew plucked and 
chucked turnips at a whole new legion of baddies. The gameplay was 
nothing like any previous or subsequent Mario game. Stomping didn't 
work in Subcon, the land of Dreams, so heroes had to pull root 
vegetables from the ground and kill bad guys with those. 

The game's different feel didn't stop with combat techniques. The 
backgrounds consisted of 8-bit interpretations of palm trees and weird, 
ovular clouds. Powering-up meant throwing a red potion on the 
ground, which predictably turned into a door, and venturing into a 
dreamy, silhouetted subspace. And somehow, the residents of Subcon 
grew rocket ships in the soil next to the turnips and radishes.

Fittingly, Nintendo explained the game's innate weirdness by 
explaining the whole thing as a kooky dream Mario has. And while 
plunk-and-chuck vegetable warfare vanished from the Marioverse 
after Super Mario Bros. 2, a lot of elements remained in the series. 
Many of the enemies, notably Bob-Ombs, Pokeys, Shy Guys, and 
Birdo, showed up again and again in later games, despite the fact that 
the plot of Super Mario Bros. 2 was explained as a dream. Whatever.


MARIO GETS HIGHER AND HIGHER


With Super Mario Bros. 3, Mario returned to a more standard plan of 
attack: jump and stomp. Bowser declares war on the Mushroom 
World, the area beyond the Mushroom Kingdom. With the help of 
some magical suits, Mario and Luigi set out to stop Bowser and his 
seven bratty children. The brothers could transform into a frog, a 
Hammer Brother, or a mythical Japanese raccoon. Miyamoto has said 
in interviews that he had even considered having Centaur Mario be 
one of Mario's possible transformations.

Oddly, even though Super Mario Bros. 3 is the best-selling video game 
of all time - 15 million copies worldwide at the time of my writing 
this - and was even featured in the 1989 film The Wizard, few 
features from this game became regular features in the series. Mario's 
animal suits all but vanished - at least until Mario and Luigi: 
Superstar Saga, 20003's Game Boy Advance RPG, in which the 
brothers fought Tanoombas, freaky Tanooki-mushroom hybrids. The 
Koopalings also got pushed to the backburner with the introduction of 
the eighth Koopaling, Bowser Jr. Even the iconic raccoon tail got 
replaced with the Super Cape in Super Mario World. As far as 
enemies, Thwomps and Boos premiered in Super Mario Bros. 3, but 
far more of the series' regulars were drawn from Super Mario Bros. 2 
or Super Mario World. Odd.

Mario leaped into 16-bit glory in 1991 with Super Mario World, in 
which Miyamoto's dreams of Mario riding an animal buddy were 
finally realized with the introduction of Yoshi. Yoshi instantly became 
a staple of the Mario games, and has since starred a few of his own 
games, including Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island, which told the 
story of Baby Mario's traumatic delivery to his parents. (For the 
purposes of this FAQ, Mario and Baby Mario are being treated as 
separate characters. To find out why, read Baby Mario's section.)

Oddly, it was as late as Super Mario World that Mario's onscreen 
appearance became finalized, likely since 16-bit games allowed 
enough characters on his sprite to reflect what his artwork in the 
instruction booklet looked like. Mario's consistently appeared slightly 
pudgy, but his clothes changed from game to game during his 8-bit 
days.

In Donkey Kong, Mario sported a blue shirt and red overalls - the 
opposite of his present outfit. In Super Mario Bros, however, the 
mustachioed one wore a green shirt and red overalls. These clothes 
never appeared again. His look in Super Mario Bros. 2 matched his 
present one, but in Super Mario Bros. 3, Mario's overalls were black. 
His look since Super Mario World, however, has stuck.


FROM SIDE-SCROLLING TO ANYWHERE-SCROLLING


It's a cliché, really, to write about how Mario revolutionized anything. 
Nonetheless, Mario took video games in a radically new direction with 
his premiere in the 3-D world of the Nintendo 64's flagship title, Super 
Mario 64. This game was the first 3-D adventure of its type. In it, 
Mario could move about arenas in any direction. Other video game 
companies mimicked it like crazy. In Super Mario 64, Mario rescued 
Princess Peach from the imprisonment inside her own castle by diving 
through magical paintings and explored the worlds inside them. 
Jumping and stomping was again central to gameplay, but now Mario 
could finally punch and kick his enemies - and send them flying in 
any direction, no less. Specially powered hats lent Mario the powers of 
flight, invisibility, and.... um... metal. Perhaps most importantly, 
however, Super Mario 64 marked Charles Martinet's debut as the 
plumber's voice. Martinet's vocal work may verge on stereotypical 
Italian quips like "Mama mia!" and "It's-a me, Mario!" but he's been 
faithfully voicing Mario - and, in later games, Luigi, Wario, and 
Waluigi as well - ever since. 

It's curious, though, to think that despite how much Super Mario 64 
might have changed video games, it marked the only installment of the 
main Mario series for the Nintendo 64. (By the main series, of course, 
I mean the platformers, which would include Super Mario 64 and 
Super Mario Sunshine, but not the RPG games and the like.) Indeed, 
the Nintendo 64 marked the age of the spin-offs. Rather than fighting 
Bowser, Mario spent much more time games with him - golf, tennis, 
and funky large-scale boards games. 

The Nintendo Gamecube debuted in 2001. Most interestingly, this 
system's launch title, Luigi's Mansion, featured Mario only in a minor 
role. Mario's first big game for Nintendo's first disc-based system is 
Super Mario Sunshine. Essentially, a modification of the Super Mario 
64 engine, Mario trades in some of his more acrobatic moves for 
F.L.U.D.D. (the Flash Liquidizer Ultra Dousing Device), a 
superpowered water pistol designed by the ingenious Dr. E. Gadd. 
Super Mario Sunshine unfolds during Mario and Peach's vacation on 
the tropical Isle Delfino, so Mario also sports rolled up sleeves and - 
with a little work - a Hawaiian shirt and sunglasses.


MARIO WITH HIT POINTS IS STILL MARIO


Mario's last appearance on the Super NES broke tradition by placing 
the plucky plumber in his first role playing game. Nintendo teamed up 
with Square, the minds behind the RPG juggernaut Final Fantasy 
series, to tell the story of Mario's battle with Smithy, the 
extraterrestrial forger of weapons. Armed with a hammer, a Koopa 
Troopa shell and his trusty stomping boots, Mario fought alongside 
Princess Peach, Bowser (!), a puffball named Mallow, and an alien-
animated puppet named Geno. Super Mario RPG also showcased the 
first 3-D rendered models for Mario and the rest of his friends.

but he bid farewell to the Nintendo 64 in 2001 with Paper Mario - 
known in Japan is Paper Mario Story, which reduces to a funny 
acronym. A semi-sequel to Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven 
Stars, Mario again set out to piece the Star Road back together. This 
RPG, however, conspicuously lacked any characters from the first 
game. The rift caused by Squares decision to develop games for the 
Sony Playstation instead of the Nintendo 64 meant none of the cast 
introduced in Super Mario RPG could appear, as Square owned the 
rights to all of them.

Sans Square, Nintendo took Paper Mario in a different direction: flat. 

By giving the entire game the look of cut-out characters in a picture 
book, Nintendo gave a new twist to the fight between Mario and 
Bowser. This time, Mario also had the help of a team of reformed 
baddies like Goombario, a Mario-idolizing Goomba, and Bombette, 
the cutest little explosive device in the world.

Unlike Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars, Paper Mario 
received a full-fledged sequel. Titled Paper Mario: The Thousand-
Year Door, the game sent Mario off to the dangerous streets of 
Rogueport, from which Peach had recently disappeared. Left with only 
an ancient treasure map, Mario trekked all across the continent in 
search of the Peach and the fabled Crystal Stars. The journey include 
all the typical RPG stops - the jungle, the desert, a haunted house - 
but this game took Mario as far as the moon - a feat a Mario game 
hasn't attempted since Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins.

As in the first Paper Mario, a small army of traveling buddies 
accompanied Mario on his journey, including revamps of buddies from 
the first game - Goombella, Koops and Bobbery - as well as wholly 
new ones - Flurrie, Vivian, Ms. Mowz and an unnamed Baby Yoshi. 
The game preserved the paper cut-out aesthetic of the first Paper 
Mario and even underscored it by giving Mario special power ups that 
allowed him to take advantage of the his paper form: he could roll up 
into a cylinder and roll, turn to the side to fit through narrow passages, 
fold into a paper airplane or even an origami boat. Though the game's 
main villains were the X-Nauts, a tribe of tech-savvy baddies, Mario 
eventually had to fight the Shadow Queen, an evil entity bent on 
bringing about the apocalypse. 


CREAMED SPINACH COLOR


While Mario starred in game after game on Nintendo's home systems, 
he also expanded his universe with a few titles for Nintendo's Game 
Boy. Though the Game Boy launched in 1989 with Tetris bundled into 
every package, Super Mario land premiered two months later. Mario 
visited Sarasaland to rescue Princess Daisy from crazed spaceman 
Tatanga. For the first time, Mario incorporated vehicles into his 
repertoire of goodies. Although his mini-plane - his "Sky Pop" - 
and mini-sub - his "Marine Pop" - were basically the same 
machine, two of Super Mario Land's twelve stages were essentially 
shooters - departures from the traditional side-scroller fare.

While Super Mario Land played much like a creamed spinach-colored 
version of Super Mario Bros, the second Game Boy game owed much 
of its look and feel to Super Mario World. In Super Mario Land 2: Six 
Golden Coins, Mario returned from rescuing Princess Daisy to his 
home in Mario Land to find that Wario had ganked his castle. While 
this plotline never explained where the hell this Mario Land came 
from or why Mario had built a castle there, it did introduce Mario's 
alterego, the villainous and greedy Wario. Like Yoshi, Wario became 
instantly popular and quickly commandeered the Mario Land series. 


WHAT WON'T MARIO DO?


If anyone deserved to relax in the meantime, it would be Mario. More 
and more often, he whiles away his hours playing any game he can. 
Following the advent of the Mario Kart franchise back in the days of 
the Super Nintendo, Mario seems happy to call his ever-growing stable 
of friends - and some enemies, oddly - together for polite 
competition, whether it be on the go-kart track, the tennis court, the 
golf course or even the baseball diamond. In nearly every game, Mario 
plays the well-rounded character. He's heaver than Peach, less 
squirrelly than Luigi and quicker than Bowser. The big exception to 
this rule is the Mario party franchise, in which none of the ever-
growing cast of partiers seems to have a physical edge over another.

It seems that Mario won't even stop at kicking the crap out of his usual 
crew. Twice now, Mario has starred in the Smash Bros. games, which 
pit him against familiar friends and mascots from other series. 

It begs the question: What will Mario's next hobby be?

(For a list of Mario's various powered-up forms, check the 
miscellaneous lists section at the end of the guide.)

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR MARIO***
Known worldwide as Mr. Nintendo, Mario uses his incredible jumping 
ability to thwart the evil Bowser time after time. While he's best 
known as a hero, Mario has played many roles, including racer, doctor, 
golfer, and villain. His tastes have changed over 20 years of gaming; 
he long ago swapped the colors of his shirt and overalls.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR MARIO***

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR RACCOON MARIO***
In Super Mario Bros. 3, Super Leafs caused Mario to grow raccoon 
ears and a tail. By sprinting and rapidly wagging the tail, Mario gained 
the ability to fly for short periods. Like the Cape in Super Mario 
World, the tail also reduced the speed at which he fell, making midair 
moves easier. Needless to say, real raccoons were jealous.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR RACCOON MARIO***

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR MARIO & YOSHI***
Yoshi was first introduced in Super Mario World, and the sight of 
Mario riding the helpful character soon became an enduring image. 
Despite his Cape, Mario can't fly while astride Yoshi. The pair can 
make huge jumps and drift slowly back to earth, though. As a last 
resort, Mario could leap off Yoshi's back to safety.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR MARIO & YOSHI***

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR METAL MARIO***
Mario was in for a surprise the first time he hit a Metal Box in Super 
Mario 64. The metal cap that popped out transformed Mario into living 
metal, giving him great stamina, a heavy tread, and the ability to walk 
underwater. In Super Smash Bros., Metal Mario showed up as an 
incredibly stubborn midlevel boss.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR METAL MARIO***

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PAPER MARIO***
The Star Rod: Bowser stole it, and Mario wants it back. Bowser vs. 
Mario is familiar for Mario aficionados, but Paper Mario is novel. 
What this game brings to the 3D polygon-filled gaming world is its art 
style: everything is wafer thin! What the visuals lack in realism, they 
more than make up for in unique artistry.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PAPER MARIO***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Luigi
Personal racecar: The Red Fire
Special weapon: Red Fireballs

Mario's starring roles:
Donkey Kong (Arcade) - 1981
Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade) - 1982
Donkey Kong (Atari 2600) - 1981
Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Atari 2600) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Atari 5200) - 1983
Mario Bros. (Commodore 64) - 1984
Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
Donkey Kong (NES) -1985
Wrecking Crew (NES) - 1985
Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
Mario Bros. (Atari 7200) - 1983
Donkey Kong Jr. (NES) - 1986
Mario Bros. (NES) - 1986
Mario Bros. 2 (Commodore 64) - 1987
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
Return of Mario Bros. (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Donkey Kong Jr. (Intellivision) - 1988
Donkey Kong Jr. (Colecovision) - 1988
Donkey Kong Jr. (Atari 7800) - 1988 
Donkey Kong Classics (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Land (Game Boy) - 1989
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
NES Open Tournament Golf (NES) - 1991
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Yoshi (Game Boy) - 1992
Yoshi (NES) - 1992
Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Game Boy) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong '94 (Game Boy) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Mario Clash (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1996
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 2 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1996
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Game & Watch Gallery (Game Boy) - 1997
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 3 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1997
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 4 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1997
Wrecking Crew '98 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1998
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario vs. Donkey Kong (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
NBA Street V3 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

Other appearances:
Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! (Arcade) - 1984
Donkey Kong Jr. Math (NES) - 1985
Golf (NES) - 1985
Tennis (NES) - 1985
Pinball (NES) - 1985
Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! (NES) - 1987
Tetris (NES) - 1989
Alleyway (Game Boy) - 1989
Baseball (Game Boy) - 1989
Earthbound Zero (NES) - 1989
Qix (Game Boy) - 1990
Mario Teaches Typing (PC and Mac) - 1991
F-1 Race (Game Boy) - 1991 
SimCity (Super NES) - 1991
Yoshi (Game Boy) - 1992
Yoshi (NES) - 1992
Mario Paint (Super NES) - 1992
Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (Super NES) - 1992
Super Play Action Football (Super NES) - 1992
Super Scope 6 LazerBlazer (Super NES) - 1992
Hotel Mario (CD-I) - 1992
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Super NES) - 1993
Mario & Wario (Super Famicom) - 1993
Mario's Time Machine (Super NES) - 1993
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (Game Boy) - 1993*
Mario's Time Machine (NES) - 1994
Stunt Race FX (Super NES) - 1994
Earthbound (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy) - 1994
Mario's Picross (Game Boy) - 1995
Mario's Picross 2 (Game Boy) - 1995
Undake 30 Same Game (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Pilot Wings 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Kirby Super Star (Super NES) - 1996
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (Game Boy Color) - 1998*
F-Zero X (Nintendo 64) - 1998**
Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (Nintendo 64) - 1998***
Picross NP Vol. 2 (Super Famicom) - 1999
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (Nintendo 64) - 2000*
Picross NP Vol. 6 (Super Famicom) - 2000
Luigi's Mansion (Gamecube) - 2001
Pikmin (Gamecube) - 2001*****
Pokémon Stadium 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
1080 Avalance (Gamecube) - 2003******
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Pikmin 2 (Gamecube) - 2004*****

* as Tarin 
** as Mr. EAD
*** as Talon
**** as a mask on the back of the Happy Mask Saleman's pack
***** as Captain Olimar
****** on the bottom of Ricky Winterborn's snowboard

(Mario has appeared in more video games than any other video game 
character. Eat your hearts out, Sonic and Mega Man.)

=======================================================================

MASTER CRASH 
[Japanese name: Okutaru]
Occupation: Glitz Pit competitor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Bob-Omb afflicted with a bizarre speech impediment that forces 
him to say "BOMB!" every few words. He hangs out in the minor 
league locker room at the Glitz Pit and offers Mario advice. Mario 
must fight his team, the Bob-Omb Squad, in the Glitz Pit arena.

=======================================================================

MASTER NECKY 
Occupation: Bad bird with a big beak
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

A jumo version of the generic, vulture-like Necky baddie, Master 
Necky is the boss of the second area of Donkey Kong Country, the 
Monkey Mines. His ugly pink head slides in from either side of the 
screen just long enough to cough a nasty nut towards Donkey and 
Diddy - and, if they're fast enough, they'll have time to stomp his 
noggin while he's there.

Either Rare was trying to scrimp in character sprites or give Master 
Necky more character depth, because this boss shows up again as the 
boss of the game's sixth world, Chimp Caverns. The game remains the 
same, however. Beak. Nuts. Stomp. No biggie.

Master Necky's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

McGOOMBA 
[Japanese name: Makuri]
Occupation: Goomba-on-the-lam
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

A Goomba who hides out behind Zess T.'s kitchen. He claims he's a 
fugitive and asks Mario to deliver a package for him.

=======================================================================

MEGASMILAX 
[Japanese name: Flower Bud]
Occupation: Wicked weed
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

A Piranha Plant residing in Bean Valley with a hydra-like ability to 
grow multiple heads, each of which are referred to as "Smilax." 
Eventually, Smilax grows one big head that, when defeated, kills the 
whole plant. A Shy Away, a skittish, flying Shy Guy with a watering 
can, works for Valentina as the plant's caretaker.

"Smilax" is the Latin name for the plant "sarsaparilla," which is not 
carnivorous at all, oddly enough.

=======================================================================

MEIDOU
Occupation: Angry mermaid
Only appearance: Wario's Woods NES (1994)

The fourth boss in the NES Wario's Woods. Given that she's a dead 
ringer for Aqualea, the mermaid boss from the SNES Wario's Woods, 
I'm fairly certain that she's the same character. Perhaps "Meidou" is 
just her Japanese name.

=======================================================================

MELODY PIANISSIMA 
[Japanese name: Pian]
Occupation: Poltergeist pianist
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

She calls herself the "spectral lady of the ivory keys." If Luigi nudges 
the haunted instruments in the mansion's conservatory, they will each 
play the Super Mario Bros. theme and Melody, delighted by the ditty, 
will materialize. She then plays her concerto, the underwater music 
from Super Mario Bros. 3., and asks Luigi what the composer had in 
mind when he wrote that song. If Luigi answers "water," he gets to 
fight Melody and her possessed sheet music. Alternately, Melody 
could also play the stage music from the original Super Mario Bros. 
and ask Luigi to identify what game the tune comes from.

Her last name is a musical term meaning "very softly."

=======================================================================

MERLON (and his family)  
[Japanese name: Deaaru]
Occupation: Seer
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

The patriarch of a family of sages, Merlon resides in a spinning house 
in Toad Town. He's regarded as an eccentric by the Toads, but Merlon 
proves to be a helpful ally in Mario's quest to rescue the Star Spirits. 
When four sinister-looking Toads lurk around Toad Town, Merlon's 
magic reveals them to be the Koopa Bros. in disguise. After that, 
Mario can visit Merlon's house any time for direction on his quest.

Oddly, the model for Merlon and his kin seems to be drawn from 
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars. Square owns the rights 
to most of the cast, and as a result, most of the characters introduced in 
the game never showed up again - Geno being a notable exception. 
But the game featured a generic character who first appears as a 
merchant on the beach area before undersea portion of that game and 
later appears as a generic baddie in Valentina's castle. The robed 
figures had eyes glowed from beneath the shadows cast by their hoods 
- just like Merlon's clan. Whether this is a coincidence, I don't know, 
but it's certainly interesting that of all the characters in Super Mario 
RPG to bring back, Nintendo chose these guys.

Merlon apparently spent the interim between the first Paper Mario and 
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door growing his moustache. It's 
quite bushier in the sequel. Mario can visit his shop in Rogueport if he 
has three Shine Sprites, which Merlon will accept as payment for 
upgrading one of his buddies' fighting abilities.

However, there's some evidence that the Merlon in Rogueport actually 
isn't the Merlon in Toad Town - nor are the Merluvlees or Merlees 
the same, either. Wonky, a chatterbox who copious inside information 
on a number of characters in the Paper Mario series, mentions a certain 
tribe that names it members by profession. For example, someone with 
Merlon's job would always be called Merlon. This doesn't quite work, 
though, when you remember that Merlon doesn't have the same job 
from on Paper Mario to the next. In the first, for example, he tells 
Mario what he should do next. In the sequel, he upgrades Mario's 
partners. Make whatever you will from that.

Merlon's appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=====

Merlon's family forms a worldwide network of psychics, shaman, 
wizards and fortune-tellers who will help Mario.

MERLUVLEE  
[Japanese name: Misuteeru]
Occupation: Fortune Teller
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Merlon's granddaughter. Goombario thinks she's beautiful, though 
you never get a good look at her face underneath her family's 
trademark cloak. She lives on Shooting Star Summit and can use her 
crystal ball to see into the future. Merluvlee's house also holds a 
special chest with star crest that is magically linked to a similar chest 
in Peach's castle. As Peach sneaks around her castle, she can deposit 
items in the chest that Mario can access by checking Merluvlee's 
chest.

In Paper-Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, Mario finds that Merluvlee 
has traded her digs on Shooting Star Summit for considerably less 
posh ones in the sewers of Rogueport. She looks different, too, as she 
now seems to be wearing a turquoise version of Merlee's outfit. Even 
in her new clothes, however, Merluvlee can still see the future. She 
also still punctuates her speech with hearts and is as cute as ever.

Merluvlee's appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=====

MERLOW
[Japanese name: Atsumeeru]
Occupation: Star Piece collector
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Merluvlee's little brother. This pint-sized shaman lives with Merluvlee 
and will trade rare badges for Star Pieces that Mario finds.

=====

MERLEE  
[Japanese name: Sandeeru]
Occupation: Fortune Teller
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Merluvlee's twin sister. She lives in a hidden alley in Dry Dry 
Outpost. For a fee, she'll make her cards dance and enchant Mario 
with a spell that will increase his offensive power, defensive power, 
star points or coins.

Merlee performs an identical service in Paper Mario: The Thousand-
Year Door, from her new home beneath the streets of Rogueport. Now, 
instead of cards she uses a magical box to bless Mario with extra luck.

Merlee's appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=====

MERLE

Merlon's son. Only a blonde, droopy moustache distinguishes him 
from the rest of the family. He lives with the Ninjis in Starborn Valley, 
were Star Kids live until they are old enough to ascend to Star Haven. 
Unfortunately, Bowser's meddling in Star Haven has rendered all the 
Star Kids earthbound. Merle begs Mario to stop Bowser and gives him 
the scarf, which is a key to unlocking the Star Palace.

=====

MERLAR

Merlon's ancestor, who appears as a ghost in a hidden room near the 
Star Palace. Madam Merlar is the messenger of the stars and shares 
Merlon's tendency to tell long-winded stories that put Mario to sleep.

=======================================================================

METAL MARIO
Occupation: Short-lived clone
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

Metal Mario first showed up as a powered-up version of Mario, not as 
a separate character. By diving into a pool of molten metal, Mario 
transformed into a stronger but heavier metal dynamo. For some 
reason, Metal Mario showed up a few years later as an alternate 
playable version of Mario in Mario Golf. 

In the original Smash Bros., characters fought Metal Mario before they 
took on the game's final boss, Master Hand. Logically, Metal Mario 
fought a lot like normal Mario, just stronger and heavier like he was in 
Super Mario 64. In Super Smash Bros. Melee, however, the character 
was more or less eliminated. The Metal Cap became an item anybody 
could use and the next-to-last battle with Master Hand was against a 
metal version of any of the game's characters - Metal Ness, Metal 
Marth or whoever. 

Finally, Metal Mario appeared as the boss of the Wario storyline in Dr. 
Mario 64. He could also be unlocked as a selectable character for 
players who beat the entire game without losing once..

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR METAL MARIO***
Mario was in for a surprise the first time he hit a Metal Box in Super 
Mario 64. The metal cap that popped out transformed Mario into living 
metal, giving him great stamina, a heavy tread, and the ability to walk 
underwater. In Super Smash Bros., Metal Mario showed up as an 
incredibly stubborn midlevel boss.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR METAL MARIO***

Metal Mario's starring roles:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

Other appearances:
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001

=======================================================================

MIKE [new]
Occupation: Karaoke robot
Only appearance: WarioWare: Touched (2005)

One of Dr. Crygor's creations, Mike is a walking, talking karaoke 
machine who deems his master's singing as "99.78 percent awful." 
However, upon being powered-up for the first time, Crygor decides to 
leave the lab and program Mike to clean. Soon enough, his "party-
rocking algorithms" overpower clean-the-house mode, and Mike blasts 
off into space in search of intergalactic karaoke competition. Thus 
opens his game set, which all involve the use of the Nintendo DS 
microphone. Blow to win, kids! 

In the epilogue, Dribble and Spitz show up to return Mike to Crygor's 
island lab. There, Crygor invite Mike to sing a duet with him. It does 
not go well.

Like Ashley, the other new character introduced in WarioWare: 
Touched!, Mike gets a theme song with lyrics. It plays during his 
opening story sequence. Mike's spoken parts are in brackets. The rest 
of the song is credited to Sal Out, one of Mona's rivals on the 
Diamond City music charts.

   Go!  Go!  Go!  Go!  Mike!
   Go!  Go!  Go!  Go!  Mike!

   [[My name is Mike]]
   Come on, let's robo karaoke!

   Rock the Mike!  Rock the Mike!

   Get up on stage and 
   Sing a little ditty for me

   Rock the Mike!  Rock the Mike!

   Rock me!  Know what I mean?
   [[I'm a karaoke machine!]]

   Rock the Mike!

   [[I've got two mics on my head
   Can you sing into me?]]

   Rock the Mike!  Rock the Mike!

   [[Don't you wanna -
   Don't you wanna -
   Don't you wanna karaoke?]]

   Rock the Mike!  Rock the Mike!

   Rock me!  Know what I mean?
   [[I'm a karaoke machine!]]

The song is also played in Mona's prologue in WarioWare: Touched!

=======================================================================

MILLENNIUM STAR 
Occupation: Super Starman
Only appearance: Mario Party 3 (2001)

A giant talking star re-incarnated every thousand years. This 
Millennium Star descends into Peach's courtyard just as she and her 
friends are squabbling over who's the greatest star. Then they play 
mini-games. Millennium Star also functions as the game's boss. At the 
end of the game's story mode, he challenges your character to one 
more round of adventure - "Stardust Battle," in which your character 
must defeat the Millennium Star by dumping stars on him. Once the 
battle ends, your character finds that the now-defeated Millennium 
Star was a fake, and that Tumble, the sentient dice block, holds the real 
deal.

The Millennium Star looks like a big Starman, the bouncing, power-up 
that grants Mario invincibility. Honestly, you'd think a celestial entity 
reborn once a millennium would have something better to do with its 
time than exchange coins for stars in an effort to pick which of eight 
people is the best at odd, competitive parties. But no. 

=======================================================================

MIPS 
Occupation: Little bunny lost
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

A brown hare hopping through the leaky basement of Princess Peach's 
castle. If Mario can catch him, he'll scream something about being late 
and toss Mario a star for his efforts. After Mario defeats Bowser, 
MIPS will show up lost in Peach's basement a second time. 
TSPhoenix points out that MIPS shares his name with that of a special 
chip in the Nintendo 64 - the "Millions of Instructions per Second" 
chip.

Though Nintendo faithfully ported most of the characters from Super 
Mario 64 to the remake, Super Mario 64 DS, MIPS is missing, in a 
sense. The game is full of runaway bunnies, and catching them yields 
keys that unlock mini-games that you can play in Peach's rec room. 
But these bunnies are not brown like MIPS. Upon being caught, none 
introduce themselves as MIPS. So he's there and he's not.

MIPS' appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=======================================================================

MISS PETUNIA
[Japanese name: Miss Bunya]
Occupation: Bath spook
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

The bathing beauty. When Luigi's enters the bathroom, he can see 
Petunia's fetching silhouette behind the curtain. Pull back the 
curtain - and she's actually quite fat. Real fat. Petunia would hate 
for Luigi to ruin her steamy shower, so Luigi should douse her 
with some ice. Once chilled, Miss Petunia is vulnerable long 
enough that Luigi can suck her up in his vacuum.

Miss Petunia's Game Boy Horror bio says that though she was 
runner-up in the Miss Ghost pageant a few years back, she hasn't 
had much modeling work lately.

Miss Petunia the ghostly bather is not to be confused with Petunia 
from Paper Mario. That Petunia actually is a petunia.

=======================================================================

MISS WARP
[Japanese name: Waapuchan]
Occupation: Hopping teleportation device
First appearance: Yoshi's Story (1998)

A hopping little character - apparently female, though her appearance 
doesn't look especially so - whom Yoshi can use to transport himself 
throughout a level. Yoshi jumps on a sleeping Miss Warp to wake her, 
and then she'll spring him to somewhere else in the same stage. 
There's usually four Miss Warps per level.

Miss Warp's appearances: 
Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
Picross NP Vol. 2 (Super Famicom) - 1999

=======================================================================

MOM PIRANHA
[Japanese name: Mother Pakkun]
Occupation: Queen carni-flower
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

Mom's offspring block the runway at Beanbean International Airport. 
Only by soaking and then shocking the vile vegetation can Mario and 
Luigi crack open the giant egg holding the Mom Piranha. Once she's 
mulch, Princess Peach's plane can safely land.

=======================================================================

MONA (and her menagerie) [new]
Occupation: Pizza maven and expert scooterer
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)

Co-worker Joe opens up the Diamond City gelateria one morning. It's 
7:53 and Mona hasn't punched in yet. Mona, a pretty lady with red 
hair and a driving goggles, is riding her scooter through some beautiful 
countryside when she realizes she's late. Mona hits the gas - right as 
she passes a cop. With the flip of a button, a hatchway on the back of 
Mona's scooter opens up. A tiny elephant fires sludge out of his truck, 
knocking out the cop car. Another cop car shows up. Flick - a tiny 
piggy pops out of the same hatch and kick a soccer ball at the cop car. 
Soon, whole fleets of Diamond City police are chasing Mona, so she 
brings out the big guns: her monkey.

The player challenges Mona's series of games with the monkey's 
bananas representing their lives. Each game beaten successfully lobs a 
banana peel at a cop car, which true to Mario Kart form, spins out of 
control. Mona's theme, strange games, fits perfectly with the 
weirdness of a night vision goggles-clad monkey throwing banana 
product at cop cars. Given a few seconds, players must catch toast 
popping out of a toaster or push a thread through the eye of a needle. 
In the end, Mona makes it to work just a second before 8 a.m. - right 
on time. Everybody else ends up hanging out at Gelato Joe's as well.

Players can also unlock a special game featuring Mona and Dribble. 
It's called - ahem - Dong Dong and requires two players to nudge 
blocks to fall on each other.

By WarioWare: Twisted, however, Mona seems to have quit the gelato 
job and opened up her own restaurant, Mona Pizza. The place even 
comes with a nifty billboard parodying the Mona Lisa. She's more 
popular in Diamond City than her rivals, the corporate franchise Pizza 
Dinosaur. As Mona speeds out to deliver her loyal customers their 
pizzas, the Pizza Dinosaur goons give chase - even whipping out an 
actual Tyrannosaurus Rex and a big dino mech-on-wheels in the effort 
to stop Mona. Luckily, Mona has her friends - the elephant, the piggy 
and the monkey - willing to help. In the midst of the fight, Mona's 
microgames start up - and to the tune of the Mona Pizza jingle by the 
Yum Yums to boot. When the elephant's oil slicks and the piggy's 
soccer balls can't stop the Pizza Dinosaur mech, the monkey drops a 
banana peel on the road. Again, in classic Mario Kart style, the dino 
mech flips and Mona delivers her pizza successfully. 

(Mona's games set, "Mini Spin," require the player to perform the 
appropriate action by making slight turns with their Game Boy 
Advance.)

Apparently unfulfilled with life as a mere pizza personality, Mona 
becomes a pop star of sorts in time for her appearance in WarioWare: 
Touched. Her rival, surly diva Vanessa, is tuning in to Diamond City's 
music news network to make sure that she's still at the top of the 
charts. But what a shocker - Mona and the Hawt Licks have 
displaced Vanessa as Diamond City's favorite. With Decko on vocals, 
Art on lead guitar and Mona on bass, Mona and the Hawt Licks pose a 
serious threat to Vanessa's stardom. But even burgeoning celebrity 
status won't stop Mona from scootering food to faithful patrons. As 
Mona dashes out from rehearsal to deliver more pizza, Vanessa and 
her back-up singers pursue on their own scooters. (At this point, the 
action breaks for Mona's microgames, the "Cute Cuts" set, in which 
the player must make tiny, quick swipes with the stylus in order to 
win.)

With the help of her animal buddies, Mona fends off her attackers, but 
Vanessa beats her to the Hawt House, the local music venue. Figuring 
she looks enough like Mona to leech her stardom, Vanessa hops on 
stage. The fans can tell, though, and boo her off. Soon enough, Mona 
hops on stage, jams on her guitar and gives the performance her fans 
wanted. What a girl!

A bit of trivia: Mona's voice comes from former Nintendo Power 
magazine editor Leslie Swan, who also voiced Princess Peach in Super 
Mario 64.

Mona's appearances:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

Other appearances:
Wario World (Gamecube) - 2003

=====

Mona is frequently aided in her roadside conflicts by a group of 
dedicated animal buddies.

NO. 1
Occupation: Betrunked buddy
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003) 

A cheerful green elephant wearing a shirt with the numeral "1" on it. 
He helps money by dropping oil slicks on the road. When No. 1, No. 2 
and No. 3 stack up totem pole-style, this pachyderm is on the bottom.

No. 1's appearances
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=====

NO. 2
Occupation: Besnouted buddy
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003) 

A small piggy wearing a shirt with the numeral "2" on it. No. 2's mode 
of attack involves kicking soccer balls at Mona's enemies. He's the 
middle of the Mona Buddy totem pole.

No. 2's appearances
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=====

NO. 3
Occupation: Opposable thumbed buddy
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003) 

A small monkey who usually saves the day by dropping a banana peel 
on the asphalt and sending Mona's enemies tumbling. I'll bet you 
could predict he's the one wearing a shirt with the numeral "3" on it.

No. 3's appearances
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=====

4.1 and 4.2
Occupation: Canine buddies
Only appearance: WarioWare: Touched (2003) 

A pair of wolf-looking characters who pilot a small aircraft in 
WarioWare: Touched that comes to Mona's aid when Vanessa and her 
goons attack. The mech Vanessa's goons are driving, however, quickly 
bats 4.1 and 4.2 away. Their uniforms slightly resemble those of Thing 
One and Thing Two, the characters from Dr. Suess's "The Cat in the 
Hat."

=======================================================================

MONSIEUR BOO
Occupation: Ghost francophile
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

Sigh. I'm getting tired of writing bios for these Wario's Woods bosses. 
Monsieur Boo is not a Boo. He's an ordinary white sheet-over-the-
head Halloween costume-style ghost. He's also not particularly 
French-looking, unless that splash of red pixels on his head is 
supposed to be a beret. As of this writing, Monsieur Boo must be my 
least favorite Mario character ever. Seriously.

=======================================================================

MONSTAR
Occupation: Star spirit monster thing
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A scary-looking cloud that blocks Mario from entering Starborn 
Valley. It's an easy fight. Afterwards, Mario finds that Monstar is 
actually a swarm of Star Kids in disguise.

=======================================================================

MONTY MOLE
[Japanese name: Choropoo]
Occupation: Dastardly digger
First appearance: Super Mario World (1991)

Pesky rodents who would burst from the walls of Cookie Mountain at attack 
Mario. As moles, they had to wear sunglasses to protect themselves from the 
light of the overworld. They also with their larger, tougher cousins, the Mega 
Moles, but Yoshi could eat them all the same.

Monty Moles enjoyed generic baddie status in many games, in fact, until 
Super Mario Sunshine. He appeared as a boss in several locations, and he'd 
attempt to fire Bullet Bills and other artillery at Mario. A short time later, 
Monty Mole showed up in Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga as a character 
who would reside in hard-to-find areas and reward the brothers for reaching 
him by giving them special items.

A character very similar to Monty appeared in Super Mario Bros. 3. His name 
was Rocky Wrench. He lived on the Koopalings' airships and would toss 
wrenches at Mario. Though he looked like a mole - the instruction manual 
even made of point of saying so - he was a Koopa and had a shell. Maybe he 
was a sort of Monty Mole prototype.

Monty Mole's starring roles:
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2003

Other appearances:
Super Mario World (Super Nintendo) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

MOUSER
[Japanese name: Donchuruge]
Occupation: Explosive rodent
First Appearance: Doki Doki Panic (1987)

Described in the original Super Mario Bros. 2 instruction manual as "a 
bomber of bad dreams that destroys good dreams" who "doesn't want 
to believe that it is just a mouse," this sunglasses-clad, bomb-throwing 
mouse is the first boss in Super Mario Bros. 2. In this game's original 
incarnation, the 1987 Japanese release Doki Doki Panic, Mouser was 
the final boss of the first, third and fifth worlds. In every following 
remake, however, Mouse lost some of his territory.

In the original American Super Mario Bros. 2, the third Mouser was 
replaced by Clawgrip, a rock-throwing crab. The Mouser who waited 
at the end of the third world also disappeared, this time being replaced 
by Robirdo. Nintendo moved this Mouser to the end of the sixth world. 
He replaced the second Tryclyde. 

Mouser hasn't yet officially reappeared, but a race of similar-looking 
mousefolk called the Nomadimice inhabited the desert town of Dry 
Dry Outpost in Paper Mario. Similar looking mice also populated the 
Cheese Land racetrack in Mario Kart: Super Circuit.

Kirby 021591 and Eab1990 mention that Mouser makes a debatable 
cameo in the first Paper Mario. A Squeek named Little Mouser runs a 
shop in Dry Dry Outpost. He looks a bit like the bomb-tossing Mouser.

Mouser's appearances:
Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1987
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Paper Mario (Nintedno 64) - 2001 (?)

=======================================================================

MOUSTAFA  
[Japanese name: Rorenchu]
Occupation: Incognito crimelord
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A green mouse who controls the underground crime in the desert 
village of Dry Dry Outpost. Initially, Moustafa introduces himself as 
Sheek. Later, Moustafa explains that he keeps a low profile. Because 
his race, the Nomadimice, built Dry Dry Ruins ages ago, only 
Moustafa can help Mario find them.

In Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, a character named Lumpy 
mentions having been helped by Moustafa while abroad in Dry Dry 
Desert. (And, oddly, he met Moustafa in his real costume, not his as 
his incognito ego Sheek. 

Nomadimice are modeled after a generic mouse baddie in Super Mario 
World 2: Yoshi's Island. Moustafa's pseudonym, "Sheek," is a 
reference to the identity Princess Zelda assumes in Ocarina of Time. In 
order to evade Ganondorf, Zelda wraps her face with cloth and calls 
herself "Sheik." 

=======================================================================

MR. and MRS. MARIO
Occupation: Hero-makers
Only appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Negating Mario and Luigi's identity as native Brooklynites, the end of 
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island has the Stork delivering Baby 
Mario and Baby Luigi to their parent's home in the Mushroom 
Kingdom. We never get a good look at Mr. and Mrs. Mario, but we do 
see their feet as they open the front door to find the stork's bundle. We 
also see their hands as they joyfully raise their newfound sons.

=======================================================================

MR. LUGGS 
[Japanese name: Ta Han]
Occupation: Face stuffer
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

A fat ghost who obsessively stuffs his ghost face in the dining room of 
the haunted mansion. According to his bio on Luigi's Game Boy 
Horror, he prefers all-you-can eat buffets to three meals a day. If Luigi 
vacuums up his meal - and the phantom waiters who keep delivering 
more food - Mr. Luggs will attack Luigi. 

Mr. Luggs is flanked by two waiter ghosts, who will deliver ghost-
food until Luigi sucks them up.

=======================================================================

MS. MOWZ 
[Japanese name: Chuchu Rina]
Occupation: Squeaky thief
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A white mouse and a master thief, Ms. Mowz first meets Mario in 
Hooktail's Castle, where she is plundering the treasure room. Ms. 
Mowz seems immediately smitten with Mario, though I'd guess that 
love comes easy to her, since her tail bends into a perfect heart shape. 
Ms. Mowz might think she's fooling people with her red mask, but 
anyone with a brain could easily recognize her as the mild-mannered 
shopkeeper at the Howz of Badges in Rogueport.

Eventually, Ms. Mowz will post a bulletin in the Trouble House - a 
sort of message board where Rogueport citizens can request assistance 
in various tasks. She wants the Attack FX B badge, which is hidden so 
well in Hooktail Castle that even her sixth sense for precious booty 
won't reveal it. When Mario meets her again on the rooftop of the 
Howz of Badges, he finds that Ms. Mowz deliberately hid the badge in 
order to determine if Mario was worth joining. She is so impressed she 
enlists immediately, bringing along her ability to fluster enemies, 
sneak away items or sniff out hidden treasure.

Ms. Mowz is a Squeek, a race of characters that first appeared as a 
generic baddie in Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island, but also 
populated Dry Dry Outpost as the Nomadimouse people in the original 
Paper Mario.

=======================================================================

THE MUSHROOM KINGS
Occupation: Rulers of the Mushroom World
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. 3 (1990)

The plotline of Super Mario Bros. 3 reveals that the Mushroom 
Kingdom is merely a portal to the larger Mushroom World, which 
consists of seven nations, each ruled by a different monarch. 
Unfortunately, the treacherous Koopa family has invaded each of these 
lands. Each ruler's magic wand has been stolen by one of Bowser's 
children, who then promptly used the wand to transform the kings into 
animals.

The transformations differ from the original Super Mario Bros. 3 to the 
version of that game that appeared on Super Mario All-Stars, the Super 
NES remake. The king of Grass Land, for example, was a dog in the 
first game but a Cobrat - the red snake enemy from Super Mario 
Bros. 2 - in the remake. The rest of the transformations are as 
follows:

 * King of Desert Hill: spider / Hoopster (ladybug baddie from Super   
   Mario Bros. 2)
 * King of Ocean Side: turtle / Dino Rhino (fire-breathing baddie from
   Super Mario World)
 * King of the Isle of Giants: dinosaur / Donkey Kong Jr.
 * King of the Sky: vulture / Albatoss (Bob-Omb carrying bird baddie 
    from Super Mario Bros. 2)
 * King of Ice Land: seal / Monty Mole
 * King of Pipe Maze: Piranha Plant (the only non-animal 
    transformation) / Yoshi

With the wands retrieved and the seven kings restores to their human 
forms, the Mushroom World is at piece. Or so you'd think. Bowser 
nabs Peach at the last moment, so Mario must trek into the eighth and 
final world, Dark Land/Koopa Kingdom.

Incidentally, there's an eighth Mushroom King. And though he 
precedes Super Mario Bros. 3 by a few years, he never actually 
appears in any game. He's Princess Peach's father. As far as the games 
are concerned, this Mushroom King only shows up in the instruction 
manual for the original Super Mario Bros. The manual states only that 
Princess Peach is the daughter of the Mushroom King. He never shows 
up, and none of the seven Mushroom monarchs in Super Mario Bros. 3 
seem to be Peach's pop. But the Mushroom King did show up in to 
non-official incarnations of the Marioverse. In the Valiant comics that 
ran some years ago, the king was a regularly occurring character - 
and a bit of a bumbler at that. The king also figured into the plot of the 
Super Mario Bros. movie, though one should note two things: (1) he's 
technically Daisy's dad, not Peach's; and (2) this movie sucked.

The Mushroom Kings' appearances:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

NANA
[Japanese name: Babara]
Occupation: Ghost knitter
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

If Luigi pops into Nana's room, he sees her knitting pleasantly and 
grandmotherly. If Luigi fires a few yarn balls on her, though, she'll be 
vulnerable just long enough for Luigi to suck her up. Take that, Nana.

According to the Game Boy Horror's information on Nana, she's 
spending her afterlife trying to finish knitting a scarf that now stretches 
to 871 feet. And if Luigi checks a musty old journal he finds on the 
bookshelf in Nana's room, he'll find that she's a bit of a prankster. She 
once poured ice water on Miss Petunia during a shower, which no 
doubt irked the bather. The trick should give Luigi a clue about how to 
capture Miss Petunia's ghost.

=======================================================================

NAVAL PIRANHA
[Japanese name: Big Pakkun]
Occupation: Poolside Piranha Plant
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island

Sensibly, the boss of the aquatic, Piranha Plant-filled castle at the end 
of the jungle world is the Naval Piranha, a giant set of leaves and teeth 
growing in a pool of water. The Naval Piranha will try to ram Yoshi 
into the wall, but if Yoshi will win if he can get his eggs to bounce off 
the wall and into a navel-shaped protrusion on the Naval Piranha's 
stem.

Like Hookbill, Nintendo ported the Naval Piranha to Tetris Attack as a 
boss.

Naval Piranha's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

NEIL 
Occupation: Golfer
Only appearance: Mario Golf: Advance Tour (2004)

This kid is one of the generic human characters whose stats you pick at 
the beginning of the game. Like Ella, Neil is the apprentice of golf 
whiz Kid. He has brown, shaggy hair and wears a blue and yellow 
golfing outfit.

=======================================================================

NEVILLE
[Japanese name: Papara]
Occupation: Ghost father
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

Neville is the first portrait ghost Luigi encounters in the haunted 
mansion. He's a father, but he spends his afterlife reading the books he 
didn't read while he was alive. If Luigi waits until Neville yawns, he 
can suck him up in his vacuum.

=======================================================================

NINA
Occupation: Tennis player
Only appearance: Mario Tennis (2000)

Another of the generic human netters that I players could unlock by 
hooking their Game Boy Color versions of Mario Tennis to their 
Nintendo 64 versions via a special cable. I, however, never had this 
cable and know nothing of Nina's appearance, behavior or tennis 
abilities.

According to the track listing for the Mario Tennis OST, however, 
Nina apparently shares her victory music with Baby Mario. Odd.

=======================================================================

NOKI ELDER 
Occupation: Number one Noki
Only appearance: Super Mario Sunshine (2002)

A shriveled member of the Noki race, who reside in the seaside cliffs 
of Isle Delphino. Bearded and wise, the Noki Elder gives Mario his 
missions in the Noki Bay area. 

=======================================================================

NURSE PEACH 
Occupation: Doctor's aide
First appearance: Dr. Mario (1990) 

I'm not sure if this character even shows up in Dr. Mario 64, but 
there's offical artwork for the game that depicts Peach standing next to 
Dr. Mario. Only it's not the usual Peach: She has a pink nurse's 
uniform instead of her dress and a nurse's hat instead of a tiara. I'm 
pretty sure I can remember hearing the phrase "Nurse Peach" at some 
point in my Dr. Mario-playing days. Can anybody help me out?

You can see some of the art for Nurse Peach yourself here:

http://gallery.gamehiker.com/displayimage.php?album=26&pos=5

I put this in a separate profile since Nintendo seems to treat Mario and 
Dr. Mario like two different characters. She may not play a large role 
in the Marioverse but it makes sense to follow that logic for Nurse 
Peach as well.

Kirby021591 reminds be that Nurse Peach also cameos in Super 
Smash Bros. Melee. Event 35 in the one-player challenge mode is 
"Time for a Checkup," in which one fighter must take on Mario and 
Nurse Peach. This Nurse Peach, however, is just the regular Peach in 
her alternate white costume. There's no real difference between Peach 
and this Nurse Peach - and if you ask me, I think her costume looks 
more like a wedding dress.

Nurse Peach's appearances:
Dr. Mario (NES) - 1990
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001

=======================================================================

OCTO 
Occupation: Tentacled boss
Only appearance: Dr. Mario 64 (2001)

An octopus whom Dr. Mario medicates and cures from the flu in the 
opening sequence to Dr. Mario 64's story mode. Octo later shows up 
to cause trouble, but only if the player chooses Wario as his or her 
character in story mode. Like all the bosses in the game, Octo is 
selectable in the game's multiplayer mode.

I'm fairly certain Octo originated in some Wario Land game. If 
anybody could tell me, I'd appreciate it.

=======================================================================

ONNANOKO [new]
Occupation: Cute little girl
Only appearance: Wrecking Crew '98 (1998)

I have no idea what Onnanoko's function is in this Japanese-only 
update to the original wrecking crew, but she's apparently a character 
alongside Mario, Peach, Bowser and Foreman Spike. See for yourself:

http://www.gamehiker.com/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=122

If anybody can fill me in on little Onnanoko, I'm all ears.

=======================================================================

OOSANSHO 
Occupation: Squishy boss
Only appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

The sixth boss in Wario Land 3, whom Wario fights in the stage called 
"The Stagnant Swamp." "Ooshanso" translates into English as "The 
Great Salamander," which is exactly what he is. Neat, huh?

I haven't played this game and don't know much about Oosansho 
other than what Shdwrlm3 posted in his Wario Land 3 guide at 
GameFAQs. Anybody with further information will be greatly 
appreciated.

=======================================================================

ORBULON
Occupation: Spaceman
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)

Orbulon, a white alien with sunglasses and head shaped like a bowling 
pin, is cruising above earth one day when an asteroid slams into his 
piggy bank-shaped spacecraft. Desperately needing assistance he 
boards the craft of the Space Hares, a group of lagomorphic aliens who 
come to his rescue. On board, the player must play a series of IQ-
based microgames. Instead of merely mashing buttons, he or she must 
input buttons in the correct sequence or use logic to determine which 
of two groups of stacked tortoises would weigh more. If successful, 
the Space Hare's cruelly release Orbulon's pig-shaped ship, The 
Oinker, which plummets down to earth and crashes into what would 
appear to be the continent of North America.

Players can control Orbulon in an unlockable microgame called 
Hurdle Race, in which he and Dr. Crygor attempt to jump hurdles.

Orbulon returns in WarioWare: Twisted!, again in the company of the 
Space Hares. Apparently since the last game, Orbulon has taken the 
creatures into his employ. A massage from one lulls him into a sleep, 
however, that nearly allows The Oinker to get sucked into a black 
hole. His game set then starts - "Time Warp," in which all the 
microgames require twice the time to complete that anyone else's do. 
Every conquered microgame results in the entry a password needed to 
steer the Oinker away from the abyss. Once successful, Orbulon ends 
up rocketing into an asteroid, which eats the ship, then spits it out. 
Orbulon crashes back in Diamond City, where he joins his friends for 
a dance.

Although Orbulon does not have his own game set in WarioWare: 
Touched!, he cameos in the cinema sequence of newcomer Ashley. 
Orbulon's Oinker is also responsible for delivering newly won goodies 
to the main menu screen.

Orbulon's appearances:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

Other appearances:
Wario World (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

OYAZI [new]
Occupation: Apparently jolly fellow
Only appearance: Wrecking Crew '98 (1998)

Like little Onnanoko, I'm unclear as to what Oyazi does in Wrecking 
Crew '98. But he's apparently a character. He looks happy. See for 
yourself:

http://www.gamehiker.com/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=122

If anybody can fill me in on Mr. Oyazi, please do so.

=======================================================================

PAK E. DERM
Occupation: Elephantine crossing guard
Only appearance: Yoshi's Story (1998)

An elephant who shows up to block the pathways in the early stages of 
Yoshi's Story. Yoshi can't fight Pak E. Derm, and he can't harm 
Yoshi. Only by stomping the ground can Yoshi remove this roadblock.

Though he's a relatively minor character in the Yoshi corner of the 
Marioverse, Pak E. Derm shows up in the background of the Yoshi's 
Story-themed Smash Bros. stage.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PAK E. DERM***
This pesky pachyderm bars Yoshi's path by sticking poles high into the 
air. Pak E. Derm has been practicing this skill for years, and he's so 
masterful that he can even block Yoshi's high-flying Flutter Jump. Pak 
E. Derm is a little unstable, however, and he tends to topple over if 
Yoshi pounds the ground anywhere nearby.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PAK E. DERM***

Pak E. Derm's appearances:
Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001

=======================================================================

PA-PATCH 
[Japanese name: Konpobi]
Occupation: Maritime bomb
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Bob-Omb with an eyepatch. He hangs out in the Rogueport harbor 
until Flavio leave son his expedition to Keelhaul Key. Pa-Patch is a 
nice guy, but he clashes with Flavio. In fact, the only thing that can 
prevent them from tearing each other apart is their mutual fear of 
pirate ghosts.

Pa-Patch's only other claim to Marioverse fame - and it's a good one 
- is that he makes the first fart joke ever in a Mario game. Despite his 
apparently lack of armpits, he makes an armpit fart to make fun of 
Flavio. There you go.

=======================================================================

PARAGOOM 
Occupation: Parasol-toting game explainer
First appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

A little guy who floats in the air with an umbrella and looks like a 
cross between Kirby and Pac-Man, Paragoom initially appeared as a 
generic bad guy in Wario Land 3. In Dr. Mario 64, he explains the 
various rules and modes of the game. 

Also, I should note that this character is not a Para Goomba, the flying 
Goomba baddie that debuted in Super Mario Bros.3. It's similarly 
named and similarly powered, but an entirely separate character.

Paragoom's appearances:
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64 - 2001

=======================================================================

PARAKARRY 
[Japanese name: Paretta]
Occupation: Postman
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A Paratroopa who works as a carrier for the Mushroom Kingdom 
postal service, though everyone knows he's the slowest mail carrier in 
the world. Parakarry delivers the party invitation form Peach to Mario 
and Luigi at the beginning of the game - before Bowser spoils the 
party by blasting off into space with Peach's castle. Later, Mario meets 
Parakarry again atop Mt. Rugged, on the way to Dry Dry Outpost. 
He's lost some letters he needs to deliver, but Mario kindly finds them. 
In gratitude, Parakarry joins the party. Thankfully, he a better fighter 
than he is a postman.

Even though Parakarry joins the party, the Mushroom Kingdom postal 
service continues fine. Throughout the game, people are always 
sending and receiving letters. Each of Mario's buddies receive mail 
from their family and friends. Mario even received postcards from 
various friends he makes on his journey. As a Paratroopa, Parakarry 
repertoire includes a lot of aerial attacks. He can also lift Mario up and 
carry him across certain chasms.

Parakarry is the second playable Paratroopa in a Mario game. (The 
first, a generic, red-shelled guy showed up in the Nintendo 64 version 
of Mario Tennis.) To my knowledge, he's also the only Koopa Troopa 
with a turquoise shell.

Paper Mario's sequel actually begins with a quick cameo from 
Parakarry, who delivers the letter from Princess Peach that launches 
Mario on another adventure. 

Parakarry's starring roles: 
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001

Other appearances:
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

PARATROOPA 
[also known as Para Troopa, Sky Troopa, Para-Koopa; Japanese name: 
Patapata]
Occupation: Koopa aerial soldier
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. (1985)

The winged form of the Koopa Troopa. Once stomp, though, and 
they're grounded. This generic baddie, whose name has since been 
shortened from Koopa Paratroopa to just Paratroopa, has appeared in 
nearly every game the generic Koopa Troop has appeared in, minus a 
few exceptions like Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island and Super 
Mario 64.

Also like the Koopa Troopa, Paratroopa has been playable. (And, 
notably, whenever he's playable, he's always in a red shell, as opposed 
to the normal Koopa Troopa, whose playable form always wears a 
green shell). Paratroopa was Bowser's partner in Mario Tennis 64. The 
little guy never touched the ground, which made him quite interesting 
to control. His only appearance since as a playable character has been 
Mario Kart: Double Dash!!, where he raced alongside his brother in 
arms, Koopa Troopa. On the Mario Kart racetrack, by the way, it's the 
red shells that are always the most prized, as they have the ability to 
home in on the nearest opponent.

The winged one appears as an unlockable player in Mario Power 
Tennis. (Tennis seems to be his thing, I guess.) Both his super moves 
are aerial ones: prepare to watch Paratroopa soar into the sky and then 
rain down opn the earth comet-style as a special attack Neat stuff.

Paratroopa's Japanese name, "Patapata" is onomatopoeia for the sound 
of fluttering wings.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PARATROOPA***
These winged Koopa Troopas can fly, but they're none too smart: they 
tend to spend a lot of their time simply jumping or fluttering around a 
small area. As a result, no one exactly thinks of them as majestic, 
soaring creatures. They lose their wings and become normal Koopa 
Troopas if Mario or Luigi jumps on their backs.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PARATROOPA***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Koopa Troopa
Personal racecar: Para Wing
Special weapon: Triple Red Shell

Paratroopa's starring roles:
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995*
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996**
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

* as Para-Koopa
** as Sky Troopa

=======================================================================

PARROTOR
Occupation: Parrot
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

He's... a parrot. He's also the sixth boss.

=======================================================================

PARRY 
Occupation: Straight arrow
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996)

Parry the Parallel-Flying Bird. Tada. He flies overhead in a parallel 
motion to Dixie. If Dixie moves to the left, so does Parry. If Dixie 
jumps, Parry flies a bit higher. Dixie can use him to collect otherwise 
unreachable bananas.

Parry's appearances:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997

=======================================================================

PAUL [new]
[also known as the Professor]
Occupation: Archeologist
Only appearance: Wario Land Advance (2001)

A doddery, bald professor who follows Wario into the Golden 
Pyramid in search of artifacts. His face - along with Princess 
Shokora's - appears on the newspaper that Wario's convertible 
throws into the wind in the game's opening sequence. Once in the 
pyramid, Wario encounters Paul in various rooms. Often, Wario will 
have to throw Paul in order to snag a certain item or activate a switch, 
acts which result in yelps of pain from the good professor.

Paul's name never appears in the game itself, but I've had a few 
readers claim that the instruction manual for Wario Land Advance 
indeed identifies him as "Paul." If anyone has any information to the 
contrary, I'd be happy to adjust the profile.

=======================================================================

PAULINE
[Japanese name: the Girl]
Occupation: Damsel in distress
First appearance: Donkey Kong (1981)

The pretty lady in a red dress.

Much like Mario's earliest incarnation, Jumpman, his girlfriend didn't 
originally have her own name. By the time she got to the United 
States, however, Nintendo looked to a silent film icon to get her one. 
The Perils of Pauline were early serial shorts in which a woman would 
continually evade death, whether by pirates, gypsies, or sharks. The 
most common scenario involved Pauline being tied to train tracks, 
desperately awaiting rescue.

Pauline's in-game appearance differed greatly from the look of the 
brunette hottie in the red dress on the Donkey Kong arcade cabinets. 
The thing that Mario actually rescued, however, was a fugly mass of 
pixels with blonde pigtails and a long pink dress.

Once Mario traded in barrel-hopping for Koopa-stomping, though, 
Pauline all but vanished. Some have speculated that Pauline hooked up 
with that other forgotten Donkey Kong foe, Stanley the Bugman, but 
that's as much buzz as she's gotten lately.

Could Pauline have a chance at Mario Party 8?

Pauline's appearances:
Donkey Kong (Arcade) - 1981
Donkey Kong (Atari 2600) - 1981
Donkey Kong (NES) -1985
Pinball (NES) - 1985
Donkey Kong '94 (Game Boy) - 1994
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

PAW
Occupation: Kat's partner
Only appearance: WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$

A big white dog who follows Kat all the way from her homeland to 
Diamond City. When Kat fights the demonic Boneheads, Paw 
transforms into a sword Kat uses to defeat the fiend.

=======================================================================

PEACH 
[also known as Princess Toadstool, the Princess]
Occupation: Benevolent Mushroom Kingdom Monarch
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. (1985)

[peach]


A  PRINCESS AMONG PRINCESSES


If you were part of a race of mushroom people, would you pledge 
allegiance to a princess with Barbie doll proportions and a Farrah 
Fawcett hairdo? And if Peach is the head honcho, shouldn't she be 
Queen Peach? And could her relationship with Mario go beyond the 
simple chaste kiss on the nose players see following her countless 
rescues? 

Three good questions. None will be answered here.

Although she replaced the forgotten Pauline from the original Donkey 
Kong, Peach pretty much set the standard for video game damsels. She 
stands beside Zelda and Ms. Pac-Man as one of earliest heroines in a 
video game. 

The first glimpse of Princess Peach - still Princess Toadstool all the 
way back in 1985 - players got was in the instruction manual for the 
original Super Mario Bros. She was a giant question mark. According 
to the instruction manual, only Princess Toadstool can break the 
Koopa curse that transformed the peaceful denizens of the Mushroom 
Kingdom into stones, bricks, and "field horsehair plants," Also, the 
game mentions that Toadstool is the daughter of the Mushroom King, 
a mysterious character whom Nintendo never mentions again. People 
who actually played and beat the game would get something that 
looked a little bit more like a princess - although not much more. In 
her earliest onscreen appearance, Princess Toadstool was a mass of 
pixels that formed a white dress, red hair, and something 
approximating a face. The same pixilated princess appeared in the 
ending of the Japanese-only Super Mario Bros. 2 - later known in the 
United States as Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels. Nintendo 
thoughtfully re-styled her to make her look more feminine and pretty, 
but her red hair made her look more like Princess Daisy than the Peach 
we know today. 

(It should be noted that the Japanese sequel to the original Super Mario 
Bros. offered a re-styled sprite for Princess Toadstool. She looked off, 
still, for sure, but the redone sprite had her facing forward and looking 
just a little more feminine.)


HOVERING INTO OUR HEARTS


In the American sequel, however, the modern Princess Peach began 
taking form. Still known as "Toadstool" - though rarely addressed by 
her one-name moniker and instead as "Princess" - the character 
joined Mario, Luigi, and Toad in the American Super Mario Bros. 2 on 
the journey to the cloud-bound castle of Wart, the evil king of bad 
dreams. Her appearance in the 1988 title is notable, as few video 
games had active female characters this early. Each of the four heroes 
had their own specialty; while Toadstool was the weakest and slowest 
of the four, she could extend her jumps by floating in midair for a few 
seconds. This ability endeared the character to newbies, who could use 
her to safely hover over large gaps or enemies. But how did Peach 
float? Was it the dress? Princess power? Another unanswerable 
question in the mystery of Peach.

Despite the social progress of Super Mario Bros. 2, however, 
Toadstool quickly resumed a back seat to Mario and Luigi. In Super 
Mario Bros. 3, the brothers' expedition into the Mushroom World 
begins at Toadstool's request. She also sends the brothers care 
packages each time they free a Koopa-conquered kingdom. However, 
before Mario and Luigi could reach the eight kingdoms, Dark World, 
Bowser himself nabs her.

Toadstool did even less in Super Mario World. According to that 
game's story, Mario, Luigi, and Toadstool take a vacation after the 
trials of tangling with Bowser in Super Mario Bros. 3. But Toadstool 
gets nabbed before anyone gets any rest and relaxation. Mario and 
Luigi don't see her again until a reunion atop Bowser's castle, 
complete with heart-shaped fireworks and a chaste kiss.

The few seconds Toadstool appeared on screen, however, did depict 
her finally as having locks as golden as those depicted in the art in the 
instruction manual. Between Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 
3, Peach's hair changed from red to brunette. Nintendo finally nailed 
banana blonde with 16-bit color. Her royal mane has grown gradually 
blonder ever since.

(On a side note, I think Peach may have evolved to look more like as 
did in the Mario anime, Super Mario Bros.: The Mission to Rescue 
Princess Peach, a film little known in Japan and downright obscure in 
the states. The movie came out in Japan in 1986, shortly after the first 
NES Super Mario Bros and before a lot of official artwork of her 
emerged. While the film depicts Mario remarkably similar to how she 
looks today, other characters like Luigi and the Mushroom Retainers 
are way off. It's presumable that game developers may have drawn 
subsequent artwork that was heavily influenced by her design in the 
movie, hence her appearance today. To check out Peach's film debut, 
go to the SMB Info Station's page on the game, the link for which is at 
the end of the guide.)


DEEPER, PINKER, MORE PRINCESSLY


The plot of Super Mario 64 revolved around Peach baking a cake - 
not the most stereotype-shattering activity, I know, but the game marks 
three significant changes for the character nonetheless. In Super Mario 
64, Peach gets a permanent home, a new name and a voice.

In the game's opening sequence, the princess sends Mario an 
invitation to have cake, but when Mario shows up at her castle, she's 
nowhere to be found. Although her castle would under go countless 
permutations through future games, Super Mario 64's included a 
courtyard, an aquarium, a giant tree-shaped clock, and an iconic 
stained glass window bearing Peach's likeness, the last of which has 
been depicted in all subsequent versions of the structure.

Although she spent most of Super Mario 64 magically trapped in that 
stained glass window, Nintendo finally got around to calling her 
"Peach." Specifically, the princess signs the cake invitation to Mario 
as "Princess Toadstool," but then has the name - or nickname - 
"Peach" scrawled stylishly at an angle at the bottom. The move wasn't 
exactly earth-shattering, however. Characters had casually referred to 
her as "Peach" as far back as Yoshi's Safari in 1993 and Japanese 
gamers always known her by this prettier and infinitely more feminine 
name. But with decision, the cross-culture disparity was eliminated. 
Incidentally, "Toadstool" seems to be used as her surname now, as 
least in fanon. (Curiously, the Nintendo DS remake of Super Mario 64 
reverts back to "Toadstool," even in text that did not exist in the 
game's Nintendo 64 incarnation.)

Super Mario 64 also provided Peach with a voice. Nintendo veteran 
Leslie Swan supplied Peach's princessly squeaks, though actress Jen 
Taylor would provide the voice in later games. This is notable in that 
she gets to speak whole words before most other Mario characters - 
Mario and Toad excluded. (For the record, Super Mario 64 features 
Bowser cackling, but not in any clear language. Luigi and Wario do 
not get to speak until Mario Kart 64).

Finally, Super Mario 64 added further depth to Peach's personality by 
giving her the hobby of pasty-baking, a pastime that has arisen again 
in the first Mario Party as well as Paper Mario. So apparently that's 
four.

Likely exhausted from constantly being kidnapped by magical turtles, 
Peach accompanies Mario for a vacation on Isle Delfino in Super 
Mario Sunshine. Unfortunately, the tropical resort is no paradise. 
Shadow Mario - Bowser Jr. in disguise - has painted the town with 
graffiti. Once released by Isle Delfino police, Mario must clear his 
good name. Amazingly, despite being surrounded by Mario, 
Toadsworth, and an entourage of Toads, Shadow Mario still nabs 
Peach. Why? Bowser has tricked his son into thinking Peach is his 
mother. It's a pretty good ploy, apparently, as even Peach falls for it. 
"I'm your mommy?" Indeed. Mario eventually rescues Peach from a 
giant rubber ducky amidst a Koopa family reunion in the fire of 
Corona Volcano.

To beat the Isle Delfino heat, Peach put her hair in a ponytail and wore 
a sundress. Curiously, she's been wearing the same dress and hairstyle 
in subsequent Gamecube appearances like Mario Party 4 and Mario 
Kart: Double Dash!!


EMPOWERED PRINCESS


Nintendo can't seem to make a standard Mario platforming game 
without putting Peach in peril. That means Peach doesn't get to do 
much besides cry for help. The Mario spin-off series, however, offer 
Peach considerably more active roles, whether it's being an 
empowered woman in the Mario RPG franchise or the token selectable 
girl in the early days of Mario Party and the Mario sports games.

Peach's first playable appearance since her days in Super Mario Bros. 
2 is Super Mario Kart, in which she is the only female character of the 
eight selectables. Her go-kart prowess remains well-known among 
fans even today, and she generally drives high-revving karts in 
whatever title she appears in. 

Several years later, Peach got her third active role - and quite a good 
one at that. In Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars, Peach 
floats out her bedroom window with a parasol to join Mario - and 
Bowser - in the search for the missing pieces of the Star Road. Her 
most active role in a Mario adventure since Super Mario Bros. 2, 
Super Mario RPG allowed Toadstool to wallop enemies with a frying 
pan, a paper fan, or her parasol. She also had handy healing powers.

While the years of the Nintendo 64 saw several games featuring Peach 
in active roles - the Mario Party games, Mario Golf and Mario 
Tennis - Peach would get another notably big role in Paper Mario, 
released during the system's last days. Since Bowser steals the entire 
Mushroom Kingdom castle and flies it into space, Peach spent much of 
the game again as a captive, hopelessly pining for Mario and 
punctuating her dialogue with hearts. This round, however, she hatches 
hare-brained schemes with her junior star spirit buddy, Twink, from 
within prison to aid Mario. Players actually got to control Peach as she 
snuck around her hijacked castle, spying on private conversations 
between Koopa Troops, reading Bowser's secret diary, baking cakes 
and participating in game shows. Peach even gets to fight in Paper 
Mario's penultimate battle; she and Twink take on Bowser's right-
hand gal, Kammy.
 
Although Peach doesn't get to trade blows with baddies in the most 
recent Mario RPG, Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga, she pops in and 
out throughout the game. In the opening sequence, the witch Cackletta 
steals Peach's voice and replaces it with explosives obscenities. A nice 
touch.

Peach figures centrally into the fourth Mario RPG, Paper Mario: The 
Thousand-Year door. While touring the mean streets of Rogueport, 
Peach slips away long enough to purchase a mysterious box from a 
merchant. The box, the merchant claims, will open for only the noble-
hearted. Naturally, Peach picks it up and it opens like a jack-in-the-
box, revealing a treasure map to the fabled Crystal Stars. She scarcely 
has time to mail the map to Mario before the X-Nauts nab her and 
whisk her off to their lair, where they interrogate her about the Crystal 
Stars.

Grodus seems oddly intent on keeping Peach free of harm - a 
welcome change from the gruff treatment she'd receive at the hands of 
Bowser, I'd guess - and during her stint in the X-Nauts' lair, players 
can control Peach. They can even make her shed her dress and take a 
shower! (The scene, of course, is tasteful.) The game even features a 
scene in which Peach drinks an invisibility potion and struts about the 
X-Naut fortress, nude but unseen.

The climax of Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door puts Peach in 
perhaps the most peril she's ever been in. Grodus awakens the sleeping 
Shadow Queen and offers her Peach's body as a vessel for her rebirth. 
The demon promptly swirls into Peach and zap! - what once was 
pink has now turned black. Peach looks mighty scary as the reborn 
Shadow Queen and she attacks with some powerful magic. The fight 
nearly drains her of all her strength. Once Mario clocks the Shadow 
Queen, however, Peach reverts to her pleasant pink outfit and descends 
gently to the floor, unharmed.

Like the other big movers in the Marioverse, Peach rumbled with 
twenty-four other Nintendo mascots in Super Smash Bros. Melee, one 
of the launch titles for the fourth Nintendo console, the Nintendo 
Gamecube. Her Melee persona fused her personas from Super Mario 
Bros. 2 (midair hovering and turnip-plucking), Super Mario RPG 
(parasol-poking and frying pan-bashing), and the Mario sports titles 
(tennis racquets and golf clubs). She could even whip out Toad - 
from under her skirt, of all places - to shield oncoming assaults.


EMOTIONALLY CHARGED


More then twenty years after Nintendo introduced us to the fair 
princess, she finally got to star in her own game. (She'd nearly be the 
first female Marioverse character to take a leading role if Wanda 
hadn't been the controllable sprite in Mario & Wario and that Donkey 
Kong  offshoot Dixie Kong hadn't walked away as the star of Donkey 
Kong Country 3.) Super Princess Peach, released in 2006 for the 
Nintendo DS, featured Peach as a heroine out to rescue the Mario 
Bros., whom Bowser had kidnapped and taken to Vibe Island. With 
her trusty, sentient umbrella Parry in hand, Peach fought through eight 
worlds of levels, featuring all the side-scrolling, hop-and-bop stage 
set-ups one would expect from a Mario game: grass, lava, ice, clouds. 
The whole works. She also fought a slew of recognizable Mario 
baddies: everyone from Goombas and Koopa Troopas to foes like the 
Lava Flowers and the Amazing Flying Hammer Brother, neither of 
which had been seen since Super Mario World. 

Instead of the usual power-ups, however, Peach struggled through 
stages with an interesting range of emotional powers. Represented on 
the DS touch screen as four hearts - red for angry, yellow for joyous, 
blue for sad and green for calm - the emotions generated elemental-
style powers when players brushed their finger over them. For 
example, angry Princess Peach burned with fire, while sad Princess 
Peach wept streams of tears that could be used to grow seedlings into 
climbable beanstalks. A joyous Peach would float into the air and 
attack enemies with swirly whirlwinds, while a grounded, calm Peach 
would glow green and slowly re-generate her health. Some players 
criticized this power-up system as being stereotypically feminine - 
that is, Peach being controlled by a series of quickly changing 
emotions. You know, like women do. Others also found that the game 
offered little challenge, as if it were intended for younger players or 
people unfamiliar to the usual Mario Bros. set-up - girls. 
Nonetheless, a starring role is a starring role. It will be interested to see 
if Peach - like Wario, Yoshi and Donkey Kong - will get her own 
actual series. 

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PEACH***
Princess Peach presides over the Mushroom Kingdom from her huge 
castle. Her loyal subject Toad does his best to protect her but always 
seems to fail spectacularly. Besides her royal duties, Peach is 
interested in both tennis and golf; since she's so magnanimous, she'll 
even deign to play a few matches with the evil Bowser.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PEACH***

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PEACH'S CASTLE***
Princess Peach's magnificent royal castle appears to be inhabited 
solely by the princess and a multitude of Toads. Bowser tried to steal 
the castle's Power Stars in Super Mario 64, and in Paper Mario, the 
surly archfiend actually lifted the castle into the stratosphere with his 
own filthy fortress.
 ***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PEACH'S CASTLE ***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Daisy
Personal racecar: The Heart Coach
Special weapon: Heart

Peach's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Game Boy) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1997
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 3 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1997
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 4 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1997
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003 
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
NBA Street V3 (Gamecube) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
Super Princess Peach (Nintendo DS) - 2006

Other appearances:
Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
NES Open Tournament Golf (NES) - 1991
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Mario Teaches Typing (PC and Mac) - 1991
F-1 Race (Game Boy) - 1991 
Hotel Mario (CD-I) - 1992
Mario Is Missing! (NES) - 1993
Mario Is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (Game Boy) - 1993*
Mario & Wario (Super Famicom) - 1993
Mario Clash (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Kirby Super Star (Super NES) - 1996
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Game & Watch Gallery (Game Boy) - 1997
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (Game Boy Color) - 1998*
Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (Nintendo 64) - 1998**
Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Picross NP Vol. 6 (Super Famicom) - 2000
Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (Nintendo 64) - 2000***
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

* as Christine, the girl pictured in a letter Link mails
** as the adult Malon, arguably, and as a portrait in Hyrule Castle
*** as Creamia, again arguably

=======================================================================

PEASLEY
[Japanese name: Mamekku]
Occupation: Valiant prince
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

An heroic bean with golden locks and a knack for adventure. Prince 
Peasley is the son of Queen Bean, the ruler of Beanbean Kingdom. 
Mario and Luigi first meet him at the summit of Hoohoo Mountain, 
where Cackletta transformed him into the monster Dragohoho. Once 
returned to his human form - or bean form, if you will - Peasley 
becomes a lot friendlier. He tails Mario and Luigi throughout their 
quest in the name of saving his kingdom from the evil Cackletta.

Though he carries a rapier and rides around on a cool little flying bean, 
Peasley seems more deeply concerned with tousling his hair and 
flashing his blinding smile than actually doing anything.

In the end, when Mario and Luigi have successfully trounced 
Cackletta, Peasley shows up in Bowser's throne room and announces 
that the entire castle will explode in three minutes. Safely back on the 
ground, Peasley, Bean and Lima bid goodbye to  their Mushroom 
Kingdom friends, but not before Peasley attaches a large gift package 
to Peach's plane: a gift-wrapped Bowser.

=======================================================================

PEEKA and LAHLA 
[Japanese names: ???? and Terena]
Occupation: Shopkeeper
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A cute, female Boo who runs Westside Goods, the items shop on the 
far side of Rogueport. She wears cat ears. Goombella describes her as 
"pretty... for a Boo." Peeka flirts with Mario, but then again most of 
the female characters in the game do. 

Lahla, who looks just like Peeka - and whose name isn't nearly as 
cute of a pun as her sister's - works at the Pianta Parlor, Don Pinata's 
casino. She will exchange coins for Pinata Tokens, which Mario can 
use to play the casino's various games. If Mario slips behind her desk, 
however, she'll chat with Mario and reveal some interesting quirks 
about Lahla and her sister.

Did you know...
- Peeka and Lahla are eighteen years old?
- They used to be models?
- Lahla's favorite food is Honey Shrooms?
- Lahla is on a diet? And she doesn't want you to tell Peeka?
- A Doogan named Arfur asked Lahla out?
- Lahla secretly wants to open her own shop? And sell cakes and... cute things?

=======================================================================

PENNINGTON 
[Japanese name: Powan]
Occupation: Keeper of the Poshley Sanctum (and part-time detective)
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

If you can't tell from the magnifying glass and stash of detective 
novels in his cabin on the Exfess Express, Pennington is obsessed with 
being a detective. Unfortunately, he's not even sharp enough to realize 
that Mario is Mario - he calls him Luigi. Pennington deputizes 
Mario, but repeatedly points him in the wrong direction in each of the 
mysteries that pop up during the trip. 

Pennington's many mysteries:

- What does little Bub want for his birthday?
- Who threatened to derail the Excess Express with a sticky-sweet 
explosion?
- Who stole Toodles' gold ring?
- Who stole the waitress' shell earrings?
- Who stole Shimi's pot of stew?
- Who has boarded the train without a ticket, thus depriving the 
conductor of a blanket?
- Who raised the drawbridge?

The answers, in order, are the autograph of the conductor, Doopliss 
(disguised as Zip Toad), Doopliss (again), Doopliss (again), Heff T., 
Ghost T., and Smorg (or at least the Smorg-ettes). For the record, 
Pennington guesses none of them correctly.

When Mario finally reaches the Poshley Sanctum, the place where the 
Garnet Star is kept, he finds that the keeper of the sanctum is away. 
He's nearly disappointed, but Pennington trots forward and identifies 
himself as the keeper. He unlocks the door, but even he doesn't seem 
to know where in the sanctum the Garnet Star is kept. 

Pennington, who shares his name with a character in Agatha Christie's 
murder mystery novel "Death on the Nile," is a Bumpty - a generic 
penguin baddie from that first appeared in Super Mario World 2: 
Yoshi's Island and was a selectable character in Tetris Attack. The 
penguin residents of Shiver City in the first Paper Mario were all 
Bumpties as well. In fact, many of the ones living in Poshley Heights 
seem to be aware of Shiver City and have relatives living there. 

=======================================================================

PETEY PIRANHA 
Occupation: Bad plant gone worse
First appearance: Super Mario Sunshine (2002)

Mario first meets Petey Piranha inside a windmill in the Bianco Hills 
area of Isle Delfino. Petey might well be the mightiest Piranha Plant 
ever to sprout from the ground. He towers above Mario and even other 
Piranha Plant bosses like the Lava Piranha or the Naval Piranha. 
Petey's head is framed by a mane of yellow petals. He can also walk 
on two leg-like growths. For some reason, Petey wears a pair briefs 
with the same of red-with-with-spots pattern all Piranha Plants have 
sported since Super Mario Bros. 3. Only by spraying a stream of water 
directly into Petey's gaping mouth can Mario defeat the fiend.

Petey showed up again in Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour, making him the 
first playable Piranha Plant in a Mario game. He's got a strong swing 
and makes disgusting slurping noises to taunt his enemies. Petey races 
alongside King Boo in Mario Kart: Double Dash!! He assembled his 
signature kart out of the green pipes his kin has been popping out of 
since the original Super Mario Bros. Petey's a competent racer, despite 
the considerable handicap of having no eyes.

Petey's ugly self plunks its way into Mario Power Tennis as well. In it, 
he uses his slimy, grimy digestive system in powering his special 
attack. Petey can swallow his racket, belch it up and hit an ooey, gooey 
offensive shot. Or he can merely puke up a Piranha Plant buddy to 
knock the ball back for him. Yuck. Rampant vomiting aside, Petey is 
the heaviest of the heavyweights.

Piranha Plants are carnivorous plants that plague heroic plumbers like 
Mario and Luigi because they live in pipes. They pop out at regular 
intervals, teeth bared, hoping to take a bite out of unsuspecting 
passers-by. Through the course of the Mario series, a whole slew of 
Piranha cousins have also been introduced, including the flame-
shooting Venus Fire Traps, the mobile Nipper Plants and Ptooies, 
which spit spiked balls.

Austrian reader Klaus sent me a small tidbit regarding the character in 
his country. Apparently he's called "Mutant Tyranha" and is female, 
as the name might suggest. Very interesting, in that I wouldn't have 
imagined other countries besides the United States and Japan switched 
characters' genders.

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: King Boo
Personal racecar: The Pipe Car
Special weapon: Anything! (Petey and King Boo can both use any 
character's special moves.)

Petey Piranha's starring roles:
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

PETUNIA
Occupation: Seed collector
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A flower in Flower Fields. Strangely, she hoards seeds. If Mario kills 
the Monty Moles that have been harassing her, Petunia will reward 
Mario with a single magical bean, though she'd rather Mario didn't 
plant it. The other flowers refer to Petunia as the "Seed Maniac."

=======================================================================

PINE 
Occupation: Prince of Jewelry Land
Only appearance: Yoshi's Safari (1993)

The son of Fret, King of Jewelry Land. When Bowser steals the twelve 
magical gems that protect Jewelry Land, it splits into two disaster-
riddles halves: a light half, where the Koopas held King Fret captive, 
and a dark one, where they held Prince Pine. Once Mario and Yoshi 
defeated the Koopas, the studly prince helped restore peace to the land.

Pine's neither a Toad nor a stocky, mustachioed plumber. He might 
just give Mario some competition for Peach's affections. Dashing but 
marked with yellow skin and a long nose, Pine actually bears a slight 
resemblance to the Flavio character from Paper Mario: The Thousand-
Year Door. Given Pine's relative obscurity, however, it's probably 
coincidental.

You can see a picture of Pine in the Yoshi's Safari ending screenshots 
at the Video Game Museum:

http://www.vgmuseum.com/end/snes/a/yoshisafari.htm 

=======================================================================

PIZZA JOE [new]
[also known as Gelato Joe]
Occupation: Gelateria owner
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$

A stout pooch who owns the Diamond City gelateria. He's Mona's 
employer and he's a bit worried she won't make it to work on time. 
Mona, however, checks in a moment before 8 a.m. Wario and the rest 
of the crew from WarioWare all end up hanging out at Gelato Joe's at 
the end of the cut scenes.

Joe shows up in the two sequels as well, although in these games he's 
apparently been employed at Mona Pizza. The credits in both games 
refer to him as "Pizza Joe."

Pizza Joe's appearances:
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=======================================================================

PIZZA DINOSAUR GOONS [new]
Occupation: Mona haters and unsatisfactory pizza makers
First appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2003)

A pair of Storm Trooper-looking grunts employed by Pizza Dinosaur, 
the corporate franchise counterpart to Mona Pizza. These two resent 
that the people of Diamond City prefer Mona's homemade pizza to 
their generic recipe. (According to their speaking part in the Mona 
Pizza jingle, Pizza Dinoaur has the most stores in the world - six 
thousand plus! - but their crust is tough and their sauce is thin.) Tired 
of getting wrong numbers at their place - mostly people trying to dial 
Mona Pizza - these two chase Mona en route to her delivery. 

They re-appear in WarioWare: Twisted. Having shed the horned 
helmets of their Pizza Dinosaur uniform, these goons apparently get 
jobs as Vanessa's back-up dancers. They again give chase to poor 
Mona.

The Pizza Dinoaur goons' appearances:
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=======================================================================

PLUM 
Occupation: Amateur golfer
First appearance: Mario Golf (1999)

Cute golfer with dark hair. Pretty much everything there is to say 
about ol' Plum is said in her Smash Bros. Melee bio. Why she showed 
up as a Smash Bros. trophy is beyond me. Plum, like Sonny, Charlie, 
Maple and several other characters introduced in Mario Golf, seemed a 
bit more real than most characters Mario meets. Plum didn't make the 
cut for the Gamecube Mario Golf. My guess is that we'll never see her 
again.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PLUM***
Plum is one of the first playable golfers in Mario Golf. She's not all 
that strong, so her drives tend to lack distance. On the other hand, her 
strike area is large and allows for refined control. She's a very stable 
golfer, both well balanced and easy to master, which makes her a 
favorite among beginners and pros alike.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR PLUM***

=======================================================================

PODLEY 
[Japanese name: Master Bean]
Occupation: Soda shop proprietor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

An apparent immigrant from Beanbean Kingdom who runs the soda 
bar on the mean streets of Rogueport. His specialty: the world-famous 
Chuckola Cola. Podley apparently had a romance with Eve, who is 
now a mother and a resident of Twilight Town.

Podley's presence in Paper Mario means that the series occurs in the 
same universe as Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga, where the 
Beanbean residents abounded and Chuckola Cola flowed freely. This 
is notable because Nintendo never made any real effort to tie the Paper 
Mario franchise to the events or characters of the first Super Mario 
RPG - though, of course, they couldn't very easily since Square still 
owns the rights to those characters.

=======================================================================

POPPLE  
[Japanese name: Paanyo]
Occupation: Thief
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

The foremost thief in Beanbean Kingdom. He looks like a cross 
between a green bean and one of the Bandit character from Super 
Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island. 

Popple pops up throughout Mario and Luigi's adventure to steal 
everything from the Beanstar to Chucklehuck Reserve. He also has an 
apprentice in tow. Initially it's Bowser (sans memory of his kingly 
status) and later Birdo, who seems to be in love with Popple. He refers 
to both as "Rookie."

Popple is not much of a fighter, though. Once the brothers stomps the 
rookie, Popple scrams. Loyal reader Matt tells me that once Birdo 
ditches Popple, he ends up scrubbing mushrooms next to the hospital 
in Little Fungitown. His Toad boss calls him "Rookie."

=======================================================================

POOCHY
[also known as Poochey, Poochie; Japanese name: Pochi]
Occupation: Man's best friend
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Everyone's favorite dog without a nose. (Seriously, if you look at him, 
he's completely missing a nose.) 

Poochy first appears in "Visit Koopa Troopa and Paratroopa," the first 
stage of the second world in Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island. A 
message block explains, "This dog's name is 'Poochy.' He is cute, 
isn't he? Hitch a ride! He runs in the direction that Yoshi faces!" So in 
a way, Poochy is controllable. If Yoshi hops on his head, Poochy will 
run in the direction Yoshi is facing. Yoshi can also jump off Poochy's 
head, allowing Yoshi to jump a lot higher. And just for the record, that 
means we had Baby Mario riding Yoshi riding Poochy. 

Poochy shows up throughout Yoshi's Island, most notably in the first 
unlockable extra stage: the first world's "Poochy Ain't Stupid."

The mutt is one of the selectable characters in Tetris Attack - he 
replaced Panel du Pon's earth fairy Thiana - but he also shows up 
again in Yoshi's Story, the sequel to Yoshi's Island. Here, he uses his 
sniffer to help Yoshi find hidden items like melons. 

Aside from the re-release of Yoshi's Island for the Game Boy 
Advance, Poochy hasn't been around a whole lot. Early screenshots 
for Paper Mario showed that Poochy was initially going to be a 
character, but anybody who's played the game knows he's nowhere to 
be found. Oh well. He would have made an excellent partner for 
Mario.

So far, Poochy's first and only Gamecube appearance has been as part 
of the Yoshi's Island-themed decor around the Baby Park racetrack in 
Mario Kart: Double Dash!!

Poochy's appearances:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
Picross NP Vol. 2 (Super Famicom) - 1999
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

THE PORK LOINS [new]
Occupation: Pen-and-ink pop quartet
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2005)

This four-piece band has a hit ranking at the number three spot on the 
Diamond City pop charts. They look like they were animated by an 
artist who was getting tired and had to rush to meet a deadline. They 
also look vaguely familiar... Could they have appeared in a 
microgame from the first WarioWare? Anyone with any pointers 
would be greatly appreciated.


=======================================================================

POSIE
Occupation: Delicate beauty
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A friendly flower who grows beneath a crystal tree that drops beautiful 
crystal berries. Actually, Posie bugs me for two reasons: first, she's 
clearly a daffodil, not a posy; second, "posy" is technically a 
misspelling. Drat.

=======================================================================

PRINCE FROGGY
Occupation: Mini-boss
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Prince Froggy is the boss of the first castle in the world three - the 
jungle world. He's actually a normal baddie, although one that looks 
just a bit like Wart from Super Mario Bros. 2. 

The battle against Prince Froggy is particularly noteworthy, however. 
While most battles involve Kamek magically making the boss bigger, 
this one begins with Kamek magically shrinking Yoshi and Baby 
Mario. Prince Froggy eats them and they must dodge stomach acid as 
they pummel the amphibian from the inside. Mario versus the 
digestive system: that's a first.

Like many of the cuter characters from Super Mario World 2, Prince 
Froggy was selectable in Tetris Attack. He replaced Elias, the water 
fairy in Tetris Attack's Japanese version, Panel du Pon.

Prince Froggy's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

PROFESSOR FRANKLY 
[Japanese name: Professor Furankuri]
Occupation: Archeology professor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A learned, bespectacled Goomba who lives in Rogueport and also 
teaches archeology courses at Goom University, where Goombella 
attends. Professor Frankly helps Mario understand the significance of 
the treasure map that Princess Peach sends him. He also briefly joins 
Mario and Goombella on a trek down to the eponymous Thousand-
Year Door in the sewers beneath Rogueport, though he declines from 
fighting in any battles they encounter. 

Frankly may refer to himself as a "shriveled shroom," but he's a good 
ally nonetheless. Throughout the game, Professor Frankly sends Mario 
informative emails. He apparently also taught Kolorado, the Koopa 
archeologist-explorer, as well.

=======================================================================

PUNCHINELLO
Occupation: Bombastic treasure hunter
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

A master of Bob-Ombs who's searching the Moleville Mines for the 
Star Piece that crashed there. He wants to be famous one day, but 
Mario quashes his hopes when he stomps him flat. During the battle, 
Punchinello summons different bombs to defend himself: the tiny 
Micro Bombs, the regular Bob-Ombs and the mid-sized Mezzo 
Bombs. When Punchinello tries to summon a supreme bomb, it 
crushes him, and then explodes, charring Mario, Mallow and Geno.

In case you ever wondered where Punchinello got his name, 
Punchinello was a stock buffoon character in Italian puppet shows.  

Though he's a weapon-wielding maniac standing between Mario and a 
Star Piece, Punchinello is not a member of Smithy's Gang. As a few 
readers have pointed out, Punchy never mentions working for Smithy. 
Furthermore, Punchinello doesn't appear as a clone in Smithy's 
Factory at the end of the game.

=======================================================================

PUNIO (and other Punies) 
Occupation: Lightweight tagalong
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Mario first encounters Punio in the while searching for a passage to the 
Boggly Woods in the Rogueport sewers. Out peeps Punio, a tiny, puny 
insect-like creature with a single glowing dealy-bob antenna. Punio 
explains that his clan has fallen on hard times and that Mario might be 
able to help. Though he doesn't enter battles, Punio joins Mario and 
shows him the way to the monochromatic splendor of the Boggly 
Woods.

Once inside the Great Tree, the Puni clan's home, Mario and Punio 
find that the X-Nauts have teamed with the rival Jabbi clan and 
imprisoned the other Punies in an effort to find the Emerald Star. 
Mario and Punio venture through the Great Tree, freeing the hapless 
Punies and encouraging them to join Mario. At one point, Mario gets a 
hundred and one Punies following him, including Punio. In the end, 
Mario defeats Lord Crump and his robotic contraptions and Punio's 
people reclaim the Great Tree from the wasp-like Jabbies.

While most Punies look the same, you can spot Punio in even the 
biggest Puni heards because he has a green glowing dealy-bob and 
stripes, while most Punies are plain white with a yellow dealy-bob.

=====
PUNIPER 
Occupation: Puni heavyweight
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A husky Puni who distrusts Mario. Eventually, Mario and Punio win 
him over and he's one of the one hundred and one Punies that join up.

=====

PUNI ELDER 
[Japanese name: Obaba]
Occupation: Little lecturer
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The oldest and therefore wisest Puni. Mario and Punio free her first 
and receive a several hour-long lecture on responsibility. Despite her 
age, the elder has some spunk. She can make herself grow twice as big 
when she's angry and she's not afraid to tell of anybody - even Lord 
Crump. The elder insists on calling Mario "Marty-o."

=====
PETUNI 
[Japanese name: Puniko]
Occupation: Lightweight tagalong
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Punio's little sister. She was picking mushrooms for Punio when the 
X-Nauts captured her. In prison, the mushroom shriveled into fungus 
jerky, but Punio lovingly eats it anyway when Mario frees Petuni and 
the other captured Punies. 

You can pick out Petuni because she has a violet dealy-bob and spots.

=====
PUNGENT 
Occupation: Shopkeeper
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Puni who runs a hidden shop inside the Great Tree. Mario can 
uncover the entrance by using Flurrie's wind powers. Inside, Pungent 
and another Puni, Pungry, hang out.

=======================================================================

PUTTS
Occupation: Golfer
First appearance: Mario Golf (2000)

With a name that's all-too-appropriate, Putts is one of the experienced 
golfers new players can challenge when they start a new quest. He's a 
suave-looking middle-aged guy in sunglasses.

Putts' starring roles:
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

PYORO [new]
Occupation: Sticky-tongued bird
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)

A little bird who, in the world of Wario and Diamond City, is a 
popular video game character. Pyoro games are briefly glimpsed in 
various characters' cinematic sequences throughout the series. What's 
more: Each WarioWare game allows the player to unlike a Pyoro 
minigame. 

In the first WarioWare, players can play the Pyoro game after 
unlocking it by doing well enough in the title's many microgames. The 
player controls Pyoro as he snags falling dandelion seeds with his 
Yoshi-like sticky tongue. If the seeds connect with the ground, that 
patch of earth vanishes. The catch is that Pyoro's tongue shoots out at 
a 45-degree angle, meaning the little guy must be standing in the right 
position in order to eat something. The game ends when there's no 
more earth left of a seed konks Pyoro on the head. WarioWare also 
offers especially handy players Pyoro 2, which plays much the same as 
the first game, with the only change being that Pyoro now spits pellets 
at the falling sproutlings.

Each subsequent WarioWare title delivers a new Pyoro variation. 
WarioWare: Twisted! offers Pyoro R, in which rotating the Game Boy 
Advance is little Pyoro's main mode of locomotion. Likewise, 
WarioWare: Touched! has Pyoro T (for "touch") and WarioWare: 
Smooth Moves has Pyoro S (for "sensor"). WarioWare: Twisted! also 
features Pyoro as the character who introduces the screens in which 
the player unlocks a goodie from the prize machine.

Pyoro has become successful enough as a video game persona that his 
game is easily available on your home computer through Flash 
versions of it. Google "Pyoro." You'll see. 

Pyoro's appearances:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=======================================================================

QUEEN B 
[also known as Bumble B Rumble]
Occupation: Thing of sting
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

A large version of the generic bee-like Zinger baddie, Queen B is the 
boss of the Vine Valley area of Donkey Kong Country. Donkey or 
Diddy will have to toss some barrels at her belly - her only 
vulnerable spot - in order to take the zing out of her sting.

Queen B's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

QUEEN BEAN
[Japanese name: Queen Mamera]
Occupation: Reigning monarch of Beanbean Kingdom
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

When Mario and Luigi first meet Queen Bean, she's a hulking 
Frankenstein-sized monster, light on small talk and spoiling for a fight. 
Mario and Luigi fight the clobber queen. When they win, Lady Lima 
rushes in and explains that Cackletta force-fed Queen Bean a Belly 
Blech worm, causing her combative craze. Mario and Luigi obtain a 
special curative soda, Chucklehuck Reserve, which Mario drinks and 
then - ahem - barfs into Bean's mouth. Soon, the queen is in good 
spirits and happy to help her rescuers. 

The soda serum may change her behavior, but the queen's not at all 
different looking after ingestion. She still a hulking woman, belly 
worm or no. Queen Bean, who's also the mother of Prince Peasley, 
shakes the ground with her every step and just might be the most plus-
sized woman in the Marioverse. Weight issues aside, Queen Bean is a 
wise and capable ruler, even when Cackletta's forces pulverize her 
kingdom. She also proves to be a great ally to Mario, Luigi and Peach 
during their adventures in Beanbean Kingdom.

=======================================================================

RAMBI 
[Japanese name: Ranbi]
Occupation: Rambunctious rhinoceros
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

This gray rhinoceros is essentially the revamped Donkey Kong's 
Yoshi. When Donkey made the transition from 8-bit obscurity to 3d-
rendered glory, Rare gave him his own Bowser (K. Rool), his own 
Peach (Candy Kong) and his own rideable animal friends, including 
Rambi. Although Enguarde the swordfish is the only animal buddy to 
appear in all three SNES Donkey Kong Country titles, Rambi is 
always the first animal buddy to be unleashed in whatever game he 
appears in. 

Like the rest of the animal buddies - and like Yoshi in Super Mario 
World - Rambi gives your character an extra hit, so to speak. Donkey 
won't take damage he touches an enemy while riding Rambi. Instead, 
Rambi will squeal and run away, leaving Donkey to his own devices 
unless Donkey can catch up to him. In later games, various heroic 
Kongs can hop into a Rambi barrel and turn into him - that is, play as 
him without riding him. 

As a rhino, Rambi's strengths lie in his giant horn. I can't think of an 
instance in any game he's appeared in which he did anything besides 
poking baddies with his horn or charging up to full speed and breaking 
into a secret passage. He does it well, at least.

In the early days of the Gamecube, Rare let loose some screenshots of 
Donkey Kong Racing, a variation on Mario Kart that had the racers 
rode animals instead of driving go-karts. One of the rideable animals 
was, of course, Rambi. The schism between Rare and Nintendo 
effectively ended this game, however, so I guess we'll never see the 
entire Kong clan riding a stampeding herd of Rambis. 

Rambi's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

Other appearances: 
Donkey Konga (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

RAPHAEL THE RAVEN
[Japanese name: Big Kyuu-chan]
Occupation: Chief raven
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island

Though Raphael first appeared as a boss, he's since become an ally of 
Mario and Yoshi. 

Yoshi fights Raphael at end of the last level in the sixth world of 
Yoshi's Island. Kamek magically enlarges a regular raven - a Pidgit-
looking baddie that pops up throughout the game - and whisks both 
Raphael and Yoshi to a small planet in the night sky. There, the screen 
rotates a full 360 degrees while Yoshi tries to stomp the entire mini-
planet in a way that will crunch Raphael against the screen. It's a truly 
unique boss battle among the many in the Mario games.

Like many Yoshi's Island characters, Raphael is selectable in Tetris 
Attack, where he replaced the moon fairy Seren from the game's 
original Japanese version, Panel du Pon. But Raphael made his most 
notable appearance in Paper Mario, in which he led the tribe of ravens 
that live with the Yoshies on Lavalava Island. Much like how he 
looked in Yoshi's Island, Raphael is the biggest of the ravens. He's 
also a bit of a recluse; hiding in the thick plant camouflage of Jade 
Jungle, he's become a bit of a local legend. None of the Yoshies can 
actually remember seeing Raphael.

When a section of the jungle appears impassable, Mario must place a 
jade raven on a pedestal to make Raphael appear. He's quite friendly, 
and unlike the lesser ravens, he can speak words besides just "caw." 
Raphael orders the ravens to build a contraption that allows Mario to 
access Mount Lavalava.

Raphael and the rest of the ravens look quite a bit like Pidgit, the 
magic-carpet riding bird from Super Mario Bros. 2. I'd wager that 
since Yoshi's Island drew a lot of its minor baddies from Super Mario 
Bros. 2 and Paper Mario drew a lot of its baddies from Yoshi's Island, 
there's some connection between Raphael and Pidgit, even if 
Nintendo's calling him a raven now.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR RAPHAEL***
The basically laid-back ravens come in several sizes. The smaller ones 
travel in flocks or traipse around small platforms all day long. The 
biggest of their breed is called Raphael the Raven, and his enormous 
size renders most direct attacks useless. Instead of fighting, Raphael 
and the Ravens helped Mario out in Paper Mario.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR RAPHAEL***

Raphael the Raven's starring roles:
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996

Other appearances:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

RATTLY 
Occupation: Coils of springy justice
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

A cheerful green snake whose coiled tail allows him to bounce like 
nobody's business. While riding Rattly, in fact, Diddy and Dixie have 
no choice but to bounce. Though he's a snake, Rattly can't bite. He 
also doesn't show up again after Donkey Kong County 2 and its 
various reincarnations.

Rattly's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

RAWK HAWK 
[also known as The Feral Nuclear Reactor; Japanese name: The Gold 
Hawk]
Occupation: Professional wrestler
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A hulking bird with blond tresses who acts like a cross between real-
life professional wrestlers Hulk Hogan and the Rock. Mario and 
company initially suspect Rawk Hawk of being the evil mastermind 
behind the mysterious goings on at the Glitz Pit fighting circuit 
because a Crystal Star is dangling from his champion ship belt. Further 
investigation, however, reveals that Rawk Hawk's only interests lie in 
his legions of adoring fans. 

When Mario, fighting under the pseudonym "The Great Gonzales," 
eventually beats Rawk Hawk and becomes the Glitz Pit champion, the 
big bird seems to hold a grudge. After Mario also Whomps Grubba, 
however, Rawk Hawk lightens up a bit a promises to no longer fight 
dirty.

Later, Mario can return to the Glitz Pit, re-enter as a beginner and 
work his way back up to challenging Rawk Hawk again. 

=======================================================================

RAZOR
Occupation: Fishfaced fool
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

The ninth boss. Perhaps the only relevant boss in Wario's Woods, the 
idiotically named Razor is a fishman. He looks a lot like the beach 
bum fishgirls from Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga.

=======================================================================

REALLY GNAWTY 
Occupation: Beaver badass
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

A purple palette swap of Very Gnawty, the boss from the first area of 
Donkey Kong Country. Really Gnawty doesn't pose much more of a 
threat, even colored purple.

Really Gnawty's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

RED [new]
Occupation: Devlish sidekick
Only appearance: WarioWare: Touched! (2005)

A tiny little devil character whom Ashley orders around. The wicked 
witch of Diamond City even sics Red after Orbulon under the notion 
that Orby would complete the ingredients list for her next big spell, but 
Red fails. Ashley forgives Red, then fiendishly tells him that she'll just 
use him instead. Red nonetheless follows Ashley to the Hawt House, 
where rocks out, even if Ashley does not.

Red's appearance is notable because it would seem to conflict with 
Nintendo of America's policy of not including Christian-affiliated 
characters in their games. Go read up on an old NES title called Devil 
World. It features a lot of religious elements, with Old Scratch himself 
as the antagonist. As a result, it never hit American shores. Maybe 
Nintendo's lightened up on what they think is appropriate for kids? Or 
maybe they thought Red was cute enough to let him slide?

=======================================================================

REZNOR 
[Japanese name: Buibui]
Occupation: Fortress boss
First appearance: Super Mario World (1990)

The Reznors are a quartet of fire-breathing rhinoceros-like dinosaurs 
who wait at the end of the four fortresses in Dinosaur Land - Vanilla 
Fortress, Forest Fortress, Chocolate Fortress and Valley of Bowser 
Fortress. Mario must bump the platform they stand on to knock them 
into the lava below. They're not to be confused with the Dino Rhino, a 
generic, fire-spitting baddie that appears in the Chocolate Island 
stages. According to the Super Mario World manual, the Reznors are 
peaceful residents of Dinosaur Land who have been placed under 
Bowser's evil spell.

In the tradition of naming Mario villains after musicians, Reznor 
would seem to take his name from Trent Reznor, lead singer of Nine 
Inch Nails. However, reader Aaron LaRose pointed out to me that 
Reznor is also the name of a heating unit manufacturer - a happy 
coincidence, since the characters breath fire.

Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991 
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002 

=======================================================================

RIP CHEATO
Occupation: Bargain basement dweller
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Unlike Chet Rippo, who promises big things but will only scam 
anybody dumb enough to pay him, Rip Cheato actually delivers a 
bargain. He'll sell Mario rare items at reasonable prices. Rip lives in 
the maze of sewers under Toad Town, and Mario can reach him by 
letting Bombette blast through a wall.

=======================================================================

ROBIRDO
Occupation: Robot sentry
Only appearance: Super Mario Advance (2001)

A giant robotic version of Birdo who replaced Mouser as the boss of 
the third world in Super Mario Advance, the latest remake of Super 
Mario Bros. 2

=======================================================================

ROCKY THE REPORTER [new]
Occupation: Bespotted television journalist
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted! (2005)

Seemingly Ken's replacement as the Diamond City report on the 
streets, the fez-wearing Dalmatian Rocky reports on the popularity of 
WarioWare Inc.'s newest title in the closing cinematics of WarioWare: 
Twisted! How's that for meta.

=======================================================================

ROGER THE POTTED GHOST
[also known as the Potted Ghost]
Occupation: Possessed planter
Only appearance: Super Mario World: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Kamek creates most bosses in Yoshi's Island by magically re-sizing 
normal baddies. Roger, however, is an exception. Kamek creates him 
from an otherwise benign flowerpot. Roger meets his undoing when 
Yoshi's pushes his pot into a hole in the floor. Smash. Roger's castle is 
the last level in the forested second level of the game.

Roger the Potted Ghost's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

ROSIE
Occupation: Prickly beauty
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Vain and selfish Rosie likes pretty things. She wants to keep the Water 
Crystal for herself, even though it's the only thing that will save Lily 
from withering away. Only a crystal berry from Posie can change her 
mind - and at that, she only decides to save Lily so somebody else 
can be around to appreciate her beauty.

=======================================================================

ROWF and RUFF 
[Japanese name: Rotten]
Occupation: Badge merchant
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Rowf sells badges in Toad Town with his son, Ruff. When Shy Guys 
storm Toad Town, they steal Rowf's calculator, halting business until 
Mario can retrieve it. 

Though Ruff is a separate character from his dad, he never really did 
enough to motivate me to give him his own profile.

Judging by their names, I assumed Rowf and his son were dogs, but 
upon looking closer at them, I think they are actually Doogans, 
members of a race that doesn't get mentioned until Paper Mario: The 
Thousand-Year Door. Around Rogueport, several guys who look like 
Rowf and Ruff mile about. Goombella indetifies them as Doogans. 
They look quite a bit like flesh-colored versions of the generic Super 
Mario World baddie Rex, what with the nose spike and all.

Incidentally, Rowf's Japanese name is "Rotten," which is also the 
Japanese name of the Doogan character Arfur from Paper Mario: The 
Thousand-Year Door. I'd guess this is a coincidence, because the 
characters wouldn't redily seem to be the same guy.

=======================================================================

RUDY 
Occupation: Demonic clown
First appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

As far as the Marioverse goes, there are few thigns as freaky as a big, 
giant clown. (Wario Land 5: Waluigi World would be among them, 
but let's not think about that yet.) Rudy is just that - and a patchwork, 
multicolored, multipatterned clown at that.

In Wario Land 3, Wario must collect five enchanted musical 
instruments called "orgels" at the request of a mysterious figure who 
greets our favorite antihero as soon as he gets sucked into a world 
entirely ecased within a cursed music box. Once Wario collects and 
plays the orgels, the figure assumes its true form: Rudy the clown, a 
truly nasty character and the game's central villain. Rudy apparently 
tricked Wario into gathering the orgels in order to ocnquer the world. 
Wario stomps Rudy, however, and frees the people living inside the 
music box.

Rudy casues trouble up again in Dr. Mario 64, in which he and Dr. 
Scienstein attempt to make off with Dr. Mario's prized megavitamins 
at the height of a nasty flu epidemic. Players chosing to select Dr. 
Mario to play as must eventually fight Rudy as the final villain. (Those 
chosing Wario, conversely, fight Scienstein.) The story mode tries to 
conceal Rudy's identity through as much of the story as possible. Only 
his red clown nose is visible on the edge of the screen as he barks 
commands to Scienstein regarding his plan to steal the only cure to flu 
season.

Rudy's starring roles:
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2000
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001

=======================================================================

SAL OUT [new]
Occupation: Diamond City pop idol
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2005)

A fellow who dresses like an astronaut and made somewhat of a dent 
in the Diamond City music scene with a cover of Mike's theme. That's 
if we can trust the latest episode of "Ear Candy," the local music 
countdown.

=======================================================================

SALVO THE SLIME
[Japanese name: Big Slime]
Occupation: Vicious, viscous villain
Only appearance: Super Mario World: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Boss of the second castle, the last level in the grassy first world of the 
game. Salvo is a giant ball of goo who shrinks each time Yoshi hits 
him with an egg. Eventually, there's nothing left but a pair of giant 
black eyes.

Salvo reappears as a mid-level boss in the first in castle in the sixth 
world.

Salvo the Slime's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003 
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

SAMMY RAI [new]
Occupation: Breakthough pop sensation
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2005)

A big guy in a samurai costume who sings traditional Japanese ballads. 
Ken the Veejay touts him as this week's highlight sensation on the 
music countdown show "Ear Candy." And that's everything we know 
about this overly punny character.

=======================================================================

SAM SPOOK
Occupation: Ghost hillbilly
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

The fourth Wario's Woods boss, Sam Spook wears overalls and a 
green pumpkin on his head.

=======================================================================

SARISSA
Occupation: Witch
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A cute little girl witch with green hair. She's the thirteenth boss.

=======================================================================

SCIENSTEIN  [new]
[also known as Mad Scienstein]
Occupation: Mad scientist
First appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

He apparently got his doctorate in villainy, because this M.D. has 
caused nothing but trouble in either the two games he's appeared in. I 
honestly can't find much info on Scienstein. I can safely say he's one 
of the most obscure characters in the entire Marioverse. However, I 
think he's an associate of Rudy, the clown villain from Wario Land 3. 
He appears more like a generic enemy, however, periodically popping 
up to toss vials of fluid that will render Wario invisible if they touch 
him. More than a hindrance, however, this effect allows Wario to pass 
through doors, so the Scienstein may an inadvertently helpful bad guy.

In Dr. Mario 64, Scienstein steals Dr. Mario's megavitamins in a ploy 
to help cure Rudy's flu and corner the market on the wondrous cure-all 
pills. He's actually playable in multiplayer mode, though only in the 
sense that players can select him as their persona as they solve puzzles. 
Otherwise, Scienstein is the main villain in the Wario storyline.

Scienstein seems to have gone the way of Syrup: missing. Honestly, 
there's not much place for him in the Marioverse anyway, as Nintendo 
seems to have adopted E. Gadd as the resident mad scientist in the 
Mario games and Dr. Crygor has emerged as a recurring mad scientist 
in the Wario Ware games. Oh well.

Curiously, Scienstein looks a little big like Dr. Light, the benevolent 
scientist from the Mega Man games. White beard, white lab coat, 
goggles. Of course, I suppose a lot of mad scientists look like that.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=105&pos=4

Scienstein's appearances:
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2000
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

SCRATCHY THE FRO BUG [new]
Occupation: Scalp irritant
Only appearance: WarioWare: Touched (2005)

A brown beetle that digs its way into Jimmy's fro, thus implementing 
Jimmy's microgame set, Dance Club Rub, in which the player must 
make quick, short strokes with the Nintendo DS stylus. In Jimmy's 
epilogue, Scratchy makes his way back into his fro during the walk 
home, but everyone just thinks Jimmy is dancing again.

=======================================================================

SCREAMY 
Occupation: Mysterious tagalong
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The fifth and final of the buddies Luigi meets along his quest to rescue 
Princess Eclair. Screamy materialized in the Rapturous Ruins, where 
Luigi meets a young boy named Cranberry who guards the final piece 
of the Marvelous Compass. Screamy explains the gravity of Luigi's 
mission, but it's all lost on me. 

Screamy says he "has something to deliver," but I have no idea what. 
Beyond that, I can't even tell what Screamy's supposed to be. Reader 
Kirby021591 guesses that Screamy might be a Luff, the ancient race 
that constructed the Rapturous Ruins, but I think he looks like the 
ghost of an onion. He also theorizes that Screamy "something to 
deliver" is Luigi and that Screamy is actually an agent working for 
Crepe to deliver the compass pieces. Debate at will.

=======================================================================

SERGEANT FLUTTER
[Japanese name: Sergeant Pataa]
Occupation: Air force commander
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

A gray Paratroopa with aviator goggles whose squadron of Sky 
Troopas help Mario ascend the steeped bluffs of Land's End. Sgt. 
Flutter helps Mario at the request of Monstermama, the kindly 
landlady of Monstro Town.

=======================================================================

SHADOW MARIO
[Japanese name: Fake Mario]
Occupation: Silhouetted imposter
First appearance: Super Mario Sunshine (2002)

Shadow Mario is the identity Bowser Jr. assumes when he vandalizes 
the walls of Isle Delfino. If Mario were made of water, he'd look a lot 
like this guy. Apparently, the get-up was an invention by the famous 
Dr. E. Gadd. Mario chases Shadow Mario throughout many of the 
isle's areas, and catching the imposter nets Mario a Shine sprite.

This isn't technically a real character, of course, because it's always 
just Bowser Jr. in disguise. However, I gave Shadow Mario his own 
profile because he's a playable character in Mario Golf: Toadstool 
Tour. We never get to see Shadow Mario with his mask off, so we 
have no way of knowing who's donned the disguise this time. It can't 
be Bowser Jr. this time, since he's a playable character, but it could 
easily be anyone else. (After all, remember how pensively Il 
Piantissimo stared at the discarded Gaddbrush at the end of Super 
Mario Sunshine?)

Bowser Jr. raced along with his dad in Mario Kart: Double Dash!! sans 
the disguise, though he still wears the mask around his neck. Let's 
hope future appearances are Bowser Jr. as Bowser Jr. and not in 
disguise.

Shadow Mario's starring roles:
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2002

=======================================================================

THE SHADOW QUEEN 
Occupation: Apocalyptic demoness
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The ancient evil lurking beneath Rogueport. A thousand years before 
Mario sets foot in the town, the Shadow Queen arose and wiped out 
the city that once stood there. A heroic troupe consisting of a Toad, a 
Koopa, a Goomba and a Boo sealed her away, but their powers could 
only restrain her for a thousand years

When Mario presents the seven Crystal Stars before the Thousand-
Year Door, the entry to the last remaining remnant of the Shadow 
Queen's power, Grodus sneaks in with Peach, opens the tomb in which 
the Shadow Queen sleeps and promptly allows her shadowy form in 
possess Peach. The earth shakes, the sky goes black and the end of the 
world seems high, but Mario fights the Shadow Queen by attacking 
Peach. Eventually, the demon's real form emerges and only the power 
of the Crystal Stars combined with the prayers of all the friends he's 
made during his quest can weaken the Shadow Queen to a point at 
which Mario can attack. Eventually, Mario triumphs and the Shadow 
Queen evacuates Peach's body, never to be seen again.

The Shadow Queen looks like a bigger, more evil version of the 
Shadow Sirens: she's a strip of ribbon-like, dark purple shadow with a 
pointy crown and giant hands. She'd almost be beautiful if she wasn't 
so gosh darn evil.

=======================================================================

THE SHADOW SIRENS 
[also known as the Three Shadow Beauties; Japanese name: the Three 
Shadows Group]
Occupation: Witchy women
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Three sorceress sisters - Beldam, Marilyn and Vivian - who seem 
to serve the X-Nauts but actually worship the evil Shadow Queen. 
Lord Grodus first sends them to the Boggly Woods to intercept Mario 
before he reaches the Emerald Star. They are supposed to match any 
passers-by with a sketch of Mario, but the three can't stop arguing - 
both over was supposed to bring the sketch and who should keep the 
necklace that Vivian found in the woods. 

The Shadow Sirens continue to show up through the remainder of the 
game, as the members' individual profiles will explain.

=====

VIVIAN 

The youngest and cutest of the Shadow Sirens, with cotton candy-pink 
swirl of hair and a red-striped hat. Goombella acknowledges that 
Vivian is even cuter than she is. She's also the least evil, it would 
seem. Perhaps because she's tired of being picked on by Beldam, 
Vivian seems reluctant to join in their witchery.

When Mario encounters the Shadow Sirens in Twilight Town, they're 
fighting over who was supposed to bring the Superbombbomb - a 
dangerous-sounding device that sounds just a bit like a certain Soul 
Coughing song. Beldam blames Vivian, of course, and leaves with 
Marilyn to take a nap while poor Viv has to search for the missing 
explosive device in the grass. Mario kindly offers to help and Vivian 
sweetly offers to join him as a thanks.

Vivian accompanies Mario as he searches through Creepy Steeple to 
find the name of the jerk who has stolen his identity. When Mario 
finally named this foe, Doopliss, and challenges him to a showdown, 
Vivian initially refuses. Mario is, after all, Mario - her foe After a 
few rounds of duking it out with Doopliss, however, Vivian admits 
that Mario's been nicer to her than anyone she's ever met. She hops 
into battle at Mario's side. From this point on, Vivian is Mario's full-
fledged companion. She can help him out battle with her crazy fire 
magic. Out of battle, she can pull Mario into the shadows, where 
enemies can't see him. This ability comes especially handy in Twilight 
Town, where Mario and Vivian must eavesdrop on crows in the trees 
to learn the whereabouts of Doopliss.

Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a chance Vivian could be a nod 
to Vivi, the Black Mage character from Final Fantasy 9. They have 
similar hats. They practice black magic. They have similar names. And 
both overcome a potentially evil leaning and join the forces of good. 
Furthermore, the three sisters present the holy Squaresoft RPG trio of 
magic - fire, ice and lightning. 

I was surprised as anyone when The Mushroom Kingdom website's 
special on Paper Mario 2's translation from Japanese to English 
indicated that though Vivian looks exactly the same in the land of the 
rising sun, the character if male - likely the most effeminate male 
character in the a Mario game.

=====

BELDAM 
[Japanese name: Marjorin/Margarine]

The oldest and smallest of the Shadow Sirens. She also has a foul 
temper to match her wicked cackle. As the oldest, Beldam bosses 
Marilyn and Vivian around quite a bit, even though she refers to her 
sisters as "lovelies," she treats them like dirt. She's especially cruel to 
Vivian and selfishly takes the necklace Vivian finds while trekking 
through the Boggly Woods. (Also, in turns out, Beldam was the one 
who had the Mario sketch all along. She blames Vivian anyway.)

After the run-in in Twilight Town, Mario meets the Shadow Sires 
again, only with Doopliss taking Vivian's place. The reformed 
Shadow Sirens show up once more at the end of the game, where 
Mario learns that they are devotees of the Shadow Queen, the 1000-
year-old demon that once destroyed Rogueport. The Shadow Queen 
seems to remember Beldam, also, so I guess we can assume that 
Beldam, Vivian and Marilyn are at least as old as the Shadow Queen. 
In fact, they even seem to be the same species: inky, shadowy, witchy 
females spirits adept at casting magic.

It's presumable that Beldam is the crone who starts this whole mess in 
the first place. If you watch the prologue to the game, you'll know that 
some unseen old woman lures Peach into opening the box with the 
treasure map to the Crystal Stars. Since Beldam is such a loyal 
follower of the Shadow Queen, it would make sense that she would 
want to begin the chain of events that would lead to the demon's 
revival.

Beldam wears a blue striped hat and casts ice spells against her 
opponents. Her name sounds a lot like "bedlam," a fancy word for 
"chaos." Ironically, the French for "beautiful lady" would be "belle 
dame" - which Beldam certainly is not.

=====

MARILYN 

The fat Shadow Siren. Goombella describes her as the "strong, silent 
type." (She might also call Marilyn the "fat type.") Indeed she is. 
Marilyn never really talks. She only grunts, though her sisters never 
have trouble understanding what she's saying.

Marilyn wears a yellow-striped hat and casts lightning magic against 
her opponents.

=======================================================================

SHAGGY [new]
Occupation: Pixel pet
First appearance: WarioWare, Inc. (2003)

Shaggy, whom I earlier described as a "yellow, Lego block-thing with 
Bart Simpson's haircut" shows up throughout Wario Ware. I honestly 
had no idea what he was supposed to be, but someone tipped me off 
that he's a member of the Fronk species and 9-Volt's pet. Apparently, 
during the in-game text says so during break scenes between level-ups 
when 9-Volt's level is played. Shaggy makes a lot more sense that 
way. I think he's supposed to be some type of pixilated creature from 
an earlier age of video games.

Players can control Shaggy in quite a few microgames. Among them: 
Huge Foot, where he must avoid being stomped upon; Shaggy's Rear 
End, in which players must successfully match Shaggy's front with his 
back; Mammity Island, in which Shaggy must dodge spouts of water 
shooting from some Super Mario Bros. 2-ish whales; and Versus 
Chicken, in which two players make Shaggy and 9-Volt compete to 
see who can skate closest to the end of a cliff without falling off.

Shaggy gets a little more credit in WarioWare: Twisted!, in which he 
has his own set of microgames, "Surprise Attack Revolution." To 
unlock Shaggy's games, however, the player must merely keep 
playing other people's sets - Crygor, Mama and Papa T., to name a 
few - and randomly open Shaggy's games.

Shaggy and other Fronks continue to appear in microgames in later 
games in the WarioWare series.

Shaggy's starring roles:
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

Other appearances:
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=======================================================================

SHELLSHOCKER 
Occupation: Glitz Pit competitor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A teal-shelled Koopa Troopa whom Mario fights in the Glitz Pit and 
hangs out in the major league locker room. His team is the 
Shellshockers.

=======================================================================

SHERRY 
Occupation: Golfer
First appearance: Mario Golf (2000)

A young, pigtailed golfer whose mother started her playing. Sherry is 
one of the four generic human characters players can chose to play as 
when they start a new quest. Like Azalea, Joe and Kid, Sherry is also 
playable in the Nintendo 64 version of Mario Golf for players with the 
proper equipment. His name and stats, however, are variable.

Sherry's starring roles:
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

SHIISA
Occupation: The grim specter of death
Only appearance: Wario's Woods NES (1994)

A menacing skeleton man clad in a blue cloak. Oddly, he's not the last 
boss in the game. Wario must fight both Shiisa and a palette swap 
version of him.

=======================================================================

SHIMI 
Occupation: Gourmet chef
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

This Cheep Cheep cooks meals for passengers riding the Excess 
Express, the high-class railroad that connects Rogueport with Poshley 
Heights. His first language being Cheep Cheep, Shimi often uses the 
wrong word - "masterbeast" instead of "masterpiece," for example. 
One of the many mysteries amateur detective Mario must solve while 
aboard the Excess Express is determining who stole Shimi's pot of 
stew. (It turns out it was the fat guy.)

"Shimi" is, of course, short for "sashimi," a Japanese name for a type 
of raw fish. Some players might remember that there's another Cheep 
Cheep in the Mario universe with a similar name. Sushie, Mario's 
Cheep Cheep companion from the first Paper Mario gets a letter from 
her daughter, Sashimie. 

=======================================================================

SHIVERS
[Japanese name: Se Nobasu-chan]
Occupation: Butler
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

According to his profile on Game Boy Horror, Shivers is the ghostly 
butler who wanders the halls of the mansion in search of his master's 
will. But Shivers says he's searching for a way to win the heart of 
Melody, the pretty ghost lady who plays piano in the music room. 
Either way, it's a moot point - Luigi sucked them both up in the 
Poltergust 3000. 

Shivers is not to be confused with that other ghost butler, Bootler from 
Paper Mario.

=======================================================================

SHOKORA
Occupation: Princess of the Golden Pyramid
Only appearance: Wario Land Advance (2001)

One morning, Wario reads a front-page newspaper detailing the 
discovery of the lost Golden Pyramid, which was once owned by the 
lost Princess Shokora. Wario drops the paper, hops in his trademark 
Wario purple convertible and speeds off for treasure, just narrowly 
missing a black cat in the road.

As Wario ventures through every passage of the Golden Pyramid, you 
could almost miss that black cat. It scurries into the item shop just 
before Wario enters, but in the shop, there's a silhouetted Mr. Game & 
Watch-looking guy inside. The items Wario buys actually call the 
shopkeeper into boss battles, where he transforms into other shapes to 
help Wario out.

When Wario finally beats the Golden Diva, the evil spirit who cursed 
Princess Shokora long ago, he finds that the black cat, the Mr. Game & 
Watch look-a-like and Princess Shokora are one in the same. Though 
cursed, she still managed to use her transformed state to her - and 
Wario's advantage.

How Shokora appears to Wario depends on how much money Wario 
collects during his adventure. At worst, Shokora stays a cat. A little 
more cash, she shows up as the shopkeeper. Her next-to-best 
appearance - and, in my opinion, the best - is as the pretty, pretty 
princess Wario glimpses in the newspaper article. She looks a lot like 
Peach, actually, only with pink hair. If Wario collects enough money, 
he sees Shokora's best appearance: a boy. Well, maybe not a boy, but 
definitely a boyish-looking girl - with a boy's haircut and wearing 
shorts. 

In the end, Shokora ascends into the sky, blowing Wario a kiss before 
she vanishes. Wario may lose the girl, but he gets to keep his cash.

=======================================================================

SHY GUY 
[Japanese name: Hei-ho]
Occupation: Mischief anonymous
First appearance: Doki Doki Panic (1987)

In short, Shy Guys are the Goombas of Wart's army, though they'd 
later be appropriated by Bowser, Smithy and Cackletta, to name a 
few. They're the dumbest and the most plentiful of the enemies in 
Super Mario Bros. 2. While the art depicted them as little guys 
wearing red or pink robes and white masks, their in-game 
appearance always reminded me more of walking loaves of bread 
- that, and the red Shy Guys always looked brown. (In the Super 
Mario All-Stars remake of Super Mario Bros. 2 and the Game Boy 
Advance version as well, Nintendo changed the pink Shy Guys to 
blue. I can only guess they did this to make people like me wonder 
why.) Two alternate forms of Shy Guys existed as well: the Snifit, 
a Shy Guy who could shoot bullets, and the Beezo, a winged Shy 
Guy who would aim for Mario and charge with a pitchfork.

Despite their plentitude in Super Mario Bros. 2, Shy Guys all but 
vanished until Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island. There, they 
appeared in as many colors as there were Koopa Troopas in Super 
Mario World. They also, apparently, had trained during their 
absence, and now attacked in a variety of inventive ways: on stilts, 
hiding in flowers, lighting themselves on fire, throwing baseballs, 
swinging baseball bats and even flying with propeller tops.

Since then, Shy Guy sightings have increased. They appear in 
nearly every Mario game since, including the RPG games. They 
populated Yoshi's Story as well, where they proved to be 
especially good eating. The Yoshies in that game could even find 
the rare White Shy Guy, who, when caught, would follow Yoshi to 
the exit and then wait with the other Yoshies to rescue one if 
Bowser's forces caught him or her. Incidentally, in Yoshi's Story, 
the Shy Guys speak. You can clearly hear them saying "hei-ho," 
their name in Japanese. And in Luigi's Mansion, Luigi could use 
his vacuum cleaner to suck off the masks of generic Shy Guy 
ghosts, finally revealing what lies underneath: a shadowy form 
with a pair of glowing eyes.

Though the Shy Guys truly had their day in Paper Mario, where 
they dominated an entire area of the game, a crazy-kiddy-colorful 
maze of games called Shy Guy's Toy Box, the first - and so far 
only - playable Shy Guy appeared in the Nintendo 64 installment 
of Mario Tennis. The little guy was an interesting character to 
control, but apparently not interesting enough. He didn't appear as 
a playable character again until the sequel, Mario Power Tennis. 
There, he powered-up his normal tennis skills with the help of an 
alternate Shy Guy persona: Spear Guy. (Picture a Shy Guy in a 
hula skirt and tribal paint on his mask and you've got it.) Shy Guy-
as-Spear Guy could use his spear to make some devastating returns 
or approach shots. 

Maybe Shy Guy's newfound might will earn him a playable spot in 
a non-tennis Mario game in the future.

And did you notice the Shy Guy-related peculiarity in Paper 
Mario: The Thousand-Year Door? Although the Shy Guys appear 
in the battle scenes as audience members - sometimes ones that 
interfere by tossing garbage at Mario and his pals - they never 
appear in the game otherwise. Not as enemies, not as generic 
characters. Nothing. Strange, eh?

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR SHY GUY***
There are many types of Shy Guys: they've been known to walk on 
the ground, fly through the air, traipse about on stilts, wear flowers 
or camouflage, throw balls, swing bats, sail on pirate ships, carry 
fruit, do the Bamboo Dance, ride submarines, play guitar, play 
tennis, wear red, come in large or small sizes, steal people's toys, 
cause mischief...
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR SHY GUY***

Shy Guy's starring roles:
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Doki Doki Panic - (Famicom) - 1987 
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy) - 1998
Picross NP Vol. 2 (Super Famicom) - 1999
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Luigi's Mansion (Gamecube) - 2001
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario vs. Donkey Kong (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

SILKY 
[Japanese name: Dworm]
Occupation: Wormy boss
Only appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

The second boss in Wario Land 3, whom Wario fights in the stage 
called "The Grasslands."

I haven't played this game and don't know much about Dworm other 
than what Shdwrlm3 posted in his Wario Land 3 guide at GameFAQs. 
Anybody with further information will be greatly appreciated.

=======================================================================

SIR WESTON
[Japanese name: Arupu]
Occupation: Freezegood ghost
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

An arctic explorer whose ghost now haunts the mansion's cold 
storage unit. Luigi will have to melt Sir Weston's shield of ice 
before he'll get a chance to suck him up in the Poltergust 3000.

=======================================================================

SLIM BANKSHOT
[Japanese name: Ball Long; alternate spelling: Boru Rongo]
Occupation: Lonely pool shark
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

A lonesome soul who shoots pool by himself in the billiard room. If 
Luigi sucks up one of the pool balls Slim hits, he can peg him and 
cause him to be vulnerable just long enough to suck him up. Slim, 
according to his Game Boy Horror bio, has "never played a living 
soul," though he's clearly had practice playing against the dead.

=======================================================================

SLUGGY THE UNSHAVEN [new]
[Japanese name: Big Kemekuji]
Occupation: Hearty slime
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island

Sluggy, a purple, hair-covered ball of slime, is the boss of the first 
castle in the game's fifth world. He's a large version of the minor 
goo baddies that populate his castle. Though Kamek claims Sluggy 
has no weak points, aiming an egg at his heart - his only visible 
organ - will finish him. 

Sluggy's Japanese name, according to TheKoopaBros., comes 
from "ke," meaning "hair," and "mekuji," meaning "slug." So 
there you have it: a big hairy slug.

Sluggy the Unshaven's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 
2003

=======================================================================

SMITHY (and his factory staff)  
[Japanese name: Kajioo]
Occupation: Forger of the world's weapons
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 
(1996)

Smithy: The evil king of weapons, the cause of all the world's strife 
in Super Mario RPG and the only force powerful enough to unite
Bowser with Mario and Peach. Smithy's ship, Exor, crashes through 
the roof of Bowser's Keep and announces its master's plants for 
taking over the world. Exor's flight, however, shattered the Star 
Road.

In the game's final leg, Mario, Peach, Bowser, Geno and Mallow 
enter Smithy's domain, a mechanical world of weapon 
manufacturing. Past conveyor belts and cheap imitations of the 
henchmen they've already beaten - Mack, Bowyer, Yaridovich and 
the Axem Rangers - Smithy waits in his forge, hammering away at 
new weapons to wreak havoc on the world. Looking just a bit like an 
evil Santa Claus with a crown, Smithy wants to fill the world with 
weapons, but Mario and his friends quickly put a stop to his plants.

Partway through the fight, Smithy becomes infuriated and starts 
pounding the floor with his hammer. The room, which his underlings 
remind him was only built the day before, collapses, and everyone 
falls down into the bowels of the factory. An angry, angry Smithy 
reveals his true form. He's not Santa at all! He's actually... a toaster 
- albeit a very mean one that wears a crown and can morph its head 
to attack in a variety of different ways. The army tank head is for 
offensive maneuvers, the wizard head for magic attacks, the safe 
head for protection and the treasure box head for a randomly selected 
trick.

Eventually, Smithy falls and Mario collects the seventh Star Piece. 
Peace is restored, and - given the rift between Square and Nintendo 
- it's safe to say that Smithy will never threaten the world again.

=====

Smithy's might army includes all the aforementioned bosses, but when 
Mario invades the factory at the end of the game, he might fight his 
way past the factory staff. (And thanks to Kirby021591 for reminding 
me of these final few mini-bosses and giving me all the information on 
them.)

THE CLERK 

The first of the four bosses, the Clerk seems to be in charge of the 
factory's production schedule. He fights Mario's party with a small 
five Mad Mallets, walking talking hammer baddies. Like the Manager 
and the Director, the Clerk fights with an axe that bears the same 
symbol as does the Blade, the airship that the Axem Rangers use.

=====

THE MANAGER 

When Mario first comes upon this boss, he's conferring with a few 
Pounders - pumped up versions of the Mad Mallet baddies - about 
the progress of Smithy's plan. Before the Manager fights Mario, he 
mentions Mack 2 and Yaridovich 2, which I presume are new versions 
of the bosses Mario has already fought.

=====

THE DIRECTOR 

An intelligent-seeming worker who admits that he's helping prevent 
Smithy from self-destructing. (Later, during the big battle with Smithy, 
Mario and company witness his meltdown firsthand.) The Director is 
flanked by several Poundettes - the highest rank of the generic 
hammer baddies.

=====

THE FACTORY CHIEF 

An advanced version of the generic Ninja baddie, the Factory Chief is 
also the inventor of the Gunyolk. He's the last obstacle before Mario 
and friends can confront Smithy.

=======================================================================

SMORG 
[Japanese name: MOA]
Occupation: Dust bunny conglomerate
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

As Mario solves the various mysteries that lurk aboard the Excess 
Express, little black soot monsters keep popping up. (I call them 
Smorg-ettes.) Essentially, they're dust bunnies - only with more 
attitudes. Eventually, the little guys plaster over the trains windows, 
horror movie-style, and carry away the train's staff and passengers. It's 
really quite freaky, when you think about it. 

Mario must climb onto the train's roof, and with the help of Flurrie's 
hot air he charges through them. They then join together and morph in 
to Smorg, a many-tentacled monster that tries to smash Mario with the 
kidnapped passengers: Heff T., Toodles, Goldbob, Sylvia, Bub and 
Shimi - none of whom seem very happy to be part of the monster. 
When Mario destroys Smorg, the passengers are freed and the train 
arrives safely at Poshley Heights.

=======================================================================

THE SNIFITS THREE  
[Japanese name: Mucho]
Occupation: Booster's lackeys
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 
(1996)

Logically, the only three friends the train-collecting, tower-
residing Booster could make are a trio of Snifits. These gray-robed 
guys do whatever Booster needs: fighting Mario, explaining what a 
party is or even catching beetles. In fact, that's what they're doing 
when they first cross Mario's path. They also leak that a girl 
recently fell from the sky and into Booster's grubby mitts.

The Snifits and their underlings seem to be running the show at 
Booster Tower, really. Given Booster's fragile mental state, it's a 
wonder the Booster dynasty won't end with Booster. Mario and his 
party fight with the three Snifits individually. But if Mario gets 
caught hiding behind the curtains in the room at the top of Booster 
Tower, he'll have to tangle with Booster and all three Snifits at 
once.

There's also a fourth Snifit Mario meets later along Booster Pass. 
He'd really like to join Booster's party as Snifit No. Four, but he's 
not strong enough. Mario beats him easily.

(SiR6 informs me that if Mario allow Snifit Number Four to beat 
his party, he'll race off to Booster Tower, only to be replaced by 
Snifit Number Five. This trick can be repeated all the way to Snifit 
Number Eight. Later, Mario can return to Booster Tower and find 
Snifits Four through Seven happily in Booster's service. Snifit 
Number Eight, however, gets the shaft, as Booster apparently only 
needs seven Snifit helpers. All of this, I should note, I'm taking in 
good faith from SiR6. If anybody can confirm or deny this, please 
tell me about it.)

Snifits first appeared in Super Mario Bros. 2. They were basically 
Shy Guys with small cannons strapped to their masks. They could 
nail Mario and his friends with bullets from quite a distance away. 
Snifits haven't reappeared quite as often as their Shy Guy cousins, 
however. Aside from appearances in Super Mario World 2: 
Yoshi's Island, Super Mario 64 and Mario and Luigi: Superstar 
Saga, they're not around too much.

=======================================================================

SONNY  
Occupation: Golfer
Only appearance: Mario Golf (1999)

Rylle was kind enough to send in this description of the S man: 
"Sonny has a brown golfer's hat, which covers all of his hair. He has a 
red t-shirt with a blue collar and three blue buttons. Sonny also has 
light-gray pants, with a black belt around his waist. Sonny, like most 
of the generic human golfers, has brown shoes and a golfer's glove on 
his left hand. Sonny's glove is red."

Now I just need to know what were these normal folk were doing 
playing alongside a princess, an ape and a turtle-dragon.

=======================================================================

SPACE MONSTER GABRIEL [new]
Occupation: Gelatinous blob
Only appearance: WarioWare: Twisted! (2005)

A curious, jellyfish-like fellow whom Dribble and Spitz give a ride to 
after their taxi cab blasts into outer space. Seems friendly enough. His 
name is specified as "Gabriel" anywhere but the credits.

=======================================================================

SPANGLE  
Occupation: Elvis-impersonating starfish
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

A character I wholly neglected to find either of the time I played 
through this game. NessMasterSSBM kindly informed me that 
Spangle hides out in a remote section of Gwahar Lagoon that Mario 
and Luigi can only reach if they've got Golden Hammers. Once in, 
Spangle the rockstarfish will hang out in the suitcase until the brothers 
happen upon Hermie, whom they earlier deprive of adornment by 
taking his Beanstar shard. There, Spangle will perch himself atop 
Hermie's Christmas tree-like shell, delighting himself and Hermie as 
well.

Spangle's not even the first musically inclined starfish in a Mario 
game; let's not forget the Monstro Town Star in Super Mario RPG. 

And this is where it gets really weird: Spangle's appearance also 
marks the third time a starfish gets confused with a regular star in the 
Mario RPG series. In Super Mario RPG, Monstermama can't tell the 
difference between a Star Piece and her dancing pet Starfish. In Paper 
Mario, the explorer Kolorado mistakes the Star Spirit Misstar for a 
starfish as well. Finally, Hermie seems perfectly content with adorning 
his "tree" with Spangle instead of a regular star ornament. Strange, eh?

=======================================================================

SPEARHEAD [new]
Occupation: Needlenosed mid-boss
First appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

Spearhead jumps into the path of either Dr. Mario or Wario as the first 
mid-boss in the story mode of Dr. Mario 64. He looks a lot like the 
blue germ from the Dr. Mario games, only with a pointy appendage 
sticking out of his face. It's entirely possible, however, the 
resemblance is coincidental, since Wario Land 3 features Spearhead as 
a generic baddie whose pointy proboscis prevents Wario from 
slamming his shoulder into him.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=105&pos=1

Spearhead's starring role:
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003

Other appearances:
Wario Land 3 (Gambe Boy Color) - 2000

=======================================================================

SPIKE [new]
[also known as Foreman Spike; Japanese name: Blackie]
Occupation: Demolition expert
First appearance: Wrecking Crew (1985)

During Mario's brief stint working in the demolition yard, he ran into 
the highly unpleasant Spike. According to Masamune at A 
Hitchhiker's Guide to Video Games, this gruff fellow, teamed up with 
baddies like the Eggplant Men and the Gotchawrenches to prevent 
Mario from doing his work. Spike showed up again in the Japanese-
only remake, Wrecking Crew '98, in which he had teamed up with 
Bowser to once again make Mario's work more difficult. There's also 
a special multiplayer versio of the game in which Spike - as well as 
minor baddies - is playable.

Spike's not wholly absent from the video game world yet. There's a 
small nod to the guy in Super Smash Bros. Melee: one of Mario's 
alternate color schemes is brown overalls with a white undershirt. 
These are Spike's colors. Whee. 

According to Luigi of the Pipes, Spike bears a slight resemblence to 
Wario, suggesting that the two villains may actually be one and the 
same. It's possible - but it's also likely that Spike's design influence 
Wario's somewhat. 

Don't confuse the Wrecking Crew Spike with the Spike, the generic 
Koopa baddie from Super Mario Bros. 3. He's the one who throw 
spiked balls - hence the name - and later became the Clubba 
baddies from the Paper Mario series. Also, please don't confuse this 
Spike with Lakilester from Paper Mario. He prefers to be called 
"Spike," though no one seems to pay attention.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=113&pos=12

Spike's starring roles:
Wrecking Crew (NES) - 1985 
Wrecking Crew '98 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1998

Other appearances:
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001

=======================================================================

SPOILED ROTTEN
Occupation: Walking temper tantrum
Only appearance: Wario Land Advance (2001)

A girly child eggplant. She's the boss of the entry way to the 
Golden Pyramid. This doll-toting eggplant is quite the cutie, but as 
Wario roughs her up, she'll begin to show her true colors by baring 
a ferocious set of demonic fangs.

=======================================================================

SPOOKY
[Japanese name: Supuki]
Occupation: Bone chewer
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

A ghost dog who lives in the backyard behind the haunted mansion. If 
Luigi defeats the dog's owner, a skeletal spirit named Mr. Bones, 
Spooky will emerge from his house to chew on one of Bones' bones. 
That's Luigi's chance to attack.


=======================================================================

SQUAWKS 
[Japanese name: Sukookusu]
Occupation: Parrot pal
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

A colorful parrot who has befriended the entire Kong clan. Squawks 
only shows up in the "Torchlight Trouble" stage of the original 
Donkey Kong Country. Once Donkey smashes open his crate, 
Squawks flies out and hovers above him, shakily waving around a 
flashlight. 

For the second Donkey Kong Country adventure, the developers at 
Rare apparently sat around and had the epiphany, "Hey! What if 
Squawks didn't suck?" For this sequel, a much larger Squawks could 
actually snatch Diddy and Dixie in his claws and carry them around. 
(One wonders if he refrained from doing so in the first adventure only 
to avoid carrying Donkey.) Squawks also got the odd talents off being 
able to cough an endless stream of rocks at enemies.

Squawks appeared basically unchanged in Donkey Kong Country 3: 
Dixie Kong's Double Trouble, but in Donkey Kong 64 he was 
relegated to giving hints, which what video games makes characters do 
when they are no longer loved. Boo.

Squawks' starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

Other appearances:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Picross NP Vol. 8 (Super Famicom) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

SQUIRT 
Occupation: Waterfall weirdo
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996)

Dixie and Kiddy step this fight out and let Ellie the elephant fight 
Squirt. I'm guessing Squirt is a crustacean of some sort. We never get 
a really good look at him since he stays hidden behind a waterfall the 
whole time. Ellie must nail Squirts eyes and mouth separate with high-
pressure jets of water.

Squirt's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997

=======================================================================

SQUITTER 
Occupation: Friendly neighborhood spider
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

Much friendlier than most big giant spiders in video games today, 
Squitter is a hairy tarantula who lets various Kongs ride him. He's 
easily the most innovative of the various animal buddies in the Donkey 
Kong Country series. Squitter can either fire globs of web at enemies 
or create temporary web platforms that he can use to scale otherwise 
impossible heights.

I like everything about Squitter, actually, except for the freaky noise 
he makes when he takes a hit. Spiders shouldn't cry.

Squitter's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

STANLEY THE BUGMAN
Occupation: Insect exterminator
First appearance: Donkey Kong 3 (1986)

You might call him the third Mario Brother. Or you just might not 
call him at all. No one else has, really.

Stanley, who in a blue and white overalls outfit does look a bit like a 
thinner Mario (minus the moustache), took over the position of hero 
in the Donkey Kong games. And then they stopped. Gone were the 
days of hammer swinging and barrel hopping. Instead, Stanley used 
his insect killing expertise to battle Donkey Kong, who had 
abandoned his pursuit of sweet Pauline to hang out in a greenhouse.

As Stanley, players had to fire shots of bug spray at angry hornets 
while also firing straight up at Donkey Kong, who attempted to 
descend onto the potted plants from the ceiling. Specifically, Stanley 
shot the big spray right into D.K.'s ass, which would make me turn 
around and run the other way too.

Rescuing potted plants and saving greenhouses didn't strike a fair 
chord with gamers, and Stanley has consequently vanished. 
Nintendo temporarily uninterred him for Super Smash Bros. Melee, 
however. The long-forgotten bugman showed up as a trophy, and 
Mr. Game & Watch used Stanley's vertical insecticide shot  -
borrowed from the Game & Watch installment of Donkey Kong 3 - 
as one of his moves. Lately, Stanley seems to have gotten a break 
with 9-Volt's game sets in the WarioWare series, which often feature 
him in short homages to his Donkey Kong 3 days.

Stanley's starring roles:
Donkey Kong 3 (Arcade) - 1986
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

Other appearances:
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2002

=======================================================================

THE STAR SPIRITS 
Occupation: Guardians of Star Haven
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Somewhat like the seven missing star pieces from Super Mario RPG: 
Legend of the Seven Stars, only these stars talk and have actual 
personalities. They are the seven guardians of Star Haven, the home 
of the wish-granting stars. When Bowser and Kammy steal the Star 
Rod, the mystical artifact of Star Haven, the Star Spirits get zapped 
into playing cards. Bowser entrusts each card to one of his guardians. 
The spirits:

ELDSTAR 

The oldest and wisest of the Star Spirits. Eldstar first appears to 
Mario in a dream, and then again on Shooting Star Summit. This 
star, who sports a gray moustache, asks Mario to rescue him from 
the Koopa Bros. Once freed, he lends Mario his power.

=====

MAMAR

The maternal Star Spirit. Like Goomama, she wears a housewife's 
headwrap to make her look more mom-like. Mario frees her by 
beating Tutankoopa in Dry Dry Ruins. Her lullaby attack can put 
enemies to sleep.

=====

SKOLAR
[Japanese name: Haaru]

A bespectacled Star Spirit with a sophisticated vocabulary. Bow 
releases Skolar when Mario helps her defeat Tubba Blubba. Skolar's 
specialty is Star Storm, which rains stars down on enemies.

=====

MUSKULAR

A strong Star Spirit wearing a sailor's hat. He likes to work out. 
Once Mario beat General Guy, he'll lend Mario his power. 
Muskular's special move is Chill Out, which lowers enemies' attack 
power.

=====

MISSTAR

A cute, flirtatious Start Spirit whom Mario rescues from the Lava 
Piranha on Lavalava Island. When the volcano is about to erupt, 
Misstar whisks Mario and Kolorado to safety. (Kolorado repays 
Misstar's kindness by repeatedly referring to her as a starfish.) 
Misstar's Smooch ability heals Mario in battle.

=====

KLEVAR

A yellow Star Spirit carrying a book. Mario rescues him from Huff 
N. Puff in Flower Fields. Though the game describes him as young 
and clever, there's absolutely nothing outstanding about his 
personality - except for the book. His special move, Time Out, 
freezes enemies in time.

=====

KALMAR

A Star Spirit with a little black moustache. Mario frees him be 
defeating the Crystal King in the Crystal Palace. Like Klevar, there's 
little of interest with this Star Spirit. 

Once reunited, the Star Spirits grant Mario the power of the Star 
Beam, a special magic that can halt the power of the Star Rod. When 
Bowser proves strong enough to resist even the Star Beam, only the 
power of Peach's wishes give the Star Spirits enough power to 
counter the Star Rod's power. The Power of the Star Beam plus 
Peach's will makes the Peach Beam, which is essentially the most 
powerful force in the game.

=====

Stars have represented power since the original Super Mario Bros. If 
Mario or Luigi touched the bouncing, flashing star item - called 
either Starman or Super Star, depending on where you read about it 
- they'd become invincible. Stars never left the series. Stars and the 
place they live - again, called the Star Road or Star Haven, 
depending on where you get your information - figure prominently 
into the storylines of the Mario RPG games.

I was genuinely surprised to see the Star Spirits appear in another 
game - and in Mario Party 5, of all places. The same stellar seven 
shows up to explain the various mini-games and modes of play.

The Star Spirits' (collective) appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

STEWART 
Occupation: Steward
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Cheep Cheep who works for the Cheep Cheep Blimp that takes 
Mario from Rogueport to Glitzville. He's the second Cheep Cheep in 
the entire Marioverse with a name. I thought I'd mention that this 
game isn't the first to feature the Cheep Cheep Blimp. As the deliverer 
of trophies, this piscine zeppelin has been a staple of the Mario Kart 
series since its inception.

=======================================================================

THE STORK
Occupation: Deliverer of babies
Only appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

Although a relatively minor character, the stork is technically the 
Peach in Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island. When Kamek's 
Toadies buzz the stork on his flight to the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Mario, they snag Baby Luigi and the stork - but not Baby Mario.

When Bowser and Kamek get their just desserts, Yoshi and Baby 
Mario find Baby Luigi and the hogtied stork on the castle rooftop. 
Yoshi frees the stork and he continues on his journey to get the Mario 
babies to their proper home.

The stork's flight plays over the game's closing credits. As peaceful as 
a lullaby, it's one of the most beautiful scenes ever captured in a video 
game.

=======================================================================

SUBCON
Occupation: Dream fairy
First appearance: Doki Doki Panic (1987)

I'm not sure if Subcon is a proper name or a in-game typo or what, but 
the end credits for Super Mario Bros. 2 list this as the name of fairies 
that Wart locks in a vase. Whichever hero beats Wart pulls the cork 
out the vase frees a few of these fairies, who thank their liberator and 
promptly dispose of Wart's bruised body.

Could these fairies be the voice that calls Mario and his friends into 
the world of dreams at the beginning of the game? The game's ending 
credits lists their name as Subcon, but that's also the name of the 
game's setting. (Notably, the game also lumps Subcon in with the 
enemies.) Since there are quite a few typos in the game's ending 
sequence, it's presumable that these fairies aren't named Subcon. Are 
they the Subcons? The Subcon fairies? Is Subcon their leader?

Judging by the way they look, I wonder if these characters have roots 
in Japanese mythology or something.

Subcon's appearances:
Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1987
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=======================================================================

SUE PEA
[Japanese name: Su Pi]
Occupation: Dozing ghost
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

Upon entering the guest bedroom, Luigi will notice two things: one, 
the room is upside down, and two, sleeping on the bed is little Sue Pea, 
a little girl ghost who's been napping for a very long time. Sue Pea 
would rather continue sleeping, but Luigi cleverly shoots water on her 
- essentially wetting the bed. Wet Sue Pea's bed three times and shell 
rouse, angry and still-sleepy. If Luigi can dodge her levitating dolls, he 
can claim her as yet another portrait ghost.

Since Luigi must wet Sue Pea's bed in order to wake her, I'll bet the 
last part of her name is a pun on "pee." (Or maybe "soupy"?) 

=======================================================================

SUGAR [new]
Occupation: Beleaguered disco owner
First appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2005)

The slim blond man who works at - and presumably owns - Club 
Sugar, the Diamond City nightspot frequented by Jimmy T. and his 
family. Sugar would seem to resent the family, however, as they are 
too preoccupied playing with their cell phones to notice that he's 
delivered their spaghetti dinner. Sugar eventually gets his way when 
Jimmy, Mama and Papa T. tire of dancing and finally head home for 
the night.

Oddly, the cast credits for WarioWare: Touched! also list Sugar as 
appearing, though I can't remember ever seeing him. Club Sugar, 
however, appears in each other WarioWare games - and in 
WarioWare: Twisted!, it's the spot where all the characters meet up 
with each other after their story sequence.

Sugar's appearances:
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched (Nintendo DS) - 2005 (?)

=======================================================================

THE SUN
Occupation: Source of light
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. 3 (1990)

For some odd reason, the sun first showed up as a minor enemy in 
Super Mario Bros. 3. The Angry Sun plagued Mario in two levels of 
the game - the un-numbered level between levels 2-3 and 2-4  in the 
desert kingdom and Level 8-2 in the Dark World - swooping down to 
burn Mario whenever he could. Nowhere near as tough as you'd 
imagine the source of the universe's energy, he'd die if you hit him 
with a single turtle shell. And, oddly, it stayed light after he died.

The sun shows up again in Paper Mario, though not as a villain and 
depicted much differently. (Interestingly, Mario's buddy Watt looks 
more like the Super Mario Bros. 3 sun than the one in Paper Mario.) 
Bowser's minion Huff N. Puff imprisons the sun in the aptly named 
Sun Tower and covered the land in clouds. If Mario destroys the evil 
Puff Puff Machine, the clouds dissipate and the sun can once again 
return to the sky.

Suns would be a popular motif in Mario games following Super Mario 
Sunshine, in which the sun character ironically does not appear. Mario 
Party 6, however, features both the sun and the moon as prominent 
characters.

The sun's appearances:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001

=======================================================================

SUSHIE
[Japanese name: Obuku]
Occupation: Aquatic nanny
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A purple Cheep Cheep who flops about on land all day. For some 
reason, the Yoshies on Lavalava Island have hired her to babysit their 
children. The baby Yoshies actually seem to resent Sushie's 
meddlesome nature, but they're nonetheless grateful when she and 
Mario help find them when they get lost in the jungle playing hide and 
seek. After Sushie hears about Mario's quest to rescue Peach, she's so 
taken with the romance of adventure that she decides to accompany 
Mario for the rest of the journey.

One of the letters Sushie receives through the postal service is from 
her daughter, Sashimie, who happily announces that she is about to 
have her "small fry," making Sushie a "grandcheep." Thus, she's the 
first playable Cheep Cheep and the first playable grandmother ever in 
a Mario game.

As a fish, Sushie's attacks are mostly water-based. She can also flop 
onto enemies to cause damage or let Mario ride her though water.

Cheep Cheeps appeared as the slow-moving underwater enemies in the 
original Super Mario Bros. Orange ones swam forward mindlessly, 
while red ones paced back and force over a certain area. Interestingly, 
according to the Super Mario Bros. instruction manual, Cheep Cheeps 
have always been female. It refers to them as "she" and all the other 
enemies as "he" or "it."

=======================================================================

SVËN
Occupation: Viking dude
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A little guy who either wants to be a Viking or a dwarf from Final 
Fantasy. Either way, he's the fifth boss.

=======================================================================

SWANKY KONG
Occupation: Game show host
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

A suave Kong who wears a loud sportscoat and hosts "Bonus 
Bonanza," a game show in which Diddy and Dixie can answer trivia 
questions about the game for extra lives. In the sequel, Swanky runs 
sideshow games in which Dixie or Kiddy can compete with Cranky in 
various contests.

According to the Donky Kong Universe website, Swanky is Donkey's 
brother. I can't find any proof of this anywhere else online. Anyone?

Swanky Kong's appearances:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

SYRUP 
[Japanese name: Shiroppu]
Occupation: Captain of the Black Sugar Pirates
First appearance: Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (1995)

Following his defeat beneath Mario's might stomping boots at the end 
of Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins, Wario sets out on his own 
adventure to win riches - most notably a giant statue of Princess 
Peach rumored to be hidden on Kitchen Isle, home of the infamous 
Captain Syrup and the Brown Sugar Pirates. After trekking through the 
various nooks of Kitchen Isle, Wario eventually arrives at Syrup 
Castle, where he hopes to fight the wily pirate captain and steal the 
treasures horded within in the castle.

Wario - and the video game player controlling him - may have been 
surprised to reach the game's final chamber, however, and find that 
Captain Syrup is not some bearded sea dog, but actually a beautiful 
woman. (I'm not sure, but I believe the instruction manual for the 
game deliberately misleads the player into thinking Syrup is male, 
possibly to make her true gender all the more surprising.) Looks aside, 
Syrup immediately attacks Wario with the help of her genie, which 
allows her to ride on his shoulder and he zaps Wario with fireballs. 
When Wario beats the genie, Syrup escapes by blowing up her entire 
castle.

She gets her revenge in the sequel, Wario Land II. The game begins 
with Wario awakening to the sound of his castle's burglar alarm 
blaring. He's none too surprised when he realizes that the culprit is 
Captain Syrup, who reformed her posse - now called the scarier-
sounding Black Sugar Pirates - and has reclaimed what the riches 
Wario got in their first confrontation. The game takes Wario 
throughout Kitchen Isle once again, including aboard Syrup's vessel, 
the S.S. Teacup. Eventually, Wario and Syrup duel once again. This 
time, however, Syrup takes on Wario with her mechanical inventions 
instead of her genie. When Wario wins, he again gets all the loot, 
leaving Syrup apparently penniless.

This villainess, who bears a slight resemblance to Princess Jasmine 
from the Disney film Aladdin, may be the most neglected character in 
the Marioverse. She's the first female big bad ever in a Mario game, 
and she's also the first after Bowser to appear as the main villain in 
more than one game. And even though Syrup's sweet, sticky name 
puts her in league with the other cutesy-named female characters in the 
Marioverse - Peach, Daisy, Valentina - Syrup is notably one of the 
few human-type Mario characters not wearing a dress. Nonetheless, 
Syrup seems to have vanished from video games altogether, save a 
cameo in the seventh installment of the Japanese Picross NP series. 
Will Nintendo ever pit greedy Wario against the even greedier Syrup 
once again? Will she ever drive a go-kart or compete in a Mario Party 
title? Her fans can only hope.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=103&pos=13

Syrup's starring roles:
Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998

Other appearances:
Picross NP Vol. 7 (Super Famicom) - 2000

=======================================================================

TAD ROCK
Occupation: Reptile thing
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A lizard boss, but one that looks slightly different from Lizardon, a 
different lizard boss.

=======================================================================

TAP-TAP THE RED NOSE
Occupation: Almost-invincible mid-boss
First appearance: Super Mario World: Yoshi's Island (1995)

The like the tinier Tap-Taps that populate Yoshi's Island, Tap-Tap the 
Red Nose is nearly indestructible. Covered in metal spikes, Tap-Tap 
the Red Nose comes after Yoshi, grinning all the while. Eggs will 
knock him back, but they can't hurt him. To finish off Tap-Tap the 
Red Nose, Yoshi has to knock away the block he stands on, much in 
the manner of the classic arcade game Alleyway.

Tap-Tap the Red Nose is the last boss before the castle of Baby 
Bowser, though a golden Tap-Tap the Red Nose shows up in that 
stage. 

Tap-Tap the Red Nose's starring roles:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

TATANGA [new]
[also known as Tatanga the Mysterious Spaceman]
Occupation: Spaceman
First Appearance: Super Mario Land (1989)

A crazed purple little spaceman who whisks Princess Daisy away in 
his spaceship. Mario ventures through the four kingdoms of Daisy's 
homeland - Birabuto Kingdom, Muda Kingdom, Easton Kingdom 
and Chai Kingdom - in order to defeat Tatanga and rescue this red-
haired Peach look-alike. Tatanga is the second Super Mario Land boss 
for whom the fight is not a traditional hop-and-bop affair. Instead, 
Mario flies his Sky Pop mini-plane to fight Tatanga in his spaceship, 
Pagosu. The battle works more like a shooter game than a traditional 
Mario game.

In the end, Mario blasts Tatanga out of the sky, freeing Daisy. 
However, in the story for the game's sequel, Super Mario Land 2: Six 
Golden Coins, we find that the entire adventure was merely a ploy to 
coax Mario out of his castle so that Wario might invade it. Tatanga 
apparently had no interest in Daisy and was actually hired by Wario to 
kidnap her.

Nothing in Super Mario Land 2 actually mentions Tatanga's name, but 
the boss of Space Zone is a little spaceman in a little spaceship that 
looks remarkably like Tatanga. Since Wario hired the guy once, is 
probably he hired him again. An image at the Gamehiker gallery leads 
me to believe even more so that the Super Mario Land 2 character and 
Tatanga are one and the same. The proof:

Tatanga as he appeared in Super Mario Land: 
gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=77&pos=54

The boss from Super Mario Land 2, as per the official artwork:
gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=78&pos=28

Pretty darn similar, right?

Tatanga's starring roles:
Super Mario Land (Game Boy) - 1989
Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992

=======================================================================

TEC 
[also known as TEC-XX; Japanese name: TECH]
Occupation: Supercomputer
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Grodus' personal supercomputer. But TEC is more than just an 
inhuman panel of blinking lights and a wide screen monitor. It also a 
machine lost in a world of human emotions. TEC strives to be the 
perfect computational device. It knows all things - except love, 
which just might be what it feels whenever Princess Peach walks into 
the room. Though initially wierded out TEC's robosexuality, Peach 
promises some lessons about the nature of love in exchange for the 
ability to send Mario emails that help him on his quest. These 
activities include everything from answering questions about the world 
she lives in to waltzing with a holographic projection TEC creates. 
Peach even volunteers to do some espionage for TEC by downing an 
invisibility potion - and then removing her clothes to strut about 
Grodus' fortress, nude yet unseen. All the while, TEC's affection for 
Peach grows more and more apparent.

Eventually, Grodus gets wise to TEC's schemes and cruelly unplugs 
him. TEC stays online using reserve power and back-up memory long 
enough to help Mario escape the X-Naut fortress on the moon, but it 
eventually explodes. The epilogue reveals that, somehow, TEC 
survived the blast.

=======================================================================

THAK
Occupation: Ogre
Only appearance: Wario's Woods (1994)

A big blue lug whose also the game's eleventh boss.

=======================================================================

THE THREE MUSTY FEARS
[Japanese name: The Undead Three]
Occupation: Flag-hiders
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

A Boo, a Dry Bones and a Greaper who visit anyone who sleeps in 
their free bed in Monstro Town. In the dead of night, these three 
apparitions materialize and challenge the sleeper to find their hidden 
flags. When Mario does - Boo's is between the O and A in the world  
"GOAL" at the racetrack on Yo'ster Isle, Dry Bones' is beneath 
Mario's bed and Greaper's is behind the flower sign in Rose Town - 
they'll award Mario the Ghost Medal, which boosts the user's defense.

Boo has his own profile in this guide. Dry Bones doesn't - yet - but 
he will. He's a hard-to-kill skeletal version of a Koopa Troopa. 
Finally, Greapers are unique to Super Mario RPG. They look like a 
floating Shy Guy dressed up like the Grim Reaper. A reader calling 
himself Virus218105 mentions that the group's name is a sound-
a-like for the Three Muskateers.

=======================================================================

THWOMP 
[Japanese name: Dosun] [new]
Occupation: Onomatopoeitic block
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. 3

A chunk of living, spine-encrusted stone that will attempt to squash 
flat anyone who passes beneath him. Mario could typically pass by 
running or jumping over this generic enemy. Since Super Mario Bros. 
3, Thwomps have appeared regularly in Mario games. More often than 
not, they're invincible.

Over time, Thwomps have also spawned several "cousin" baddies, 
including Whomps, flat, tile-shaped baddies that attempt to flatten 
Mario by falling face-first onto him, and Thwimps, a tinier version of 
the Thwomp that appeared only in Super Mario World. In Mario Party 
4, Thwomp awaited players in the Extra Room with his pal Thwomp. 
Once unlocked, players could challenge the games included in 
Thwomps Backroom Ball, which were special variations on the boards 
and multiplayer mini-games available elsewhere in the game. Thwomp 
also appeared in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. He waits in 
the Shhwonk Fortress and the X-Naut Fortress and challenges Mario to 
trivia in order to let him complete the area.

In Super Mario World and Mario vs. Donkey Kong, Thowmps are 
occasionally accompanied by their smaller counterparts, Thwimps.

The Thwomp's Japanese name, "Dosun" is onmatopoeia along the 
same lines as our "bam."

Thwomp's appearances:
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (Game Boy) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (Game Boy Color) - 1998
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (Game Boy Color) - 2001
Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (Game Boy Color) - 2001
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario vs. Donkey Kong (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

TINY
Occupation: Golfer
First appearance: Mario Golf (2000)

A bodybuilder who swings a mean golf club. He's one of the golfers 
players can challenge.

Tiny's starring roles:
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

TINY KONG [new]
Occupation: Sissy simian
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 64 (1999)

The only Kong who wears shoes. 

I wish that was all I had to say about this little tyke. Reputed to be 
Dixie Kong's little sister, Tiny's one of the five playable Kong heroes 
in Donkey Kong 64. She has her sister's ability to float through the air 
using her hair - Dixie uses a ponytail, Tiny uses pigtails - but she 
also has the unique ability to shrink to fit into spaces other characters 
can't.

I personally loathe Tiny. I loathe her too-cute grunge style, her dorky 
beanie and even her creepy big blue eyes. I don't really see why Rare 
picked her to be in Donkey Kong 64 and not Dixie. But whatever. 
Tiny Kong popped up in the promo shots for the now-cancelled 
Donkey Kong Racing, but since that game bit the dust she hasn't been 
seen. (Dixie Kong, by the way, did not show up in any of those 
screenshots.) 

I said I'd be happy to never see Tiny Kong again, but Nintendo decide 
to include the pipsqueak in its port of Donkey Kong Country 2 to the 
Game Boy Advance. There, players can partake in Funky Kong's 
various rescue missions, in which little Tiny is the ape needing the 
rescue.

Tiny Kong's starring roles:
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999

Other appearances: 
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

TOAD (and miscellaneous Toads) 
[Japanese name: Kinopio]
Occupation: Mushroom Retainer
First appearance: Super Mario Bros. (1985)

[toad]

"Thank you, but our princess is in another castle!"

While Mushroom Retainers awaited Mario and Luigi at the end of 
worlds one through seven in the Super Mario Bros. in 1985, the 
name Toad doesn't pop up quite yet. The Mushroom Retainers are 
just what their name implies: jolly, mushroom-topped fellows who 
serve in the court of Princess Peach. One would hope the 
Mushroom Retainers' royal duties did not include protecting the 
princess, as the small-statured little guys often need rescuing 
themselves. 

Toad, one of the few Mushroom Retainers to get a real name, is 
one of the four selectable characters in Super Mario Bros. 2. He 
accompanies Mario, Luigi, and Peach on the picnic that sends them 
stumbling into Subcon, the land of dreams. Short but stout, Toad 
took the place occupied by short but stout Papa in Doki Doki 
Panic. Though Toad jumped like his mushroom cap was made 
from cement, he could pluck vegetables and dig through sand like 
nobody's business.

Scads of mushroom folk populated Super Mario Bros. 3 in 1990. 
They worked in the castles of the seven Mushroom Kings and they 
ran shops and gambling houses. They looked identical, and Toad 
became the generic term for anyone wearing a mushroom hat. 
Here's a Toad. There's a Toad. Toads everywhere. But there's still 
Toad, the guy we all know and love - he's just one Toad who's 
happened to be named Toad among many nameless look-a-like 
Toads. So there's Toad and then there's Toads. Got it?

Only there weren't any Toads anywhere in Super Mario World, 
since the setting shifting from the Mushroom Kingdom and its 
environs to the reptile-populated Dinosaur Land. Nonetheless, 
Toad got his first and only turn as the central character in a game 
in Wario's Woods in 1994. A Tetris-like puzzle game, Wario's 
Woods pitted Toad and flitting pixie Wanda against Wario. Rather 
than actually controlling the descent of the blocks Wanda dropped, 
players controlled Toad, who could catch and place the pieces. 
Since Wario's Woods, Toad has languished in various supporting 
roles, like being a ghostly wall-bound prisoner of Peach's castle in 
Super Mario 64. 

In Mario Kart 64, Toad talked - or chirped, anyway. In fact, 
Toad's high-pitched voice led many gamers to question his 
manhood. After all, can a fungus even have gender? Video game 
magazine Electronic Gaming Monthly devoted a full two-page 
spread dedicated solely speculation about the little guy's gender. 
(As it turns out, mushrooms are fungal blooms and do not have 
true gender.)

His fans have since concluded that Toad is indeed male, even if 
mushroom folk ascribe to a different kind of manliness than the 
rest of the world does - like carrying the rainbow racquet in the 
Nintendo 64 installment Mario Tennis, for example. The Mario 
RPG series also introduced the female Mushroom Kingdom 
denizens (Toadettes?) that have further specified Toad's gender.

Although a gaggle of generic non-Toad Toads appeared in Peach's 
entourage in Super Mario Sunshine, it was Mario Party 5 that 
finally gave Toad a chance to compete in the mini-games he 
usually only hosts, so maybe future Nintendo games won't screw 
Toad out of all the fun the taller characters in the Marioverse 
enjoy. Toad even got a partner in crime in the most recent Mario 
Kart: a female counterpart named Toadette.

Players can briefly control Toad at the beginning of Mario and 
Luigi: Superstar Saga. He comes rushing in to warn Mario and 
Luigi of the tragedy that has befallen Peach. Luigi merrily 
continues hanging laundry on the drying line, while Toad has to 
burst in on Mario in the shower. Yikes.

Camelot screwed poor little Toad out of another worthwhile Mario 
sports appearance with Mario Power Tennis. Even though the little 
guy was quite the netter in the Nintendo 64 nistallment, he's 
nowhere to be seen on the character select screen. Curiously, he 
does appear in the game's intro movie. As Wario and Waluigi 
deface the image of Mario and Luigi on the tournament roster, the 
camera briefly pans over an image of Toad and Toadette, as if 
these two were an entry in the tournament. All the other doubles 
teams glimpsed in this scene do appear, yet neither Toad nor 
Toadette are among the secret characters in the game. Could 
Camelot, as many have hoped, hidden these two in the Game Boy 
Advance version of Mario Tennis? 

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR TOAD***
Toad, Peach's longtime servant, first showed off his strength in 
Super Mario Bros. 2, then proved to be an agile driver in Super 
Mario Kart. There are many Toads in Peach's castle and across the 
Mushroom Kingdom, and although they look similar, they have 
varied natures. Not the best of guards, Toad must often be rescued.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR TOAD***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Toadette
Personal racecar: Toad's Kart
Special weapon: Golden Mushroom

Toad's starring roles:
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Wario's Woods (NES) - 1994
Wario's Woods (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1996
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 2 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1996
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 3 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1997
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 4 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1997
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1997
Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985*
Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986*
Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986*
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988*
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1988*
Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990*
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990*
F-1 Race (Game Boy) - 1991 
Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995*
Mario Clash (Virtual Boy) - 1995*
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996*
Kirby Super Star (Super NES) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997*
Game & Watch Gallery (Game Boy) - 1997
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy Color) - 1998
Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999*
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Picross NP Vol. 6 (Super Famicom) - 2000
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001*
Luigi's Mansion (Gamecube) - 2001*
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002*
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004*
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004*
Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004*
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

* Because Toad is both a unique character and a generic term for 
his whole race, I decided to differentiate between his appearances 
in this list. Entries with an asterisk mean that Toad appears as a 
generic race - not as the specific Mushroom-hatted fellow we all 
know and love.

=====

Miscellaneous Toads

Often throughout Mario's RPG adventures, he encounters various 
a lot of Toads who contribute to his quest in minor ways. Rather 
than give each of them there own profiles, I decided to list them 
here. (I have, however, decided to give separate profiles to 
Toadette and Toadsworth, the former because she's a playable 
character and the latter because he's shown up in more than one 
game.)

THE CHANCELLOR OF THE MUSHROOM KINGDOM
[Japanese name: Mushroom Cabinet Minister]
Occupation: Royal advisor
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 
(1996)

A green-clad Toad who oversees Mushroom Kingdom affairs 
during Peach's absence. He's not especially remarkable. 
Toadsworth does a better job at being Peach's elderly voice of 
wisdom than this guy does.

=====

CHANTERELLE 
[Japanese name: Songstress]
Occupation: Pop diva
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Chanterelle is the lounge singer in Club 64, the Toad Town Bar. In 
fact, some characters actually refer to her as Pop Diva, as if that 
were her name. After Bowser rockets Peach's castle into space, 
however, she's too shaken up to sing. Mario must find suitable 
lyrics and a nice melody to goad her into singing again.

"Chanterelle" sounds a lot "chanteuse," which is a fancy word for 
a female singer. In a wonderful coincidence, however, Chanterelle 
is also a variety of mushroom. Chanterelle is one of the few Toads 
in Paper Mario whose name doesn't end with the initial "T," 
which, by the way, stands for "Toad." (But you knew that.)

=====

FELISSA T.
Occupation: Cutie pie
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Felissa is the youngest - and, by Goombario's account, the cutest 
- of the three Toad sisters known as the Amazingly Beautiful 
Toad Sisters. She's the one with the purple spots on her mushroom 
cap.

EDIT: God, that list sentence sounds so dirty.

=====

FICE T.
Occupation: Guard
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Fice guards the gate that leads to Forever Forest, which leads to 
Bow's mansion. Unfortunately, Fice is terrified of ghosts and he 
shakes in fear whenever one comes near Toad Town.

=====

GAZ
[Japanese name: Toidoo]
Occupation: Rambunctious child
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 
(1996)

Gaz is the young resident of Rose Town whose doll, Geno, comes 
to life and aids Mario in his quest. Gaz likes Mario because Mario 
plays dolls with him, even if doing so knocks Mario out of 
consciousness for a bit. Caught up in the spirit of a play-duel 
between a Bowser doll and a Geno doll, Gaz nails Mario with the 
Geno doll's Super Star Shot. Later, Gaz makes it clear that he 
thinks the walking, talking Geno doll is way cooler than Mario.

Gaz's house is also the Rose Town Inn. Link can be found sleeping 
there if Mario checks the upstairs immediately after he stops 
Bowyer.

=====

GHOST T. 
Occupation: Train spook
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Other passengers remark that they hear someone scuttering around in 
Mario's cabin. When Mario checks, there's no one there. If Vivian 
uses her power to sink into the shadows, however, the noisemaker will 
think reveal himself: Ghost T., the spirit of a Toad who died on the 
Excess Express ages ago. He's lingering onto the train because he left 
his diary in the baggage car and can't bear the thought of a living soul 
reading it. If Mario presents Ghost T. with his diary, he'll slowly begin 
his ascent to heaven - then stop partway into it because he decides he 
likes the wallpaper in his train cabin. 

(If Mario decides to read the dairy, by the way, Ghost T. will kill him. 
No lie. Don't read ghost diaries.) 

=====

GRANDMA
Occupation: Peach's caretaker
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 
(1996)

The only relative of Peach's relatives ever seen in a Mario game. 
At first, the matronly Toad in Peach's bedroom seems like a 
mere attendant. If Mario examines a Peach's chair, he'll find 
some mystery item of Peach's. Grandma will rush over and 
snatch the item from Mario, telling her to leave a lady's 
belongings alone. Later, when Mario rescues Peach from 
Booster, he'll return her to the Mushroom Kingdom, where the 
Chancellor will forbid her to journey with Mario. Peach sneaks 
out the window, and Grandma lovingly wears a Peach disguise 
around the castle to fool the Mushroom Retainers.

On occasion, Grandma lends out Peach's bed to that other 
Nintendo heroine, Samus Aran of the Metroid series.

=====

HEFF T. 
Occupation: Glutton
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

An obese Toad who frequents the Excess Express. When Chef Shimi's 
pot of stew goes missing, Heff initially resents the accusation that the 
fat guy stole it. Then it turns out he did it. Great message, Nintendo. 
Fat people steal food. Shimi, thankfully, takes the act as a compliment 
and they becomes friends.

Heff later gets absorbed into the polluted mass that is Smorg, the dust 
bunny monster Mario must fight at the end of the Excess Express 
chapter. Beating Smorg frees Heff, who promptly boards the train for 
another road of Shimi's cooking. 

=====

HERB T. 
Occupation: Teahouse proprietor
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A mustachioed Toad who runs a tea house down in the ruins beneath 
the streets of Rogueport. It's a safe, calming space compared to the 
generally rough atmosphere travelers find in the rest of Rogueport.

=====

HINOPIO
Occupation: Volcano dwelling merchant/innkeeper
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 
(1996)

Mario meets Hinopio, a Toad whose cap sports a unique flame 
pattern, in the heart of Barrel Volcano. A jack of all trades, 
Hinopio sells items, armor and even a room for the night. He also 
seems to collect F-Zero figurines, as a few are displayed on his 
shelf.

Hinopio gets his name from the Japanese "hino," meaning "fire," 
and "Kinopio," Toad's Japanese name.

===== 

JOLENE 
[Japanese name: Kinoshikowa]
Occupation: Glitz Pit manager
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

When Mario first meets Jolene, the female Toad with the severe bangs 
and sharp-edged businesswoman style, she's about as warm and 
friendly as a spike-covered snowball. Curt, abrupt and business-like to 
a fault, Jolene just doesn't have much interest in making small talk 
with any of the Glitz Pit competitors, it seems. Her manner earn her 
the nickname "Queen Nag."

As Mario progresses through the ranks, however, he begins receiving 
mysterious emails from a certain X who's interesting in helping Mario 
get to the bottom of the mystery of Grubba, some missing competitors 
and a certain Crystal Star. Jolene also masquerades as the well-dressed 
lady who hangs out at the juice bar in Glitzville, which just happens to 
be the spot where X delivers aid packages to Mario. Quite suspicious.

Eventually, Mario finds that Grubba has been sucking the life energy 
out of past champions - particularly the beloved Prince Mush - 
using a machine powered by the Crystal Star. Once Grubba falls under 
the power of Mario's might stomping boots, Jolene comes forward and 
admits to stringing Mario along to help solve the mystery. Jolene 
continues that Prince Mush was her brother. In the end, she is reunited 
with her long-lost brother when they use Grubba's machine backwards 
to restore his vim and vigor. She also becomes owner of the Glitz Pit.

You might not expect that Jolene and Toodles would have anything in 
common besides their tendency to hang out around the Glitz Pit. 
However, both are conspicuously female Toads whose named don't 
end in "T."

=====

THE MASTER
Occupation: Sensei
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Like Jinx in Super Mario RPG, the Master teaches at a dojo. 
Mario can challenge his two disciples, Lee and Chan, and then 
the Master himself. Though the Master looks elderly, he's one 
tough Toad in battle. He looks like an old man, but he can 
transform himself into a younger and buffer version of himself to 
fight Mario.

=====

MISS T. 
Occupation: Second-rate cutie pie
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

The middle member of the Amazingly Beautiful Toad Sisters. 
Mario delivers a letter to Mr. E for her. Miss and Felissa's younger 
sister is apparently nameless.

=====

MINH T.
[Japanese name: Lip]
Occupation: Horticulturalist
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Minh tends the flowers in the Toad Town garden. She also would 
like to collect seeds from the Bub-Ulbs, a race of talking flowers. 
Once Mario gives her a red, blue, yellow and green Bub-Ulb 
seed, the door to flower fields magically appears. Minh has been 
fretting about the fate of the flowers since Bowser's minions 
have been causing havoc there.

Incidentally, Minh shares her Japanese name with Lip, the 
protagonist of Panel du Pon, a Japanese puzzle game that was 
made over as a Yoshi-centric game called Tetris Attack.

=====

MONSTERMAMA  
[Japanese name: Monster Mother]
Occupation: Landlady
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 
(1996)

She owns Monstro Town, the village of reformed monsters. 
When Mario inquires about the fames Monstro Town star, 
Monstermama directs him to the top floor of her house. There, 
instead of the sixth Star Piece, Mario finds a dancing starfish - 
or, to be technical, a friendly member of the Starslap generic 
baddie species. Monstermama proved helpful after all when she 
asks Sergeant Flutter and his squadron of Sky Troopas to help 
Mario scale the cliffs at the edge of Land's End.

Oddly, Monstermama's confusion between a starfish and an 
actual star is not unique in the Mario RPG series. Kolorado 
makes a similar mistake when he meets Misstar in Paper Mario. 
And in Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga, when Hermie the 
decorator crab dresses himself up like a Christmas tree, he settles 
for Spangle, an Elvis impersonator starfish, instead of a regular 
star ornament.

=====

MR. E (1) 
Occupation: Letter writer
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A shrouded Toad who lives in Dry Dry Outpost. He's a link in 
the letter-writing chain Mario and Parakarry must help complete. 
He's also not the only Toad with the puntastic name "Mr. E."

=====

MR. E (2) 
Occupation: Mystery lover
Only appearance: Mario Party Advance (2005)

As his name might imply, Mr. E is a sharp-looking Toad with big 
eyebrows who likes chasing down mysteries in the fair town of 
Shroom City. He's also a coward, unfortunately, and will flee at 
the first sign of danger.

=====

MRS. SHROOMLOCK 
Occupation: Housekeeper
Only appearance: Mario Party Advance (2005)

A purple-capped lady Toad who dresses like a housewife, frying 
pan in hand and all. She's married to Shroomlock, the famous 
Toad detective. She's also a notorious gossip.

=====

MUSHBERT 
Occupation: Fanboy
Only appearance: Mario Party Advance (2005)

A green-capped Toad who collects memorabilia for the popular 
TV show "Toad Force V."

=====

MUSS T.
Occupation: Out-of-work castle guard
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Muss hangs out by the rubble located where Bowser blasts 
Peach's castle into the sky. He's a fisher and writes letters to 
other fishermen about an upcoming fishing trip.

=====

PINE T. 
[Japanese name: Kiino]
Occupation: Hapless dad
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Toad who becomes trapped around the fiftieth floor of the Pit 
of 100 Trials. Mario answers a bulletin posted in the Trouble 
House by Pine T.'s son, Pine T. Jr. Once reunited, father and son 
return to Rogueport.

=====

PLENN T. 
[Japanese name: Kinoshimo]
Occupation: Shopkeeper
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

The shopkeeper who runs the general goods store in Rogueport. 
He's apparently a bit of a control freak, as he runs his identical 
twin brother all the way to Keelhaul Key to start his own store.

=====

PRINCE MUSH 
[Japanese name: Kinoshichofu]
Occupation: Former Glitz Pit champion
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Despite what his name might imply, he's not Princess Peach's 
long-lost brother. He's actually the long-lost former champion of 
the Glitz Pit and Jolene's little brother. He's hasn't been around 
for some time, and some investigation reveals that Grubba, the 
master of ceremonies at the Glitz Pit, has been draining the 
energy out of fighters in order to keep himself youthful and fit.

When Mario finally defeats Grubba, the energy-sucking machine 
flips into reverse, restoring Prince Mush and reuniting him with 
Jolene. Happy ending.

=====

RAZ and RAINI 
[Japanese name: Kino and Nancy]
Occupation: Newlyweds
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 
(1996)

Mario meets these lovebirds in the Mushroom Kingdom early in 
his journey. They're engaged and very much in love. Eventually, 
they get married at the chapel in Marrymore, the newlyweds' 
paradise. I don't know how to gage mushroom folk beauty, but 
one wedding attendee describes Raini as "a real peach." In the 
game's closing sequence, Raz and Raini are depicted as 
honeymooning on Yo'ster Isle.

Raini's Japanese name is Nancy, the same name Zess T. has in 
the Japanese version of Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. 
I'm fairly certain this is just a coincidence, however.

=====

RUSS T.
[Japanese name: Kinopon]
Occupation: Know-it-all
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A bookworm and historian, Russ can tell Mario all about the way 
the world works if Mario stops by his house in Toad Town. Once 
Mario retrieves Russ. T's dictionary from the Shy Guy's Toy 
Box, he can decipher the key to fixing the broken railroad therein 
and completing the area.

=====

SHROOMLOCK 
Occupation: The great detective of Toadland Yard
Only appearance: Mario Party Advance (2005)

A lazy and often-tardy Toad who's nonetheless reputed for his 
skills in detection and deduction.

=====

STARSHADE BROS.
Occupation: Military men
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

A pair of military Toad brothers who live in Area 64 of the 
Stardust Fields. Sergeant Starshade and General Starshade wear a 
red and green mushroom cap, respectively, together and They 
teach Mario and Luigi how to perform high jumps and spin 
jumps by working as a team.

=====

TAYCE T.
[Japanese name: Cassie]
Occupation: Peach's royal chef
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

In addition to being Peach's personal chef and the caterer to the 
fateful party that Bowser destroys at the beginning of the game, 
Tayce owns a bakery in Toad Town. If Mario brings her a certain 
ingredients, Tacye can whip up a snack that will restore Mario's 
health. After Mario gives her a cookbook, Tayce can combine 
two ingredients into a special meal.

Tayce is also the sister of Zess T., who cooks up a storm in 
Rogueport.

=====

THRIFF T. 
Occupation: Shopkeeper
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Brother of the owner of the Toad who keeps shop in Rogeuport. Thriff 
sneaks on board the S.S. Flavio so he can open shop on Keelhaul Key. 
He's always wanted to open his own place...

=====

TOADIA 
[Japanese name: Kinobia]
Occupation: Secretary of the Luigi fan club
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A lady Toad who hangs out by the fountain near the Poshley 
Sanctum. According to Goombella, she's an active member in 
the Luigi fan club. She even wears green - the color of her 
favorite Mario Brother.

=====

TOADOFSKY
[Japanese name: Kinokofsky]
Occupation: Composer
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars 
(1996)

He tries to compose music at Melody Bay, an inlet at Tadpole 
Pond. He uses the tadpoles there to help him write his music, but 
it seems he'll need Mario for inspiration as well. Throughout his 
quest, Mario meets characters who know of a certain melody. If 
Mario presents these to Toadofsky, the composer will finish 
another movement of his symphony.

The melodies are "Frogfucius' Suite No. Eighteen" (learned from 
a tadpole), "The Moleville Blues" (learned from the moles 
working in the mine) and "Monstro Town Melody" (learned 
from the dancing starfish in Monstro Town). Toadofsky allows 
Mario to compose the last quarter of the symphony himself.

=====

TOODLES 
[Japanese name: Madam Rose]
Occupation: The champion's number one fan
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

An elegantly-dressed Toad who hangs out in the foyer of the 
Glitz Pit, waiting to flirt with whoever happens to be the current 
fighting champion. Toodles doesn't even acknowledge Mario's 
existence until he begins to rise in the fighting ranks. Then she 
begins laying on the charm.

Mario meets Toodles again on the Excess Express, which 
connects Rogueport with Toodles' hometown, Poshley Heights. 
She's as vain as ever. Being absorbed into the giant, tentacled 
dust busy monster Smorg can't cut her down.

=====

TRAVELING SISTERS THREE 
Occupation: World tourists
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

A trio of female Toads who, as their name might imply, travel 
together. They shadow Mario as he moves from location to 
location during his quest. The get temporarily transformed into a 
trio of piglets during their trip to Twilight Town.

They're not the same characters, but these ladies seem awfully 
similar to two different sets of characters from the first Paper 
Mario. They're cute like the Toad Town sisters of which Felissa 
T. was a member; they also travel like the three maids who get 
an extended vacation when Bowser flies off with Peach's Castle, 
where they normally work.

=====

VANNA T.
Occupation: Lovely assistant
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A gorgeous Toad who claps when Mario answers questions 
correctly on Chuck Quizmo's game show. She's the only Toad I 
know of with hearts instead of the usual round spots. 

Vanna T.'s name is a double pun. It references both the 
character's beauty and her status as a parody of Vanna White, the 
lovely "Wheel of Fortune" letter-turner.

=====

ZESS T. 
[Japanese name: Nancy]
Occupation: Cook
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

Miss Zess initially seems like a prickly character. Mario accidentally 
stomps her contact lens and she stubbornly blocks access to the west 
part of Rogueport until he finds her a replacement. However, once her 
vision is back to twenty-twenty, she goes back to work as a cook. If 
Mario brings her the proper ingredients, she can whip up some tasty 
treats that will help him in battle. She can even combine two 
ingredients once Mairo presents her with a cookbooked penned by the 
famed gourmand, Maitre Delish. Zess apparently does more than cook, 
however. Rumors on the Rogueport message board eventually suggest 
of a golden oldie romance blooming between Toadsworth and Zess.

Essentially, Zess is Tayce T., the Toad cook from the first Paper 
Mario. The only major difference is that Tayce was a sweetie, while 
Zess has a mean streak in her. It makes sense, then, that one of the 
stories Wonky will tell Mario invovlves a rumor that Zess has a 
longlost sister living in Toad Town. This is, of course, Tayce T. from 
the first Paper Mario.

Zess's Japanese name is Nancy, which was the same name as Raini 
has in the Japanese version of Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven 
Stars. The two Nancys, I'm assuming, are unrelated.

=====

ZIP TOAD 
[Japanese name: Mr. Tron]
Occupation: Movie star
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

An arrogant Toad in a pink polo shirt and sunglasses. Mario meets him 
on the Excess Express. Zip claims he's heading to Poshley Heights to 
scout locations for some million-dollar art flick. He's apparently a 
famous movie star - and he's not afraid to remind Mario of it. The 
drawer in his cabin is even stuffed with autographed glossies. When an 
anonymous terrorist threatens to derail the Excess Express in a gooey, 
sweet explosion, Mario doesn't initially suspect Zip Toad. And 
technically, it's not him - it's Doopliss, disguised as Zip Toad. After 
he's caught, Doopliss sheds his disguise and flees. I guess that means 
no one ever really gets to meet the real superstar - neither Mario nor 
the adorable Excess Express waitress who idolizes Zip Toad.

It seems like Zip Toad could easily be called Zip T., in the style of 
every other Toad. But the game never refers to him as such. I wonder 
why.

=======================================================================

TOADETTE 
Occupation: Cheerful she-fungus
First appearance: Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (2002)

Toad + Strawberry Shortcake + Smurfette = Toadette.

Players balked when the preliminary screens of the Gamecube 
installment of Mario Kart lacked Toad, a player favorite. But those 
with patience were rewarded with not just one mushroom but two: 
Toad and his ladyfriend, Toadette. The gender ambiguous Toad 
suddenly looked a bit more masculine. Not a lot, mind you. Just a bit. 
Regardless, Toad's racing partner sported some wicked pink braids 
with little mushroom balls hanging one the ends. Unlike most Toads, 
who have white mushroom caps with colored spots, Toadette has a 
pink mushroom cap with white spots. (It should be noted that while 
Toad is both a specific character and the generalized race of 
mushroom folk, Toadette is only Toadette; she is not the generic term 
for any female mushroom citizen, as far as I know.)

In Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, Toadette followed in the 
footsteps of Waluigi, another "filler character" hastily created to give a 
pre-existing character a partner, and peeped her way into a more 
mainstream Mario game. Whenever Mario gets a new special move, 
the game breaks and Toadette trots onscreen to explain the new 
feature. This role is essentially one Toad filled in Super Mario RPG: 
Legend of the Seven Stars. Toadette's appearance in Paper Mario: The 
Thousand-Year door is especially curious because Toad - the 
character named Toad and not the generic mushroom Toad - does not 
appear at all. 

Toadette's only contribution to the plot of the game besides 
explanation is a note scrawled on the back of the bulletin board in 
Rogueport plaza indicating that she misses "squishy little Punio."

Toadette has a blink-and-you'll-miss-it cameo in the intro movie to 
Mario Power Tennis. Apparently, she and Toad were considered at 
some point as a doubles team, yet no one's seen any sight of them on 
the court yet. Possibly, the Game Boy Advance version of Mario 
Tennis will yield some answers.

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Toad
Personal racecar: Toadette's Kart
Special weapon: Golden Mushroom

Toadette's staring roles:
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

THE TOADIES  
Occupation: Kamek's lackeys
First appearance: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)

The Toadies are little Koopas in red robes. They can fly about using 
propellers that come out of their heads. Yoshi can't actually ever fight 
them; they only show up to buzz about Baby Mario when he's been 
knocked off Yoshi's back. If the timer runs out on Baby Mario, the 
Toadies fly away with him. In Yoshi's Story, the Toadies return even 
though Kamek does not. When a Yoshi's petal-o-meter reaches zero, 
the Toadies swoop in and whisk him or her away to Baby Bowser's 
castle.

The Toadies appeared in Mario Party 6 as well. Players could set traps 
that, when tripped, would summon a Toadie to steal an opponent's 
item. In Mario Party Advance, they appear in a band called Kamek's 
Krew, though Kamek himself does not appear to be a member.

Toadies' appearances:
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

TOADSWORTH  
[Japanese name: Kinojii/Uncle Mushroom]
Occupation: Grandfatherly fungus
First appearance: Super Mario Sunshine (2002)

The graying Toadsworth accompanies Mario, Peach and several 
smaller Toads on the trip to Isle Delfino. He's a wise and concerned 
Toad who's served Princess Peach for a long time. He carries a 
walking stick and sports have brown spots - age spots, maybe? - on 
his Mushroom Cap.

Despite his age, Nintendo put this super senior is the driver's seat of 
the gold victory car that drives the winners into Delfino Plaza in Mario 
Kart: Double Dash!! Toadsworth also showed up in Mario and Luigi: 
Superstar Saga as Peach's faithful attendant, much in the tradition of 
the Chancellor from the first Super Mario RPG. In Mario and Luigi, he 
seemed to form a close friendship with Lady Lima, his counterpart in 
Beanbean Kingdom. 

Toadsworth appears again as Peach's guardian in Paper Mario: The 
Thousand-Year Door. He's as protective as ever, though he manages 
to lose Peach just long enough for her to purchase the treasure map 
that sparks the quest for the Crystal Stars. (One wonders why he even 
would take her to such a scummy place to begin with.) After she 
disappears, he hangs out idly in the Rogueport Inn above Podley's bar.

It looks like Toadsworth may be around for a while - or at least until 
Nintendo gets tired of him. He's already supplanted Mario as the chair 
umpire of the Marioverse tennis matches, as evidenced by his 
appearance in Mario Power Tennis.

Toadsworth's appearances:
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

TOLIELIP
Occupation: Fallacious flower
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Looks more like a daffodil, but Tolielip makes a better pun. A yellow 
flower who knows a lot about Flower Fields but won't ever tell Mario 
the truth.

=======================================================================

TOLSTAR
[Japanese name: Hossuii]
Occupation: Blackmailer, mini-boss
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

When Cackletta destroys Bowser's Koopa Cruiser, Bowser tumbles 
from the sky and slams his rear end into a cannon. Tolstar, a fat, 
winged Koopa who patrols the Stardust Fields area - and whose own 
girth leaves him no room to mock Bowser's weighty situation - vows 
to publicize Bowser's embarrassing situation unless Mario and Luigi 
collect one hundred coins. Even when they do, Tolstar still challenges 
the brothers to a fight. Meanwhile, Bowser gets fired out of the cannon 
to parts unknown.

=======================================================================

TORQUE 
Occupation: Utility beetle
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Buzzy Beetle that Luigi pals up with during his expedition to Circuit 
Break Island, where he must participate in go-kart races to win a piece 
of the Marvellous Compass, which will lead him to the kidnapped 
Princess Eclair. Torque has what looks like a crescent wrench growing 
out of his shell. Apparently, he can attack a variety of tools to his shell, 
a trait that has helped him to become a mechanical genius. Torque says 
he continues journeying with Luigi to earn back his racing money.

Torque is one of the few named Buzzy Beetle characters in the entire 
Marioverse. Buzzy Beetles are generic enemies that have been around 
since the original Super Mario Bros. They're quite the little army tanks 
- fireballs don't even faze them. (And, I'd imagine if Luigi's quest 
was playable, Torque would be the first playable Buzzy Beetle.)

=======================================================================

TORTE
Occupation: Head chef
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

Torte, a Koopa Troopa with a chef's hat, works in the kitchen at the 
chapel in Marrymore, the marriage resort. He's always in a mad rush 
and barks at his apprentice with a bad German accent.

Mario's party fights Torte and his apprentice briefly after the 
disruption of Booster's wedding to Peach. Once the two chefs realize 
that the wedding cake is alive, they split.

=======================================================================

TRUNKLE
Occupation: Desert-dwelling deciduous
Only appearance: Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (2003)

Trunkle blocks access to Little Fungitown, to which Mario and Luigi 
are trying to escort Princess Peach. He's a mean tree trunk. I'd be 
mean too if I was a tree that had to live in the desert.

=======================================================================

TRYCLYDE
[also known as Triclyde; Japanese name: Gapucho]
First appearance: Doki Doki Panic (1987)
Occupation: Triple threat

A three-headed snake who served as the boss of the two desert stages 
of Super Mario Bros. 2: world two and world six. Mario or whichever 
of his friends fought Tryclyde could beat him by throwing mushroom 
blocks at his fire-spitting heads.

Probably as a result of programmer laziness, Tryclyde looks like a 
three-headed version of a Cobrat - a red snake enemy that populates 
the sandpits and vases of Super Mario Bros. 2.

Tryclyde's appearances:
Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1987
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=======================================================================

TUBBA BLUBBA
[Japanese name: Dogabon]
Occupation: Ghost-eater
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A giant Koopa reputed as being invincible by the ghosts he snacks on. 
He was holding the Star Spirit Skolar captive, but Skolar escaped to 
Bow's mansion. Bow held him until Mario agreed to defeat Tubba 
Blubba and end his feeding frenzy.

Basically, Tubba Blubba was invincible until Mario and Bow found 
that he kept his heart in a separate room beneath a windmill in the 
windblown valley of Gusty Gulch. When Tubba Blubba and his heart 
reunited, Mario could finally take him down. Defeated, he admits to 
being quite sensitive and runs away crying.

Tubba Blubba looks a lot like Spike, a minor enemy from Super Mario 
Bros. 3 who threw spikes balls at Mario. Tubba is bigger and has 
purple skin. His underlings, who are smaller and have green skin, look 
exactly like Spike, but they carry clubs and are called "Clubba."

=======================================================================

TUMBLE [new]
Occupation: Mini-game guide
First appearance: Mario Party 3 (2001)

A living dice block who replaced Toad as the introducer of mini-ganes 
in the third Mario Party. Picture Toad's head, but instead of a 
mushroom cap, he's wearing a dice block. His hands and feet float 
under his head, disembodied. He'd be creepy if he wasn't so cheerful.

Tumble shows up again in Mario Party Advance, but not having 
played the game yet I'm not sure what he does. I'd imagine it's not too 
different from what he did in Mario Party 3.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=78&pos=28

Tumble's appearances
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

TUTANKOOPA 
[Japanese name: Kaamen; also known as Egyptian Koopa]
Occupation: Pharaoh wannabe
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

The boss of Dry Dry Ruins and guardian of the Star Spirit Mamar. 
Tutankoopa dresses like King Tut and keeps Chomps as pets. Because 
Tutankoopa treats his Chomps so poorly, however, they eventually 
turn on him. Tutankoopa, or some othe pharaoh Koopa who looks a lot 
like Tutankoopa makes an appearance as a boss in the Game Boy 
Adance title, Mari Pinball Land. I was as surprised as anyone. For 
whatever reason, Nintendo refers to the character as "Egyptian 
Koopa."

Tutankoopa's starring roles:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004 (as Egyptian Koopa)

=======================================================================

TUXIE and MAMA PENGUIN
[Japanese name: Penguin no Oyaku]
Occupation: Little penguin lost
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

Tuxie is a cute penguin chick who gets lost on Cool, Cool 
Mountain. Mario has to catch her and slide down the mountains icy 
slopes all the way to the bottom, where he can reunite her with 
Mama Penguin. Immediately near Mama Penguin is a second 
penguin chick who looks just like Tuxie. If Mario presents the fake 
Tuxie, Mama Penguin will peck at him angrily.

Tuxie and her ilk represent a short-lived trend in Nintendo 64 
games: penguins. They showed up often in the system's early life. 
Aside from Tuxie and her mother, a third penguin will challenge 
Mario to an ice slide race in Cool, Cool Mountain. Tuxies show up 
in abundance in the Vanilla Lake track of Super Mario 64. 
Silhouetted penguins even show up in the water in Wave Race 64. 
And then Nintendo stopped. Today, we have dolphins instead.

Tuxie and Mama Penguin's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Picross NP Vol. 6 (Super Famicom) - 2000
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

TWILA 
Occupation: Lunar manifestation
Only appearance: Mario Party 6 (2004)

The counterpart to the solar Brighton, Twila represents the moon in 
Mario Party 6. She looks like the rare 3-up crescent moon from Super 
Mario World mounted as a head on a blue and white robed body. 
Twila and Brighton are feuding over who between them is more 
popular - and this question will inexplicably be answered by Mario 
and his friends playing mini-games.

=======================================================================

TWINK
[Japanese name: Tink]
Occupation: Star Kid
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

When Bowser blasts off into space with Princess Peach's entire castle, 
she cries in her bedroom and wishes that someone might somehow 
help her. In flies Twink, a tiny little star-in-training, or Star Kid, from 
Star Haven. Twink promises to grant Peach's wish. From that point on, 
he follows Peach, much like Mario's helpers follow him.

Throughout the game, Twink relays to Mario vital tidbits that Peach 
overhears from the Koopa Troop. Near the end of the game, Peach and 
Twink fight Kammy Koopa together. Though initially powerless, 
Peach's wishes increase Twink's strength. After Twink and Peach 
defeat Kammy, Twink adds his power to the Star Beam, the only 
weapon capable of stopping Bowser. This creates the Peach Beam, 
which nullifies the power of the Star Road and sends Bowser packing. 
Twink returns with the Star Spirits to Star Haven, where he can mature 
one day into a full-fledged star.

=======================================================================

UKIKI 
Occupation: Hat-nabber
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

A cute little monkey - and for a change a Mario simian whose last 
name isn't "Kong." Ukiki resides on the cliffs of Tall, Tall Mountain 
and will try to steal Mario's hat. While hatless, Mario takes double 
damage, so it's in Mario's best interest to track Ukiki down and 
retrieve the hat.

As reader Leah Bernard points out, Ukiki bears some resemblance to 
the Grinders, the generic monkey enemies in the jungle world of Super 
Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island. Like Ukiki, those monkeys also had a 
nasty habbit of stealing things - namely Baby Mario. Ukiki and the 
Grinders do look a lot alike, being monkeys and all. But they also look 
distinctly different from the simians in the Donkey Kong Country 
continuity. 

Ukiki's also made a habit of popping up in the Mario Party games as 
well. In Mario Party 4, you may remember Ukiki as the monkey at 
Banana Peel Junction. He'd toss a banana peel, your character would 
tread on it and the slip would cause them to end up on either side of 
the game board. (Often, in my case, on the side that would lead away 
from the next star.) Ukiki also pops up in Mario Party 5, as a capsule 
event item. Using it allows Ukiki to steal the items from a certain 
player and scatter them around the game board.

I was surprised to see that Ukiki appears as a generic race in the intro 
movie to Mario Power Tennis. In the stands, you can see various little 
monkeys hopping around alongside other generic races like Piantas 
and Goombas. If you look closely, you'll notice that these monkeys 
are clearly modeled on Ukiki. 

Ukiki also appears as the mayor of Jungle Town in Mario Advance. 
He's apparently fond of playing tricks, much to the chagrin of his 
niece, Akiki.

Some players might recall that in the hedge maze before the first Dark 
World dungeon in Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, Link met a 
monkey named Kiki. This monkey, however, was far more helpful and 
would help Link open the gates to the dungeon for a fee of 101 rupees.

Ukiki's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

=======================================================================

UNAGI
Occupation: Unprocessed seafood
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

A giant, ferocious. eel that lives in Jolly Roger Bay. At one point, 
Mario must snatch a star stuck to Unagi's tail. "Unagi," as frequent 
patrons of sushi restaurants may know, is Japanese for "eel."

Unagi's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Verison (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=======================================================================

UNCLE GRIMMLY
[Japanese name: Yaminofu]
Occupation: Brooding ghost
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

Only when a lightning bolt knocks out the mansion's power does the 
reclusive Uncle Grimmly materialize. This ghost loves two things: the 
solitary dark and mirrors. Luigi finds him standing before the ornate 
mirror in the wardrobe room and sucks him up in the Poltergust 3000.

According to Uncle Grimmly's bio on Luigi's Game Boy Horror, the 
rest of the family is perfectly fine with his choice to hide in the dark.

=======================================================================

UNDODOG
Occupation: Chronic sneezer
Only appearance: Mario Paint (1992)

Really stretching the term "character" here, but anyhow...

Undodog is the CTRL-Z in Mario Paint. If you screw up and paint 
the sky brown instead of blue - you idiot - you just click on the 
Undodog icon and he'd bark your mistake away. I guess the only 
reason I'm including this dog, which is basically a practical feature 
and not a real character, is that occasionally Undodog sneezes. 
Players have three options for background music: a happy 
industrious tune, a melodic tune and nothing. If they chose 
nothing, they'll eventually here the little guy sneeze.

=======================================================================

VALENTINA [new]
[Japanese name: Margarita]
Occupation: Dictatrix
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

What a birdbrain. 

Mallow travels the world with Mario, searching for his birthplace. He 
finds it in Nimbus land, where the buildings and the residents are re 
both made of clouds. In fact, Mallow is actually Prince Mallow, heir to 
the Nimbus Land throne!

Unfortunately, the rightful king and queen sit in a jail cell all day 
thanks to evil Valentina, a cunning diva with lofty political aspirations. 
She has somehow fooled the residents of Nimbus Land into thinking 
her obese toucan underling, Dodo, is the long-lost Prince Mallow - 
and that he would like to make Valentina his queen! More elegant than 
the average Mario villain, Valentina wears an evening gown and totes 
a Martini glass everywhere she goes. Also, indicative of both her 
insanity and her bird fetish, Valentina wore a parrot atop her ovular 
head.

Mario and company stole into the Nimbus Land castle with the help of 
the sculptor Garro. Once in, they trashed Valentina's underlings, Dodo 
and the irrepressible Birdo.  The fight Valentina, too, but before the 
heroes can finish her off, Dodo carries Valentina away. He drops her 
later in the balcony of Booster's Tower, where she and Booster fall in 
love.

Since Square owns the rights to Valentina and all the other characters 
unique to Super Mario RPG, Valentina has yet to cause any more 
trouble.

On an interesting note, I've read that Valentina's Japanese name is 
Margarita. This puts her in synch with the trend of naming female 
characters after diminutive or sweet objects: she's a sweet alcoholic 
drink. It seems like a stretch, since Margarita is also a women's name 
in Italian or Spanish, but if you look at her official art, Valentina is 
consistently pictured holding a cocktail glass. It looks more like a 
martini glass than a margarita glass, but it's a cocktail, for sure.

Image link: gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=46&pos=92

=======================================================================

VAMPIRE WARIO
Occupation: Blood sucker
First appearance: Wario Land II (1998)

In the latter Wario Land games, Wario powers up by touching 
enemies. He gets the Vampire Wario status by touching a vampire 
baddie. In that form, he can fly about the room like a bat.

Vampire Wario isn't any more of a character that Raccoon Mario - 
it's just a form of the initial character. However, players can unlock 
and then choose to play as Vampire Wario in Dr. Mario 64 by beating 
the entire game by not losing once. (One of Mario's alternate forms, 
Metal Mario, can be unlocked as a playable character in a similar 
manner.) Oddly, the way Wario transforms into Vampire Wario in Dr. 
Mario 64 isn't through a vampire bit but by ingesting Dr. Mario's 
megavitamins. Don't eat those megavitamins.

Vampire Wario's starring roles:
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003

Other appearances:
Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=======================================================================

VANESSA [new]
Occupation: Surly pop diva
Only appearance: WarioWare: Touched (2005)

"You people disgust me."

The queen of the Diamond City pop charts, Vanessa is watching "Ear 
Candy," the local music countdown show one day and enjoying a cup 
of tea. When Ken the VJ reveals that Vanessa has been displaced from 
her number one slot, however, she drops the tea in shock and anger.

Vanessa chases after Mona, hoping to destroy the up-and-comer in en 
route to a pizza delivery. Flanked by her back-up singers - who look 
remarkably like the Pizza Dinosaur goons in new uniforms - Vanessa 
fails to run Mona off the road. As a last resort, Vanessa jams over to 
the Hawt House and hops on stage in a copy of Mona's outfit. Mona's 
fans won't have it, though. They boo the green-haired diva away.

Curiously, Vanessa remains on stage with Mona's band in the 
epilogues to other characters' stories. She's standing next to Mona, 
happily singing, so the two may have made amends. One should note 
that the contrast of Mona's red hair against Vanessa's green hair is 
reminiscient of that other red-green pair, Mario and Luigi.

=======================================================================

VERY GNAWTY 
Occupation: Beaver boss
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

The boss of the Kongo Jungle area in Donkey Kong Country, Very 
Gnawty is a giant version of the generic beaver-like baddie, Gnawty. 
This boss is ridiculously easy to beat. Just stomp him until he croaks.

A similar - and slightly harder boss - called Really Gnawty is the 
boss of Gorilla Glacier, the game's fourth area.

Very Gnawty's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

VINCENT VAN GORE
[Japanese name: Seńor Puji]
Occupation: Artsy-fartsy ghost
Only appearance: Luigi's Mansion (2001)

Tortured artist Vincent would hate to let his art die, yet he only paints 
pictures of ghosts. Luigi must fight a barrage of ghost paintings come 
to life before he can fight Vincent himself. Even though the Vincent 
van Gogh, the artist this guy is clearly intended to parody, was not 
French, Vincent van Gore speaks with a French accent.

=======================================================================

THE VIRUSES
Occupation: Microbial meanies
First appearance: Dr. Mario (1990)

Dr. Mario targets this trio of viruses with his megavitamins. Red pills 
kill red the red disease, blue to blue and yellow to yellow. The viruses 
appear more-or-less identically in every Dr. Mario game.

The viruses show up again in Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga, as 
minor baddies running around Woohoo Hooniversity. Every time 
Mario or Luigi strike the walking illnesses, they change color. When 
two or more viruses match colors, they die.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR THE VIRUSES***
These contagious viruses make life difficult for Dr. Mario. They infect 
everything they come into contact with, and the good doctor must 
attempt to neutralize them with his trusty megavitamins. Dr. Mario can 
stop these pesky germs by lining up the megavitamin capsules of the 
same color with the nasty microorganisms.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR THE VIRUSES***

The viruses' appearances:
Dr. Mario (Game Boy) - 1990
Dr. Mario (NES) - 1990
Versus Dr. Mario (Arcade) - 1990
Dr. Mario (Bandai Satellaview) - 1998
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
Dr. Mario (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

WALUIGI 
[alternate Japanese spelling: Waruiji]
Occupation: Purple beanpole of evil
First appearance: Mario Tennis (2000)

"I'm-a Waluigi! I'm-a numbah one!"

Shameless clone of a clone with bad fashion sense? Or worthwhile 
contribution to the Marioverse? No matter whether fans either love or 
hate Waluigi, he's here to stay.

One of the biggest beefs Mario fans seem to have with Waluigi is his 
clunky name. Wa-Luigi? Bleh. Doesn't really roll of the tongue. 
Worse yet, it could give way to even worse evil twin names. 
Wapeach? Watoad? The benevolent and wise Wabowser?

Like most of the names in the Marioverse, however, there's a reason 
Waluigi is called what he is. In Japanese, the word "warui" means 
"bad." When Nintendo created Wario for Super Mario Land 2: Six 
Golden Coins, they blended "warui" into "Mario," creating "Wario." 
Wario needed a doubles partner for the Nintendo 64 installment of 
Mario Tennis, and so Waluigi was born. Awkward though it may 
sound in English, the moniker flows a lot more smoothly in Japanese. 
Because the distinction between R and L is less clear in Japanese, 
Luigi's name is pronounced more like "ruiji." Thus, "warui" slides 
perfectly into "ruiji." Furthermore, "Waluigi" is also a perfect anagram 
for "igiwalu," Japanese for "a bad person."

Tall, skinny Waluigi instantly joined the ranks of Mario regulars - 
neatly bypassing the years of 8-bit obscurity characters like Birdo and 
Daisy had to endure before getting pulled up into the big leagues. He's 
yet to get his own game - and damn Nintendo if he gets one before 
Toad, Bowser or Peach - but he's continually been showing up in all 
the Mario side games (Golf, Tennis, Party, etc.). His wiry frame makes 
him one of the two evil characters in Mario Kart: Double Dash!! to not 
qualify for the heavyweight class. (The other one, by the way, is little 
Bowser Jr.)

Waluigi's giant, pointy nose poked its way in Mario Power Tennis as 
well. There, he once again served as Wario's doubles partner - both 
on the court and in crime - and he brought some interesting super 
moves with him. In one, Waluigi leaps into the arm and contorts 
himself into the inverted L symbol that appears on his hat. Anyone 
hitting the ball blasted off by this super move is twirled into a dizzying 
cyclone. Alternatively, Waluigi can also reach far-off shots by 
swimming across the court through imaginary water. He's a strange, 
strange man, that Waluigi.

Thankfully, Nintendo has yet to unleash a pair of classless lasses for 
Wario and Waluigi to carouse around the Mushroom Kingdom with. 
Pirate queen Syrup and motorcycle babe Mona might fit the role well.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR WALUIGI***
This tall, thin, evil-looking guy seems to be Luigi's rival. He works 
hard at his mischief: Waluigi reportedly spent a lot of time training for 
his debut in Mario Tennis by honing his ability to antagonize the 
Mario brothers. While it's general knowledge that he's the same age as 
Luigi, his relationship to Wario is unclear.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR WALUIGI***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Wario
Personal racecar: Waluigi Racer
Special weapon: Bob-Omb

Waluigi's starring roles:
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004

Other appearances:
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004*

* as an alternate costume Mario can wear by using both the W and L 
Emblem badges simultaneously

=======================================================================

WANDA [new]
Occupation: Block fairy
First appearance: Mario & Wario (1993)

Following the tradition of characters flying around on flying wands, 
Wanda scoots around on one throughout Mario & Wario, a 1993 
release that never hit American shores. In this game, Mario - or 
Yoshi or Peach, depending on the difficulty level the player chooses 
- is blinded when Wario dumps a makeshift helmet on his head. 
Mindlessly walking forward, this hapless character is in danger of 
falling into pits or one of Wario's evil traps. Fortunately, Wanda is 
present to help. Wanda, whom plays control with the Super NES 
mouse, flits about the screen creating or destroying blocks to direct the 
path of Mario (or whoever) and help them get safely to the exit.

Wanda must have a beef with that creep Wario. Her only other 
appearance is in the Super NES installment of Wario's Woods. Wanda 
flies at the top of the screen and drops blocks that Toad uses to fight 
Wario. (Oddly, Wario's Woods is a kind of a depository for many off-
the-radar Mario characters of the time: Wario, Toad, Birdo and 
Wanda.) Wanda has yet to show up again. 

Image link: 
gamehiker.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=random&cat=118&pos=-5230

Wanda's staring role:
Mario & Wario (Super Famicom) - 1993

Other appearance:
Wario's Woods (Super NES) - 1994

=======================================================================

WARIO 
Occupation: Professional plunderer
First appearance: Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (1992)

[wario]

WARIORIGINS


After rescuing Daisy from crazed spaceman Tatanga in Super Mario 
Land, Mario returned to his home away from home, Mario Land, 
where he had a cozy setup in his very own castle. But Mario found that 
the entire original Super Mario Land adventure was Wario's doing; he 
had paid Tatanga to nab Daisy to give himself a chance at invading 
Mario's castle. The iconic M heralding Mario's ownership had even 
been flipped upside-down to a W.

Wario's name isn't as simple as a flipped M, however. In what is 
probably the best-working in-game pun Nintendo has made, Wario's 
name comes from the Japanese word "warui," which means "bad." 
And Wario is bad. So it works. But on top of that, the M/W 
relationship works interestingly too.

Mario had to venture through the six sectors of Mario Land - Tree 
Zone, Turtle Zone, Mario Zone, Macro Zone, Space Zone, and 
Pumpkin Zone - to collect the six golden coins that unlocked the gate 
to the castle. There, he fought the yellow and purple-clad Wario, an 
acquaintance from Mario's childhood who had long been jealous of 
Mario's fame and fortune. Wario shot back with dark version of 
Mario's Fire Flower and Bunny Carrot, but Mario prevailed and 
shrunk his villainous alterego down to size. 

Playing Mario's foil only made Wario popular. Almost immediately, 
Wario scored a starring role in Mario & Wario, a Japan-only game in 
which Wario plunked a makeshift helmet - a bucket, a pipe, an 
octopus - on the head of Mario, Yoshi, or Peach. Players controlled 
the fairy Wanda with the short-lived Super NES mouse, creating and 
destroying blocks with a magic wand to ensure that the blindly 
walking plumber/dinosaur/princess would not fall. 

Nintendo then released a Tetris-style puzzle game, Wario's Woods, on 
both the NES and the Super NES. In this title where he tangled again 
with Wanda and made an enemy of Toad for the first time.

The same year also featured Wario as a playable protagonist in Wario 
Blast: Featuring Bomberman!, a title that pitted Wario against the 
explosive-happy Hudson mascot. It's notable that today Wario if often 
associated with bombs - both Bob-Ombs and generic explosive 
devices - and particularly so in the Mario Party games, which are 
also made by Hudson. It could very well be that Wario's association 
with the boom-booms arose from Wario Blast. This game also was the 
first to pose Wario as a controllable character, setting him well on his 
way to anti-herohood. 


LIKE MARIO LAND, ONLY MEANER


Wario had capped off a particularly lucrative year by overtaking the 
Super Mario Land series with Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land. 
Having lost Mario's castle, Wario sets out for Kitchen Island, the 
hideaway of the notoriously wealthy Black Sugar Pirates. Rumor had 
it that the Brown Sugar Pirates, led by Captain Syrup, had stolen a 
giant, golden statue of Princess Peach. This game marks Wario's entry 
into the same side-scrolling platform genre that made Mario so 
famous. Akin to Mario's animal suits in Super Mario Bros. 3, Wario 
donned a variety of different hats to battle enemies with special 
powers. He even has his own twist on the Super Mushroom, the staple 
power-up of the Mario Bros. diet. Befitting his foul temper, Wario 
chows down on cloves of garlic, to power-up. This motif would 
remain associated with Wario in later appearances as well, particularly 
in the WarioWare games.

Wario's adventure led him eventually to Syrup Castle, where he found 
that the evil Captain Syrup was actually a beautiful woman. Her 
beauty belying her feistiness, Syrup summoned her genie to eliminate 
the obese, greasy intruder. Wario prevailed in the fight and even in 
Syrup's bombing of her own castle. The ruins of Syrup Castle yield 
the hidden statue of Peach, but no luck for Wario - Mario sweeps in 
his Sky Pop airplane, thanks Wario then speeds away with the statue.

In 1995, Wario starred in a Virtual Boy version of Wario Land. 
Though the next Game Boy game is called Wario Land II, the Virtual 
Boy Wario Land is the true sequel, as it retains the magical hats as 
power-ups. Being a Virtual Boy release, of course, not a whole lot of 
people played this game, including me. The gist is similar to that of the 
first game however: money-grubbing Wario is hunting for treasure, 
this time in a jungle-like area called the Awazon.

Wario's initial Game Boy outing ended with Wario keeping nothing 
but the genie's lamp. Of course, the big guy wished for his own castle. 
(The level of the castle's grandeur depended on how much loot Wario 
had collected in the game - a sort of financially dependent ending 
sequence that would appear again in later Wario games as well as in 
Luigi's Mansion.) The next Wario game, Wario Land II, begins with 
Syrup and her new goons, the Black Sugar Gang, returning to Wario's 
newly granted castle for retribution. They nab the loot and Wario 
chases them - and the money - all the way back to Syrup Castle on 
Kitchen Isle, where he once again battles the beautiful pirate. For this 
outing, however, the developers throw a twist into the typical jump-
and-stomp side-scroller formula: Wario can't die. Instead of taking 
damage from enemies, they change his condition; stomping things 
would squash Wario flat, allowing him through narrow passages, 
while fiery foes would light Wario on fire. Some conditions were 
beneficial. Some weren't. 

This innovation persisted through Wario Land 3, which had Wario 
being magically sucked into a music box, much like Boo House music 
box Mario got sucked into in Super Mario 64. This mystical musical 
instrument lent its name to subtitle that appeared in the Japanese title 
of the game, Wario Land 3: The Mysterious Orgel. (According to 
ShdwRlm3, the author of a Wario Land 3 FAQ, an "orgel" is a certain 
kind of Dutch organ. Go figure.) Technically, the game had five 
different orgels, which Wario had to collect to restore to power the 
figure who summoned him into the world to begin with. When Wario 
did, however, the figure revealed himself to be Rudy, a giant clown 
bent on world domination. (Or, at least, the world inside the magical 
orgel.) Wario dispatched the freaky clown, received thanks from those 
Rudy had imprisoned, and returned home with priceless treasure in 
tow.

The Game Boy Advance realized the most recent Wario Land outing 
in full color in 2001. Reading the paper one day, Wario learns of a 
newly discovered pyramid discovered by archeologists. According to 
legend, Princess Shokora owned the pyramid until she fell under a 
sleeping spell. With dreams of even more riches in mind, Wario hops 
into his purple convertible and sets out for another adventure. After 
clearing the four different branches of Shokora's pyramid - the 
Emerald, Ruby, Sapphire, and Topaz Passages - Wario fights and 
defeated the sinister force called the Golden Diva, thereby freeing 
Shokora from the Golden Diva's curse. One should note that this game 
combined the play mechanics of previous Wario titles. Like the latter 
two, Wario gains wacky status attributes through physical contact with 
enemies. But like the first two, he has a health meter and can die. 


MUSHROOM KINGDOM TROUBLEMAKER


Running parallel to Wario's burgeoning career as a platform star in the 
small screen - that is, the smallest of Nintendo's screens at the time 
- Wario also developed some popularity as a supporting player in the 
various side-franchises of the Mario games.

Mario Kart 64, released in 1997, marked his entry into the Big Eight 
- the group of core Mario characters who seem appear the most often 
in the various off-shoot games. Mario Kart 64 also introduced Wario's 
voice - easily one of the most irritating in a video game, but perfectly 
suited for Wario's temperament. Since then, Nintendo can't seem to 
put the Mario characters on a golf course, tennis court, race track, or 
giant board game without sticking Wario's big-nosed face in the 
middle of it all. More often than not, Wario represents a power player 
- the slow-to-start but hard-to-hit kind of character typified by 
Bowser and Donkey Kong.

It's one of these games - the Nintendo 64 installment of Mario 
Tennis, specifically - that introduces Waluigi, Wario's gangly partner 
in crime. The two are default tennis partners. The jury's out on exactly 
what Waluigi's relationship to Wario is - brother? look-a-like buddy? 
Just some guy who hates Luigi as mush as Wario hates Mario? - but 
the two do like to cause trouble together. For example, Wario and 
Waluigi cause memorable trouble in the opening sequence to Mario 
Power Tennis for the Gamecube. The intro features the Wario and 
Waluigi teaming up with Bowser to hi-jack the tennis tournament and 
cause Bob-Omb havoc. The forces of good triumph, naturally. Beyond 
the intro movie, Wario enhances his tennis skills with an extend-o-
glove and a contraption that delivers an electric shock in order to 
super-power his shots.

In the last days of the Nintendo 64, Wario returned once more to the 
puzzle genre in Doctor Mario 64, where he tangled with Mario's 
medically licensed alterego, as well as with faces from Wario Land 3 
like Rudy Mad Scienstein. The various puzzle stages were framed by a 
story involving Scienstein stealing Dr. Mario's megavitamins to cure 
ailing Rudy. Players can either pick Dr. Mario or Wario's scenario, 
encountering different foes on the quest to Rudy's castle.

The port of Super Mario 64 to the Nintendo DS system marks the 
introduction of Wario into a "real" Mario game - by which a mean 
one of the central Mario adventures and not an ancillary game like the 
ones mentioned in this subsection. Wario is the last of the game's four 
heroes to be unlocked. And for what it's worth, the player can skip 
Wario entirely and go straight to the big fight with Bowser if he or she 
chooses. Once Wario's out and about, however, he proves to be a 
powerhouse. He can break blocks that Mario, Luigi and Yoshi can't. 
Wario also inherits the metal power-up from the original Super Mario 
64, making him even more of a powerhouse than he usually is.


WARIO THE ENTREPRENEUR


[new]

Wario's latest feat is the new WarioWare series, in which he puts his 
love of money to a more practical use. Picking his nose while 
watching TV one day at his new pad in Diamond City, Wario sees a 
news report about the booming success of the latest Game Boy 
Advance game, Pyoro. Eager to jump on a new, lucrative business 
venture, Wario buys a computer in hopes of developing his own best-
selling game. He even founds WarioWare, Inc. and names himself the 
president. Unfortunately, Wario is not very smart and can't think of 
any ideas. Thus, He calls his friends - Mona, 9-Volt, Jimmy, Dribble, 
Spitz, Kat, Ana, Dr. Crygor and Orbulon - to drop what they're doing 
and brainstorm some five-second microgames. (I'm noting that we 
should be surprised Wario even has friends. Good for him!) The action 
is unique and varied, to say the least, and Wario pops up in many of 
the title's over 200 microgames as a playable character - clad this 
time in tough guy biker gear. These appearances include everything 
from riding a motorcycle to pulling a flag up a flagpole. Several of the 
microgames infuse Wario into Mario titles he never actually appeared 
in, like Super Mario Land and the original Mario Bros.

By playing WarioWare well, players can unlock special microgames, 
like Dr. Wario - a Wario-pirated version of Dr. Mario. There's also 
Fly Swatter, the old coffee break game from Mario Paint, a version of 
the Game & Watch Classic Sheriff starring Wario, and Pyoro, the 
seed-eating game-within-a-game that inspired Wario to found his 
company in the first place.

WarioWare sold well - both in Diamond City and in the real world. 
(In fact, the game ends with Wario making truckloads of cash, but then 
skipping out on paying his friends for their ideas). The game was 
ported to the Gamecube - in real the world, I should clarify - as 
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$, which featured special multi-
player versions of the game in the first WarioWare.

A second WarioWare title also came out for the Game Boy Advance. 
Titled WarioWare: Twisted, the game featured an innovative game pak 
that allowed players to control the action onscreen simply by tilting 
and spinning their Game Boy Advance. The game's intro sequence 
sets up the unusual gameplay by showing Wario break his Game Boy 
Advance and then motoring over to Dr. Crygor's lab to have it 
repaired. The good doctor tosses it into a washing machine-looking 
contraption that spins it and fixes it - sans buttons. Wario is initially 
furious at the apparent inability to control his game, but when Mona 
and 9-Volt trot over and immediately become engaged in the unusual, 
wobbly game, Wario smells yet another get-rich-quick scheme.

The game details various other shenanigans, like Wario chasing a 
mouse around his house, becoming imprisoned inside a clock, and 
generating more mini-games in the process. The game's final 
challenge involves Wario's transformation into his superhero alterego, 
Wario-Man. (For the sake of brevity, I'm including those in Wario-
Man's separate profile.)

The fourth game in the series, WarioWare: Touched, begins with 
Wario dropping both his Game Boy Advance and his Game Boy 
Advance SP into the sewer. A saintly fellow called the Guru of the 
Sewer arises and asks which Wario owns: the two dropped game 
systems, or some fancy new own with two screens. Wario demands all 
of them and promptly mugs the guru. But he's initially perplexed by 
the Nintendo DS. He even tries spinning it to no avail. Wario nearly 
chucks the system, only to shake out the stylus. In a remarkable demo 
of the Nintendo DS's capabilities, he marvels at how much fun it is to 
poke a screen - and once again sets out to make big bucks. 

WarioWare: Touched also features Wario as the maker of the game's 
first set of microgames, Touch Training. The in-game story features 
Wario's visit to the aptly named dentist, Dr. Payne, who needs the help 
of a touch screen helper to rid Wario's mouth of cavities. The game 
concludes, however, with the reappearance of Wario-Man. (Again, see 
the appropriate profile.)

I'll note here that it's not entirely clear that Wario's new hometown, 
Diamond City, exists in the same universe as Mario and the Mushroom 
Kingdom. Case in point: Nintendo seems to exist as a company in 
Diamond City. Characters like 9-Volt even seem to be familiar with 
the Mario games. Furthermore, Wario has a map of the world tacked to 
the wall of his living room. And I mean our world - like the one with 
North America and Africa and all that. Of course, he also has a photo 
up that clearly depicts the Golden Pyramid. I suppose it's debatable, 
but this separation could explain why we haven't seen folks like Mona 
or Jimmy popping up in the Mario Party or Mario Kart series yet - or 
closely Wario-associated characters like Waluigi or Syrup showing up 
in WarioWare.

For a list of Wario's various powered-up forms, check the 
miscellaneous lists section at the end of the guide. For information on 
Wario's alteregos, see the profiles for Vampire Wario, Dr. Wario and 
Wario-Man.

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR WARIO***
An old acquaintance of Mario's. His failure to seize Mario's castle has 
fueled Wario's desire for a palace of his own. Wario has Herculean 
strength and can do things that even Mario can't imitate. His 
unexpected skills include a talent with items and the ability to assume 
many roles, among them a snowman, a zombie, and a bat.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR WARIO***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Waluigi
Personal racecar: Wario Car
Special weapon: Bob-Omb

Wario's starring roles:
Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992
Mario & Wario (Super Famicom) - 1993
Wario's Woods (NES) - 1994
Wario's Woods (Super NES) - 1994
Wario Blast: Featuring Bomberman! (Game Boy) - 1994
Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy) - 1994
Virtual Boy Wario Land (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 2 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1996
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 3 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1997
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 4 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1997
Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Wario World (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

Other appearances:
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996* 
Pilot Wings 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Uniracers (Super NES) - 1997** 
Game & Watch Gallery 2 (Game Boy Color) - 1998
Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64) - 1999***
Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001****
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003***** 
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004***

* in a painting in Booster Tower
** as the racetrack "Wario Paint"
***  as Mario's alternate costume
**** as a trophy and as Mario's alternate costume
***** on a poster in the Yoshi Theater

=======================================================================

WARIO-MAN [new]
Occupation: Diamond City's finest
First appearance: WarioWare: Twisted! (2005)

"Stouter than an iron burrito" and "studlier than a snow tire," this 
purple-clad potbelly is Wario's superhero alterego. He shows up in the 
WarioWare games. That's easy. Saying exactly when he first appears, 
however, is tricky, as Nintendo released WarioWare: Twisted! after 
WarioWare: Touched! in the United States, even though Twisted! 
technically comes before Touched in the series. Furthermore, both 
games offer their own version of Wario-Man's secret origins.

In WarioWare: Twisted!, Wario-Man's technical debut, Wario hops 
into Dr. Crygor's hopped-up washing machine - the same contraption 
that transformed Wario's broken Game Boy Advance into the 
spintastic version. The result is Wario in spandex. Hungry for power, 
Wario hops into the machine a second time and morphs into a super 
Wario robo-mech that flies into space. Wario-Man is enjoying his 
newfound superpowers when along comes space alien Orbulon in his 
Oinker spaceship, which identifies Wario-Man as a hostile presence 
and pummels him with shots from his porcine snout. The mech 
crumbles, and Wario - now reduced to his street clothes - plummets 
to the earth and splashes into the sea near Diamond City. "I'm firing 
everyone," he mutters.

In WarioWare: Touched! - most American gamer's first introduction 
to Wario-Man - the player sees fat, lazy Wario sitting around his 
house and going to the fridge for a snack. The nearest thing to food he 
finds is a nasty, overgrown clove of garlic. Wario chows down 
anyway, and like Popeye with spinach he transforms into Wario-Man 
once again. (The garlic clove, notably, is a throwback to the early 
Wario Land games, in which garlic served as Wario's power-ups.) 
Wario-Man decided will use his superstrength to stop a speeding train, 
but doing so knocks him into the stratosphere. 

It would seem that Wario-Man's secret weakness is any violent assault 
against him. (A particularly poor secret weakness for a superhero, if 
you ask me.) In fact, on the menu screen for WarioWare: Twisted, the 
player can transform Wario into Wario-Man by dragging the Nasty 
Garlic icon onto Wario. To undo the transformation, the player has to 
drag a bomb onto Wario-Man. Funny, that.

In both WarioWare: Touched! and WarioWare: Twisted!, Wario-
Man's microgames represent the last to be unlocked and therefore the 
hardest.

Wario-Man's appearances:
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

=======================================================================

WART
[Japanese name: Mamu]
Occupation: King of bad dreams
First appearance: Doki Doki Panic (1987)

This obese amphibians first appearance is Doki Doki Panic, better 
known as the American Super Mario Bros. 2 with its original cast. In 
this plot, Wart abducts the two youngest members of a can-do Arabian 
family through a magical storybook. Mama, Papa, son Imajin, and 
daughter Lina rush to the tykes' rescue and show Wart what's for.

As far as I know, Wart's existence in the original Doki Doki Panic is 
identical to that in the Americanized version. Whether it's Imajin or 
Mario dueling with the regally dressed frog, the showdown happens in 
the room of the Bad Dream Machine, a three-piped contraption Wart 
has been using to destroy all bad dreams.

Foolishly, Wart's machine also spits out vegetables - Wart's only 
weakness. When the froggy one opens his mouth to spew out bubbles 
o' pain, the heroes must toss the produce in. A few hits and Wart goes 
down.

If it's the Imajin-Lina-Mama-Papa team, Wart's defeat frees the kids. 
If it's Mario-Luigi-Peach-Toad group, victory means freeing the 
Subcon fairies, flitting red things that keep the land of dreams (also 
called Subcon) nice and orderly.

Wart is the first non-Bowser boss in the Mario series since Donkey 
Kong. He's also the only main villain in any of the "big" Mario games 
- not an RPG or a Wario game or something like that. And for a guy 
who hasn't appeared in an actual Mario game (excluding Super Mario 
Bros. 2 remakes), he still got a cameo in a Zelda game. Not even Toad 
got that.

(As a side note, some have pointed out that Wart bears a slight 
resemblence to Prince Froggy, the mini-boss of the jungle world in 
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island.)

Wart's appearances:
Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1987
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (Game Boy) - 1993*
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (Game Boy Color) - 1998*
Animal Crossing (Gamecube) - 2001**

* as Mamu
** as Wart Jr.

=======================================================================

WATINGA
Occupation: Bionic bug
First appearance: Mario Paint (1992)

If fumbling around with a Paintbrush knockoff or animating a whole 
nine-frame movie ain't your thing, Mario Paint offers a game-within-
a-game that might be more fun: Fly Swatter. This mini-game, which 
can be accessed by clicking on the coffee mug icon, seems designed to 
help players improve their dexterity with the Super NES mouse. You 
play a hand. It's your job to swat insects as they flitter across the 
screen: little flies, big flies, Bob-Omb flies, wasps and finally Watinga, 
a giant robo-bug.

Eleven years later, Fly Swatter and its cast of insectoid villains got a 
reprieve from video game obscurity and showed up in part as a 
microgame in 9-Volt's retro gaming series and then in full as an 
unlockable game. This time, of course, players had to do their swatting 
without the benefit of the mouse.

Watinga's appearances:
Mario Paint (Super NES) - 1992
WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=======================================================================

WATT
[Japanese name: Akarin]
Occupation: Living flashlight
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

One of the stranger legs of Mario's journey in Paper Mario involves 
shrinking down to flea-sized proportions and venturing into the Shy 
Guy's Toy Box, a dangerous toy land populated by those mask-
wearing spooks from Super Mario Bros. 2.

Inside, Mario fights the Lantern Ghost and crushes his lantern, 
releasing little Watt. Even though she looks more like a miniature 
version of the Sun from Super Mario Bros. 3, Watt is a Li'l Sparky, 
one of the slow-moving fireball baddies from Super Mario World. 
(Honestly, such an enemy's inclusion among the menagerie of 
common enemies - Goomba, Koopa Troopa, Cheep Cheep - that 
Mario befriends in Paper Mario seems strange to me, but whatever.) 
Because she's a baby, she sucks on a pacifier - that blue thing on her 
face, in case you were wondering. Watt joins Mario. She may suck on 
a pacifier, but she's a mighty ally. Watt can illuminate darkened 
passages or shock foes with electrical discharges.

=======================================================================

WEBBER
[Japanese name: Spigon]
Occupation: Arachnotastic boss
Only appearance: Wario Land 3 (2000)

The next-to-last boss in Wario Land 3, Webber is a yellow and black-
striped tree spider whom Wario fights in the stage called "Out of the 
Woods." Wario must dodge Webber's cobweb shots in order to 
survive. 

This spidery character pops up again in Dr. Mario 64 as a midboss and 
as a selectable character in the game's multiplayer mode.

Webber's starring roles:
Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003

=======================================================================

WHACKA 
[Japanese name: Koburon]
Occupation: Living whack-a-mole
First appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

A blue mole-looking guy whose head grows a giant, edible lump if 
Mario whacks him with a hammer. Whacka doesn't appreciate being 
hit, but the lumps that fall of his noggin are some of the best power-
ups in the game. Whacka only lives on Mt. Rugged. In Paper Mario: 
The Thousand-Year Door, Whacka shows up again on the island 
called Keelhaul Key. He's virtually unchanged from the first Paper 
Mario: whack him with a hammer and he'll produce an edible, 
healthful lump. Want some tragic news? Have Goombella use her 
Tattle ability near Whacka and she'll reveal that he's an endangered 
species - probably because those lumps are so mysteriously 
delicious. 

In either game, SiR6 informs me, Whacka will die if Mario bops him 
too many times. How could Mario be so cruel?

Whacka is the second cute, helpful mole character in a Mario RPG 
game. In Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars, Mario met 
Mukumuku, a cuddly burrower who would attack enemies if Mario 
used a Mukumuku Cookie.

Whacka's appearances:
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=======================================================================

WHOMP 
[Japanese name: Battan]
Occupation: Sinister stepping stone
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

Whomps debuted as minor baddies in Super Mario 64. They acted just 
like their superior, the Whomp King - they'd try to slam Mario into 
the ground by falling on him. Their appearance, their behavior and 
their names would suggest that they are related to the Thowmps - the 
living blue blocks that would try to slam down from the ceiling 
whenever Mario comes near.

Although Whomp generally shows up as a generic baddie, he awaited 
players in the Extra Room in Mario Party 3. There, he challenged 
players to take on the unique one-player games in the Thwomp's 
Basebment Bouhaha collection. These one-player games were 
decidedly off-beat, the strangest being Mushroom Medic, in which 
players had to determine which hospital patient had ingested a 
poisonous mushroom by checking their heartbeat. Odd indeed.

Whomp's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Verison (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Party 4 (Nintendo 64) - 2002
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=======================================================================

WHOMP KING
Occupation: Supreme stepping stone
First appearance: Super Mario 64 (1996)

Boss of Whomp's Fortress, the Whomp King is a giant slab of stone 
who tries to crush Mario by falling on him. When the Whomp King 
falls on his face, Mario can slam down onto his back to defeat him, 
whereupon the Whomp King makes a terrible pun wit the words 
"gravel" and "grovel."

Whomp King's appearances:
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Verison (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=======================================================================

WIGGLER 
[Japanese name: Hanachan; also known as Wigglerfly] 
Occupation: Deceptive caterpillar
First appearance: Super Mario World (1991)

A segmented yellow caterpillar with a big brown nose, a jolly grin and 
a daisy growing out of his head. Yes, it seems like Mario and Wiggler 
should be bosom buddies instead of enemies, but Wiggler's 
appearance belies his true nature. He's a baddie who'd like nothing 
better than to trample over Mario. Wiggler first appears in the Forest 
of Illusion stages in Super Mario World. He seems harmless enough 
until Mario stomps him. The daisy withers and falls off and Wiggler's 
shade turns from mellow yellow to a steamed red. He'll come after 
Mario at full speed.

Wiggler appears again as a generic baddie in Super Mario World's 
sequel, though not as a caterpillar. Yoshi faces off with Wiggler's 
post-cocoon form, the Wigglerfly: lovely, but just as much of a pain. 
Players could even chose to play as the Wigglerfly in Tetris Attack, 
the puzzle game spin off of Super Mario World 2. The Wigglerfly 
replaced Ruby, the jewel fairy in Tetris Attack's Japanese version, 
Panel du Pon.

Since then, Wiggler has shows up as a boss and not a generic baddie. 
In Super Mario 64, Wiggler is the final boss in the Tiny-Huge Island 
area. If, in the tiny version of the island, Mario stomps a certain pool 
of water, it will drain. Returning to the same spot in the giant version 
of the island, Mario can slip through the cracks and into Wiggler's lair, 
where Mario finds the caterpillar fuming because someone has flooded 
his home. Beating Wiggler earns Mario a star.

A green-hued Wiggler shows up as a boss in the Gelato Beach area of 
Isle Delfino in Super Mario Sunshine as well. That same Wiggler is a 
model for the Wiggler bus that creates traffic hazards in Mario Kart: 
Double Dash!! 

Wiggler also shows up in Mario Party 5 as a capsule event item. 
Activating it allows Wiggler to give you a ride directly to the next star.

Wiggler appears as a true playable character for the first time in Mario 
Power Tennis, in which he is unlockable by beating the Thunder Cup-
level Gimmick Masters in singles mode. Curiously, Wiggler walks 
with much of his caterpillar body upright, rather than all on the ground 
as players are used to seeing him. Wiggler proves to be a formidable 
opponent, as he can morph into his two alternate forms for his power 
attacks: He can either become enraged, as he does in Super Mario 
World when Mario dares to stomp him, or he can become the 
Wigglerfly, his ultra-rare alternate form. Either way, he's eight legs of 
tennis-playing caterpillar madness.

Wiggler's starring roles:
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996*
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Game & Watch Galley 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

Other appearances:
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995*
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Picross NP Vol. 6 (Super Famicom) - 2000
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004

* only as Wigglerfly

=======================================================================

WINKY 
[Japanese name: Uinkii]
Occupation: Hopalong froggy
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country (1994)

Winky, an unfortunately named green and red-speckled frog, is one of 
the rideable animal buddies in Donkey Kong Country. He can jump 
higher than any other character and, curiously, his soft underbelly can 
stomp baddies other characters can't. (Oddly, considering that it's 
probably mushier than D.K.'s feet.) Winky never appears again after 
Donkey Kong Country and its various remakes.

Winky's starring roles:
Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

WISE WISTERWOOD
Occupation: Sagacious tree
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Much like the Deku Tree in the Zelda games, Wise Wisterwood is the 
elder of the woodsy environment he lives in. He helps guide Mario 
through Flower Fields, where Bowser's minion Huff N. Puff aims to 
block the sun out forever, killing all plant life.

=======================================================================

WONKY 
Occupation: Blabbermouth
Only appearance: Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

A Humpty Dumpy-shaped chap who hangs out in Herb. T's teahouse 
in the ruins beneath Rogueport. For a small fee, he'll spin a yarn - 
anything from legends of the pirate king Cortez to gossip about Zess 
T's long lost sister. Is it just me, or does Wonky look a little like Miss 
Warp from Yoshi's Story?

=======================================================================

WRINKLY KONG 
Occupation: Schoolmarm
First appearance: Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)

She has an unfortunate name, but the kindest soul in the whole 
Marioverse. She'd have to - she's married to Cranky Kong. Wrinkly, 
a hunched over ape with gray hair and glasses, waits for her pupils 
Diddy and Dixie to stop by the Kong College. There, they can record 
their progress. She fulfills the same function in Donkey Kong Country 
3, only she's ditched her school teacher shawl for - shudder - a 
workout leotard. Candy Kong was definitely easier on the eyes. When 
Nintendo ported Donkey Kong Country 2 to the Game Boy Advance, 
they switched Wrinkly's job to accommodate the game's save feature. 
Ever the schoolteacher, the revamped Wrinkly Kong now assigned 
homework - special missions for Diddy and Dixie to perform.

Wrinkly holds the dubious honor to be the only recurring character in 
the entire Marioverse to permanently die. Rare killed her off between 
Donkey Kong Country 3 and Donkey Kong 64. I'm not sure how, 
exactly, but she's not around - at least not in the corporeal sense. Her 
ghost shows up to offer the hints. Spooky.

DK: King of Swing, the original platforming title Nintendo developed 
for the Game Boy Advance, also features Wrinkly Kong in a playable 
role, I'm told, but I'm not sure how. Is she still even a ghost? 
Anybody?

Wrinkly Kong's appearances:
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble (Super NES) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Donkey Kong Country 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=======================================================================

YAKKEY
Occupation: Talkative key
Only appearance: Paper Mario (2001)

Yakkey unlocks the cellar where Tubba Blubba keeps his greatest 
secret - his talking, disembodied heart. Mario creeps past sleeping 
Tubba Blubba to get the key, but the key is unfortunately both sentient 
and a loyal follower of Tubba Blubba's. Yakkey screams and Tubba 
Blubba chases Mario through his fortress.

=======================================================================

YARIDOVICH  
Occupation: Smithy's minion
Only appearance: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (1996)

Okay. I get that all of Smithy's goons are weapons. Mack hops 
around on a knife and Bowyer is a bow. The Axem Rangers all 
carry axes. But what the hell is Yaridovich supposed to be?

When Mario and his party first enter Seaside City, it's all but 
deserted. Instead of Toads happily going about their days, Mario 
finds only strange Toads who don't act human. The village elder, 
also a suspicious Toad, asks Mario to fetch the fifth Star Piece 
from Jonathan Jones at the bottom of the sea. When Mario 
complies, the elder reveals himself to be a disguised Yaridovich, 
one of Smithy's henchmen.

Yaridovich and the other phony Toads attempt to vamoose, but 
Jonathan Jones valiantly pops up and blocks their escape root. 
Trapped, Yaridovich and the phony Toads merge into one giant 
mental contraption that fights with a spear. It's not too difficult a 
battle for our heroes, and soon the real residents of Seaside City 
are released.

A reader calling himself Krail points out that Yaridovich is 
probably a spear. I'd agree, especially since reader Davey points 
out that "yari" is a Japanese word for a certain type of spear. 
Honest. Google it. I'd guess that the Russian-sounding "-ovich" 
ending was just added to make his name sound like a typical bad 
guy name.

=======================================================================

YOSHI [new]
Occupation: Egg chucker, compulsive eater
First appearance: Super Mario World (1991)
 
[yoshi]

YOSHI'S LONG-LOST COUSIN


To really understand Yoshi's origins, one would have to first look 
at Demon World, a Pac-Man clone Nintendo of Japan released for 
the Famicom in 1984. The game starred Tamagon, a little lizard 
dude who hatched from an egg and chased demons down dot-lined 
corridors. Tamagon's big foe was Satan himself, and crucifixes 
worked as the Devil's World equivalent of Power Pills. 

Nintendo's strict censors would never permit such Christian icons 
in an American release, Devil's World never saw the light of day 
stateside. In fact, Nintendo of America was so leery of pissing off 
American Christians that they even omitted Tamagon's trophy 
from Super Smash Bros. Melee nearly twenty years later in 2001. 
So maybe religious controversy prevented Tamagon from figuring 
into the Nintendo universe as a whole, but he seems to have 
influenced the creation Yoshi's creation. Also a green lizard dude, 
Tamagon makes the exact same noise when he hatches from his 
egg as Yoshi does.

While Yoshi didn't show up until Super Mario World in 1991, 
Miyamoto has said in interviews that he had wanted Mario 
mounted on a trusty steed since the days of the original Super 
Mario Bros. Concept sketches even show an ostrich-looking 
creature that programming limitations nixed from the three original 
Mario games. (Or so Miyamoto says. Curiously, in the second 
game of the Mario Bros.-like Hudson's Adventure Island series, its 
hero Master Higgins rode a variety of pre-Yoshi dinosaur buddies. 
So Master Higgins can do it on his NES adventures, yet Mario 
apparently could not.)


HATCHING A HERO


Yoshi finally joined Mario during his journey through Dinosaur 
Land in Super Mario World in 1991. When Bowser stormed the 
prehistoric vacation spot, he magically trapped Yoshi and his 
friends in eggs. Mario freed Yoshi, hopped into his saddle, and 
employed the lizard's sticky tongue in his quest. 

The dinosaur proved to be a bottomless pit; he could eat nearly any 
of Bowser's minions. And despite the notable handicap of being 
male, Yoshi could also lay eggs that could produce - perplexingly 
- mushrooms or smiling clouds that rained coins. Yoshi 
accompanied Mario through nearly every section of Super Mario 
World, excluding Boo Houses, fortresses, and the castles of the 
seven Koopalings.

While the main Yoshi was green, Mario could also unlock three 
other varieties: the Red Yoshi, the Blue Yoshi, and the Yellow 
Yoshi. In each of them the shells of Koopa Troopas had magical 
effects. While the regular Green Yoshi, for example, could eat a 
red Koopa Troopa shell and spew fireballs, the Red Yoshi could 
eat any colored Koopa Troopa shell to create the same fire breath.

Ending Bowser's terrible reign over Dinosaur Land freed both 
kidnapped Peach and the seven Yoshi babies. The group returned 
to the southwestern corner of Dinosaur Land, a subcontinent called 
Yoshi's Island, where the Yoshies flourished in the shade of Kappa 
Mountain. Eggs hatched. People rejoiced.

The fifth installment of Super Mario Bros. is completely Yoshi's 
show. Its complete title is Super Mario Bros. 5: Super Mario 
World 2: Yoshi's Island and it tells the story of how the Yoshi clan 
saved the infant Mario Brothers from destruction at the hands of 
Kamek and his charge, the newborn Koopa King. Released ten 
years after Super Mario Bros. brought Mario to home video game 
systems in 1985, this game has Baby Mario getting bucked from 
the saddle of one Yoshi to another as he inches closer towards 
reunion with Baby Luigi. The game features an expanded rainbow 
of Yoshi colors - green, red, yellow, blue, purple, pink, orange 
and navy blue - though the Yoshi's color now has no effect over 
his abilities.

In Yoshi's Island, Yoshi took egg production to a new level. 
Eating anything now forced Yoshi to poop out an egg. Up to six 
different eggs would trail behind the Yoshter, and he could aim 
them at enemies with precision. Though colors granted them no 
special effects, a full rainbow of Yoshies appeared in this game: 
green, red, light blue, yellow, purple, pink, orange, and dark blue. 

The distinctively kiddy look to the game  - backgrounds that 
charmingly resembled a child's crayon scribblings - belied the 
game's depth. Many argue that innovative play mechanics of 
Yoshi's Island make it the greatest Mario game ever - even if 
Mario's role is minimal. One gameplay element that never sailed 
off Yoshi's Island, however, was the sticky tongued one's 
transformation into various vehicles: helicopters, submarines, 
racecars, trains, mole machine. All in all, much like a child's toys. 
While now mostly forgotten, the Yoshicopter did make a cameo 
above the Baby Park racetrack in Mario Kart: Double Dash!!


YOSHI GROWS UP


The whole clan showed in a second dino-only venture in 1998 in 
Yoshi's Story. That bratty Baby Bowser returned to Yoshi's Island 
and plucked the source of all happiness and fruit, the Super Happy 
Tree, from the ground it grew in. To really rub it in, the young king 
also flattened Yoshi's Island into a storybook. The core six 
Yoshies - green, red, yellow, blue, purple, and pink - were 
joined by special black and white Yoshies that could stomach even 
the hottest chili peppers. (Feed your Yoshi right. Red and Pink 
Yoshi prefer apples, but Blue and Purple Yoshi like grapes. Green 
Yoshi likes watermelons (as opposed to normal melons), and 
Yellow Yoshi predictably hankers for bananas. Black and White 
Yoshi eat anything with digestive impunity.) The game boasted a 
circular level design, wherein the same backgrounds were scroll by 
on an endless loop. The trick to level-beating was fruit eating. 
Eating each Yoshi's choice fruits earned a higher happiness rating 
- that is, a score - that opened up more levels accordingly. 
Melons earned the highest scores.

Pestering Poochy the dog to sniff out melons wasn't most players' 
idea of a great video game. Mixed reception, coupled with an 
infuriating theme song sung by what sounds like a gibberish-fluent 
kindergarten class, meant Yoshi didn't make a subsequent solo 
effort until the latter days of the Game Boy Advance. But while 
Yoshi's Story did not further entrench Yoshi's status as a 
platforming star, it did modify his design in a way that has had 
long-lasting consequences. Previous to Yoshi's Story, Yoshi 
looked more dinosaur-like, with a longer neck and tiny, useless 
Tyrannosaurus Rex arms. The Yoshi's Story model, however, had 
a Yoshi with more humanoid proportions, larger eyes and 
functional hands. This Yoshi, supposedly a more juvenile Yoshi 
than the one who had starred in previous games, became the 
default Yoshi from this point forward.

The newly modeled Yoshi makes an appearance in nearly every 
Mario game. Although he only made a cameo in Super Mario 64, 
he was ready for action in Super Mario Sunshine. Just as well as 
Mario's water pack, F.L.U.D.D., the orange, pink, and purple 
Yoshies native to Isle Delfino could clear graffiti by high-pressure 
vomiting their favorite fruits. Props to Nintendo for including the 
rare but existent tropical durian fruit as Purple Yoshi's favorite 
snack - a first, I'd imagine, for a video game.

Nintendo surprisingly posed Yoshi as the star of the Nintendo DS 
remake of Super Mario 64. The player actually starts the game as 
Yoshi, and though Mario must be rescued, the decision whether to 
rescue Luigi and Wario is entirely left to the player, as Yoshi can 
put on their hats to temporarily borrow their abilities. Yoshi's 
transition into the three-dimensional world of Super Mario 64 is so 
seamless that one wonders why he wasn't in the original version of 
the game. For the first time, he can eat enemies and toss eggs in 
any direction. In a way, Nintendo giving Yoshi the starring role is 
almost an apology for his throwaway cameo in Super Mario 64. 
There, Mario could meet Yoshi atop Peach's castle to gain extra 
lives and an improved triple jump. At the beginning of Super 
Mario 64 DS, the camera sweeps over Peach's Castle as Mario, 
Luigi and Wario are entering. You can briefly spot Yoshi napping 
on the roof - a nod to his original cameo.


FURTHER YOSHI MUTATIONS


Cuddly, cheerful, green, and jolly, Yoshi instantly became popular. 
He joined veterans like Toad and Donkey Kong Jr. in Super Mario 
Kart in 1992 and then got his name in two multiplatform puzzle 
games: Yoshi and Yoshi's Cookie. 

Yoshi appeared in a third puzzle game in 1996: Tetris Attack, 
nicknamed perfectly by the Mushroom Kingdom website as "Tetris 
A-Hack." Much like Doki Doki Panic's transformation into the 
American Super Mario Bros. 2, Nintendo of America stripped the 
Japanese release Panel de Pon of its original cast of cute fairies and 
replaced them with Yoshi's pals from Yoshi's Island. The play 
mechanics were virtually identical, but Nintendo figured American 
players would rather solve puzzles with cuddly animals than a 
bunch of girly-girl fairies.

(Notably, the main fairy was named Lip. While excised from 
American gaming, her trademark flower staff showed up in 2001 
in Super Smash Bros. Melee as Lip's Stick, which made opponents 
sprout a flower out of their head when struck with it.)

The game itself had nothing to do with the original Tetris concept, 
surprisingly. Rather than arrange falling blocks, the object of Tetris 
Attack was to shuffle colored tiles so as to line up similar colored 
ones.

(For a detailed description of Yoshi's transformations, check the 
miscellaneous lists section at the end of the guide.)

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR YOSHI***
Yoshies are gentle, fleet-of-foot dinosaurs that make their home on 
idyllic Yoshi's Island. They come in a variety of colors and have 
evolved an interesting trait to help increase their numbers: they can 
transform anything they swallow into an egg. With adhesive 
tongues and bottomless bellies, Yoshies have been known to eat 
anything.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR YOSHI***

***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR MARIO & YOSHI***
Yoshi was first introduced in Super Mario World, and the sight of 
Mario riding the helpful character soon became an enduring image. 
Despite his Cape, Mario can't fly while astride Yoshi. The pair can 
make huge jumps and drift slowly back to earth, though. As a last 
resort, Mario could leap off Yoshi's back to safety.
***SMASH BROS. TROPHY INFO FOR MARIO & YOSHI***

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!! DATA:
Partner: Birdo
Personal racecar: Turbo Yoshi
Special weapon: Yoshi Egg

Yoshi's starring roles:
Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Game Boy) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (NES) - 1993
Yoshi's Cookie (Super NES) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1995
Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
Game & Watch Gallery (Game Boy) - 1997
Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) - 1997
Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle 4 (Bandai Satellaview-X) - 1997
Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
Picross NP Vol. 2 (Super Famicom) - 1999
Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64) - 1999
Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002*
Mario Party 4 (Gamecube) - 2002
Mario Party-e (Game Boy Advance E-Reader) - 2002
Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004
Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004
Mario Golf: Advance Tour (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Mario Party 6 (Gamecube) - 2004
Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2005

Other appearances:
Mario Paint (Super NES) - 1992
Yoshi (Game Boy) - 1992
Yoshi (NES) - 1992
Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993*
Mario & Wario (Super Famicom) - 1993
Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 1995
Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 1996
Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (Nintendo 64) - 1998**
Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (Game Boy Color) - 1993
Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001*
Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (Nintendo 64) - 1998*
Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001*
Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003*
Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
Mario Pinball Land (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004*

* Because Yoshi is both a unique character and a generic term for his 
whole race, I decided to differentiate between his appearances in this 
list. Entries with an asterisk mean that Yoshi appears as a generic race 
- not as the specific green Yoshi character we all know and love.
** as a portrait in Hyrule Castle

=======================================================================

THE YUM YUMS [new]
[Japanese name: Nao Komori]
Occupation: Pro-Mona pop group
First appearance: WarioWare: Twisted (2005)

A Diamond City pop group who seem to have scored a hit with the 
Mona Pizza jingle, which doubles as Mona's theme song during her 
mini-games in WarioWare: Twisted. The group's singer - whose 
name may be Nao Komori in the game's English version as well as the 
Japanese version - takes the lead vocals, though Joe and the goons 
from Pizza Dinosaur also chime in as well. 

The lyrics to the Mona Pizza jingle are as follows, according to the 
WarioWare song lyrics guide posted by Enigmapoeia at 
GameFAQs.com. Lyrics in parentheses are spoken by Joe. Lyrics in 
brackets are spoken by the Pizza Dinosaur goons.

   This here is Mona Pizza
   Makers of the world's best eats-a
   Fresh sauce and cheese gal-ore
   Brought straight to your front do-or
 
   This here is Mona Pizza (Buon giorno!)
   Makers of all tasty treats-a (Buono!)
   Our pies' crispy crunchy cru-sts (Bellissima!)
   Leaves others in the d-ust (Mamma mia!)

   Grab a hot slice and take a big bite
   It's so good that you'll start a fight for more
 
   Mona Pizza (I'm the manager of this joint!)
   Mona Pizza (My name is Joe!)
   Mona Pizza (It's a pizza art!)
   Mona Pizza! (I said a "pizza art," ahahahaha!)

   [[We represent Pizza Dinosaur]]
   [[We got the most stores in the world]]
   [[Our crust is tough and our sauce is thin]]
   [[But we're everywhere, so you gotta give in]]

   [[Mona Pizza's got nothing on us]]
   [['Cause we've got six thousand stores plus!]]
   [[Pizza Dinosaur!]]
   [[Pizza Dinosaur!]]
   [[Wahahahahha! Wahahahahha!]]

The Yum Yums briefly cameo in WarioWare: Touched, as well.

The Yum Yums' appearances:
WarioWare: Twisted! (Game Boy Advance) - 2005
WarioWare: Touched! (Nintendo DS) - 2005

==M A R I O==G A M E==M A S T E R L I S T===============================

[gamelist]

All the games in the Marioverse, plus a brief description of plot, 
gameplay and the major players. I've also noted when a game 
introduces characters that appear in subsequent games. Games in 
which Marioverse characters only make cameos are not listed here. 
And yes, I know I'm using the word "damsel" fairly liberally. If 
you can think of a better term, please let me know.

=====

DONKEY KONG
- Arcade (1981)
 - Playable character: Mario
- Big bad: Donkey Kong
- Damsel: Pauline

The first ever Mario game. Big ape Donkey Kong kidnaps Pauline 
to the top of a construction site where Mario works. Mario must 
leap over the barrels Donkey Kong tosses and rescue Pauline.

- Introduces Mario (as "Jumpman"), Donkey Kong and Pauline

Remakes and ports
- Donkey Kong (Atari 2600) - 1981
- Donkey Kong (NES) - 1985
- Donkey Kong Classics (NES) - 1988
- Donkey Kong '94 (Game Boy Color) - 1994
- Game & Watch Gallery 2 - (Game Boy Color) - 1998

Included in
- Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
- Animal Crossing (Gamecube) - 2001

=====

DONKEY KONG JR. 
- Arcade (1982)
- Playable character: Donkey Kong Jr.
- Big bad: Mario
- Damsel: Donkey Kong

Mario has Donkey Kong imprisoned in a cage. D.K.'s son, Donkey 
Kong Jr., must swing from through the jungle on vine to vine to 
rescue his pops. For the first and only time, Mario plays the game's 
villain.

- Introduces Donkey Kong Jr.

Remakes and ports
- Donkey Kong Jr. (NES) - 1986 
- Donkey Kong Jr. (Intellivision) - 1988
- Donkey Kong Jr. (Colecovision) - 1988
- Donkey Kong Jr. (Atari 7800) - 1988 
- Donkey Kong Classics (NES) - 1988
- Game & Watch Gallery 3 (Game Boy Color) - 1999 
- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002

=====

MARIO BROS.
- Arcade (1983)
 - Playable characters: Mario, Luigi

Mario and Luigi, both plumbers, scramble for coins in a sewer 
populated with pests including Shellcreepers, Fighter Flys and 
Crabs, which the brothers fight by bopping them from below. 
Note: Don't confuse this game with the Game & Watch Gallery 
version of Mario Bros., which plays completely differently. 

A bit of trivia: this is easily the most-often remade game in the 
Mario series.

- Introduces the Koopa Troopa (as "Shellcreeper")

Followed by
- Return of the Mario Bros. (Famicom) - 1988

Remakes and ports
- Mario Bros. (Atari 2600) - 1983
- Mario Bros. (Atari 5200) - 1983
- Mario Bros. (Atari 7200) - 1983
- Mario Bros. (Commodore 64) - 1984
- Mario Bros. (NES) - 1986

Included in
- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
- Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
- Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
- Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 
2003
- Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=====

SUPER MARIO BROS.
- NES (1985)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsel: The Mushroom Retainers, Princess Peach

Mario and Luigi venture through the Mushroom Kingdom to fight 
the Koopas and rescue Princess Peach. Aside from stomping, the 
brothers can use power-ups like Super Mushrooms and Fire 
Flowers.

- Introduces Bowser, Princess Peach, the generic Mushroom 
Retainers and a host of generic Mario baddies, including Goomba, 
Paratroopa, Piranha Flower, Lakitu, Spiny, Buzzy Beetle, the 
Hammer Bros., Cheep Cheep, Blooper and Poodooboo

Remakes and ports
- Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986 
- Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
- Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet 
(NES) - 1990
- Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
- Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (NES) - 1998 
- Animal Crossing (Gamecube) - 2001
- Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=====

DONKEY KONG JR. MATH
[Japanese name: Donkey Kong Jr. Math Lesson]
- Nintendo (1985)
- Playable character: Donkey Kong Jr.

Like regular Donkey Kong Jr. - just with math! Be jazzed, people!

=====

WRECKING CREW
- NES (1985)
 - Playable characters: Mario, Luigi
- Big bad: Spike

Now apparently a construction worker, Mario breaks through 
concrete walls with his hammer and contends with nasty Foreman 
Spike. 

- Introduces Spike

Remakes and ports
- Wrecking Crew '98 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1998

=====

VERSUS SUPER MARIO BROS.
- Arcade (1986)
 - Playable characters: Mario, Luigi
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsel: The Mushroom Retainers, Princess Peach

A rare, coin-operated version of the original Super Mario Bros. in 
which players take turns playing a stage. First Mario goes through 
Level 1-1, for example, and then Luigi has a go. Whoever reaches 
Peach first wins.

Remake of
- Super Mario Bros. (1985)

=====

SUPER MARIO BROS: THE LOST LEVELS (Japan only)
[Japanese name: Super Mario Bros. 2]
- Famicom (1986)
 - Playable characters: Mario, Luigi
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsel: The Mushroom Retainers, Princess Peach

The Japanese sequel to the original Super Mario Bros. allows 
players to choose to play as Mario or Luigi in the one-player 
version. Luigi jumps higher, but Mario is easier to control. This 
game also introduces the strange Marioverse tendency for 
background objects like trees and clouds to have idiot smiling 
faces on them.

Remakes and ports
- Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993 
- Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1998
- Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=====

DOKI DOKI PANIC (Japan only)
[also known as Yume Kajoo: Doki Doki Panic]
- Famicom (1987)
- Playable characters: Imajin, Lina, Mama, Papa
- Big bad: Wart (as "Mamu")
- Damsel: Imajin's little brother and sister

Not a Mario game in the tradition sense, but the Japanese game 
Nintendo hacked to make the American sequel to the original 
Super Mario Bros.  

- Introduces Birdo, Mouser, Triclyde, Fryguy and Wart and several 
generic baddies, including Bob-Omb, Shy Guy, Snifit, Beezo, 
Ninji, Pidgit and Pokey

Remakes and ports
- Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
- Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
- Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=====

RETURN OF THE MARIO BROS. (Japan only)
[also known as Mario Bros. 2]
- Famicom (1988)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi

A minor upgrade to the Mario Bros. arcade game that was only 
available by purchasing the Famicom Disk Writer accessory. 
Neither this accessory nor Return of the Mario Bros. were 
available in the United States.

Remake of
Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983

Remakes and ports
- Return of the Mario Bros. (Commodore 64) - 1988

=====

SUPER MARIO BROS. + DUCK HUNT
- NES (1988)
 
A compilation of the original Super Mario Bros. and the cutest 
hunting simulation in the world, Duck Hunt. 

Remakes of
- Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1986

=====

SUPER MARIO BROS. 2
[Japanese name: Super Mario USA]
- NES (1998)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi, Peach, Toad
- Big bad: Wart
- Damsels: The Subcon fairies

Trades jumping and stomping in the Mushroom Kingdom for 
vegetable-plucking and tossing in Subcon, the land of dreams. 
Peach and Toad became playable for the first time, though they 
would not be so again until four years later in Super Mario Kart.

- Introduces Toad and Clawgrip

Remake of
- Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1987

Remakes and ports
- Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
- Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=====

DONKEY KONG CLASSICS
- NES (1988) 

The original Donkey Kong and Donkey Kong Jr. ported onto one 
cartridge.

Remake of
- Donkey Kong (NES) - 1981 
- Donkey Kong Jr. (NES) - 1982

=====

SUPER MARIO LAND
- Game Boy (1989)
- Playable characters: Mario
- Big bad: Tatanga
- Damsels: Daisy

In his Game Boy debut, Mario ventures through Sarasaland to 
rescue Princess Daisy from Tatanga. Gameplay is virtually 
identical to the original Super Mario Bros with two notable 
exceptions: the Fire Flower is replaces with the Super Flower and 
two stages depart from jump-and-stomp mechanics for side-
scrolling shooter action.

(Introduces Daisy and Tatanga.)

=====

SUPER MARIO BROS. + DUCK HUNT + WORLD CLASS 
TRACK MEET
- NES (1990)
 
A compilation of three games on one cartridge. A bargain!

Remake of
- Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
- Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988

=====

SUPER MARIO BROS. 3
- NES (1990)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsel: The seven Mushroom Kings, Princess Peach

Mario and Luigi restore peace to the seven kingdoms of the 
Mushroom World by defeating Bowser's seven children. Features 
an expanded system of power-ups such as the Raccoon Leaf, 
which allows them to fly, and the Frog Suit, which facilitates 
swimming. This is the first Mario game to feature a map screen.

(Introduces the Koopalings and several generic baddies, including 
Thwomp, Boo, Chain Chomp and the Nipper Plant)

Remakes and ports
- Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
- Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993 
- Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 2003

Includes 
- Mario Bros. (NES)  - 1986

=====

DR. MARIO
- NES (1990), Game Boy (1990)

A Tetris-like puzzle game in which the player must match red, 
yellow and blue colored pill capsules with similarly colored 
viruses. Though Dr. Mario is the main character, the player doesn't 
control him in anyway.

(Introduces Dr. Mario, the Viruses)

Remakes and ports
- Versus Dr. Mario (Arcade) - 1990
- Dr. Mario (Bandai Satellaview) - 1998
- Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
- Wario Ware: Mega Microgame$ - (2003)
- Wario Ware: Mega Party Game$ - (2003)
- Dr. Mario (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=====

VERSUS DR. MARIO 
- Arcade (1990)

A coin-operated port of the Dr. Mario engine.

Remake of 
- Dr. Mario (NES) - 1990

=====

NES OPEN TOURNAMENT GOLF
- NES (1991)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi

The first Mario-themed sports game. As Mario and Luigi, one or 
two players can compete in various golf tournaments. 

=====

SUPER MARIO WORLD
[also known as Super Mario Bros. 4: Super Mario World]
- Super NES (1991)
 - Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Yoshi
  * Blue Yoshi (rare)
  * Red Yoshi (rare)
  * Yellow Yoshi (rare)
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsels: Seven Baby Yoshies, Princess Peach

A well-deserved vacation to Dinosaur Land goes awry when 
Bowser imprisons the dino-residents and kidnaps Peach. Mario and 
Luigi are aided in their adventure by Yoshi, the hungry, quick-
tongued dinosaur, and the Cape Feather, which allows them to fly 
like never before.

- Introduces Yoshi, the Big Boo, Wiggler, Swooper, Spike Top, 
Magikoopa, Chargin' Chuck and Monty Mole

Remakes and ports
- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (1994) 
- Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (2002)

=====

SUPER MARIO LAND 2: SIX GOLDEN COINS
- Game Boy (1992)
- Playable characters: Mario
- Big bad: Wario

When Wario overtakes Mario's castle, Mario must venture through 
Mario Land and collect the six coins that can unlock the seal on the 
castle's front door. The noteworthy power-up here is the Bunny 
Carrot, which allows Mario to float with using pair of rabbit ears.

- Introduces Wario

=====

YOSHI
- NES (1992), Game Boy (1992) 
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi

Instantly popular in the wake of Super Mario World, Yoshi gets his 
first title - a puzzle game in which Mario must try to arrange 
alike tiles depicting various Mario baddies between the halves of 
Yoshi eggshells.

=====

MARIO PAINT
- Super NES (1992)
- Big Bad: Watinga (in Fly Swatter mini-game)

Not so much a game as a Mario-infused version of Paintbrush. 
Included is Fly Swatter, a mouse dexterity mini-game in which the 
player can swat some nasty insects.

- Introduces Watinga

=====

SUPER MARIO KART
- Super NES (1992) 
- Playable characters:
  * Mario
  * Luigi 
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Toad
  * Koopa Troopa
  * Bowser
  * Donkey Kong Jr.

The first in the popular Mario Kart series. Mario and friends stage 
go-kart races on a variety of tracks inspired by Super Mario World.

Remakes and ports
- Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=====

HOTEL MARIO
- CD-I (1992)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi
- Big bad: Bowser

Mario and Luigi chase a host of baddies through their new hotel. I 
have not found much information about this title, but I've read the 
game plays like the NES title Bugs Bunny's Crazy Castle, what 
with its popping-out-of-doors action.

=====

SUPER MARIO ALL-STARS
[Japanese name: Super Mario Collection]
- Super NES (1993)
 
The NES Mario adventures become realized in 16-bit glory. And 
the original Japanese sequel to Super Mario Bros. hits American 
shores for the first time as Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels. 

Remakes of
- Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985,
- Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
- Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986

Remakes and ports
- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994, 
- Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
- Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy 
Advance) - 2003

=====

YOSHI'S SAFARI
[Japanese name: Yoshi's Road Hunting]
- Super NES (1993)
- Playable characters: Mario, Yoshi
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsels: Princess Peach, Prince Pine, King Fret

The first and thus far the only Mario shooter. As Yoshi speeds 
through Jewelry Land, Mario shoots berries at enemies. Players 
control the gunfire with the Super Scope Six.

=====

MARIO IS MISSING!
- Super NES (1993), NES (1993)
- Playable characters: Luigi
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsel: Mario

Long before ghosts nabbed Mario, Bowser got his claws on his and 
whisked him away to the real world - our world. Luigi follows Mario 
around the globe, learning about geography in the process.

=====

YOSHI'S COOKIE
[Japanese name: Kuruppon Oven de Cookie]
- Super NES (1993), NES (1993), Game Boy (1993)
- Selectable characters: Mario, Peach, Yoshi, Bowser

Another Yoshi-themed puzzle game. Arrange similar cookies on a grid 
into a line or column and make them disappear. Like in other Mario 
puzzle games, the selection of characters doesn't alter gameplay; it 
only changes the player's on-screen persona.

=====

MARIO & WARIO (Japan only)
[Japanese name: Mario and Wario]
- Super NES (1993)
- Playable character: Wanda
- Big bad: Wario
- Damsels: Mario, Yoshi, Peach

Wario fiendishly drops a bucket on Mario, Yoshi or Peach's head, 
causing them to blindly trudge forward. Only little pixie Wanda can 
save them by creating or removing blocks in their path.

- Introduces Wanda

=====

DONKEY KONG '94
- Game Boy (1994)
- Playable character: Mario
- Big bad: Donkey Kong
- Damsel: Pauline

A revamp/sequel of the original Donkey Kong that has Mario 
exploring bigger and more difficult stages, though all still with the 
purpose or rescuing sweet Pauline. Some suspect that this game may 
contain elements from The Return of Donkey Kong, the scrapped 
arcade sequel to the original Donkey Kong.
 
=====

MARIO'S TIME MACHINE
- Super NES (1994), NES (1994)
- Playable character: Mario
- Big bad: Bowser

Mario tracks Bowser's crimes through time, learning a bit about 
history in the process.

=====

WARIO'S WOODS
- Super NES (1994), NES (1994)
- Playable characters: Toad
- Big bad: Wario

A Tetris-like puzzle game with elements of a platform side-scroller. 
Control Toad as he catches falling baddies and arranges them next to 
similar ones to make them disappear. The game's plot involves trying 
to chase Wario and his cronies from Pleasant Woods.

Included in
- Animal Crossing (Gamecube) - 2001

=====

DONKEY KONG COUNTRY
[Japanese name: Super Donkey Kong]
- Super NES (1994)
- Playable characters: 
  * Donkey Kong
  * Diddy Kong
  * Rambi
  * Enguarde
  * Expresso
  * Winky
- Big bad: K. Rool

The revamped Donkey Kong and new buddy Diddy Kong search Kong 
Isle for a missing banana horde in this platform adventure.

- Introduces Diddy Kong, Cranky Kong, Funky Kong, Candy Kong, 
Rambi, Enguarde, Expresso, Squawks, K. Rool and the Kremlings

Remakes and ports
- Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Color) - 2000
- Donkey Kong Country (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=====

SUPER MARIO ALL-STARS + SUPER MARIO WORLD
- Super NES (1994) 

A direct port of Super Mario All-Stars and a minor upgrade to Super 
Mario World that grants Mario and Luigi different jumping abilities. 
This is the version of Super Mario World that Nintendo ported for 
Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World.

Remake of
- Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993 
- Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991

Remakes and ports
- Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002

=====

WARIO BLAST: FEATURING BOMBERMAN!
- Game Boy (1994)
- Playable characters: Wario, Bomberman.

Bomb-chucking Wario gets into a blasting match with Bomberman, 
the explosives-happy fellow from the Bomberman series. Typical 
Bomberman rules here. Hudson, the company that today churns out the 
Mario Party games, programmed this one as well.

=====

SUPER MARIO LAND 3: WARIO LAND
- Game Boy (1994)
- Playable characters: Wario
- Big bad: Syrup

Wario, equipped with a system of magical hat power-ups, takes the 
reigns of the Mario Land franchise as he hunts for treasure on Kitchen 
Isle, home of the infamous Black Sugar Pirates.

- Introduces Syrup

=====

SUPER MARIO WORLD 2: YOSHI'S ISLAND
[also known as Super Mario Bros. 5: Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's 
Island]
- Super NES (1995)
- Playable characters: 
  * Green Yoshi
  * Red Yoshi
  * Yellow Yoshi
  * Blue Yoshi
  * Pink Yoshi
  * Light Blue Yoshi
  * Purple Yoshi
  * Brown Yoshi 
  * Baby Mario (only when powered by Starman)
  * Poochey (only in the sense that Yoshi can control him by facing 
    a certain direction)
- Big bad: Baby Bowser 
- Damsel: Baby Luigi, the Stork

The Yoshi clan - multicolored but identically ables - relays Baby 
Mario across Yoshi's Island in hopes of reuniting him with his brother 
and stopping Baby Bower and his guardian, Kamek. Typical Mario 
stomping action mixes with new Yoshi egg-tossing action. 

- Introduces Baby Mario, Baby Luigi, Poochy, Kamek, the Toadies, 
Baby Bowser, Hookbill the Koopa, the Naval Piranha, Raphael the 
Raven, Bandit and several generic baddies, including the Lantern 
Ghost, Goonie, Crayzee Dayzee, Squeek and Bumpty

Remakes:
- Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

=====

DONKEY KONG LAND
[Japanese name: Super Donkey Kong GB]
- Game Boy Color (1995)
- Playable characters:
  * Donkey Kong
  * Diddy Kong
  * Rambi
  * Expresso
* Enguarge
- Big bad: K. Rool

In order to prove to Cranky Kong that modern video games are just as 
good of the past, Donkey Kong lets the Kremlings re-capture his 
banana horde in order to re-create their adventure on the Game Boy. 
While not a port of Donkey Kong Country, its Game Boy Color 
counterpart presents similar worlds and similar stages. What's 
especially interesting about this game is the bonus area, Big Ape City, 
an urban environment that is supposedly the environment in which 
Mario originally fought Donkey Kong.

=====

MARIO CLASH
- Virtual Boy (1995)
- Playable character: Mario

In Mario's first Virtual Boy outing, he must clear rooms of baddies by 
tossing Koopa shells at them. There's no boss and no damsel - more 
like the games of an earlier era, the goal is to get a high score.

=====

SUPER MARIO RPG: LEGEND OF THE SEVEN STARS
- Super NES (1996)
- Playable characters:
  * Mario
  * Mallow
  * Geno
  * Bowser
  * Peach
- Big bad: Smithy

Mario's first RPG outing, for which Nintendo teamed with RPG 
juggernaut Square. The combo mixed standard Mario action with a 
turn-based RPG system for nice results. Though Square declined for 
further Mario RPG outings, many elements carried over into the Paper 
Mario series, such as timed hits, special attack-fueling Flower Points 
being shared by the entire party and Mario's knack for pantomime.

- Introduces Geno 

=====

MARIO TENNIS
- Virtual Boy (1995)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Toad
  * Yoshi
  * Koopa Troopa
  * Donkey Kong Jr.

Mario and crew spend the day at the tennis courts.

=====

VIRTUAL BOY WARIO LAND
[Japanese name: Virtual Boy Wario Land: Treasure of the Awazon]
- Virtual Boy (1995)
- Playable character: Wario

Wario falls into a treasure rich underworld during a vacation to the 
Awazon river basin and must hike out through fourteen levels. A true 
sequel to Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land, in that Wario uses his 
magical hat power-ups in both games.

=====

DONKEY KONG COUNTRY 2: DIDDY'S KONG QUEST 
- Super NES (1995)
- Playable characters: 
  * Diddy Kong
  * Dixie Kong
  * Rambi
  * Enguarde
  * Squawks
  * Rattly
  * Squitter
- Big bad: K. Rool
- Damsel: Donkey Kong

Hot on the tail of the K. Rool and the captive Donkey Kong, Diddy 
and Dixie journey through Crocodile Isle in this second Kong clan 
adventure.

- Introduces Dixie Kong, Wrinkly Kong, Swanky Kong, Squitter

=====

MARIO'S PICROSS
- Game Boy (1995)

A brain-bending puzzle game involving numbered tiles. Many of the 
tile arrangements resemble Mario characters.

=====

DONKEY KONG LAND 2
[Japanese name: Super Donkey Kong 2 GB]
- Game Boy Color (1996)
- Playable characters: 
  * Diddy Kong
  * Dixie Kong
  * Rambi
  * Enguarde
  * Squawks
  * Rattly
  * Squitter
- Big bad: K. Rool
- Damsel: Donkey Kong

The Nintendo Database describes this game nicely: "not a remake of 
Donkey Kong Country, but rather a handheld homage to it."

=====

TETRIS ATTACK
[Japanese name: Yoshi's Panel du Pon]
- Super NES (1996)
- Selectable characters: 
  * Yoshi
  * Poochey
  * Bumpty
  * Raphael
  * Lakitu
  * Wigglerfly
  * Gargantua Blargg
  * Lunge Fish
- Big bad: Bowser

A remake of the Japanese title Panel du Pon infused with characters 
from Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island. Pick a character, then flip 
colored panels like mad to make similar colors match up. Like in other 
Nintendo puzzle games, playing as different characters doesn't alter 
gameplay; it only changes the player's on-screen persona.

=====

SUPER MARIO 64 
- Nintendo 64 (1996)
 - Playable character: Mario
- Big Bad: Bowser
- Damsel: Princess Peach

For his 64-bit debut, Mario gets rendered in 3-D, though many of the 
play mechanics of his 2-D, side-scrolling world remain. In this 
adventure, Mario is searching for the hidden Power Stars that free 
Peach and open the doorway to a showdown with Bowser.

- Introduces Metal Mario, Whomp, Mr. Blizzard, Bob-Omb King, 
Dorrie, Klepto, Ukiki and MIPS

Remakes and ports:
- Super Mario 64 Shindou Version (Nintendo 64) - 1997
- Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

=====

DONKEY KONG COUNTRY 3: DIXIE KONG'S DOUBLE TROUBLE
[Japanese name: Super Donkey Kong 3: Nazo no Kremis Shima]
- Super NES (1996)
- Playable characters: 
  * Dixie Kong
  * Kiddy Kong
  * Ellie 
  * Squitter
  * Enguarde
  * Squawks
  * Parry (only in the sense that Parry mimicks the player's movement 
and can collect items by touching them)
- Big bad: Dr. K. Roolenstein
- Damsels: Donkey Kong, Diddy Kong

Those Kremlings strike again, this time nabbing both Donkey Kong 
and Diddy Kong. Dixie and her toddler cousin Kiddy Kong follow 
them to the uncharted lands of the Northern Kremisphere for even 
more Kong family hijinx.

- Introduces Kiddy Kong, Ellie

=====

EXCITEBIKE: BUN BUN MARIO BATTLE 
- Bandai Satellaview (1996)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi, Yoshi, Toad

Mario and friends team-up for this remake of the original NES 
motorcycle racing game.

=====

EXCITEBIKE: BUN BUN MARIO BATTLE 2
- Bandai Satellaview (1996)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi, Yoshi, Wario

The same deal at as the first game, only with Wario in place of Toad.

=====

EXCITEBIKE: BUN BUN MARIO BATTLE 3
- Bandai Satellaview (1997)
- Playable characters: Mario, Peach, Toad, Wario

For this third Excitebike remake, Peach joins the races. Lord knows 
how you can ride a motorcycle in an ankle-length skirt.

=====

MARIO KART 64
- Nintendo 64 (1997)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Toad
  * Yoshi
  * Bowser
  * Donkey Kong
  * Wario

Mario and friends cruise onto the Nintendo 64 through racetracks 
inspired by Super Mario 64. This is the first game to feature a group I 
call the "Big Eight" - the core eight characters that seem to populate 
Mario games nowadays.

=====

EXCITEBIKE: BUN BUN MARIO BATTLE 4
- Bandai Satellaview (1997)
- Playable characters: Mario, Peach, Yoshi, Wario

The last Excitebike remake.

=====

SUPER MARIO 64 SHINDOU VERSION (Japan only)
- Nintendo 64 (1997)
- Playable character: Mario
- Big Bad: Bowser
- Damsel: Princess Peach

A Japanese-only remake of Super Mario 64 remade to be compatible 
with the Nintendo 64 Rumble Pak. Shakey shakey.

Remake of 
- Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996

=====

GAME & WATCH GALLERY
[Japanese name: Game Boy Gallery]
- Game Boy (1997)
- Playable characters: Mario (in modern Fire, modern Octopus and 
modern Oil Panic), Luigi (in modern Fire), Yoshi (in modern 
Manhole)

A compilation of mini-games from Nintendo's Game & Watch 
systems, including Manhole, Fire, Octopus, Oil Panic. Each game 
is available in its original version and an updated version populated 
with Mario characters. The classic versions star the omnipresent 
Mr. Game & Watch.

=====

DIDDY KONG RACING
- Nintendo 64 (1997)
- Playable characters: 
  * Diddy Kong
  * Conker (from Conker's Bad Fur Day)
  * Banjo (from Banjo-Kazooie)
  * Tiptup
  * Bumper
  * Pipsy
  * Timber
  * Krunch
  * Drumstick [unlockable]
  * T.T. [unlockable]
- Big bad: Wizpig

A variation on the Mario Kart engine populated with Diddy Kong and 
his woodland critter friends. Instead of just go-karts, characters can 
also race in hovercrafts or tiny one-seater airplanes. This is Diddy's 
first solo effort.

(I'm not including any of the Diddy Kong Racing crew in this guide. 
Banjo and Conker appeared on Nintendo systems for a while, but have 
since crossed over. They're clearly Rareware characters. Since none of 
the others ever appeared again in a Nintendo-only title, I've got to 
assume they belong to Rare as well.)

=====

DONKEY KONG LAND 3
[Japanese name: Donkey Kong GB: Dixie Kong and Dinky Kong]
- Game Boy Color (1997)
- Playable characters: 
  * Dixie Kong
  * Kiddy Kong
  * Ellie
  * Squitter
  * Enguarde
  * Squawks
- Big bad: K. Rool
- Damsels: Donkey Kong, Diddy King

Again, a portable version of its Super NES counterpart, only with 
different stages.

=====

WRECKING CREW '98 (Japan only)
- Bandai Satellaview (1998)
- Playable characters: Mario, Spike, Eggplant Man, Gotchawrench
- Big bad: Spike

This Japanese-only sequel includes two games: a port of the original as 
well as a Panel de Pon-like, Wrecking Crew-themed puzzle game.

Remake of
- Wrecking Crew (NES) - 1986

=====

DR. MARIO
- Bandai Satellaview (1998)

A cosmetic upgrade to the original Dr. Mario engine.

Remake of
- Dr. Mario (NES) - 1990

=====

GAME & WATCH GALLERY 2 
[Game Boy Gallery 2]
- Game Boy (1998)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario (in modern Parachute, modern Helmet, modern and 
   classic Donkey Kong), 
  * Luigi (in modern Parachute) 
  * Peach (in modernChef), 
  * Yoshi (in modern Vermin)
- Big bad: Donkey Kong (in classic and modern Donkey Kong)
- Damsel: Pauline (in classic Donkey Kong mini-game); Peach (in 
modern Donkey Kong mini-game)

A second compilation of Game & Watch classics includes Parachute, 
Chef, Donkey Kong, Helmet, Vermin and Ball, each with modern and 
classic versions. While Mario characters populate the remakes, the 
classic versions usually star the omnipresent Mr. Game & Watch.

Remake of
- Donkey Kong (Arcade) - 1982

=====

WARIO LAND II
[Japanese name: Wario Land II: Nusumare ta Zaihou]
- Game Boy (1998)
- Playable characters: Wario
- Big bad: Syrup

Wario wakes up one morning to the sound of his security alarm 
blaring. Syrup has returned to Wario Castle to retrieve the treasure 
Wario stole in his last adventure. Depending on the player's actions, 
the story unfolds differently in this side-scrolling game. Also, Wario 
cannot die; touching enemies merely changes his status in a number of 
amusing ways.

=====

YOSHI'S STORY
- Nintendo 64 (1998)
- Playable characters:
  * Red Yoshi
  * Yellow Yoshi
  * Green Yoshi
  * Dark Blue Yoshi
  * Light Blue Yoshi
  * Pink Yoshi
  * White Yoshi [unlockable] 
  * Black Yoshi [unlockable] 
- Big bad: Baby Bowser
- Damsel: The Super Happy Tree

Baby Bowser steals the source of the Yoshies' happiness, the Super 
Happy Tree, and transforms Yoshi's Island into a storybook. The 
stages, each of which are rendered to look like a different material, 
loop endlessly and Yoshi must collect a certain amount of fruit in each 
to advance.

=====

SUPER MARIO BROS. DELUXE
- Game Boy Color (1999)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsel: The Mushroom Retainers, Princess Peach

A port of both the original Super Mario Bros. and its Japanese sequel, 
Super Mario Bros: the Lost Levels. The remake included special 
challenge modes - one in which Mario has to find red coins and a 
hidden Yoshi egg in each level and another in which he raced against a 
Boo.

Remake of
- Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985

======

GAME & WATCH GALLERY 3
[Japanese name: Game Boy Gallery 3]
- Game Boy Color (1999)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario (in classic and modern Mario Bros.)
  * Luigi (in classic and modern Mario Bros.)
  * Yoshi (in modern Egg, modern Greenhouse)
  * Toad (in modern Turtle Bridge)
  * Donkey Kong Jr. (in classic and modern Donkey Kong Jr.)
- Big bad: Mario (in classic and modern Donkey Kong Jr.)
- Damsel: Donkey Kong (in classic and modern Donkey Kong Jr.)

Another collection of Game & Watch titles, including classic and 
modern versions of Egg, Greenhouse, Turtle Bridge, Donkey Kong Jr. 
and the Game & Watch version of Mario Bros., which is quite 
different from the arcade version. Four more games are also 
unlockable, though only in classic versions - Flagman, Judge, Lion 
and Fire.

Remake of
- Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade) - 1982

=====

MARIO PARTY
- Nintendo 64 (1999)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Wario
  * Donkey Kong

Mario and each of his friends sure throw some strange parties. Their 
fiestas involve competing in button-mashing mini-games for coins and 
stars and hopping around on such game boards as Mario's Rainbow 
Castle, Donkey Kong's Jungle Adventure, Peach's Birthday Cake, 
Yoshi's Tropical Island, Wario's Bob-Omb Battlefield, Luigi's Engine 
Room, Bowser's Magma Mountain and the stellar Eternal Star. If you 
lack friends, you can also sail to Mini Game Island and tackle these 
little contests solo.

- Introduces the Koopa Kid

======

MARIO GOLF
[Japanese name: Mario Golf 64]
- Nintendo 64 (1999)
- Playable characters: 
  * Plum
  * Charlie
  * Peach
  * Baby Mario
  * Luigi [unlockable]
  * Yoshi [unlockable]
  * Sonny [unlockable]
  * Wario [unlockable]
  * Harry [unlockable]
  * Mario [unlockable]
  * Maple [unlockable]
  * Bowser [unlockable]
  * Metal Mario [unlockable]
  * Azalea (by linking to the Game Boy Color version of Mario Golf)
  * Joe (by linking to the Game Boy Color version of Mario Golf)
  * Kid (by linking to the Game Boy Color version of Mario Golf)
  * Sherry (by linking to the Game Boy Color version of Mario Golf)

Hit the links with Mario, his friends and a bunch of folks who look 
like they don't belong in the Mushroom Kingdom. Courses include 
Toad Highlands, Koopa Park, Shy Guy Desert, Yoshi's Island, Boo 
Valley and Mario's Star. Oddly, Mario is not immediately playable 
when you first start the game - a rarity in a Mario title. 

=====

DONKEY KONG 64
- Nintendo 64 (1999)
- Playable characters: 
  * Donkey Kong
  * Diddy Kong
  * Lanky Kong
  * Chunky Kong
  * Tiny Kong
- Big bad: K. Rool

K. Rool kidnaps the extended Kong family and only Donkey Kong can 
rescue them. As he journeys through this first-and-only 3-D rendering 
of his world, Donkey is joined by Diddy and several new friends, each 
with his or her own special ability.

Includes a remake of
- Donkey Kong (Arcade) - 1983

=====

SUPER SMASH BROS.
[Japanese name: Nintendo All-Star! Royal Battle Smash Bros.]
- Nintendo 64 (1999)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Yoshi
  * Donkey Kong
  * Luigi [unlockable] 
  * Link (from Legend of Zelda)
  * Samus (from Metroid)
  * Fox McCloud (from StarFox)
  * Pikachu (from Pokémon)
  * Kirby (from Kirby's Dreamland)
  * Jigglypuff (from Pokémon)
  * Ness (from Earthbound)
  * Captain Falcon (from F-Zero)
- Big Bad: Master Hand

The imagination of some gloved video game fan sends his officially 
licensed Nintendo products into battle against each other. Mascots 
battle and try to knock each other out of the ring. (And yes, as some 
readers have pointed out, the characters are technically just dolls of 
various video game characters and not the characters themselves. 
Nonetheless, you're still playing as Mario, though, no matter how you 
look at it.) Up to four characters can fight at once. Characters retain 
moves from the franchises that made them famous, so Mario and Luigi 
throw fireballs, Yoshi tosses eggs and Donkey Kong can lift heavy 
objects.

=====

MARIO PARTY 2
- Nintendo 64 (2000)
- Playable characters:
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Donkey Kong
  * Wario

One party isn't enough. Sixty-four new mini-games on new 
amusement park-themed game boards, including Pirate Land, Western 
Land, Space Land, Mystery Land and Horror Land. Adorably, the 
characters dress up in a costume appropriate to whatever board they're 
playing on.

=====

MARIO GOLF
- Game Boy Color (2000)
- Playable characters: 
  * Kid
  * Joe
  * Sherry
  * Azalea

An unusual hybrid of golfing simulation and RPG and players create a 
character and play golf to build their stats.

=====

WARIO LAND 3
[Japanese name: Wario Land 3: The Mysterious Orgel]
- Game Boy Color (2000)
- Playable character: Wario
- Big bad: Rudy

Magical forces summon Wario inside a haunted organ, where he must 
battle an evil clown named Rudy and free the people trapped inside. 
Play mechanics work similarly to Wario Land II - again, Wario can't 
die.

- Introduces Rudy, Scienstein

=====

MARIO TENNIS
[also known as Mario Tennis 64]
- Nintendo 64 (2000)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Daisy
  * Yoshi
  * Birdo
  * Toad
  * Baby Mario
  * Bowser
  * Paratroopa
  * Wario
  * Waluigi
  * Donkey
  * Boo, 
  * Donkey Kong Jr. [unlockable]
  * Shy Guy [unlockable]
  * Alex (by linking to the Game Boy Color version of Mario Tennis)
  * Nina (by linking to the Game Boy Color version of Mario Tennis)
  * Kate (by linking to the Game Boy Color version of Mario Tennis)
  * Harry (by linking to the Game Boy Color version of Mario Tennis)

The group returns to the tennis courts, but the matches are now spiced 
up with typical Mario zaniness: character-themed courts and a special 
battle mode where items affect gameplay.

- Introduces Waluigi

=====

DONKEY KONG COUNTRY
- Game Boy Color (2000) 

While the Game Boy title Donkey Kong Land is a re-envisioning of 
the original Donkey Kong Country, this Game Boy Color title is a 
direct port. All the levels from the original are re-created faithfully.

Remake of
- Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1995 

=====
  
DR. MARIO 64
- Nintendo 64 (2001)
 - Selectable characters: 
  * Dr. Mario
  * Wario  
  * Spearhead (multiplayer mode only)
  * Webber (multiplayer mode only)
  * Silky (multiplayer mode only)
  * Appleby (multiplayer mode only)
  * Jellybob (multiplayer mode only)
  * Octo (multiplayer mode only)
  * Helio (multiplayer mode only)
  * Lump (multiplayer mode only)
  * Hammerbot (multiplayer mode only)
  * Scienstein  (multiplayer mode only)
  * Rudy (multiplayer mode only)
  * Metal Mario [unlockable]
  * Vampire Wario [unlockable]
- The Big Bad: Rudy

A remake of the original Dr. Mario engine with infused with a story 
mode, in which Dr. Mario, Wario and Scienstein vie for the wondrous 
cure-all megavitamins. Somehow, a bunch of characters from the 
Wario Land games get mixed in. The graphics of the game's story 
sequences are done in a Paper Mario-inspired two-dimensional cut-out 
style. And as in Tetris Attack, the selection of available characters 
doesn't really alter gameplay; it only changes what your on-screen 
persona looks like.

Remake of
- Dr. Mario (NES) - 1990

=====

PAPER MARIO
[Japanese name: Paper Mario Story]
- Nintendo 64 (2001)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Goombario
  * Kooper
  * Bombette
  * Parakarry
  * Bow
  * Watt
  * Sushie
  * Lakilester
  * Peach (during special scenes)
  * Goompapa (very briefly)
  * Twink (very briefly)
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsel: Peach

Nintendo renders Mario's world as flat as a page in a storybook as 
Mario travels the world in search of the missing Star Spirits and the 
precious Star Rod. The second Mario RPG adventure pairs Mario with 
an entourage of baddies as buddies in battle.

- Introduces Kammy and Bow

=====

MARIO PARTY 3 
- Nintendo 64 (2001)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Donkey Kong
  * Wario
  * Waluigi (though not in Story Mode)
  * Daisy (though not in Story Mode)
- Big Bad: Millennium Star

These party animals don't quit - and they've picked up two more 
revelers in their never-ending contest to determine who among them is 
the celeb most worthy of winning the Millennium Star. Game boards 
include Chilly Waters, Deep Blooper Sea, Spiny Desert, Creepy 
Cavern, Waluigi's Island and the idiotically named Woody Woods. 
This installment also includes a "duel" mode in which characters go 
head-to-head with another with some generic baddies - Goombas, 
Whomps, Mr. Blizzards, Toads - fighting along their side.

=====

SUPER MARIO ADVANCE
[also known as Super Mario Advance: Super Mario Bros. 2]
- Game Boy Advance (2001)

Yet another remake of Super Mario Bros. 2. This is essentially the 
version from Super Mario All-Stars with a few changes: a few titanic 
turnips and supersized Shy Guys, the introduction of Robirdo and a 
Yoshi egg hunt once you've beaten Wart.

Remake of
- Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1987 
- Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
- Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994

Includes a remake of
- Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983

=====

MARIO KART SUPER CIRCUIT
[Japanese game: Mario Kart Advance]
- Game Boy Advance (2001)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Toad
  * Donkey Kong
  * Bowser
  * Wario

The Big Eight race onto Nintendo's full-color portable. In addition to 
the sixteen tracks created especially for this title, Nintendo also packed 
in all the tracks from the original Super NES Super Mario Kart.

Includes a remake of
- Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992

=====

LUIGI'S MANSION
[Japanese name: Luigi Mansion]
- Gamecube (2001)
- Playable character: Luigi
- Big bad: King Boo
- Damsel: Mario

In his first major solo adventure, Luigi investigates the paranormal 
occurrences around his new mansion. Instead of stomping the ghosts 
who nabbed his brother, however, Luigi must suck them up with his 
vacuum cleaner, the Poltergust 3000.

- Introduces E. Gadd, King Boo

=====

SUPER SMASH BROS. MELEE
- Gamecube (2001)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Yoshi
  * Donkey Kong
  * Peach
  * Bowser
  * Luigi [unlockable] 
  * Dr. Mario [unlockable]
  * Link (from Legend of Zelda)
  * Samus (from Metroid)
  * Fox McCloud (from StarFox)
  * Pikachu (from Pokémon) 
  * Kirby (from Kirby's Dreamland)
  * Ness (from Earthbound)
  * Captain Falcon (from F-Zero)
  * Zelda/Sheik (from Legend of Zelda)
  * Ice Climbers (form Ice Climbers)
  * Jigglypuff (from Pokémon)
  * Marth (from Fire Emblem)
  * Mr. Game & Watch (from Game & Watch series)
  * Mewtwo (from Pokémon) 
  * Roy (from Fire Emblem)
  * Falco (from StarFox)
  * Gannondorf (from Legend of Zelda)
  * Young Link (from Legend of Zelda)
  * Pichu (from Pokémon)  
- Big bad: Master Hand

Who would have thought a civil war within Nintendo's video game 
empire could be so much fun? Brothers-in-bash and sisters-in-smash 
unite for a massive brawl. (And again, the characters aren't technically 
their video game selves but the trophies of some mad video game 
collector magically brought to life. Whatever. Mario is Mario is 
Mario.) Basically an upgrade to the original, though an excellent one 
at that: thirteen new characters, more challenges and a Nintendo 
memorabilia collection mode.

=====

WARIO LAND ADVANCE
[also known as Wario Land 4]
- Game Boy Advance (2001)
- Playable character: Wario
- Big bad: The Golden Diva
- Damsel: Princess Shokora

News of a recently discovered pyramid sends Wario on a new side-
scrolling treasure hunt through these mysterious ruins. Though 
touching enemies still affects Wario's status, he now has a life meter 
as well.

===== 

SUPER MARIO ADVANCE 2: SUPER MARIO WORLD
- Game Boy Advance (2002)

A remake of the title that launched the Super NES. Graphically 
identical, but with a few nice gameplay modifications. For example, 
players can alternate between Mario and Luigi, who now have 
different jumping abilities.

Remake of
- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994 

Includes a remake of
- Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983

=====

SUPER MARIO SUNSHINE
- Gamecube (2002)
- Playable characters:
  * Mario 
  * Purple Yoshi
  * Pink Yoshi
  * Orange Yoshi

Mario and Peach's vacation on Isle Delfino turns into a search for the 
Shine Sprites that Bowser and his graffiti-painting son have hidden. 
Essentially, this game is a refined version of Super Mario 64, the 
major differences being the inclusion of Yoshi and Mario's use of 
FLUDD, a high-pressure water nozzle.

- Introduces Bowser Jr., Shadow Mario, FLUDD, Petey Piranha, 
Gooper Blooper and Toadsworth

=====

YOSHI'S ISLAND: MARIO ADVANCE 3
- Game Boy Advance (2003)
- Playable characters: 
  * Green Yoshi
  * Red Yoshi
  * Yellow Yoshi
  * Blue Yoshi
  * Pink Yoshi
  * Light Blue Yoshi
  * Purple Yoshi
  * Brown Yoshi 
  * Baby Mario (only when powered by Starman)
  * Poochey (only in the sense that Yoshi can control him by facing a 
    certain direction)
- Big bad: Baby Bowser 
- Damsel: Baby Luigi, the Stork

As far as I know, this version has no significant differences from the 
Super NES version.

Remake of
- Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995

Includes a remake of
- Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983

=====

MARIO PARTY 4
- Gamecube (2002)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Wario
  * Donkey Kong
  * Waluigi
  * Daisy

As Mario and his friends frolic about in a meadow near Peach's castle, 
a giant hovering cube descends from the heavens - and invites them 
to party! It's the Party Cube! New mini-games once again await 
players on boards like Toad's Midway Madness, Shy Guy's Jungle 
Jam, Boo's Haunted Bash, Goomba's Greedy Gala, Koopa's Seaside 
Soiree and Bowser's Gnarly Party. 

=====

GAME & WATCH GALLERY 4
[Japanese name: Game Boy Gallery 4]
- Game Boy Advance (2002)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario (modern Fire, modern Rainshower, classic and modern 
   Mario's Cement Factory, classic and modern Donkey Kong, modern 
   Octopus, modern Donkey Kong 3, classic and modern Mario Bros.)
  * Luigi (modern Fire, modern Boxing, classic and modern Mario 
   Bros.)
  * Peach (modern Chef)
  * Donkey Kong (modern Donkey Kong 3)
  * Donkey Kong Jr. (classic and modern Donkey Kong Jr.)
  * Wario (modern Fire Attack)
  * Waluigi (modern Boxing)
  * Wiggler (modern Boxing)
  * Boo (modern Boxing)
  * Stanley the Bugman (classic Donkey Kong 3)

Game & Watch Gallery gets the full-color treatment. Curiously, many 
of the games selected for this installment were available on previous 
ones. The games include Fire, Boxing, Rainshower, Mario's Cement 
Factory, Donkey Kong Jr., Donkey Kong 3, Chef, Mario Bros., 
Donkey Kong, Octopus and Fire Attack.

=====

MARIO PARTY-E
- Game Boy Advance E-Reader (2002)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Wario
  * Donkey Kong
  * Waluigi
  * Daisy

Scan different cards and play different mini-games featuring different 
Marioverse regulars.

=====

MARIO GOLF: TOADSTOOL TOUR
[Japanese name: Mario Golf: Family Tour]
- Gamecube (2003)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Donkey Kong
  * Bowser
  * Wario
  * Waluigi
  * Daisy
  * Birdo
  * Koopa Troopa
  * Diddy Kong
  * Boo (unockable)
  * Petey Piranha [unlockable]
  * Bowser Jr. [unlockable]
  * Shadow Mario [unlockable]

Mario's crew plays a third round of golf, this time on a collection of 
courses that paradoxically seem both more realistic than ever and more 
representative of the Mario zaniness we all love. 

=====

WARIO WORLD
- Gamecube (2003)
- Playable character: Wario
- Big bad: Black Jewel

One of the jewels Wario uses to decorate his castle starts spewing inky 
black evil and engulfs the whole place - the castle, the treasures and 
Wario himself. The big guy must fight his way out.

=====

MARIO PARTY 5
- Gamecube (2003)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Wario
  * Waluigi
  * Daisy
  * Toad
  * Boo
  * Koopa Kid

Donkey Kong may be gone but the party still rages on - this time in 
the Land of Dreams, though not the one from Super Mario Bros. 2. 
Game boards include Toy Dream, Sweet Dream, Future Dream, 
Undersea Dream, Pirate Dream, Rainbow Dream and Bowser 
Nightmare.

=====

NINTENDO PUZZLE COLLECTION (Japan only)
- Gamecube (2003)
 
As the title implies, a collection of puzzle games from previous 
Nintendo systems, including Dr. Mario 64, a graphically improved 
Yoshi's Cookie and the original incarnation of Tetris Attack, the 
fairy-populated Panel du Pon. 

Remake of
- Yoshi's Cookie (Super NES) - 2003
- Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001

=====

MARIO KART: DOUBLE DASH!!
- Gamecube (2003)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Daisy
  * Yoshi
  * Birdo
  * Wario
  * Waluigi
  * Donkey Kong
  * Diddy Kong
  * Baby Mario
  * Baby Luigi
  * Koopa Troopa
  * Paratroopa
  * Bowser
  * Bowser Jr.
  * Toad [unlockable]
  * Toadette [unlockable]
  * Petey Piranha [unlockable]
  * King Boo [unlockable]

Mario meets Wacky Races. In this installment of the racing franchise, 
racers forgo the go-karts altogether in favor of suped up racers that 
seat two: one to steer and one to toss the items at opponents. Different 
rules, same great racing action. So far, this game features the most 
playable Mario characters - twenty.

- Introduces Toadette

=====

WARIOWARE, INC.: MEGA MICROGAME$!
- Game Boy Advance (2003)
- Selectable characters: 
  * Wario
  * Shaggy
  * Jimmy
  * Mona
  * 9-Volt
  * Spitz 
  * Dribble
  * Dr. Crygor
  * Orbulon
  * Kat
  * Ana

Wario latest money-making scheme involves creating a video game 
full of "microgames" his friends think up. Essentially, you're playing 
that game. The characters besides Wario and Shaggy are technically 
only playable in the unlockable two-player microgames.

Remakes and ports
- WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Party Game$ (Gamecube) - 2003

Includes a remake of
- Dr. Mario (NES) - 1990 
- Fly Swatter from Mario Paint (Super NES) - 1992

=====

SUPER MARIO ADVANCE 4: SUPER MARIO BROS. 3
- Game Boy Advance (2003)

Basically the version of Super Mario Bros. 3 included in Super Mario 
All-Stars plus Clear Mode, in which players can attempt to explore the 
game's worlds more thoroughly.

Remake of
- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990

Includes a remake of
- Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983

=====

DONKEY KONG COUNTRY
- Game Boy Advance (2003)
- Playable characters: 
  * Donkey Kong
  * Diddy Kong
  * Rambi
  * Enguarde
  * Expresso
  * Winky
- Big bad: K. Rool

A slight modification to the original Donkey Kong Country, its map 
screens restyled and the screen made to fit the Game Boy Advance. 

Remake of
- Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994

=====

MARIO AND LUIGI: SUPERSTAR SAGA
- Game Boy Advance (2003)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi
- Big bad: Cackletta

When the evil witch Cackletta steals Peach's voice, Mario and Luigi 
head over to neighboring Beanbean Kingdom to stop her. The first 
portable Mario RPG features a revolutionary control system in which 
one button controls Mario and the other Luigi, allowing for some 
tricky maneuvers and fancy fingerwork on the part of the player.

Includes a remake of
- Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1983

=====

WARIOWARE, INC.: MEGA PARTY GAME$
- Gamecube (2003)
- Selectable characters: 
  * Wario
  * Shaggy
  * Jimmy
  * Mona
  * 9-Volt
  * Spitz 
  * Dribble
  * Dr. Crygor
  * Orbulon
  * Kat
  * Ana

A slight modification to the Wario Ware: Mega Microgame$ engine 
that allows four Gamecube players to play at once. The microgames 
themselves are basically unchanged. Players can now actually pick and 
control the various folk who populated the first Wario game, whereas 
in the first game they could only be controlled in special unlockable 
microgames. Modes of play include Wobbly Bobbly, in which 
winning microgames adds to the stack of turtles players must sit on 
during intermissions; Milky Way Delirium, a board game-based 
competition; and Listen to the Doctor, in which players must play 
microgames and also complete real-life tasks commanded to them by 
an on-screen doc.

Remake of
- WarioWare, Inc. (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

Includes a remake of
- Dr. Mario (NES) - 1990 
- Fly Swatter from Mario Paint (Super NES) - 1992

=====

MARIO VS. DONKEY KONG
- Game Boy Advance (2004)
- Playable character: Mario
- Big bad: Donkey Kong

Donkey Kong makes off a ton of the latest product from the Mario 
Toy Company: a wind-up Mario doll. Mario chases him through 
different stages, stomping and hopping all the way to the big ape.

=====

DONKEY KONGA
- Gamecube (2004)
- Selectable characters: Donkey Kong, Diddy Kong

Nintendo loans out the characters from the Donkey Kong franchise to 
Namco, who loads them into their first "rhythm action" game. Here, 
players must keep the beat by tapping a special set of bongo-shaped 
controllers. More fun than it sounds, believe me. And yes, this game 
features the return of dreaded Donkey Kong rap.

=====

MARIO PINBALL LAND
- Game Boy Advance (2004)
- Selectable characters: None, technically. (Though Mario is the ball, 
the player can only control the flippers that knock him around.)
- Big Bad: Bowser
- Damsel: Peach

A machine transforms people into pinballs. Peach hops in, becomes 
Ball Peach and naturally gets kidnapped. Ball Mario pinballs his way 
to her rescue. I'm not saying this game is derivative of Sonic Spinball, 
but let's just say the developers have obviously heard of the title.

=====

DONKEY KONG 2: HIT SONG PARADE
- Gamecube (2004)
- Selectable characters: Donkey Kong, Diddy Kong

According to Nintendo Database, this game is "essentially an 
expansion pack" for the original Donkey Konga and features a lot of J-
Pop songs. It was never released in the United States.

(I should also note that while logic dictates that I'm placing it after the 
first Donkey Konga in the Masterlist, this game technically came out 
in Japan a few months before the first Donkey Konga came out in 
America. However, I'm using American release dates whenever 
possible, so I figured this would be the best way to do it.)

=====

SUPER MARIO BROS.
- Game Boy Advance (2004)

A port of the 1985 title that helped launch the original Nintendo 
Entertainment System.

Remake of
- Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

=====

SUPER MARIO BROS. 2
- Game Boy Advance (2004)

Not the American Super Mario Bros. 2, but rather a port of the 
Japanese Super Mario Bros. 2, often known in the U.S. as "Super 
Mario Bros: The Lost Levels." (The American Super Mario Bros. 2, 
conversely, was remade for the Game Boy Advance as "Super Mario 
Advance.") I'm fairly certain that this marks the first-ever time the 
Japanese Super Mario Bros. 2 was released in the states as such. 

Remake of 
- Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986

=====

DR. MARIO
- Game Boy Advance (2004)

A direct port of the original pill-popping puzzler.

Remake of
- Dr. Mario (NES) - 1990

=====

MARIO PARTY 6
- Gamecube (2004)
- Playable characters:
  * Mario
  * Luigi
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Wario
  * Waluigi
  * Daisy
  * Toad
  * Boo
  * Koopa Kid
  * Toadette [unlockable]

This installment of the mindlessly popular mini-game series take place 
amidst a popularity context between Brighton and Twila - 
represtation of the sun and the moon, respectively. Game boards 
include Castaway Bay, E. Gadd's Garage, Faire Square, Snowflake 
Lake, Towering Treetop and Clockwork Castle. The most significant 
gameplay tweak here is the addition of a microphone that players must 
use to play certain mini-games.

=====

PAPER MARO: THE THOUSAND-YEAR DOOR
- Gamecube (2004)
- Playable characters: 
  * Mario
  * Gombella
  * Koops
  * Flurri
  * Baby Yoshi
  * Vivian
  * Bobbery
  * Ms. Mowz (optional)
  * Bowser (during special scenes)
  * Peach (during special scenes)
  * Professor Frankly (very briefly)
  * Punio (very briefly)
  * Flavio (very briefly)
- Big Bad: The Shadow Queen
- Damsel: Peach

The fourth Mario RPG adventure is a true sequel - the events of this 
quest happen in the world of the first Paper Mario, just in a different 
part of it. The paper cut-out aesthetic of the first game returns here, as 
Mario uses his new paperly powers - rolling into a cylinder, folding 
into an airplane, etc. - to explore Rogueport and its neighboring areas 
in search of the Crystal Stars.

=====

SUPER MARIO 64 DS
- Nintendo DS (2004)
- Playable characters: Yoshi, Mario [unlockable], Luigi [unlockable], 
Wario [unlockable]
- Big bad: Bowser
- Damsel: Peach

This launch title for the Nintendo DS system treads the line between 
being a remake of Super Mario 64 and a sequel to it. Super Mario 64 
DS actually stars Yoshi, who must free Mario, Luigi and Wario before 
they can be playable as well. Stages from the orginal game are created 
pretty faithfully. Lots of unlockable mini-games showcase the 
capabilities of the Nintendo DS.

Remake of
- Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996

=====

MARIO GOLF: ADVANCE TOUR
- Game Boy Advance (2004)
- Playable characters:
  * Mario
  * Peach
  * Yoshi
  * Donkey Kong
  * Neil
  * Ella
  * Luigi [unlockable]
  * Wario [unlockable]
  * Waluigi [unlockable]
  * Bowser [unlockable]
  * Putts [unlockable]
  * Joe [unlockable]
  * Grace [unlockable]
  * Sherry [unlockable]
  * Azalea [unlockable]
  * Tiny [unlockable]
  * Kid [unlockable]

This round of golf features more RPG elements than previous 
installments, including a story mode and basic characters whose stats 
you must build up.

=====

MARIO PARTY ADVANCE
- Game Boy Advance (2005)
- Playable characters: Mario, Luigi, Peach Yoshi

Mario and friends travel throughout Shroom City and its neighboring 
areas, helping out townspeople and competing in mini-games in the 
process. The game seems deisgned more for single players than 
console-based Mario Party titles. Also the first Mario Party title not to 
feature Wario or Donkey Kong in any way.

=====

WARIOWARE: TWISTED!
- Game Boy Advance (2005)
- Selectable characters: 
  * Wario
  * Mona
  * Jimmy T.
  * Kat and Ana
  * Mama and Papa T.
  * Dribble and Spitz 
  * Dr. Crygor
  * Orbulon
  * 9-Volt
  * Wario-Man
  * Shaggy/Fronk [unlockable]

A special sensor in the game cartridge - specifically a piezoelectric 
gyroscope - allows the player to control the microgame action merely 
by tilting amd moving the Game Boy Advance.

=====

WARIOWARE: TOUCHED!
- Nintendo DS (2005)
- Selectable characters: 
  * Wario
  * Mona
  * Jimmy T.
  * Jamie T.
  * Kat and Ana
  * Ashley and Red
  * Dr. Crygor
  * James T. 
  * Mike 
  * 9-Volt and 18-Volt
  * Wario-Man

This go-around includes 250 more microgames controlled by the DS 
touch screen and stylus.

==F R E Q U E N T L Y==A S K E D==Q U E S T I O N S ====================

[faq]

This is posted at GameFAQs, after all.

=====

Q: Hey, I noticed you're kind of slow. Do you want me to write 
some profiles for you?

A: Nah. Not to sound like a jerk, but this is kind of my pet project. 
I'll get around to it eventually. If, and only if, I develop a terminal 
illness, I may contact you and ask that you take the reigns. But 
let's not worry about that yet, okay?

=====

Q: Duh. You got the Koopalings names wrong. You're stupid.

A: That's not really a question, but you bring up a good point. 
Even though this guide is more concerned with the lives of 
Marioverse characters in the actual games, the DIC-produced 
Saturday morning cartoons based on Super Mario Bros. 3 and 
Super Mario World changed the named of the Koopa Kids. 

Roy = Bully
Morton = Big Mouth
Ludwig = Kooky
Wendy = Kootie Pie
Lemmy = Hip
Iggy = Hop
Larry = Cheatsy

Virtually identical characters, but I believe the makers of the 
cartoon changed the names to avoid having to purchase the rights 
to all seven Koopalings. And while I'm on the subject, please don't 
write me and ask me to add a profile for characters like Friendly 
Floyd, Stanley the Talking Fish, Wooster or Dennis Hopper. Not 
gonna happen.

=====

Q: Aren't the Yoshies from Yoshi's Story considered Baby 
Yoshies? 

A: I don't see why they would, since they look basically like fully 
grown Yoshies with slightly large eyes. The Baby Yoshies are the 
ones that are short and squat and actually look like babies.

=====

Q: Aren't Toad, Yoshi and Birdo all hermaphrodites? 

A: Depends on how you look at it. In the strict sense, a 
hermaphrodite is an organism that has both male and female sex 
organs. I never would have guessed Toad had any of those dangly 
parts until Toadette showed up, so now I'd guess that Toad's all 
man - it's just that mushroom folk subscribe to a different 
definition of manliness than most people. 

Yoshi does lay eggs, but his eggs never seem to hatch any Baby 
Yoshies, so I'd guess that only the female Yoshies can do that. 
(Not that we've met any female Yoshies yet.) Robert W reminds 
me, however, that in the Game & Watch Gallery updates of the 
"Chef" mini-game, Yoshi does indeed lay eggs that hatch into 
viable Baby Yoshies. This offshoot is the only occurrence of this 
ever happening. Since the Game & Watch Gallery games rank a bit 
below the foundation Mario games as far as the rules of the 
Marioverse, I'd assume that this is a case of out-of-the-house 
developers taking liberties with Yoshi for the purposes of the mini-
game. In Yoshi's big appearances - Super Mario World, Yoshi's 
Island, Super Mario Sunshine - he ain't no mommy.

As for Birdo, she's officially a female now. In Japan she always 
was. So either take that as meaning that she her back story of being 
a boy who wished he was a girl has been officially abolished by 
Nintendo or that she's a transsexual - one of the first ever in a 
video game. But she's not a hermaphrodite.

So to answer the question: no, no and no. Technically, the 
character that comes closest to really blurring gender lines is 
Vivian from Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. In the 
Japanese version, Vivian is male despite having the mannerisms 
exterior appearance of a female. Or maybe Hemie, the lisping 
decorator crab from Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga.

=====

Q: Do the bosses from Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden coins have 
names?

A: Apparently not. On his way to fighting Wario, Mario meets six 
bosses:

- a bird guarding her egg at the end of Tree Zone
- a rat at the end of Micro Zone
- a witch at the end of Pumpkin Zone
- a trio of piglets at the end of Mario Zone
- an octopus at the end of Turtle Zone
- and a guy who looks a hell of a lot like Tatanga at the end of 
Space Zone

Aside from the Space Zone boss - who isn't officially Tatanga 
but totally has to be - these guys don't have names. The closest 
any of them get are the three pigs. SiR6 reminded me that loyal 
Nintendo Power subscribers might remember a "Mario & Wario" 
comic in which these swine introduced themselves as the Three 
Little Pigheads. (And, if memory serves, Mario stuck his fingers in 
the one pig's snout and used him like a bowling ball.) It's not 
canon, but it's all we have.

=====

Q: What about Mario Adventure?

A: Ah, a technicality. Mario Adventure is a hack of the Super 
Mario Bros 3 engine. And although it's probably one of the best 
hacks ever, it's not a legit Mario game. Nonetheless, I encourage 
any and all diehard Mario fans to check it out:

http://dahrkdaiz.panicus.org/Mario_Adventure/index.html

Completely new levels, enemies and cool power-ups like the 
Magic Wand, which turns Mario into Magic Mario, and Kuribo's 
Shoe, which now shows up thoughout the game instead of only in 
one level.

=====

Q: And what about the Great Giana Sisters?

A: Okay, I'll admit nobody asked this, but I decided to put in a few 
quick notes about the Giana Sisters anyway. The Great Giana 
Sisters was a video game released in the late 80s on a number of 
platforms, including Commodore 64 and as an arcade unit. The 
story revolved around two sisters, Giana and Maria, who are 
whisked away from their beds in Milan to a dream world that's 
suspiciously similar to the Mushroom Kingdom - so similar, in 
fact, that I'm told developer Rainbow Arts yanked the title to avoid 
a lawsuit from Nintendo. Mario fans might want to check out a few 
screenshots of the Great Giana Sisters just to check out how hard 
Rainbow Arts bit Nintendo's style. I have two recommended sites, 
though a simple Google search will turn up more.

http://www.markuz.dds.nl/giana/index.html
http://users.skynet.be/NightGem/c64_gianasisters.htm

=====

Q: What about NBA Street V3?

A: This is a tricky one. The Gamecube version of this Electronic 
Arts title features Mario, Luigi and Peach as unlockable characters, 
as well as a Mushroom Kingdom-themed court.This is especially 
weird because the rest of the roster consists of realistic players. 
The overall effect is something like Link's appearance in Soul 
Caliber II - only quirkier. I didn't create an entry for NBA Street 
V3 in the Masterlist because it's clearly not a Mario game, so I 
guess I'll just mention it here. This game marks the first time 
Mario or anyone else from the Mario games appeared as a playable 
character in a game developed completely outside of Nintendo. I 
just wonder if this marks a step towards a Mario basketball title?

=====

[new]

Q: So I'm confused. Are you one of those awful people who dares 
to claim that Mario and Luigi aren't from Brooklyn?

A: Yes and no, really. Easily one of the most frustrating mysteries 
in the Marioverse is the one of the brothers' origin. Initially, 
American gamers never questioned the fact that Mario and Luigi 
had been magically spirited to the Mushroom Kingdom from their 
home in Brooklyn, New York. It said so in the manual for the 
original Super Mario Bros. and the plot point remained in the non-
official Mario cartoons, comics, books and, of course, the movie. 
But when Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island came out in 1995, 
the plot apparently contradicted the backstory Americans knew and 
loved. In the ending sequence to the game, the Stork delivered 
Baby Mario and Baby Luigi to their parents in the Mushroom 
Kingdom - not Brooklyn. 

One could interpret this in a number of ways. Nintendo could have 
chosen to retroactively change the series continuity - a 
phenomenon known in comic book circles as a "retcon." 
Alternatively, the company could have chosen to just abandon 
continuity altogether for the sake of inventing new games. But the 
explanation that the original Brooklyn backstory was altogether 
false - invented by Nintendo of America of the cuff, much in the 
manner that Birdo's ambiguous gender was invented by whoever 
wrote the manual for Super Mario Bros. 2. (This matter, notably, 
has also been discarded.) The whole Brooklyn story could have 
easily been thought up by American minds without anticipation of 
where the series would go or how popular Mario would become.

This still, however, introduces problems. If Mario grew up in the 
Mushroom Kingdom, then how would one account for his accent 
and his distinctly Italian appearance? By delving into the 
Marioverse itself, one could look at the various characters from the 
Paper Mario series who speak in French, Russian and German 
accents despite clearly being residents of the Mushroom Kingdom 
and environs. 

It is quite possible that Mario's general Italian-ness grew out of his 
name - itself a nod to an Italian-American, former Nintendo of 
America landlord Mario Segali - and Japanese perceptions of 
what an Italian person was like - hence the stereotypical 
elements. 

Those who defend the Brooklyn backstory, however, should 
consider one more element of the story that gamers often leave out: 
Donkey Kong. In the traditional interpretation of the Mario saga, 
the original Donkey Kong games occur in Brooklyn, where Mario 
lives with Pauline. However, Donkey Kong, in one form or 
another, persisted as a character in the Mario games long after 
Mario left the Mushroom Kingdom. So unless whatever magical 
transport device that brought Mario and Luigi to the Mushroom 
Kingdom also picked up Donkey Kong and deposited him on Kong 
Island, it seems that the beloved Brooklyn story isn't so plausible 
after all. What's even more confusing, however, is something a 
reader named Kacy Shelley informed me about: the last area of the 
Game Boy game Donkey Kong Land is called Big Ape City. 
According to the game, this is the area where Mario supposedly 
first fought with Donkey Kong. And it isn't anywhere near 
Brooklyn.

So there you have it. A contradiction on top of a contradiction on 
top of a contradiction. Unsolvable but interesting nonetheless. Of 
course, I have to wonder if this is even an issue in Japan, where 
Mario's supposed Brooklyn origins may not ever have been 
introduced at all.

==M I S C E L L A N E O U S==L I S T S==================================

[misc]

MARIO, THE MAN OF MANY POWER-UPS 

Here's a list of Mario's various power-ed up forms over the years. 
Starred entries indicate that they're also power-ups for Luigi as well. 
Tragically, Luigi has only one power-up of his own: the Vanish Cap in 
Super Mario 64 DS.
  
- Balloon Mario (Super Mario World)*
  A fairly rare power-up that only appears in a handful of stages, the 
  Power Balloon puffs Mario up and allows him to float vertically until 
  he runs out of hot air. In Super Mario 64 DS, Mario gets all balloony 
  when he touches the Power Flower.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
  - Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
  - Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

- Caped Mario (Super Mario World)*
  The Cape Feather turns allows Mario to fly with a yellow cape. The 
  powers the cape grants are basically enhanced versions of the ones he 
  gained as Raccoon Mario in Super Mario Bros. 3. The cape, for 
  example, allows Mario more control over his aerial movement.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
  - Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002

- Fire Mario*
  [also known as Fiery Mario]
  The Fire Flower. No matter how it looks, it gives Mario the power to 
  shoot fireballs. In Super Smash Bros. and Paper Mario, Mario 
  actually shoots the fire from the flower itself, whereas in previous 
  games he seemed to shoot the fire from the palms of his hands.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
  - Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986
  - Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
  - Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
  - Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
  - Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992
  - Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
  - Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
  - Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
  - Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

- Frog Mario (Super Mario Bros. 3)*
  The Frog Suit allows Mario to swim with ease in Super Mario Bros. 
  3's underwater levels. On land, however, it's pretty useless.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
  - Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

- Hammer Bros. Mario (Super Mario Bros. 3)*
  Though he won't look much like any Hammer Bros. I've seen, Mario   
  in this form can toss hammers and hide under a protective shell. His 
  overalls also get a cool black-and-white color scheme.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
  - Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

- Invincible Mario*
  Touching the bouncing star makes Mario invincible - only falling 
  in a hole can kill him while he's flashing star-style. This power-up 
  appears in more Mario games than perhaps any other.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
  - Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986
  - Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
  - Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
  - Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
  - Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1988
  - Super Mario Land (Game Boy) - 1989
  - Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
  - Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992
  - Super Mario Kart (Super NES) - 1992
  - Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
  - Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
  - Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
  - Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
  - Super Smash Bros. (Nintendo 64) - 1999
  - Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
  - Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
  - Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
  - Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
  - Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
  - Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
  - Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
  - Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004

- Invisible Mario 
  A different special cap allows Mario to become invisible - or at 
  least all pixilated enough to allow him to pass through wire screens. 
  This power-up appears in Super Mario 64 DS, but only Luigi can use 
  it.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996

- Kuribo's Shoe Mario (Super Mario Bros. 3)*
  My personal favorite of Mario's power-ups, Kurbo's Shoe is also the 
  game's rarest. Appearing only in level 5-3, Kuribo's Shoe is a big 
  green boot with a wind-up key that Mario can hop inside once he rids 
  it of its Goomba master. Incidentally, "Kuribo" is the Japanese name 
  for the Goomba.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
  - Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

- Metal Mario (Super Mario 64)
  Grab that molten metal hat! Encased in liquid metal, Mario becomes 
  heavy and strong. This is the first of Mario's powered-up forms to 
  become its own character. See the Metal Mario profile for more 
  information. 
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996

- Rabbit Mario 
  A variant on the Raccoon Mario form. When Mario collects a Super 
  Carrot, he grows a pair of rabbit ears. Though he can't fly, Rabbit 
  Mario can flit his ears to slowly descend to the ground.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992

- Raccoon Mario (Super Mario Bros. 3)*
  The Super Lead grants Mario the unusual ability to grow a raccoon  
  tail and ears. The tail can propel Mario into the sky like a furry little 
  propeller or swat enemies. The ears, conversely, are just for show.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
  - Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

- Super Mario*
  Since the days of the original Super Mario Bros., Mario can snag a 
  Super Mushroom to become a taller, version of his normal, short-
  statured self. Super Mushrooms, were called "Magic Mushrooms" 
  back in the day.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985
  - Versus Super Mario Bros. (Arcade) - 1986
  - Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels (Famicom) - 1986
  - Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt (NES) - 1988
  - Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
  - Super Mario Land (Game Boy) - 1989
  - Super Mario Bros. + Duck Hunt + World Class Track Meet (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
  - Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992
  - Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (Game Boy Color) - 1999
  - Super Mario Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
  - Super Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
  - Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
  - Super Mario Bros. (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
  - Super Mario Bros. 2 (Game Boy Advance) - 2004
  - Super Mario 64 DS (Nintedno DS) - 2004

- Superball Flower
  Though the Game Boy's limited palette makes the Super Flower look 
  identical to the Fire Flower, you'll know there's a difference. When 
  Mario tags this blossom, he throws Superballs, which will bounce 
  around the room, killing enemies and collecting coins.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Land (Game Boy) - 1989

- Tanooki Mario (Super Mario Bros. 3)*
  A power-up among power-ups, if you will. Rather than just ears and a  
  tail, the Tanooki Suit is a full raccoon body cover. It basically grants 
  Mario the same powers as the Super Leaf, only with the additional 
  benefit of allowing Mario to transform into a statue. In this form, 
  Mario can escape the notice of enemies or stomp the otherwise un-
  stompable. In Japanese folklore, the tanuki is a raccoon-like spirit 
  that can also transform into a statue.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
  - Super Mario All-Stars (Super NES) - 1993
  - Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1994
  - Bandai Satellaview Super Mario Bros. 3 (Bandai Satellaview) - 1995
  - Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

- Wing Cap Mario
  Mario's hat sprouts wings and he flies with even more aerial freedom 
  yet.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996

=====

MEAN PEOPLE HAVE POWER-UPS, TOO 

Here's a list of Wario's various powered-up incarnations and what 
caused them. 

- Ball Wario
  The result of Wario being manhandled by Ball Bunny. Swish!
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000

- Bubble Wario
  Wario gets himself encases in a bubble, which he can ride through 
  otherwise impassable water currents.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
  - Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

- Bull Wario 
  Touching a Garlic glove makes Wario even stronger. He can also 
  poke enemies with his horns.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy) - 1994
  - Virtual Boy Wario Land (Virtual Boy) - 1995

- Dragon Wario 
  Wario's hat grows a dragon snout that spits fire. In Virtual Boy 
  Wario Land, this powered-up form was called Sea Dragon Wario.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy) - 1994
  - Virtual Boy Wario Land (Virtual Boy) - 1995

- Eagle Wario 
  The Eagle Statue gives Wario the ability to fly with wings that grow 
  from his hat. Very similar winged hats later showed up in Super 
  Mario 64.
  Appears in:
  - Virtual Boy Wario Land (Virtual Boy) - 1995

- Fat Wario 
  Seems like this should be called "Fatter Wario." Whether it's special 
  cakes or a monkey's apples, they make Wario gain a few pounds in a 
  hurry. With his extra girth, he can break through certain floors.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
  - Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

- Flat Wario
  If something heavy crushes Wario, he'll emerge as Flat Wario. In this    
  Form, Wario can into areas he'd normally be too tall to fit.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998

- Frozen Wario
  Touch a snowflake and slide around like a happy liitle ice cube.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
  - Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

- Hot Wario 
  [also known as Fire Wario, Flaming Wario]
  When touched by flames, Wario starts running around wildly. Given 
  enough time, the flames eventually envelop Wario and sending him 
  charging forward at full speed.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
  - Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

- Invisible Wario
  Dr. Scienstein's curious concoctions will render Wario invisible. All 
  Scienstein has to do is to peg Wario with one of the beakers.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000

- Intoxicated Wario
  An amusing form that Wario acquired by being hit by a ball thrown 
  by a generic penguin baddie. In this state, Wario lurches about, 
  drunk-like. He can also spit energy balls at enemies, for some reason. 
  In the Japanese version, the penguins actually threw beer, which 
  would make this state seem more logical. 
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000

- Jet Wario 
  Snagging the Jet Pot power-up gives Wario's hat the power to fly 
  about jet-style for short amounts of time.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy) - 1994

- King Dragon Wario
  The ultimate Wario power-up. By either touching the Dragon Crystal 
  as Eagle Wario or by touching an Eagle Statue as Sea Dragon Wario,   
  Wario can perform all the special moves in the game.
  Appears in:
  - Virtual Boy Wario Land (Virtual Boy) - 1995

- Metal Wario
  Wario gets Mario's old power-up from Super Mario 64 by touching 
  the Power Flower.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

- Puffy Wario
  An allergic reaction to bee stings makes Wario's head puff up,  
  causing him to rise like a balloon. The condition is remarkably 
  similar to the Balloon Mario state from Super Mario World.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
  - Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

- Snowman Wario
  Snow makes Wario look like a snowman. That is boring, I know. But 
  slide down a slanted surface and Wario rolls into a giant snowball 
  that will become increasingly bigger as it rolls.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
  - Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

- Spring Wario
  [also known as Bouncy Wario]
  For some reason, the force of a hammer colliding with Wario turns 
  him into a human spring. Thanks a lot, Hammerbot.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
  - Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

- Super Wario
  Just like Mario's done for years, tagging a Super Mushroom makes 
  Wario grow to giant size, where he can crush enemies just by 
  walking over them.
  - Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

- Vampire Wario
  Following the logic established by Zombie Wario, the vampire bat 
  baddies can transform Wario into Vampire Wario. The best part: in 
  this form, Wario can transform into a bar and fly. Like Metal Mario, 
  Vampire Wario became his own selectable character in Dr. Mario 64.
  Appears in:
  -  Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
  - Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
  - Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

- Yarn Wario
  Yep. When Wario touches the thread of the silkworm's webbing, he 
  becomes a kitty cat's plaything. He can roll around. It's fun.
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000

- Zombie Wario
  You know the rule: get bitten by the undead, become the undead. As 
  Zombie Wario, Wario will walk slowly trudge about and instantly   
  kill any enemies that may touch him. Only pure water or light can 
  cure this condition. 
  Appears in:
  - Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
  - Wario Land 3 (Game Boy Color) - 2000
  - Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

=====

GO! GO! YOSHI RACER! 

Beginning with Super Mario World 2:Yoshi's Island, Yoshi gained 
the unusual ability to transform into vehicles. 

- Fire Yoshi
  Yoshi breaths fire, a condition he gets by eating a red Koopa shell 
  in Super Mario World or a Power Flower in Super Mario 64 DS.
  - Super Mario World (Super NES) - 1991
  - Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

- Super Yoshi
  The Super Mushroom allows Yoshi to go Godzilla on them.
  - Super Mario 64 DS (Nintendo DS) - 2004

- Yoshi Copter
  A helicopter with a big Yoshi nose. He flies around quickly, but 
  turns very slowly.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
  - Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
  - Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003

- Yoshi Mole Machine
  A digging vehicle that can retrieve items from soft dirt.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
  - Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

- Yoshi Submarine 
  Yoshi's transformation for underwater situations has a handy  
  torpedo weapon. Blast away!
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
  - Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

- Yoshi Racecar
  A speedy little puddle jumper that can avoid obstacles by 
  extending a pair of stilts between its chassis and its wheels. My 
  personal favorite of Yoshi's transformations.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
  - Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

- Yoshi Train
  An especially rare transformation that allows Yoshi to get items 
  located on train tracks in the the background of certain levels.
  Appears in:
  - Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
  - Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

(The "Lost Bytes" special at the Mushroom Kingdom website 
indicates that the Yoshi's Island programmers initially had three 
other transformations planned: a propeller plane, a tree and a 
mushroom. In Super Mario 64 DS, Yoshi could also put on the hats 
of Mario, Luigi or Wario to temporarily borrow their powers.)

=====


TOP BILLED

This list indicates who has starred as the central, controllable, 
"starring" character in a Mario game. The titles are listed in the 
order they premiered. I'm only counting the first game a given 
character starred in.

- Mario in Donkey Kong (1981)
- Donkey Kong Jr. in Donkey Kong Jr. (1982)
- Stanley the Bugman in Donkey Kong 3 (1986)
- Luigi in Mario Is Missing! (1993)
- Wanda in Mario & Wario (1993)
- Toad in Wario's Wood (1994)
- Wario in Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (1994)
- Donkey Kong in Donkey Kong Country (1994)
- Diddy Kong in Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest 
(1995)
- Yoshi in Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (1995)*
- Dixie Kong in Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double 
Trouble (1996) 
- Peach in Super Princess Peach (2006)

* One could argue that Yoshi was the central, starring character of 
the 1992 puzzle game "Yoshi," but I'd say he wasn't really 
controllable here. Toad's entry, also a puzzle game, counts because 
the player can actually control his movement as they would in a 
platform game.

=====

WHAT'S IN A NAME?

Female Marioverse characters whose names are sweet, decorative, 
or otherwise diminutive objects.

- Peach
- Daisy
- Captain Syrup
- Lady Bow
- Queen Bean
- Lady Lima
- Plum
- Maple
- Candy Kong
- Melody
- Miss Petunia
- Azalea
- Watt
- Kat and Ana ("katana," which can be a decorative item)
- Lily
- Rose
- Posie
- Flurrie

(Not to mention Wanda, Sushie, Valentina and Birdo, whose 
names are one end-letter away from being such an object. There 
are a few male characters that fit this mold as well, such as Toad, 
Mallow, Fret, Torte, Bubbles and Pine.)

=====

FINAL BOSSES

The big bads - and how many games in which each has played 
the final villain. (I excluded remakes and multi-platform releases 
for this tabulation.)

Bowser
- Super Mario Bros. (NES) - 1985 
- Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels (NES) - 1986
- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES) - 1990
- Super Mario World (Super NES)
- Hotel Mario (CD-I) - 1992
- Yoshi's Safari (Super NES) - 1993
- Mario is Missing! (Super NES) - 1993
- Mario's Time Machine (Super NES) - 1994
- Tetris Attack (Super NES) - 1996
- Super Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1996
- Paper Mario (Nintendo 64) - 2001
- Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube) - 2002
TOTAL: 12 (By far the most, but not nearly as many one might 
expect.) 

K. Rool
- Donkey Kong Country (Super NES) - 1994
- Donkey Kong Land (Game Boy) - 1995 
- Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Super NES) - 
1995
- Donkey Kong Land 2 (Game Boy) - 1996 
- Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble (Super 
NES) - 1996
- Donkey Kong Land 3 (Game Boy) - 1997
- Donkey Kong 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1999
TOTAL: 7 (Not bad for a guy who just barely makes the cut as a 
Mario character.)
                                                                 
Wario
- Super Mario Land 2: Six Golden Coins (Game Boy) - 1992
- Mario & Wario (Super Famicom) - 1993
- Wario's Woods (Super NES) - 1994
TOTAL: 3 (Apparently starring in your own games leaves little 
time to play the villain.)

Donkey Kong
- Donkey Kong (Arcade) - 1981
- Donkey Kong '94 (Game Boy) - 1994
- Mario vs. Donkey Kong (Game Boy Advance) - 2003
TOTAL: 3 (He's the first, but he's not all that into villainy 
anymore.)

Wart
- Doki Doki Panic (Famicom) - 1987
- Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) - 1988
TOTAL: 2

Syrup
- Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land (Game Boy) - 1994
- Wario Land II (Game Boy) - 1998
TOTAL: 2 (She's the first female end boss in any Mario game and 
the only female end boss in more than one game.)

Baby Bowser
- Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (Super NES) - 1995
- Yoshi's Story (Nintendo 64) - 1998
TOTAL: 2

Rudy
- Wario Land 3: The Mysterious Orgel (Game Boy) - 2000
- Dr. Mario 64 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
TOTAL: 2

And coming in with one game each...

Mario
- Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade) - 1982

Tatanga
- Super Mario Land (Game Boy) - 1989

Smithy
- Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 
1996

Millennium Star 
- Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001

King Boo
- Luigi's Mansion (Gamecube) - 2001

Golden Diva
- Wario Land Advance (Game Boy Advance) - 2001

The Black Jewel
- Wario World (Gamecube) - 2003

Cackletta
- Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga (Game Boy Advance) - 2003

The Shadow Queen
- Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (Gamecube) - 2004

=====

THE ADVENTURES OF THE BIG EIGHT

Mario, Luigi, Peach, Toad, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, Wario and 
Bowser - these eight are the core of the Marioverse. With 
apologies to Waluigi and Daisy fans, every game in the Mario 
series revolves around at least one of these characters. And they 
have a habit of showing up the most often - even when Toad is 
stuck giving directions. I thought I'd see which games in which all 
eight of them appear.

- Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (Super NES) - 
1996*
- Mario Kart 64 (Nintendo 64) - 1997
- Mario Party (Nintendo 64) - 1999
- Mario Golf (Nintendo 64) - 1999
- Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64) - 2000
- Mario Tennis (Nintendo 64) - 2000
- Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64) - 2001
- Mario Kart: Super Circuit (Game Boy Advance) - 2001
- Super Smash Bros. Melee (Gamecube) - 2001
- Mario Party 4 (Nintendo 64) - 2002
- Game & Watch Galley 4 (Game Boy Advance) - 2002
- Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (Gamecube) - 2003
- Mario Party 5 (Gamecube) - 2003
- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (Gamecube) - 2003
- Mario Power Tennis (Gamecube) - 2004

* Yes, all eight show up. Mario, Bowser, Peach, Toad and Yoshi are 
obvious. Luigi cameos in the ending sequence, Wario in a portrait in 
Booster Tower and Donkey Kong as the generic baddies "Chained 
Kong" and "Guerilla."

=====

LET'S JOURNEY TOGETHER, MARIO!

The various traveling buddies Mario has collected in his RPG 
adventures and the various powers they brought to Mario's party. 

Bobbery (Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door)
- blowing up objects, enemies

Bombette (Paper Mario)
- blowing up objects, enemies 

Bow (Paper Mario)
- making Mario invisible to enemies
- frightening enemies

Bowser (Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars
- earth magic
- attacking with other enemies (The Big Boo, Mecha Koopa, Chain 
Chomp)

Flurrie (Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door)
- wind-based attacks
- blowing away panels disguising hidden doors, items

Geno (Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars)
- star magic (shooting stars, star-powered lasers, star cannons, etc.)
- the ability to boost allies' offense

Goombario (Paper Mario)
- explanation of just about anything
- headbonking

Goombella (Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door)
- explaining just about anything
- headbonking

Kooper (Paper Mario)
- firing his shell at enemies, objects

Koops (Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door)
- firing his shell at enemies, objects 

Lakilester (Paper Mario)
- throwing Spiny eggs
- allowing Mario to ride on his cloud over otherwise dangerous 
surfaces

Mallow (Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars)
- HP restoration
- the ability to check enemy stats
- weather manipulation (lightning, snow, falling stars)

Ms. Mowz (Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door)
- stealing items from enemies
- flustering enemies
- sniffing out hidden items

Parakarry (Paper Mario)
- aerial attacks
- air-lifting Mario over chasms

Peach (Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars) 
- HP/status restoration
- psychic attack power ("Psych Bomb")

Sushie (Paper Mario)
- water-based attacks
- allowing Mario to ride on her back on and under water

Unnamed Baby Yoshi (Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door)
- eating enemies
- tossing eggs
- allowing Mario to ride on his back
- flutter-jumping over chasms

Vivian (Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door)
- fire magic
- temporarily pulling Mario into the shadows, making him 
invulnerable to enemies

Watt (Paper Mario)
- electricity-based attacks
- illuminating darkened rooms

(This list excludes Luigi because Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga 
featured the L man as a co-hero, not a sidekick. In Paper Mario: The 
Thousand-Year Door, Luigi gets five traveling buddies of his own - 
Blooey, Jerry, Torque, Hayzee and Screamy - but we never get to see 
them do anything cool. Furthermore, Goompapa, Professor Frankly, 
Punio and Flavio each also join Mario for a brief time, though none of 
them bother to help out with the fighting.)

=====

VISITORS FROM ANOTHER SERIES 

They're not Marioverse characters, but that doesn't stop them from 
being playable in Marioverse games.

- Bomberman (in Wario Blast: Featuring Bomberman!)
- Banjo from "Banjo-Kazooie" (in Diddy Kong Racing)
- Conker from "Conker's Bad Fur Day" (in Diddy Kong Racing)
- Bubbles from "Clu Clu Land" (in DK: King of Swing)

==W H O==D I D==T H I S ?===============================================

[author]

I'm a college student who started writing this guide in a fit of 
antisocial boredom on New Year's Day of 2004. It mushroomed, 
appropriately, and went on from there. I took the following 
summer off for a much-needed break from work and school, and 
the guide began to grow again. Now, it is what it is.

I've been playing Nintendo every since my brother got an NES for 
Christmas when I was six. That was 1988. Now I'm technically 
grown up, I have a job and a real life, but I will always have an 
affinity for Mario and the crazy universe that spins around him. I'd 
die if my friends found out I poured this much free time into 
Mario, but I hope someone somewhere reads this guide and 
remembers how great these games were. As lame as it might 
sound, I really like working on this guide. I bitch about having a 
job where I sit in front of a computer all day, but reminiscing about 
these games has never felt like a chore.

If you need to get in contact with me for any reason, please feel 
free to email me at spacepope4u@gmail.com. 

==W O R K S==C I T E D=(and recommended reading)==========================

[cited]

The Mushroom Kingdom
http://www.classicgaming.com/tmk/tmk.shtml

Quite simply the best Mario sight on the internet, in my opinion. 
The Mariopedia they have here was my inspiration for compiling 
this guide, and I've gleaned some incidental information about 
some characters from it. I also picked up a few things from their 
Mario in Japan specials, which detail some of the differences 
between American Mario games and their overseas counterparts. A 
lot of the Japanese names came form here. Everything else here is 
pretty cool too. If you've never seen it, you're missing out.

=====

The Hitchhiker's Guide to Video Games
http://mario.gamehiker.com/

The Mariopedia might have been my primary inspiration, but this 
guide shares a lot more in spirit with the one at Hitchhiker's Guide 
to Video Games. They have a character guide, but a lot more, 
including a guide to the various lands that have served as settings 
to Mario games. Good stuff, all around.

=====

Nintendo Database
http://www.planetnintendo.com/nindb/index2.shtml

Another top-notch site. This has extensive information for all 
Nintendo games, Mario-related and otherwise. I copied a pasted 
the text of the trophy descriptions from Super Smash Bros. Melee 
from this site's trophy guide directly into this guide. The site has 
also recently began documenting cameos between Nintendo 
games, which people like me go nuts for.

=====

L'histoire de Mario Bros. (The History of the Mario Bros.)
http://membres.lycos.fr/cubecorp/photoalbum.html

A cool little site Google found for me. My French is limited, but 
it's pretty cool, all the same, and with an interesting choice of 
games. It's good to know that Mario isn't just limited to the 
English and Japanese-speaking parts of the world.

=====

Nintendo Land - Mario Mania
http://www.nintendoland.com/home2.htm?Mario/birth/
                                     
A good sight for comprehensive information on all things Mario, 
even if it doesn't seem to be updated very often. I got some info 
about the origin of Mario from here. They've got a nifty enemy 
encyclopedia as well.

=====
                 
The Video Game Museium
http://www.vgmuseum.com/
                  
A great resource for game endings and screenshots. A good 
number of endings to Mario games show up here, so if you've 
never played a Wario Land game but have always wanted to know 
what Captain Syrup looks like...
                           
=====
          
Miyamoto Shrine
http://www.miyamotoshrine.com
              
A nifty sight with a lot of information about Mario's daddy, 
Shigeru Miyamoto. Lots of non-Mario related Nintendo 
information too.
                                       
=====

Poprocks & Coke
http://www.poprocksandcoke.com/24.php

A generally good sight for a lot of reasons, but I had a look 
specifically at their page detailing the transformation of Doki Doki 
Panic into Super Mario Bros. 2. They also have a link here to a 
ROM of the original Doki Doki Panic, in case you're curious.

=====

SMB Infostation - thread "Theoretical Origin of the Koopalings' 
Names"
http://smbis.nescentral.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=32

A message board thread with some insights as to the names of the 
Koopa family. The site's main page - which can be accessed at 
this address: http://smbis.nescentral.com/main.htm - also rocks. 
Check out this site's commentary section; it's a great resource for 
Mario fans, especially for its page on the Mario anime, which is at 
http://smbis.nescentral.com/commentary/marioanime.htm.

=====

Answers.com and the Wikipedia
http://www.answers.com
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

Two similar sites that boast info on everything - including Mario 
characters. Run a basic search on your favorites and eat up those 
tidbits. These sites also boast pictures that, alas, this FAQ cannot. 
One warning about the Wikipedia, however; though it's edited by 
some of the most dedicated Mario fans out there, it's also "helped" 
by a lot of braindead six-year-olds who seem bent on filling the 
Mario profiles with typos, rumors, fancruft and general 
misinformation. Take yer chances.

=====

And there's a hell of a lot more worthwhile sites out there I'm 
probably forgetting. If you have a good site that you think I'd be 
interested in, please email me a spacepope4u(at)excite(dot)com.

==S P E C I A L==T H A N K S============================================

[thanks]

In addition to the keepers of the websites credited above, I would also 
like to thank...

 * GameFAQs.com, for hosting this guide.
 * Ragnarock01, for being the first guy to email me about this guide
 * Koopa Prince, for posting a thread about the origin of the 
   Koopalings' names at Super Mario Infostation
 * LajosJancsi, for the Koopa/gugbab connection
 * Luigi of the Pipes, for the insight about the changing state of Boo 
   leadership
 * ShdwRlm3, author of a Wario Land 3 FAQ that explained to me 
   what an "orgel" was
 * Rob, for the Mini Milde
 * Rey Esteban
 * Chris Marsh/Jelly Soup, for the E.Gadd/Mako thing 
 * NessMasterSSBM for the tip about Spangle and a correction about 
   Henry and Orville
 * Virus218105
 * The Sunset Kid for several corrections and additions
 * Devin Morgan, whose Yosih's Safari FAQ clarifies that storyline  
 * Samuel Fuhrman for help with Punchinello's affiliations
 * Royalfire for the Koopa-Kappa connection
 * Krail for a Yaridovich pointer
 * Jdude84 for info on the Brothers Bear
 * Joe Etienne for a possible Grate Guy explanation
 * Richard Gallivan for the same explanation
 * Xensyria for Spike info and various other pointers
 * Davey for the Yaridovich/yari connection
 * SiR6 for a Spiny correction and some more stuff
 * ON EI for Axem Red's death groan
 * Rylle for descriptions of Harry, Sonny and Charlie
 * Spookychee for a bunch of Japanese names from Paper Mario 2
 * Leah Bernard for Ukiki info, the Hyrule Castle portraits and more 
 * EAB1990 for info on some Paper Mario characters
 * Mega Rose for suggesting Krunch get a profile
 * Yogizmo330 for bits on Mouser, Parakarry and others
 * E-107 Sigma for info K. Rool, Paragoom and Lump
 * Kacy Shelley for info on Imajin's true origin
 * Hanchen Lu for various pointers
 * Devin8or
 * Robert W for Yoshi's viable offspring in Game & Watch Gallery 3
 * TheKoopaBros., who posted info regarding the etymology of
   various characters' Japanese names at the official Nintendo.com 
   forums.
* Klaus Kloss, for info regarding Mario characters in Austria
* Olliesuncle 1, for the Noki Elder
* ZapDash, for the Chomp Bros.
* KWS369, for the Grubba-Spike connection
* Heroic Jay, for various pointers
* Aaron LaRose, for the note about Reznor being a heating unit 
   manufacturer
* Jay Mitchell, acclaimed Wariologist, for Bobo
* Enigmapoeia, for lyrics to the WarioWare songs

A big 1-Up Mushroom to for the following, each of whom has 
contributed numerous helpful additions, suggestions and corrections:  
 * R. Boegler
 * TSPhoenix
 * Tinus
 * Kirby021591

I would also like to think Shigeru Miyamoto and Nintendo as well as 
Square, Namco Camelot, HAL, Intelligent Systems, Alpha Dream and 
the many other developers which have helped to make Mario what he 
is. 

==G A M E==O V E R======================================================

And that's all he wrote, at least for now. Of course, I'm always 
looking forward to expanding this. If you have any ideas, please 
tell me about them. I hope you enjoyed this guide.

Number of times the word "Mario" is used in this document: 4,483

=====

"Mario... was I... of... assistance?"
(c) 2005, the Space Pope
spacepope4u(at)excite(dot)com