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    Strategy Guide by RJones

    Version: 1.9955 | Updated: 02/26/03 | Printable Version | Search This Guide

    ******************************
    *TREATISE ON POKEMON STRATEGY*
    ******************************
    
    Copyright 2002-present R. Jones <jolt0135@aol.com>
    Current version: 1.9955
    Started: 2002/01/13
    Last update: 2003/02/25
    
    Disclaimer: "Pokemon" and all related names and images are copyright 1995-2001 
    Nintendo, Inc. and GAMEFREAK.  I am not affiliated with either of these 
    corporations, their parent companies, and/or subsidiaries.  The statements and 
    opinions given in this guide have not been reviewed or approved by Nintendo, 
    Inc. or GAMEFREAK.  Don't do drugs.  Thank you for reading this disclaimer. 
    
    If you have this document in text format, it's recommended that you change it 
    to Word (.doc) format right away (with Courier New 10pt font, and L/R margins 
    of 1").  The references to page numbers are much easier to follow that way.
    
    **********
    *CONTENTS*
    **********
    
    1. Introduction.............................................................1
      100. Version History......................................................2
      101. Things to Know.......................................................3
      102. Contacting Me........................................................4
    
    2. RBY Mechanics and Strategies.............................................5
      200. Help for Starters....................................................5
      201. Factoids, Mechanics, and Calculations................................5
      202. Pokemon Analysis....................................................34
      203. Building a Team.....................................................48
      204. Reference Chart.....................................................53
      205. Variant Play........................................................79
    
    3. GSC Mechanics and Strategies............................................83
      300. Help for Starters...................................................83
      301. Factoids, Mechanics, and Calculations...............................84
      302. Pokemon Analysis...................................................111
      303. Building a Team....................................................132
      304. Reference Chart....................................................149
      305. Variant Play.......................................................200
    
    4. Conclusion.............................................................205
      400. The Error Policy...................................................206
      401. Glossary...........................................................206
      402. References.........................................................207
      403. Credits............................................................207
    
    *****************
    *1. Introduction*
    *****************
    
    Seven years ago, a company named GAMEFREAK had a vision.  An RPG where your 
    party was six members long, but chosen from a field of 137...and by trading 
    with other players, this number rose to 150 and eventually 151.  And each 
    member would have an incredible number of powers, but these were similarly 
    limited to four per member.  So many party choices, and so much thought 
    involved in optimizing these choices, that eventually a player could transcend 
    the RPG gameplay of Pokemon and turn it into the #1 designed turn-based 
    strategy game in a long time, possibly since Chess.
    
    However, by releasing their game for a Nintendo system, the company had to 
    surrender a Contract of Ownership.  GAMEFREAK would get lots of money for the 
    concept, but Nintendo would be in charge of sales and marketing.
    
    Obviously, sales weren't a problem.  The base Pokemon series would sell over 
    10,000,000 units, prompting a second, even more vast series.  This one would 
    sell as well, and a third series lies just one month away.
    
    However, for a game with so much potential, the company in charge sure wasn't 
    seeing it.  Their chosen path of marketing was to make Pokemon action figures, 
    a self-contradicting TV show, even-more-contradictory movies, a degenerate 
    card game, and addition to the Pokemon logo to any product which could 
    possibly carry a price tag.
    
    It was clear: This company doesn't need to follow the vision of GAMEFREAK.  As 
    long as they can sell products and make money, things are good, and what 
    better audience than the highly impulsive 8-year-olds?
    
    By opting for this path, the players who do wish to play Pokemon for its game 
    design are left on their own.
    
    Eventually, groups of interested players banded together, with the hopes of 
    recruiting players and helping them understand the game.
    
    But now, to help reverse the path of inconvenience that those players were 
    forced to take, I have constructed this treatise for all to use.
    
    Everything that can help you understand the game, in a single document of 208 
    pages--as small as Nintendo's official Stadium 1 guide, and much more 
    comprehensive too.
    
    Welcome to the document that, depending on your current position, will either 
    help you learn the Pokemon games; solidify your knowledge of their numerous 
    oddities; magnify any interest you may have in complex math; or get you to 
    stop doing drugs.  And to reinforce the position this document holds, it's 
    completely open to reader input!  If you find an error, or wish to submit an 
    editorial, go right ahead!
    
    Part 2 covers RBY, 3 covers GSC, and 4 covers any would-be lawsuits.
    
    **********************
    *100. Version History*
    **********************
    
    Note: Updates that do nothing but change move lists, copyright information, or 
    add editorial comments will not be accounted for here. 
    
    V1.99 - 2002/12/25 - I've had many tries at making an all-encompassing guide 
    to the world of Pokemon.  Each time, it's ended in failure--be it computer 
    crash, an apparent lack of interest by the online community as a whole, or the 
    work being packed in a box while I move 1,000 miles away.  But now, it has 
    finally materialized.  If you're reading this, you're reading the longest-
    delayed Pokemon guide ever published.  Added sections 100, 101, 102, 200, 201, 
    202, 203, 204, 205, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 400, 401, 402, and 403.  By 
    the way, have a merry Christmas if you're reading this right away.
    
    V1.9901 - 2002/12/29 - Since this guide has not appeared on any website as of 
    yet (despite all necessary measures on my behalf), I'm changing the copyright 
    information to reflect such a situation.  Also expanded section 303.
    
    V1.9902 - 2003/01/02 - Made the copyright restraint much more lenient.  Added 
    the first inductee to the Editing Hall of Fame.  I just remembered the need 
    for a Move Effect Encyclopedia, but after a year of writing, rewriting, and 
    awaiting publication, I think I deserve a break, at least for now.  And yes, I 
    AM intentionally putting off a version number of 2 until the RS_ update.
    
    V1.994 - 2003/02/02 - Okay, so a month is long enough for a break.  This 
    update changes a lot of 202/302 descriptions, adds the aforementioned Move 
    Encyclopedia to 204 and 304, and changes the legal information yet again.  And 
    there are also two editorial sections added, one each in 201 and 301.  
    Basically, every section gets a little something extra.  Almost to Version 
    2...
    
    V1.995 - 2003/02/16 - Finally, over 200 pages!  Section 201 gets a forgotten 
    argument added to the "newbie misconceptions" area, which also gets a name 
    change.  204 and 304 get some errors fixed, and a new data entry is added to 
    each.  303's second section is expanded by 28%.  The Introduction is 
    completely gutted and renovated.
    
    V1.9955 - 2003/02/25 - Mainly an error-proofing update, where I corrected 
    erroneous information on my own (denying a few people eventual trips to the 
    Hall of Fame).  There's a new mode added to 305.  Still waiting for March 17, 
    though the Ruby and Sapphire update probably won't be ready until early May.
    
    *********************
    *101. Things to Know*
    *********************
    
    1. Don't break the law.
    This guide is written by Rusty Jones (aka Jolt135 and/or SadisticMystic).  For 
    a text of this magnitude, that's been in development (and deconstruction) for 
    almost a year, it's rather obvious why there's a copyright law protecting it.  
    It's bad enough that I make no money from typing up these 200 pages; the last 
    thing I need is to go chasing after everyone who tries to separate my name 
    from the intellectual credit.  You may look at the guide from any non-banned 
    website, and you may download it to your computer for personal use, but 
    plagiarism is a federal (and international) crime.  You may NOT upload this 
    FAQ onto a Banned Website (the list of banned sites is currently null), 
    maintain it on a site after that site has been banned, upload a version of the 
    document that differs from any that I've sent you or that has been available 
    online at some time or another, force payment for viewing of this document 
    (though donations are gladly accepted), or print sections of this guide 
    verbatim while changing the supposed source of the information.  Just be good, 
    and you won't risk an appearance on a COPS marathon.  And just to get the 
    point across, don't do drugs.
    
    2. This is a guide for players who want to advance.
    If you want a walkthrough, go look somewhere else.  There are enough 
    walkthroughs out there that finding and using one is no problem.  I devote 
    less than 700 words of this 96,000-word document to the RPG aspect of the 
    game, because quite simply I think that Pokemon is better classified as a 
    strategy game.  For example, on my Gold cart, the timer reads 693 hours.  That 
    doesn't count experimental restarts, alternate save files, computerized 
    simulations, or gameplay on Stadium, so in reality I've racked about 4,500 
    hours with that game.  Exactly 23.3 of them were spent getting through the RPG 
    element of the game, and I never saw much good in that.  Which leaves 4,476.7 
    for strategy testing, and anything that you spend that long on must require 
    motivation.  Case in point.  And since the players who have been at the top 
    for a long time should know most of this material (though I've noticed those 
    players are reading it anyway since it's a new piece of literature that's hard 
    to come by in this game), that leaves one market segment left: The players who 
    are trying to play well, and externally depict themselves as good players, but 
    know that somehow, they need to improve.  If you fall into that category, 
    prepare to do a lot of reading.
    
    3. Using the Gameshark isn't all bad.
    This is one of the toughest points to get across to the newbies on their path 
    to Transcendence Point (my term for the crossover to the advanced community).  
    Sure, using a Shark to play an RPG would cheapen the role you're supposedly 
    playing.  But, as the above point addresses, it's my position that Pokemon is 
    NOT an RPG, except for the 10-20 hours you spend getting to the end for the 
    first time.  Think of those hours as a so-called "driving school", and once 
    you're done, you gain full access to the game.  But playing a pure strategy 
    game, at an RPG pace, could easily expend several thousand hours .  Enter 
    Gameshark.  Yes, some codes (such as 999 stats and quad-Sketch movesets) 
    undermine even a strategy game.  But with the proper codes, all you do is 
    speed up the process of team building, and set up the all-around level playing 
    field by setting all stats to (legal) maximums.  People will eventually reach 
    the position at which all Pokemon are optimized; what does it matter whether 
    it takes five hours or 5,000?  And as for Mew, there's a choice:  Access it by 
    modifying your own RAM (2 bytes) or access it by having Nintendo modify your 
    RAM with the same kind of device (36 bytes).  And Nintendo still has the 
    audacity to call their own Mews "official", but claim that it's "wrong", 
    "illegal", and "risky" to shark a Mew of your own.  Sounds contradictory?  
    Well, it is.  Which brings me to...
    
    4. Nintendo is, for the most part, unreliable and antithetical to players.
    The RBY carts have been out for almost four years (in the U. S.).   Yet 
    Nintendo is still highly reluctant to give out the "inside information" about 
    the game.  If you were to listen to everything Nintendo gave about the game in 
    the past four years, and nothing else, you'd know about as much as top 
    researchers did after just six months.  They don't explain any of the logical 
    reasoning that I often retort to when giving explanations, and they have 
    repeatedly failed to give complete versions of stat calculation and damage 
    formulas.  And yet they're supposed to be the "official" authorities for these 
    games.  I find them unworthy to hold such a duty.  Several researchers, myself 
    included, have urged them to release this information to the general public, 
    to no avail.  Meaning they have something to hide, which (in all likelihood) 
    has to do with a financial loss that would be incurred.  Doesn't this sound 
    like corporate bias?  I thought so.  Allowing Nintendo to hold their position 
    as the authorities in charge of all things Pokemon would lead to an 
    incompletely explored game.  With your help, this system just might be 
    refined.
    
    ********************
    *102. Contacting Me*
    ********************
    
    If you have a point of clarification, a disagreement with the information I 
    present, comments/suggestions, editorials, or even an error (typographical or 
    otherwise) in the guide, send an e-mail message to me at <jolt0135@aol.com>.  
    Messages deemed "foolish" or "time-wasting", or that include an attachment 
    with no text, will be deleted without a response.  All other e-mails should be 
    answered within 72 hours.
    
    *********************************
    *2. RBY Mechanics and Strategies*
    *********************************
    
    RBY were the games that started it all.  While the general stance is that 
    these games are outdated now, RBY still has a small and devoted following.
    
    ************************
    *200. Help for Starters*
    ************************
    
    If you just got the game, and are expecting to receive a full walkthrough, let 
    me say now: YOU AREN'T.  This is a strategy guide, and is primarily meant for 
    players who have already passed the ten hours of RPG gameplay provided by 
    Pokemon.
    
    However, I know there are still some of you out there, so allow me to satiate 
    your appetites with...
    
    "The 250-Word Walkthrough!"
    
    Get starter (Bulbasaur's best; Yellow must use rat).  Level up immediately; go 
    north.  Get a box; retrace footsteps; trade for Pokedex.  Talk to "Glitch 
    Guy"; navigate buggy place; receive first badge.  Now head east for Cave 1.  
    At bottom of mountain, fight for irrelevant fossil.  Emerge, then east, heal, 
    and north.  Beat 7; get P5000 gold piece.  Yellow finds two starters; R/B get 
    Abra.  Kill Misty; find Bill; get overhyped ticket.  South thru the tunnel, 
    continue to seaside.  Board ship.  Explore if desired, but end with first HM.  
    Catch Dugtrio (skipping Flash); break into Gym; look for switches.  Use said 
    Dugtrio for badge.  Find Bike Voucher.  Back to Cerulean, score bike, go east 
    to second cave.  It's dark; trial-and-error works.  Exit cave; west thru 
    tunnel.  Get Eevee; evolve (your choice).  Buy drink; bribe guard; abandon 
    subsatisfactory tunnel.  Man guarding poster?  Battle!  Defeat Casino 
    Underground, Pokemon Tower, Silph Company in order (level up Lapras big time).  
    Get two more badges.  West to Cycling Road (get Fly first).  Fun!  Beat Safari 
    Zone (2 HMs, Dratini, Chansey), then Koga.  Surf to Cinnabar (flying to Pallet 
    cuts out Seafoam; faster but no Articuno).  Fun with quizzes and badge 7 (and 
    Missingno.)  Finally, Fly to Viridian.  Get final badge.  Go to Power Plant 
    for Zapdos, level it up (65's good), then back to Viridian.  West to Route 23, 
    then north.  Solve Victory Road.  Five battles away from 
    victory...four...three...two...one...zero.  Claim Mewtwo as your prize.  Now 
    build a serious team.
    
    Done with zero words to spare.  Now you can start playing the game like the 
    pros do, and the rest of this guide will help you with that.
    
    ********************************************
    *201. Factoids, Mechanics, and Calculations*
    ********************************************
    
    In this section, I explore the facets of the game that you may already know, 
    that Nintendo won't tell you, and that haven't even been explained completely 
    until now.  It's almost enough to classify this subject as Ph. D-worthy (yeah, 
    right, like anyone would get paid to play and study this game).  Of course, 
    since it's RBY, there's significantly less information than the corresponding 
    section in GSC, and you might even be able to learn it all.  Now, come join me 
    as I show the power of researching and/or hacking the game.
    
    ----------------
    |The Type Chart|
    ----------------
    
    Okay, so this isn't exactly a secret.  But it's necessary for a complete 
    guide, and there might be those one or two matchups you've forgotten.  On with 
    the chart:
    
            D e f e n d e r   T y p e  
    
          N F F B G R G P F W I E G P D
          O T L U R C H O I T C L R S R
          R G Y G D K O I R R E C S Y G
    
      NOR 1 1 1 1 1 1/2 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
    A FTG 2 1 1/2 1/2 1 2 0 1/2 1 1 2 1 1 1/2 1
    t FLY 1 2 1 2 1 1/2 1 1 1 1 1 1/2 2 1 1
    t BUG 1 1/2 1/2 1 1 1 1/2 2 1/2 1 1 1 2 2 1
    a GRD 1 1 0 1/2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1/2 1 1
    c RCK 1 1/2 2 2 1/2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1
    k GHO 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1
    e POI 1 1 1 2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1
    r FIR 1 1 1 2 1 1/2 1 1 1/2 1/2 2 1 2 1 1/2
      WTR 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1/2 1 1 1/2 1 1/2
    T ICE 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1/2 1/2 1 2 1 2
    y ELC 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 1/2 1/2 1 1/2
    p GRS 1 1 1/2 1/2 2 2 1 1/2 1/2 2 1 1 1/2 1 1/2
    e PSY 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1/2 1
      DRG 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2
    
    Ah, the power of the "1/2" symbol.  And if you can't understand this, then 
    you're helpless to get the rest of section 201.
    
    ---------------------------
    |The Wonders of Missingno.|
    ---------------------------
    
    This is it--one of the first major achievements I presented on my path to 
    "exalted" status.  A thorough explanation of all things related to the 
    Cinnabar Coast Trick, normally abbreviated "Missingno." (pronounced: "missing 
    number") after the most famous by-product of that trick.  It'll be in 
    question-and-answer format.  On with the show...
    
    Q: What is Missingno.?  
     
    A: For 1-byte variables on Game Boy games, there are 8 bits.  This means the 
    number of possibilities for the variable is 256, labeled 0 to 255 (HEX 00 to 
    FF).  Most of RBY's variables are 1 byte long, including ones for all the 
    Pokemon lookup slots.  However, only 151 Pokemon exist in RBY. So, if there 
    are 256 possibilities, and only 151 slots were defined by the programmers, 
    what do the other 105 slots have? Glitches.  And most of them just so happened 
    to be named Missingno. 
     
    Q: How do I find it?  
     
    A: You don't know how to find it? Go play some more RBY. But, if you're one of 
    the outcasts who doesn't know how to find it, here goes. Talk to the Old Man 
    at the northern edge of Viridian, and let him catch a Weedle.  Then, Fly to 
    Cinnabar (you can also go to Fuchsia and Surf to Seafoam Islands, but that 
    takes a lot longer) and Surf up and down the right edge.  After a while, 
    you'll run into some unnatural Pokemon at high levels, and Missingno. (or a 
    Pokemon with a glitched name containing 'M in the middle). NOTE: THIS DOES NOT 
    WORK IN YELLOW.  
     
    Q: Why does the above trick work?  
     
    A: There are two things that, when combined, made it possible for this trick 
    to exist. Here they are:  
    1. When creating the map for what Pokemon appear where, they made a crucial 
    flaw. The 1-square-wide strip of water on the right side of Cinnabar and 
    Seafoam Islands was programmed to be a place where wild Pokemon CAN appear. 
    But (thank the programmers for this one) they forgot to define what Pokemon 
    can appear there. This wouldn't be that big of a deal, except that means the 
    previous settings for "what Pokemon can appear" will remain, and if you read 
    #2, you'll see why that causes the glitch.  
    2. When the Old Man catches the Weedle, they change the variables that are 
    assigned to "Your Name" to Old Man, so it shows up as "Old Man threw the Poke 
    Ball." Now, in order to do that, it overwrites the variables you gave to "Your 
    Name". Therefore, the game must store the variables that make up your name to 
    another place, so it can recall them later. So the programmers likely thought,  
    "What are some variables that we can overwrite to assign to the character's 
    name for this process?" 
    "I got it! How about the slots that define what Pokemon you can run into?" 
    "That's it! Whenever the character enters a new area, they'll be rewritten, so 
    it won't disturb the game at all!" 
    *points to #1* Umm.....no. As a result, that wonderful glitch can be yours for 
    only <insert whatever price your local retailer charges for R/B>! 
     
    Another explanation is much more logical.  Pokemon Red and Blue were 
    GAMEFREAK's first major projects in quite a while, so the programmers needed 
    to retest their unorthodox programming capability.  One way of doing this was 
    to hide an entry to a glitch somewhere in the game, and hope none of the 
    consumers learned about it (and if they intended to fix it later, it was 
    forgotten until Yellow). But alas, the word got out, and now such things as 
    this article become possible. 
     
    Of course, it's not JUST Missingno. you can run into. There will also be some 
    L100+ Pokemon, whose species and levels are determined by your name.
    
    Q: How do I determine the levels?  
     
    A: First off, look at letters 2, 4, and 6 of your name. (Technically, your 
    name spans 11 variables, so 8 and 10 are also used, but unless you're using a 
    default name, 10 will always be <Null-0>, and 8 will either be <Null-0> or, 
    for a seven-letter name, <End-80>.) Those letters will determine the levels of 
    the Pokemon you can run into.  First, take the NUMERICAL equivalent (A=1, B=2, 
    etc.) of those letters, and add 127 for uppercase or 159 for lowercase. In 
    addition, the symbols are as follows: 
    <Null-0> 0 (of course) 
    <End-80> 80 (really!) 
    <Space> 127 
    ( 154 
    ) 155 
    : 156 
    ; 157 
    [ 158 
    ] 159
    e 186
    ' 224
    PK 225  
    MN 226
    - 227
    ? 230
    ! 231
    <Male> 239
    <MonetaryP> 240 
    <TimesSign> 241
    . 232 or 24289-
    / 243
    , 244 
    <Female> 245
    <Numbers> 246 + number 
    At the end of every name, the game inserts an 80 (HEX 50) to designate "End of 
    Name". 
     
    Q: Species determined by name? Cool! I'll get a new name and try that so I can 
    get Mew WITHOUT SHARKING!  
     
    A: Hold it right there. While it is determined by name, the lowest number 
    assigned to a character (other than <Null-0>, <End-80>, and <Space>) is 128, 
    for a capital A. In EVERY internal RBY variable that designates a Pokemon, Mew 
    is assigned the number 21 (HEX 15). If you can make the connection, that means 
    that NO name you enter will result in Mew being a possibility. The low numbers 
    like 21 represent glitch characters that are not available for naming anything 
    and can only be found with a Shark. For convenience, here is the table of what 
    Pokemon will appear for each letter. Letters 3, 5, and 7 (as well as the 
    usually-null slots 9 and 11) are used to determine this:
     
    <Null-0>: Even-more-glitched form of Missingno. with a name including 'M 
    <End-80>: Missingno.
    A: Golduck 
    B: Hypno 
    C: Golbat 
    D: Mewtwo (BIG OPPORTUNITY HERE!) 
    E: Snorlax 
    F: Magikarp 
    G: Missingno. 
    H: Missingno. 
    I: Muk 
    J: Missingno. 
    K: Kingler 
    L: Cloyster 
    M: Missingno. 
    N: Electrode 
    O: Clefable 
    P: Weezing 
    Q: Persian 
    R: Marowak 
    S: Missingno. 
    T: Haunter 
    U: Abra 
    V: Alakazam 
    W: Pidgeotto 
    X: Pidgeot 
    Y: Starmie 
    Z: Bulbasaur (Get all the starters without trading!) 
    a: Missingno. 
    b: Missingno. 
    c: Missingno. 
    d: Ponyta 
    e: Rapidash 
    f: Rattata 
    g: Raticate 
    h: Nidorino 
    i: Nidorina 
    j: Geodude 
    k: Porygon 
    l: Aerodactyl 
    m: Missingno. 
    n: Magnemite 
    o: Missingno. 
    p: Missingno. 
    q: Charmander (Get all the starters without trading!) 
    r: Squirtle (Get all the starters without trading!) 
    s: Charmeleon 
    t: Wartortle 
    u: Charizard 
    v: Missingno. 
    w: Missingno. 
    x: Missingno. 
    y: Missingno. 
    z: Oddish  
    Note: If you want to try the glitch, DO NOT use one of the special characters 
    in slots 3, 5, or 7.  If you do, you might end up facing a Trainer.  You can't 
    get out of the match, and eventually one of their Pokemon will be a glitch 
    that can freeze (and possibly erase) your game, one of the few dangerous 
    aspects of this trick.  Also, species from 3 goes with level from 2, species 
    from 5 goes with level from 4, and species from 7 goes with level from 6.  For 
    the 11-character-long default names, 9 pairs with 8, and 11 with 10 similarly.  
    Catching 'M has been known to crash games, but feel free to catch Missingno., 
    throw some TMs on, and level it up. Missingno. and 'M evolve into Kangaskhan 
    and/or Rhydon (which just so happen to have internal numbers of 02 and 01, 
    respectively) at any level, though the specifics of this remain unknown.  
    Finally, since your name isn't long enough to cover the entire Wild Encounter 
    list, some of your most recent settings will remain.  Your final two 
    possibilities are Pokemon from the last area you entered a battle on land, at 
    the level they existed at.  Nothing special.
    
    Q: How about some examples?  
     
    A: Okay. 
    Test #1- Name: PIKACHU 
    Letters 2, 4, and 6 (levels): 
    2: I = 9 + 127 = 136 
    4: A = 1 + 127 = 128 
    6: H = 8 + 127 = 135 
    Letters 3, 5, and 7 (species): 
    3: K = Kingler on chart 
    5: C = Golbat on chart 
    7: U = Abra on chart 
    Combining the numbers, the name "PIKACHU" should yield L136 Kingler, L128 
    Golbat, and L135 Abra. Test it out; it does. Because it's a seven-character 
    name, slot 8 is <End-80> and all subsequent ones are <Null-0>, which yields 
    the usual 'M at L80 and L0. 
     
    Test #2- Name: DxDyDzD 
    Letters 2, 4, 6 (levels): 
    x: 24 + 159 = 183 
    y: 25 + 159 = 184 
    z: 26 + 159 = 185 
    Letters 3, 5, and 7 (species): 
    D = Mewtwo on chart 
    Result: Mewtwo at levels 183-185. Name change, anyone?  
     
    Test #3- Name: BLUE 
    Result: Starmie, Abra, Golduck (????????) 
    The name "BLUE" only has 4 letters, the third of which is a U, yielding Abra 
    (the L giving L139). But that doesn't explain Starmie and Golduck! Here's the 
    deal with that: Whenever you play one of the default names, it's actually one 
    continuous string, and each default name from a given version uses the same 
    string (with a different start point). 
    Here is what each name really gives as far as variables are concerned (the _ 
    counts as an <End-80>): 
    Red: RED_ASH_JAC 
    Ash: ASH_JACK_NE 
    Jack: JACK_NEW_NA 
    Blue: BLUE_GARY_J 
    Gary: GARY_JOHN_N 
    John: JOHN_NEW_NA  
     
    Incidentally, you can Rare-Candy these L100+ monsters past 255 to get to L0, 
    then to whatever you want. Or, you can just take them into battle, where ANY 
    experience points revert them to L100. As a side note, remember that only 
    three bytes are given to Experience Points, meaning that variable tops out at 
    16,777,215. The only reason this matters is when leveling up Pokemon to high 
    levels. 
     
    Experience Points for an L255: 
    Normal Growth Schedule: 16,581,375 = HEX FD02FF 
    Fast Growth Schedule: 13,265,100 = HEX CA68CC 
    Slow Growth Schedule: 20,726,718 = HEX 13C43BE 
    Fading Growth Schedule: 18,947,635 = HEX 1211E33 
     
    As you can see, the last two are problematic, because their binary 
    representations will exceed the allocation of 24 bits. Using a Pokemon that 
    surpasses the limit could throw the game off. The simple solution to this is 
    to NOT KEEP ANYTHING THAT EXCEEDS 16777215. For Slow growth, anything up to 
    L237 will be under the limit. For the Fading schedule, L245 is the highest 
    safe level. Just keep that in mind, and the game won't freeze when you put 
    away your high-level Mewtwo. 
     
    Q: Where would I get that many Rare Candies?  
     
    A: I was hoping you would ask. That's the other part of the Missingno. glitch. 
    You see, when I was referring to the 8-bit variables earlier on, items also 
    follow the 8-bit pattern. Whenever you run into Missingno. or 'M, it takes the 
    first bit of the "Copies of Sixth Item Held" byte (D329) and sets it to 1. In 
    simpler terms, if you have 127 or fewer copies of your sixth item, you get an 
    additional 128 copies (if you already have 128+, nothing happens). And since 
    the most copies of an item you can naturally have in a slot is 99 = HEX 63 = 
    BIN 01100011, the "127 or less" requirement will always be fulfilled unless 
    you sharked items past 127 or have used the trick on that item before.  
     
    Q: How do I shark a name change? I want that "DxDyDzD" name without having to 
    restart!  
     
    A: Well, if you're sharking, just go ahead and get the Pokemon that way. But 
    if you want a name change, here it is: 
    Letter 1: 01**58D1 
    Letter 2: 01**59D1 
    Letter 3: 01**5AD1 
    Letter 4: 01**5BD1 
    Letter 5: 01**5CD1 
    Letter 6: 01**5DD1 
    Letter 7: 01**5ED1 
    Letter 8: 01**5FD1  
    Letter 9: 01**60D1 
    Letter 10: 01**61D1 
    Letter 11: 01**62D1 
     
    Enter the values for the necessary letters, then put a "50" in the value 
    immediately following the end of your name, and fill all following values with 
    "00". 
     
    The chart for values is as follows: 
    <Space>: 7F 
    A 80 
    B 81 
    C 82 
    ... 
    ... 
    ... 
    P 8F 
    Q 90 
    ... 
    ... 
    ... 
    Z 99 
    ( 9A 
    ) 9B 
    : 9C 
    ; 9D 
    [ 9E 
    ] 9F 
    a A0 
    b A1 
    c A2 
    ... 
    ... 
    ... 
    z B9
    
    Now consider yourself educated.  (True, this section doesn't directly help 
    your gameplay, but it does get you thinking in the way of the computer.)
    
    --------------------------------------------
    |The Game's Two Most Important Computations|
    --------------------------------------------
    
    Stats and damage.  You may have already guessed at the formula behind stats, 
    and indeed you may be correct.  But it took a year and a half for anyone in 
    the online community to discover the correct damage formula, and then only 
    after a look through the ROM.  But you'll need to know both the easy formula 
    and the hard one to have a masterful grasp on the battle system.  Be prepared 
    to do some math:
    
    Stat Formula:
    
    Stat = int((2B + 2D + S) * L / 100) + X
    
    B: The base stat.  This is the version of the stat that the game hardcodes, 
    and is the first number of each stat in section 204.  Base stats are 
    contingent on the Pokemon's species and HP/AT/DF/SP/SC.  The highest base stat 
    in RBY is 250 for Chansey's HP (in GSC, Blissey replaces this with the maximum 
    allowable 255).  The lowest allowed base stat is 0, which is only achieved by 
    Missingno.'s Defense.
    
    D: The DV (Determinant Value).  DVs are a set of five 4-bit numbers contained 
    within a random 16-bit variable; this 16-bit number is assigned as soon as 
    your Pokemon is caught, and can't be changed afterward except by RAM 
    modification.  "How do you fit five 4-bit numbers in 16 bits?"  Dependently, 
    that's how.  If the variable is expressed as a string of 16 consecutive 1s 
    and/or 0s, then the first four bits are the Attack DV, the second four are the 
    Defense DV, third four are Speed DV, and final four are Special DV.  But HP DV 
    is every fourth bit in order, borrowing one from each of the others.  Anyway, 
    each one follows the standard 4-bit limits of 0-15.  And did I mention they're 
    random unless you Shark them?
    
    S: Stat Points, a 6-bit number that's derived from a 16-bit variable.  The 16-
    bit number is called Stat Experience (Stat Exp.), and is the source of the 
    myth "Rare Candying leads to lower stats".  Here's how it really works:
    1. Each Pokemon has five Stat Exp. banks.  (In GSC, the fifth one controls 
    BOTH Special stats.)
    2. Whenever you defeat a Pokemon on GB (not link or Stadium battles), a number 
    of points equal to that Pokemon's base stats are added to the corresponding 
    Stat Exp. banks.  (In GSC, for the Special bank, the Special Attack is used to 
    copy this.)  This is what causes the "Train vs. Candy" myth; having your 
    Pokemon level up via battles gives it Level Experience concurrent with Stat 
    Experience, whereas using Rare Candies up to 100 will provide quite a bit of 
    Level Experience with little effort, but lacks the Stat Experience which is 
    responsible for up to 63 points in stats.  But even at L100, it's possible to 
    salvage the missing Stat Exp. by battle, so as long as you battle for Stat 
    Exp. at SOME point (or save even more work and Shark the Stat Exp. banks), it 
    doesn't matter if you Rare-Candy up your level a few times beforehand.  The 
    so-called "Box Trick" is just a clarifying step to supplement this; if you 
    have an L100 gaining Stat Exp., you can't level up to force recalculation.  
    You have to deposit the Pokemon into the PC, then take it out, in order to see 
    a visible improvement in the stats (although Stadium will see this stat 
    increase without having to deposit and withdraw).
    3. Whenever you use a stat drug, such as Protein or Iron, the game looks at 
    the proper Stat Exp. bank.  If it's 25599 or less, 2560 is added; otherwise 
    nothing happens.  And since (as I'll explain later) it only takes 63002 to 
    obtain the full benefit of the bank, stat drugs can cut your training time by 
    almost half.  Note I said "STAT Drug," though; it's never a good idea to feed 
    a Pokemon real drugs.  Or else your GB will start convulsing and eventually 
    explode.  (Yeah, that ought to be a strong enough myth.)  And never, EVER, do 
    drugs in real life, either.
    4. In order to transfer Stat Exp. to Stat Points, there's yet another formula 
    involved: P = int((sqrt(E - 1) + 1) / 4).  And while E can reach a maximum of 
    65535, that would create an output of over 64, which violates the 6-bit limit 
    for Stat Points.  So any Stat Exp. beyond 65025 is disregarded (this number 
    creates an output just under 64), and in order to be right at the maximum 63, 
    one needs to collect 63002 Stat Exp. in a given bank.
    
    L: Level.  This seemingly simple 8-bit number is actually the by-product of a 
    24-bit variable (EXP Points), derived from one of four formulas according to 
    species.
    1. Slow: L = int(int(E ^ (1 / 3)) * 0.8)
    2. Normal: L = int(E ^ (1 / 3))
    3. Fast: L = int(int(E ^ (1 / 3)) * 1.25)
    4. Fading: E = int(1.2 * L3) - (15 * L2) + (100 * L) - 140
    (For formula 4, just use reverse substitution.  It's much easier to work that 
    way than with the inverse function.)
    Obviously, L is capped at 100, unless you start above that level (see 
    Missingno. Section), and then any experience gained through battling (not Rare 
    Candies) will still set your level back to 100, by setting E accordingly.
    
    X: The Unequalizer.  Rather simple; for HP, X = L + 10.  Otherwise, X = 5.  
    The X is why L0 Pokemon don't have 0 stats; they have 10 HP and 5 all else.  
    It's also why, when measured on an even scale with other stats, it's almost 
    impossible for a Pokemon to have poor HP.
    
    Finally, there are stat modifiers, which are in-battle alterations to stats.  
    Each stat modifier goes from -6 to 6 (Swords Dance raises Attack modifier by 
    2, Screech lowers opponent's Defense modifier by 2, X Speed increases Speed 
    modifier by 1, etc.) and affects stats by the following correspondence:
    -6: x0.25
    -5: x0.286 (2/7)
    -4: x0.333 (1/3)
    -3: x0.4
    -2: x0.5
    -1: x0.667 (2/3)
    ?0: x1
    +1: x1.5
    +2: x2
    +3: x2.5
    +4: x3
    +5: x3.5
    +6: x4
    
    Note, though, that stat modifiers can't take a stat past 999.  For example, 
    imagine a Cloyster (458 Defense) decided to make the incredibly stupid mistake 
    of using Withdraw over and over.  First one is x1.5 = 687, second is x2 = 916, 
    and third is x2.5 = 1145, but reduced to 999.  And future Withdraw use won't 
    raise the stat any more, nor will they even increase the physical modifier.  
    For example, the Cloyster could Withdraw six times, but one Screech and the 
    modifier is back down to +1, because it's never allowed to pass +3.  Of 
    course, this is just an example.  Withdraw isn't a good idea on ANYONE, much 
    less Cloyster.
    
    And now the much tougher subject, damage:
    
    Damage = int((min(int(int(((2 + int(0.4 * L)) * A * P) / D) / 50) , 997) + 2) 
    * X)
    
    The above is actually a rearrangement of the formula that allowed me to make 
    it easier to teach.  Just remember this saying:  "LAPD is trying to catch the 
    criminal mastermind X, but it's caught in the middle of two 2s, point-four, 
    and a 50."  Got that?  The signs will fill in naturally after a while.  Even 
    if you already had the formula, the above version is much more fun to use.
    
    Now on with the next step: deciphering each letter.
    
    L: Your level.  See the stat formula in case you need to know how to calculate 
    it (unlikely because you keep seeing it above your health bar).  It's actually 
    an element in this formula independent of the stats it helps create.  Note: 
    For RBY Critical Hits, you'll be doubling this value, and treating all Stat 
    Modifiers as 0.
    
    A: Your Attack stat.  Use Special (GSC'ers use Special Attack) instead if the 
    attack is Special-typed (Fire, Water, Ice, Electric, Grass, Psychic, Dragon; 
    plus Dark in GSC).
    
    P: The move's power.  10 for Constrict, 50 for Struggle, 100 for Earthquake, 
    etc.  If you're unsure of a move's power, then find the Move Lookup in section 
    204.  Enjoy.
    
    D: The opponent's Defense.  As with A, use the Special version of the stat on 
    a special-typed attack.
    
    X: Extra multipliers:
    1. STAB - x1.5 if the move's type matches one of your types (even Normal-types 
    get this bonus)
    2. Type 1 - x0, x0.5, x1, or x2 based on the matchup of attack type vs. 
    opponent's Type 1 (see the Type Chart)
    3. Type 2 - x0, x0.5, x1, or x2 based on the matchup of attack type vs. 
    opponent's Type 2, if any (see the Type Chart)
    4. Random Number - x((217 + Z) / 255), where Z is a random number from 0 to 38
    
    ---------------------
    |Game-Defining Facts|
    ---------------------
    
    Okay, these are just some oddball facts that come in handy in some situations.  
    The game isn't the same without them.
    
    1. The 99.6 Rule
    Yes, that much-hated rule comes to haunt players all the time.  But what is 
    it?
    
    Well, each move has an 8-bit accuracy number.  This means 0 to 255, although 
    the lowest such number actually assigned to a move is 75 for the one-hit 
    kills.  Basically, the accuracy check is "Throw out a random 8-bit number, and 
    if it's less than the accuracy number, the move hits."
    
    Notice anything wrong with that?  Yep--it's "less than" instead of "less than 
    or equal to".  Which means that when the random check turns up 255, it causes 
    any move--including Psychic, Thunderbolt, and yes, even Swift--to miss.  So 
    the so-called "100 accuracy" moves actually have a 1-in-256 (0.390625%) chance 
    to miss.  Hence it's called "The 99.6 Rule" (the pedantic version, "The 
    99.609375 Rule," puts too little emphasis on the rule and too much on the 
    number).  And until GSC (even afterwards, including some who believe in it to 
    this day), everyone feared that it would strike at the most inopportune time.  
    All it did was turn surefire wins into losses for no apparent reason, and with 
    no possible circumvention.
    
    2. Critical Hits
    
    Critical hits seem random, and beyond control.  But in fact, some Pokemon get 
    to skew the crit-hit odds.  It's a very simple formula:
    
    Odds = S / 512, where S is the base Speed.  Not the maximum, or the current 
    value of the stat.  Take the maximum, subtract 98, cut it in half, and there's 
    your base stat.
    
    Odds for Razor Leaf, Karate Chop, Slash, and Crabhammer = S / 64 (maximum 
    255/256)
    
    Odds with Focus Energy (Stadium) = S / 128 (again with the 255 cap)
    
    Odds with Focus Energy (GB) = no change when faster than opponent, 0% when 
    slower.  This is a glitch.
    
    3. Moves that Work Incorrectly
    
    Some of RBY's moves are, to say the least, programmed badly.  (This doesn't 
    count PBS-only glitches like Pin Missile.  That's the fault of the PBS 
    designer--go write to said authority immediately if you don't like it.)
    
    Counter: You'd think this move could hit all Physical attacks, right?  It even 
    says so in all of Nintendo's documented material!  But if you're curious why 
    Counter seems to miss 80% of the time, it's because the move won't do anything 
    for Flying, Bug, Ground, Rock, Ghost, and Poison attacks.  Just Normal and 
    Fighting.  Not only does this make one wonder why Gengar is capable of picking 
    up Counter, but it gives added merit to Earthquake, Rock Slide, and Drill 
    Peck.
    
    Substitute: It was bad originally, but Stadium was saving grace and more.  It 
    seems natural that a Substitute would protect its user from being paralyzed, 
    poisoned, burned, frozen, sapped, slowed down, and various other maladies.  
    And on Stadium, it does so just fine, but if you're planning on link-battling 
    (or playing an online simulator, which channels the Game Boy version), you'll 
    have to plan on finding, you guessed it, a substitute for Substitute!
    
    Haze: The anti-stat-modifier, it's drastically overlooked by those who insist 
    on the DT Ban, mainly because the same group is hell-bent against GSC-
    transferred moves, and the set of pure-RBY Hazers is, well, bad.  But there's 
    another little cost involved.  You knock out the stat modifiers, but if the 
    opponent has a condition (like poison or freeze), that gets erased too!  And 
    no, if you have a condition as well, that doesn't get erased!  (However, 
    Attack drop from Burn or Speed loss from Paralyze will indeed go away from 
    your Pokemon.)  So if you expect the opponent to Haze, don't hesitate to 
    switch to a frozen Pokemon, if you have one.
    
    The One-Hit Kills: I don't know if it was intentional or not, but Fissure, 
    Horn Drill, and Guillotine have an added mask that makes them hit even less 
    than the documented 30% rate.  Essentially: If a OHKO (one-hit KO) move goes 
    second, it can't hit.  This is why Stadium's Gambler always used moves like 
    Body Slam, Thunder Wave, and Bubblebeam: so he could strike first.  If you're 
    one of the many that has trouble with Gambler, here's the best piece of advice 
    yet: Use fast Pokemon, along with moves like Substitute for paralyze defense.  
    Also, if you plan on using OHKOs in your team, do everyone a favor and don't 
    waste them on Rhydon or other slow monsters.
    
    -----------------------------------------
    |71/2 Habits of Highly Ineffective Players|
    -----------------------------------------
    
    This is where my ruthless style of "reconstruct the statement without assuming 
    anything" really starts to shine.  I will take seven incorrect statements that 
    the neophytes tend to believe, advocate, and brag about with respect to team 
    building (plus an all-purpose statement numbered 71/2), and turn them around.  
    I've come to give a detailed analysis of the flaw in each, and give a line of 
    reasoning that defeats their supporters.  Remember these for situations where 
    you may be forced to use similar lines of argument.  Are you ready?
    
    1. "Dig and Fly are good because you get a free turn"
    
    Where's the "free turn" coming from?  If it's "opponent misses", then that's 
    not a free turn.  It's one wasted PP, which is irrelevant in all but the most 
    extreme of cases (and Dig and Fly aren't exactly the best of PP wasters 
    anyway.)  Here's what happens: You use Dig/Fly, causing no damage yet.  
    Opponent attacks, missing (except in the case of Swift, where the move's a 
    definite disadvantage), no damage.  You resurface, 70-100 power.  Opponent 
    hits, power equal to the move.
    
    So over two turns, you each hit once.  No one gets a free turn from that.  And 
    since most of the game's good moves fall into the 85-100 power bracket, Fly is 
    usually disadvantaged (because they get in 85-100 while you only hit for 70) 
    and Dig's advantage is only minor if at all (imagine Digging Charizard taking 
    a Surf on the alternate turn--instead of 100-95, it's a 190-100 disadvantage).
    
    But it's more complicated.  When you Fly/Dig, you completely give away what 
    your next action will be.  This gives the OPPONENT a free turn--a free 
    opportunity to switch to a type resistant/immune to your attack--and you'll 
    either have to fight into a clear disadvantage or switch into an attack that 
    you have no real anticipation of.  So now, when you expected to GAIN a turn, 
    you actually LOST a turn.  And if you don't think the opponent's smart enough 
    to switch after a Dig/Fly, then that's one of the most unforgiving mistakes in 
    the game.  Always assume the opponent to be an educated player going into the 
    battle: if you do so, and guess wrong, you're still playing with a competitive 
    mindset and will win easily.  On the other hand, if you guess the opponent to 
    be a complete idiot, and are wrong that time, you've given the opponent a 
    prime opportunity to breach your intentional downplay, resulting in your 
    demise.  Some bad.
    
    But at least now you know why Dig and Fly are bad propositions, and what to do 
    if your opponent tries them.
    
    2. "Don't waste turns on defensive moves"
    
    Let me guess--you want to think of this game as a tempo war, and in order to 
    win, you try to apply constant pressure such that you never lose tempo, right?
    
    Well then, I suggest you go read about any of the numerous chess games won by 
    a Queen sacrifice or similar stratagem.  This illustrates a point: sometimes 
    you can temporarily lose tempo, only to gain it back later, in full force, and 
    for good.  Time to look at it mathematically:
    
    Reflect and Barrier are first to be handled.  Into a physical attacker, 
    putting up a Reflect will cut all future hits in half.  You lose one turn when 
    you put up the Reflect, but every opposing attack gets you +1/2 turn.  This 
    means that after one turn (2 if you're slower), the Reflect has already paid 
    for itself.  Anything beyond that is just gravy.  Barrier is just like it, but 
    can pump up the protection even more (however, each subsequent use requires an 
    additional turn for self-redemption).  And if you've "forced" the opponent 
    into special attacks, then since that wasn't the opponent's plan to begin 
    with, you've still been given an advantage.  And if Reflect and Barrier are 
    worth it, then Amnesia (a Special-ized version of Barrier that also pumps your 
    attacking potential) becomes the best move in the game, or close to it.
    
    Next, Recover and Rest.  These are usually easy to demonstrate.  Recover is "I 
    lose one turn, but your strike is reduced by 50% of my HP."  So if the 
    opponent is hitting for less than 50% a turn, then you register a gain over 
    the one-turn interval.  And if they can hit for over 50%, then it's likely a 
    losing proposition anyway, and you should switch.  Furthermore, 
    notwithstanding the one-turn interval, you're making sure a key Pokemon on 
    your team gets to stick around long enough to do what you want it to do--which 
    can't be expressed in terms of "turn advantage".  And Recover has 32 PP, which 
    is enough to waste any one of the playable attacks and have somewhere between 
    8-24 PP left.  You're trading one of their moves for 25%-75% of yours.  
    Another intangible, but obvious, advantage.
    
    Rest is harder to use effectively.  While Recover should NEVER be left out of 
    the set of any Pokemon that gets it, if the same were true with Rest then one 
    move of EVERY moveset would already be known.  Rest maxes out your HP, and 
    gets rid of status inflictions...at the cost of three turns.  Unless you're 
    expecting to take three hits, and/or give the opponent free switching turns, 
    Rest won't be beneficial.  Double Team can help in that regard.  But on a 
    defensive Pokemon such as Lapras or Chansey (although Chansey gets 
    Softboiled), Rest can be worth it even without an evade modifier.  With 
    one...look out.
    
    Speaking of Evade modifiers, Double Team and Minimize are downright abusive 
    when set up in multiples.  The basic plan with DTs is to make sure you're 
    alive long enough that their misses outnumber your DTs.  Granted, Swift 
    supposedly renders this moot, but Swift is only 60 power; evaders usually come 
    equipped with Recover or Rest which should out recover Swift's damage.  If 
    nothing else, even on fragile Pokemon, DT-Rest is a highly compatible combo 
    that at least wastes PP.  You never know when you'll hit a Blizzard and run it 
    out, saving your Dragonite from potential ruin...
    
    So you DON'T have to deal damage every turn to win, you just have to make sure 
    that your per-turn average exceeds your opponent's.  And defensive moves are 
    usually a way of using one turn in order to earn a payoff at EVERY subsequent 
    turn, or a way to stick around enough to deliver more blows.  Attacks are only 
    one-turn effects.
    
    Useless?  I think not.
    
    3. "Hyper Beam is the best move in the game"
    
    Power-wise, H-Beam may be second in the game (behind Explosion's 170, although 
    both that and Selfdestruct have automatic double-damage subroutines), but what 
    are you really getting?
    
    Turn 1, 150 power attack.  Turn 2, do nothing (0 power).  2-turn iteration, 
    average 75 power per turn.  Factor in accuracy, and your overall average is 
    under 68 a turn.
    
    Meanwhile, your opponent gets to strike for a hit each time.  All they have to 
    do is outdamage 68 a turn.  What are the most likely attacks to be used?
    
    Psychic - 90 power
    Thunderbolt - 95 power
    Ice Beam - 95 power
    Blizzard - 120 power (229 accuracy; average 108)
    Fire Blast - 120 power (216 accuracy, average 102)
    Flamethrower - 95 power
    Surf - 95 power
    Razor Leaf - 55 power (critical mania, average 81-104 depending on Pokemon)
    Earthquake - 100 power
    Body Slam - 85 power
    Rock Slide - 75 power (229 accuracy; average 68)
    Drill Peck - 80 power
    Double-Edge - 100 power (25% back at user; total advantage 75)
    
    All of which are at least as good as H-Beam's average.
    
    Remember, some of those moves will hit for super effective damage, whereas 
    Hyper Beam never can.  Further disadvantage to the Beam.
    
    And with the attacks listed above, you may paralyze, freeze, or lower Special 
    on the opponent.  Hyper Beam's side effect?  Lose a turn.
    
    In RBY link battles (not Stadium), the problem was rectifiable, since you 
    didn't lose the turn on a miss or KO.  Therefore, H-Beam could be used to 
    finish off an opponent that might otherwise be out of reach, without fear.  
    Under Stadium, if you get a Hyper Beam KO, the opponent just brings in the 
    Pokemon you fear most, and you have no choice but to take the hit.
    
    How good is the move looking now?
    
    4. "Thunder/Fire Blast/Hydro Pump/Blizzard ROCKS!"
    
    Ugh.  The above statement does get 1.5 out of 4 right, but the general idea of 
    overpowering everything may just leave you high and dry with nothing to show 
    for it.
    
    First off, I have a nickname for attacks like those.  They're called VHPSAs 
    (Very-High-Power Special Attacks), and their usefulness depends on how badly 
    the programmers set out to wreck them.
    
    Obviously the VHPSAs wouldn't have been created unless there was a chip taken 
    out of accuracy, or else their HPSA counterparts (Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, 
    Surf...) would be put completely to shame.  But each of the moves has a 
    different accuracy, and hence have different degrees of usefulness.
    
    At this point I'd like to bring up the idea of Statistical Power, which is the 
    product of a move's power on a hit and the fraction of times during which it 
    should hit.  For example, a 90-power move with accuracy 70% (note - if such a 
    move is ever created, avoid it like Michael Jackson) would have Statistical 
    Power 63.  Over a span of 1000 turns, 700 uses of the move would be expected 
    to hit, dealing 90 * 700 = 63000 power worth of damage.  The remaining 300 
    uses will miss, dealing 0.  Overall power is 63000, divided by the 1000 turns, 
    for an average of 63.
    
    Now, this tool can be used to compare VHPSAs to their HPSA counterparts.
    
    Blizzard, at SP 108, is the select move of the four, the one that no one will 
    criticize you for using (or if they do, the criticizer obviously needs to read 
    a 200-page analysis of the Pokemon games).  If you're trying to use Ice moves 
    with attackers, put Blizzard first.  It might even make a difference -- 
    Clefable vs. Nidoking comes to mind, where Ice Beam is practically a 
    guaranteed kill in 3...but with Blizzard, it's about 81% to save a full turn.
    
    Of course, if you're trying to play defense and still want an Ice attack, this 
    is where Ice Beam still has a use.  The other major aspect of the HPSA/VHPSA 
    war is how many PP the moves have, and Chansey or Lapras can quite easily stay 
    alive long enough to exhaust the 8-round clip of Blizzard.  Ice Beam, on the 
    other hand, allows them to stay busy for another eight turns, dealing more 
    overall Ice Beam damage than a full set of Blizzard hits could possibly deal.  
    It may take longer to dish out the damage, but these aren't speed-centered 
    Pokemon...who cares about how long it takes to kill?
    
    Just remember...if your Pokemon isn't going to live for eight attacking turns 
    very often, there's little point in the Beam.
    
    Fire Blast comes next with an SP of 102, and has the added edge of being 
    available as an RBY TM (Flamethrower fans, don't worry, a quick commute to 
    Crystal will allow access to that move).  However, it suffers from being Fire, 
    the type with a very narrow scope in this domain.  The move has to vie with 
    Blizzard, and lower accuracy combined with an inferior side effect...not good.  
    Only Fire-types should use this attack, and only if they can be proven 
    superior to comparable Ice-types.  Not too likely.  But if, for some reason, 
    you absolutely insist on a Fire attack (and have access to both choices), the 
    consensus seems to be that each person makes their own decision.  There hasn't 
    been a single definitive argument in the 41/2 years of Pokemon's existence that 
    has decided this debate one way or the other.
    
    On paper, Hydro Pump comes out ahead of its HPSA counterpart, 96-95.  But in 
    this case, Surf has 16 extra PP (though that rarely comes into play), a one-
    point lead is no decision-maker, and the mere fact that Surf is actually 
    consistent should overcome that one point.  To extend the point, imagine if 
    there was a 960-power Water attack with accuracy 10%.  Yes, it averages above 
    Surf as well, but Surf's consistency makes it much more useful.  Hydro Pump is 
    a less severe version of this effect.
    
    Last, and most definitely least, Thunder.  With accuracy 178 (this makes an 
    incredible jump to 179 in GSC, and Blizzard gets knocked down to that level, 
    dooming it in that game), Thunder's SP sits back at 84.  And while it's the 
    only VHPSA with 16 PP, Thunderbolt still has 24.  Thunder does miss, and too 
    often for it to be useful at anything.
    
    New players like hitting for a lot of damage at once, which could be one 
    driving force behind their decisions.  But remember that this will also lead 
    to quite a few turns during which 0 damage is dealt.  Bad?  Yep.
    
    5. "Doubling up on attacks is a good thing"
    
    I don't know where people get that idea, but it's still a very bad idea.
    
    You've all seen Ember/Fire Blast/Flamethrower/Fire Spin movesets for 
    Charizard.  And if you're the kind of person to actually USE a moveset like 
    that, then pay close attention to this.
    
    When there are two or more moves of any type in a set, you lose versatility.  
    In the Charizard set above, with only Fire moves, all you do is establish 
    victory over Grass and Bug types.  One Fire move (preferably Flamethrower; 
    some players will recommend Fire Blast) will be enough to show that.  But in 
    this case, you leave yourself no option in a type disadvantage but to switch.  
    Say the opponent sends in Omastar...what would you do?  Blast it for a maximum 
    of 31 damage?  I didn't think so.
    
    Charizard would be much better off with something like Flamethrower (or Fire 
    Blast, but only one)/Earthquake/Rock Slide/Swords Dance.  If you have a super 
    effective move, it doesn't matter how many you have; you can still only get 
    one hit per turn.  By devoting only one slot to Fire, you have three more to 
    try and combat less desirable matchups.  In fact, it's usually a good idea to 
    Swords Dance even against a Grass-type.  They can't accomplish much by staying 
    in, so you get a free Attack boost while they switch to a Water- or Rock-type.  
    Then you get to pummel them with the equivalent of two Earthquakes, which 
    might just take the opponent out before you have to take a hit.
    
    Another thing:  When you have four moves of the same type, do you seriously 
    intend on using all of them?  In the example above, Flamethrower/Fire 
    Blast/Ember/Fire Spin, will you EVER plan on using Ember?  Why have 40 power 
    when you can use Flamethrower for 95 with the same accuracy?  The only 
    conceivable reason is in case all other moves run out of PP, to which I say:  
    If you've already dished out 3220 power in moves (in increments of 95 or 120), 
    to no avail, what good will an extra 1920 do, dished out just 40 at a time?  
    If Fire moves aren't working, perhaps you should try out another type.  And as 
    for the case against Fire Spin, see part 7.
    
    6. "Toxic/Leech Seed is the ultimate combo"
    
    Congratulations, you've found a glitch.  Leech Seed's sap counter is run by 
    the same variable as Toxic's, and as Toxic makes it go up, Leech Seed gets to 
    join the fun as well.
    
    But in reality, Toxic is one of the WORST moves you can use in a game, and 
    Leech Seed is at best another PP bank that force-switches (a losing 
    proposition).
    
    What does Toxic do?  It starts out taking 6.25% health, then increases 
    drainage by 6.25% each turn.  When that's up, Leech Seed will take as much, 
    but will move the drained HP to the other side of the board.
    
    As long as the opponent's Pokemon stays active.
    
    And since this is RBY, there's no way to ensure that except by killing all 5 
    of its teammates, which (if your opponent knows this) won't come about from 
    Leech Seed-Toxic.
    
    You use Toxic...they get poisoned, and switch.
    
    Now the fun part: After they switch, the game no longer acknowledges that 
    Poison as being a result of Toxic.  Which means that even if the opponent 
    brings the poisoned Pokemon back out, to let it get Seeded, the poison counter 
    will no longer rise.  They'll lose an insignificant 12.5% a turn, plus 
    whatever pitifully weak attack your Grass-type uses, meaning you usually need 
    to survive for 4-7 turns in order to kill (barring Recover or Rest, and Rest 
    has the somewhat-questionable effect of wiping out poison).  All you get is an 
    even more insignificant 6.25% health back each time.  So your health meter 
    plus 25-44% will need to last 7 turns...as long as the opponent can deal 20% a 
    turn for 7 turns, or 32% for 4, that's a losing proposition. 
    
    And when the opponent is poisoned, they're immune to the much more dangerous 
    ailments of Sleep, Paralyze, and Freeze.  Some bad.
    
    Verdict on Toxic/Leech Seed?  Save it for fun matches, or 1-on-1s where there 
    is no fear of switching.
    
    7. "Moves like Fire Spin and Wrap make you invincible"
    
    One, they don't, and two, this is RBY, so they don't even perform anything 
    useful.
    
    Fire Spin, Wrap, Bind, and Clamp are fundamentally misleading.  Sure, they 
    make it seem like you get several hits in a row while the opponent does 
    nothing...
    
    ...But wouldn't it make sense to think of all those turns as one big attack, 
    like Pin Missile or Spike Cannon?  After all, the power of each hit is nowhere 
    near impressive.
    
    Combining multiple hits together, we get maximum power of 75 for Wrap, Bind, 
    and Fire Spin, and 175 for Clamp.  So Clamp is the only one that stands out, 
    especially considering these aren't 48-PP moves, and none are more accurate 
    than 85%.
    
    But let's also take into consideration that those are 5-hit figures.  Average 
    hit count of 3.5 gives totals of 122.5 for Clamp and 52.5 for the rest.  
    Again, only Clamp looks remotely interesting.
    
    Okay, intervention time.  "What if I strike first with a multi-turn move?"  In 
    theory, that means you just continue pummeling the opponent without fear of 
    retribution.  However, that only lasts as long as you keep hitting, and when 
    the most accurate of the moves is 85%, you aren't really invincible.  More on 
    this later.
    
    Intervention #2: "Okay, it may seem like one move, but it's multiple turns.  
    This means Toxic gets more time to work."  Either you're stuck in a GSC 
    mindset, or you haven't read Habit #6.  Do that now.
    
    Enough with the interventions (interventia?).  Time to give the one tactic 
    that will beat multi-turn moves once and for all...THE SWITCH.  (Doesn't that 
    seem like the most powerful "move" in the game right about now?)  Again, 
    there's no way to prevent a switch in RBY.  Once you use Wrap, or whatever 
    multi-turn move you have, the opponent (who is smart, and has read this 
    section) will simply switch.  The multi-turn move automatically ends, and to 
    add insult to (lack of) injury, you don't get to do anything that turn.  The 
    so-called "invincibility" move now reads: 15-35 Power, 70-85 Accuracy, 16-32 
    PP, Opponent gets to switch to the Pokemon of their choice.
    
    I thought a 70-accuracy, 16-PP move would be better than that.
    
    But it isn't, and Wrap, Clamp, and Bind aren't much better.  Now do you see 
    why?
    
    71/2: "I'm the best"
    
    Those neophytes never cease to throw out this line.  The rebuttal of such 
    logically ignorant statements as this appears to be difficult, but when it 
    works, the pleasure gained by humiliating your clueless adversary is nearly 
    unmatched in all of gaming.  Here goes:
    
    Part 1 of the argument debates against the very declaration of inherency.  
    Very few things may properly be considered "intrinsic", and those that can are 
    simply philosophical ideals, far out of the reach of such a subject as gaming.  
    Pokemon is simply a set of electronic switches, arranged so as to enable 
    interactive control over a "game".  Many people have scoured the code many 
    times over, and nothing in it states that any one player is automatically 
    better at playing than anyone else.
    
    With fundamental possibilities out of the way, all that remains is to 
    demonstrate how the defendant is NOT "the best player the game has ever seen".  
    The most obvious way to accomplish this is by challenging him or her to a 
    simple 6-on-6 battle.  If the challenge is refused, for ANY reason, the 
    following line is a surefire way to draw the opponent across the line in this 
    "mismatched argumentative tug-of-war":
    
    "Since you were the one that made the original statement, you're the one with 
    the burden of proof.  Refusal to battle implies nothing but lack of proof."
    
    Without proof, their "I'm the best" cannot hold.  Eventually, they will be 
    forced into one of several stances, each of which has an easy counter:
    
    1 - They attempt to quietly duck out of the argument, change the subject, or 
    otherwise try to divert your mind, in the futile hope that you won't consider 
    them having admitted anything.
    Answer: In order to be a top-level player and teacher, you can't let anyone 
    get away this easily.  Ask your "student", flat out, whether they still 
    believe they're the best.  On a "no", your job is done.  On a "yes", the rest 
    of the conversation should unfold as follows:
    
    You: "Why?"
    Clueless Opponent: "Because no one can beat me!"
    "Well, if you never let anyone fight you, then your claim isn't saying much."
    "I've beaten <SomeUnbelievableNumber> people without losing!"
    "And I'm supposed to be tricked into thinking <ThatNumber> is a diverse, 
    representative population of all classes of Pokemon players?  For all I know, 
    all those players were just 8-year-olds in your neighborhood who think Hyper 
    Beam is the game's best move."
    "SHUT UP!"
    "Not without a reason.  Everyone has equal entitlement to state their cases 
    and rebuttals, and the line 'Shut Up' does not change any truths."
    "*Breaks down*"
    "So do you want to learn the PROPER fundamentals of the game?"
    
    and then show them this guide.  Congratulations, you now have a following.
    
    2 - They try to dismiss your claim as random words which mean nothing.
    Answer: If you carry a dictionary in your pocket (like me), you can show your 
    victim just what each and every one of the words means.  If not, try 
    rephrasing it: "People don't see drastic-sounding statements like ' 
    I'm the best' to be true unless you can prove it.  Except by testing in a 
    battle, there isn't much you can do to prove your words."  If you can make 
    this even more kid-friendly, good for you.  If they continue to call your 
    statement "gibberish", remind them that "if you can't understand this, you're 
    only making an ass out of yourself, and don't sound anywhere near smart enough 
    to play at the top level of competition."  As usual, bust out the guide in its 
    entirely, and let an otherwise-doomed player learn the real game in Pokemon.
    
    3 - They go ahead and battle.
    Answer: Seeing as you've read this guide, and anyone who throws out such 
    ridiculous lines probably hasn't, winning should be easy (but remember never 
    to stereotype someone's battling ability before the fight actually begins).  
    Again, there are a few post-battle possibilities.
    
    A - They try to duck out of it.  See Option #1.
    
    B - They state "YOU CHEATED".  This is the most common answer when a new 
    player loses to someone in the upper echelon.  The obvious answer to give is 
    "How did I cheat?"  Normally, their counter rebuttal can be answered by some 
    combination of showing them this guide or the screen on your GB.  Point out 
    that you don't have a Shark plugged in (while you may have one at home, 
    anything you do is attainable by legal means).  Point out that illegal stats 
    can be reset by depositing into a box and then withdrawing.  If you have 
    access to a computer, point out the following site: 
    www.sirlin.net/features/feature_PlayToWinPart1.htm (Playing to Win, an 
    important part of David Sirlin's excellent website that outlines game design).  
    Tell your soon-to-be-educated adversary that while that page uses Street 
    Fighter as an example, most of the same principles apply to Pokemon.  For 
    example, "staying in a block" can be equated with "using evasion".  Explain 
    that "the tactics I'm using aren't 'cheap' or 'cheating', they're just 
    'playing to win'.  Do you have a problem with that?  Read the site, and you'll 
    agree."  At this point, any response can be quickly dismissed. 
    
    But if their answer is "You cheated because you won", it's a different 
    argument.  You can counter by saying "So you really think I'm explicitly 
    banned from winning, or you're explicitly protected from losing?  No.  The 
    game of Pokemon does not guarantee that any player must always lose or always 
    win.  Such a game is called 'I Win'.  Pokemon is not 'I Win', and no one will 
    ever willfully play 'I Win' when they aren't the 'I'.  With this in mind, did 
    I really cheat, and if so, how?"  You now have the offender pinned against the 
    wall.  Congratulations.
    
    C - They blame it on luck, and want to play again.  Go ahead and take them up 
    on the offer--you've got the proven tactics, right?  Keep fighting them until 
    they realize that luck won't help in this match.  Or if it does, simply point 
    out "So out of eight battles, you won once?  If luck comes to the rescue just 
    12.5% of the time, then taking an average split of the luck seems to result in 
    your demise."  Change the 8 and 12.5% based on if and when they ever do break 
    through.  The ultimate point to be reinforced is that if so many battles 
    result in such a skewed outcome, the difference is more than luck.  If their 
    one win represents the way battles "should" happen, how come you have seven 
    times as many?  The teams must be mismatched, and it's your cue to show how 
    teams should be built.
    
    So many possibilities, but it's all covered. "I'm the best" has no foundation, 
    and if you can demonstrate that, welcome to the world of recruiting. (Just for 
    the record, I have no connection to the military of the United States, or any 
    other nation, at the time of this guide's most recent update.)
    
    -------------
    |House Rules|
    -------------
    
    If you simply play by the rules the game has given you, most opponents you'll 
    find online simply walk away.  Why?  Pokemon on its own is unbalanced, and a 
    game with a single idealized team pitted against itself over and over isn't 
    really a game.  So players decide to enforce their own rules of balance in 
    order to make the game playable, and different players go to different extents 
    to achieve this balance.
    
    Let's take a look at the most common rules you'll run into.  So as not to 
    infuse opinion into their enforcement, only a summary of each rule will be 
    given underneath each one.  After each has been presented, an "editorial" 
    section will follow, in the Fox News tradition of "We report, YOU decide."  E-
    mail me with your vantage points on the rules, and they'll be published in a 
    future edition!
    
    LEGEND BAN 
    
    "Take your Mewtwo and Mew away from my battle arena.  They overcentralize the 
    game."
    
    SPECIES LIMIT
    
    "Six Alakazams? Bo-ring.  Why don't you try diversifying?"
    
    SLEEP RESTRICTION
    
    "Come on!  I'm already asleep!  Isn't two simultaneous Spores a little 
    excessive?" (Note: This restriction doesn't count Rest-induced sleep.)
    
    EVADE BAN/RESTRICTION
    
    "Remove those DTs and Minimizes immediately!  I don't want to be here all 
    day!"
    
    ONE-HIT KILL BAN
    
    "This is Pokemon, not Craps.  Fissure, Horn Drill, and Guillotine are simply 
    out of place in this game."
    
    RBY PURITY
    
    "Tradeback Move Lists?  To hell with them!  This is RBY!"
    
    **EDITORIALS**
    
    1 editorial(s) so far.
    
    Me, 2003/01/31:
    
    "People have a tendency to be too restrictive on themselves.  The clearest 
    cause I can see is that they don't want to have to think about as much, and so 
    they reduce the possible scope of the game.  If this is so, it effectively 
    defeats most of the purpose of such a game.
    
    Unfortunately, this reduction prevents many otherwise-viable teams from ever 
    materializing.
    
    First things first, let me say: Pokemon needs its luck-based decisions.  If 
    there was no luck, then a given battle between any two players would always 
    turn out nearly identically, and there would be no use for rematches.  That 
    said, both One-Hit Kills and Evasion Modifiers are simply ways of testing 
    luck.  It might pay off, making you invincible or ending the battle quickly.  
    On the other hand, if you're misfortunate, then all those turns spent with 
    Double Team or Fissure are completely wasted.  It's the probability factor 
    that keeps the game interesting: they're not guaranteed to overpower the game, 
    but they're not so bad as to be inconsiderable for a team.  And if you're 
    worried about 5-hour evasion wars, then maybe Pokemon isn't the right game for 
    you.
    
    Mewtwo was made as nothing more than a prize for "completing" the game; it 
    doesn't belong in the same realm as the rest.  Give it eight turns, and most 
    teams will be long gone.  No other Pokemon pulls this off.  So yes, it does 
    need to be set aside.
    
    As for Tradebacks, this is quite possibly the subject of more debate than any 
    other in the game's history.  Here's my stance on the subject:
    
    This game needs to be playable if it is to remain a game.  One of the ways of 
    accomplishing this is to keep the environment changing.
    
    This has already happened.  Yellow came out, with its moveset expansions, and 
    no one complained.  Stadium came out, allowing Raichu to acquire Surf and 
    Golduck to acquire Amnesia, and no one complained.  Likewise, Crystal provided 
    about 25 new egg moves, some of which were quite usable, and still no one 
    complained (at least not after the game was physically released in this 
    country).
    
    Why, then, is the G/S transition unacceptable for move distribution?  Is it 
    the sheer quantity of moves involved, which requires you to think even more, 
    which can't possibly be good?  How absurd..."thinking too much"...
    
    There is one other possibility, that being "RBY and GSC were intended as 
    completely separate domains".  Except if this were true, the Time Machine 
    would not have been created in the first place, RBY-only moves would have to 
    be banned from GSC, and all RBY players would have no reason to keep playing 
    those games after October 15, 2000 (since the history books on those games 
    could progress no longer).
    
    I'm viewing all of Pokemon as a single game, and the RBY and GSC subdivisions 
    as two different rule subsets by which to play the game, one of which just so 
    happens to be more limited than the other.  But all of it evolves at once, so 
    if a move is given to one version of the game, any other version to which it 
    can be transferred must have access as well.
    
    Here's a short and simple ruleset by which RBY battles can be played as openly 
    as possible without being broken.  I call it the Unrestricted Standard Set of 
    Rules, or USSR:
    
    1. All moves shall function as mandated by the current battle medium.
    2. Mewtwo at L83 or less is legal; L84 or more results in disqualification.
    3. Mew at L90 or less is legal; L91 or more results in disqualification.
    4. Use of multiple Pokemon of the same species on the same team results in 
    disqualification.
    5. Use of any move not on a Pokemon's Level-up, TM, HM, Stadium Special, or 
    Tradeback List (as subject to the 11/11 Criterion) results in 
    disqualification.
    
    Have fun, and don't do drugs." 
    
    Submit your editorials at the address found way back on page 4.
    
    ----------------
    |Gameshark Help|
    ----------------
    
    Just for quick reference, here's a quick list of the codes you'll use most 
    often.  (All codes listed are for Red/Blue; Yellow may require the subtraction 
    of 1 from the sixth digit.)  Also note that, unless a key is listed below it, 
    'xx' is equal to the hex representation of whatever number you're looking for.  
    I won't go into a complete chart of hex values, but hex 63 is decimal 99, and 
    hex FF is decimal 255 (the highest allowed value).  Those values should 
    satisfy most of your needs.
    
    Move Modifier: 01xx73D1 (first), 01xx74D1 (second), 01xx75D1 (third), 01xx76D1 
    (fourth)
    
    Key for xx: 
    00 - <empty slot> 
    01 - Pound 
    02 - Karate Chop 
    03 - Double Slap 
    04 - Comet Punch 
    05 - Mega Punch 
    06 - Pay Day 
    07 - Fire Punch 
    08 - Ice Punch 
    09 - Thunderpunch 
    0A - Scratch 
    0B - Vice Grip 
    0C - Guillotine 
    0D - Razor Wind 
    0E - Swords Dance 
    0F - Cut 
    10 - Gust 
    11 - Wing Attack 
    12 - Whirlwind 
    13 - Fly 
    14 - Bind 
    15 - Slam 
    16 - Vine Whip 
    17 - Stomp 
    18 - Double Kick 
    19 - Mega Kick 
    1A - Jump Kick 
    1B - Rolling Kick 
    1C - Sand-Attack 
    1D - Headbutt 
    1E - Horn Attack 
    1F - Fury Attack 
    20 - Horn Drill 
    21 - Tackle 
    22 - Body Slam 
    23 - Wrap 
    24 - Take Down 
    25 - Thrash 
    26 - Double-Edge 
    27 - Tail Whip 
    28 - Poison Sting 
    29 - Twineedle
    2A - Pin Missile 
    2B - Leer 
    2C - Bite 
    2D - Growl 
    2E - Roar 
    2F - Sing 
    30 - Supersonic 
    31 - Sonicboom 
    32 - Disable 
    33 - Acid 
    34 - Ember 
    35 - Flamethrower 
    36 - Mist 
    37 - Water Gun 
    38 - Hydro Pump 
    39 - Surf 
    3A - Ice Beam 
    3B - Blizzard 
    3C - Psybeam 
    3D - Bubblebeam 
    3E - Aurora Beam 
    3F - Hyper Beam 
    40 - Peck 
    41 - Drill Peck 
    42 - Submission 
    43 - Low Kick 
    44 - Counter 
    45 - Seismic Toss 
    46 - Strength 
    47 - Absorb 
    48 - Mega Drain 
    49 - Leech Seed 
    4A - Growth 
    4B - Razor Leaf 
    4C - Solar Beam 
    4D - Poisonpowder 
    4E - Stun Spore 
    4F - Sleep Powder 
    50 - Petal Dance 
    51 - String Shot 
    52 - Dragon Rage 
    53 - Fire Spin 
    54 - Thundershock 
    55 - Thunderbolt 
    56 - Thunder Wave 
    57 - Thunder 
    58 - Rock Throw 
    59 - Earthquake 
    5A - Fissure 
    5B - Dig 
    5C - Toxic 
    5D - Confusion 
    5E - Psychic 
    5F - Hypnosis 
    60 - Meditate 
    61 - Agility 
    62 - Quick Attack 
    63 - Rage 
    64 - Teleport 
    65 - Night Shade 
    66 - Mimic 
    67 - Screech 
    68 - Double Team 
    69 - Recover 
    6A - Harden 
    6B - Minimize 
    6C - Smokescreen 
    6D - Confuse Ray 
    6E - Withdraw 
    6F - Defense Curl 
    70 - Barrier 
    71 - Light Screen 
    72 - Haze 
    73 - Reflect 
    74 - Focus Energy 
    75 - Bide 
    76 - Metronome 
    77 - Mirror Move 
    78 - Selfdestruct 
    79 - Egg Bomb 
    7A - Lick 
    7B - Smog 
    7C - Sludge 
    7D - Bone Club 
    7E - Fire Blast 
    7F - Waterfall 
    80 - Clamp 
    81 - Swift 
    82 - Skull Bash 
    83 - Spike Cannon 
    84 - Constrict 
    85 - Amnesia 
    86 - Kinesis 
    87 - Softboiled 
    88 - Hi Jump Kick 
    89 - Glare 
    8A - Dream Eater 
    8B - Poison Gas 
    8C - Barrage 
    8D - Leech Life 
    8E - Lovely Kiss 
    8F - Sky Attack 
    90 - Transform 
    91 - Bubble 
    92 - Dizzy Punch 
    93 - Spore 
    94 - Flash 
    95 - Psywave 
    96 - Splash 
    97 - Acid Armor 
    98 - Crabhammer 
    99 - Explosion 
    9A - Fury Swipes 
    9B - Bonemerang 
    9C - Rest 
    9D - Rock Slide 
    9E - Hyper Fang 
    9F - Sharpen 
    A0 - Conversion 
    A1 - Tri Attack 
    A2 - Super Fang 
    A3 - Slash 
    A4 - Substitute 
    A5 - Struggle
    
    Wild Pokemon level modifier: 01xxBFCF
    
    Wild Pokemon species modifier: 01xxD8CF
    
    Key for xx:
    01 - Rhydon
    02 - Kangaskhan
    03 - NidoranM
    04 - Clefairy
    05 - Spearow
    06 - Voltorb
    07 - Nidoking
    08 - Slowbro
    09 - Ivysaur
    0A - Exeggutor
    0B - Lickitung
    0C - Exeggcute
    0D - Grimer
    0E - Gengar
    0F - NidoranF
    10 - Nidoqueen
    11 - Cubone
    12 - Rhyhorn
    13 - Lapras
    14 - Arcanine
    15 - Mew
    16 - Gyarados
    17 - Shellder
    18 - Tentacool
    19 - Gastly
    1A - Scyther
    1B - Staryu
    1C - Blastoise
    1D - Pinsir
    1E - Tangela
    1F - Missingno.
    20 - Missingno.
    21 - Growlithe
    22 - Onix
    23 - Fearow
    24 - Pidgey
    25 - Slowpoke
    26 - Kadabra
    27 - Graveler
    28 - Chansey
    29 - Machoke
    2A - Mr. Mime
    2B - Hitmonlee
    2C - Hitmonchan
    2D - Arbok
    2E - Parasect
    2F - Psyduck
    30 - Drowzee
    31 - Golem
    32 - Missingno.
    33 - Magmar
    34 - Mankey
    35 - Electabuzz
    36 - Magneton
    37 - Koffing
    38 - Missingno.
    39 - Missingno.
    3A - Seel
    3B - Diglett
    3C - Tauros
    3D - Missingno.
    3E - Missingno.
    3F - Missingno.
    40 - Farfetch'd
    41 - Venonat
    42 - Dragonite
    43 - Missingno.
    44 - Missingno.
    45 - Missingno.
    46 - Doduo
    47 - Poliwag
    48 - Jynx
    49 - Moltres
    4A - Articuno
    4B - Zapdos
    4C - Ditto
    4D - Meowth
    4E - Krabby
    4F - Missingno.
    50 - Missingno.
    51 - Missingno.
    52 - Vulpix
    53 - Ninetales
    54 - Pikachu
    55 - Raichu
    56 - Missingno.
    57 - Missingno.
    58 - Dratini
    59 - Dragonair
    5A - Kabuto
    5B - Kabutops
    5C - Horsea
    5D - Seadra
    5E - Missingno.
    5F - Missingno.
    60 - Sandshrew
    61 - Sandslash
    62 - Omanyte
    63 - Omastar
    64 - Jigglypuff
    65 - Wigglytuff
    66 - Eevee
    67 - Flareon
    68 - Jolteon
    69 - Vaporeon
    6A - Machop
    6B - Zubat
    6C - Ekans
    6D - Paras
    6E - Poliwhirl
    6F - Poliwrath
    70 - Weedle
    71 - Kakuna
    72 - Beedrill
    73 - Missingno.
    74 - Dodrio
    75 - Primeape
    76 - Dugtrio
    77 - Venomoth
    78 - Dewgong
    79 - Missingno.
    7A - Missingno.
    7B - Caterpie
    7C - Metapod
    7D - Butterfree
    7E - Machamp
    7F - Missingno.
    80 - Golduck
    81 - Hypno
    82 - Golbat
    83 - Mewtwo
    84 - Snorlax
    85 - Magikarp
    86 - Missingno.
    87 - Missingno.
    88 - Muk
    8A - Kingler
    8B - Cloyster
    8C - Missingno.
    8D - Electrode
    8E - Clefable
    8F - Weezing
    90 - Persian
    91 - Marowak
    92 - Missingno.
    93 - Haunter
    94 - Abra
    95 - Alakazam
    96 - Pidgeotto
    97 - Pidgeot
    98 - Starmie
    99 - Bulbasaur
    9A - Venusaur
    9B - Tentacruel
    9C - Missingno.
    9D - Goldeen
    9E - Seaking
    9F - Missingno.
    A0 - Missingno.
    A1 - Missingno.
    A2 - Missingno.
    A3 - Ponyta
    A4 - Rapidash
    A5 - Rattata
    A6 - Raticate
    A7 - Nidorino
    A8 - Nidorina
    A9 - Geodude
    AA - Porygon
    AB - Aerodactyl
    AC - Missingno.
    AD - Magnemite
    AE - Missingno.
    AF - Missingno.
    B0 - Charmander
    B1 - Squirtle
    B2 - Charmeleon
    B3 - Wartortle
    B4 - Charizard
    B5 - Missingno.
    B6 - Missingno.
    B7 - Missingno.
    B8 - Missingno.
    B9 - Oddish
    BA - Gloom
    BB - Vileplume
    BC - Bellsprout
    BD - Weepinbell
    BE - Victreebel
    
    Trainers do NOT block Poke Balls: 010157D0 (don't activate this code until 
    after the battle starts)
    
    Walk through walls: 010138CD
    
    Item quantity 1: 01xx1FD3 (change the 1F to 21 for second item, 23 for third 
    item, etc. adding 2 each time)
    
    Item type 1: 01xx1ED3 (change the 1E to 20 for second item, 22 for third item, 
    etc. adding 2 each time)
    
    Key for xx:
    
    01 - Master Ball
    02 - Ultra Ball
    03 - Great Ball
    04 - Poke Ball
    05 - Town Map
    06 - Bicycle
    07 - ????? (basically a surfboard)
    08 - Safari Ball
    09 - Pokedex
    0A - Moon Stone
    0B - Antidote
    0C - Burn Heal
    0D - Ice Heal
    0E - Awakening
    0F - Parlyz Heal
    10 - Full Restore
    11 - Max Potion
    12 - Hyper Potion
    13 - Super Potion
    14 - Potion
    15 - Boulderbadge
    16 - Cascadebadge
    17 - Thunderbadge
    18 - Rainbowbadge
    19 - Soulbadge
    1A - Marshbadge
    1B - Volcanobadge
    1C - Earthbadge
    1D - Escape Rope
    1E - Repel
    1F - Old Amber
    20 - Fire Stone
    21 - Thunderstone
    22 - Water Stone
    23 - HP Up
    24 - Protein
    25 - Iron
    26 - Carbos
    27 - Calcium
    28 - Rare Candy
    29 - Dome Fossil
    2A - Helix Fossil
    2B - Secret Key
    2C - ????? (no use found)
    2D - Bike Voucher
    2E - X Accuracy
    2F - Leaf Stone
    30 - Card Key
    31 - Nugget
    32 - PP Up
    33 - Poke Doll
    34 - Full Heal
    35 - Revive
    36 - Max Revive
    37 - Guard Spec.
    38 - Super Repel
    39 - Max Repel
    3A - Dire Hit
    3B - Coin
    3C - Fresh Water
    3D - Soda Pop
    3E - Lemonade
    3F - S.S. Ticket
    40 - Gold Teeth
    41 - X Attack
    42 - X Defend
    43 - X Speed
    44 - X Special
    45 - Coin Case
    46 - Oak's Parcel
    47 - Item Finder
    48 - Silph Scope
    49 - Poke Flute
    4A - Lift Key
    4B - Exp. All
    4C - Old Rod
    4D - Good Rod
    4E - Super Rod
    4F - PP Up
    50 - Ether
    51 - Max Ether
    52 - Elixir
    53 - Max Elixir
    C4 - HM01 (Cut)
    C5 - HM02 (Fly)
    C6 - HM03 (Surf)
    C7 - HM04 (Strength)
    C8 - HM05 (Flash)
    C9 - TM01 (Mega Punch)
    CA - TM02 (Razor Wind)
    CB - TM03 (Swords Dance)
    CC - TM04 (Whirlwind)
    CD - TM05 (Mega Kick)
    CE - TM06 (Toxic)
    CF - TM07 (Horn Drill)
    D0 - TM08 (Body Slam)
    D1 - TM09 (Take Down)
    D2 - TM10 (Double-Edge)
    D3 - TM11 (Bubblebeam)
    D4 - TM12 (Water Gun)
    D5 - TM13 (Ice Beam)
    D6 - TM14 (Blizzard)
    D7 - TM15 (Hyper Beam)
    D8 - TM16 (Pay Day)
    D9 - TM17 (Submission)
    DA - TM18 (Counter)
    DB - TM19 (Seismic Toss)
    DC - TM20 (Rage)
    DD - TM21 (Mega Drain)
    DE - TM22 (Solarbeam)
    DF - TM23 (Dragon Rage)
    E0 - TM24 (Thunderbolt)
    E1 - TM25 (Thunder)
    E2 - TM26 (Earthquake)
    E3 - TM27 (Fissure)
    E4 - TM28 (Dig)
    E5 - TM29 (Psychic)
    E6 - TM30 (Teleport)
    E7 - TM31 (Mimic)
    E8 - TM32 (Double Team)
    E9 - TM33 (Reflect)
    EA - TM34 (Bide)
    EB - TM35 (Metronome)
    EC - TM36 (Selfdestruct)
    ED - TM37 (Egg Bomb)
    EE - TM38 (Fire Blast)
    EF - TM39 (Swift)
    F0 - TM40 (Skull Bash)
    F1 - TM41 (Softboiled)
    F2 - TM42 (Dream Eater)
    F3 - TM43 (Sky Attack)
    F4 - TM44 (Rest)
    F5 - TM45 (Thunder Wave)
    F6 - TM46 (Psywave)
    F7 - TM47 (Explosion)
    F8 - TM48 (Rock Slide)
    F9 - TM49 (Tri Attack)
    FA - TM50 (Substitute)
    FF - <empty slot>
    
    ***********************
    *202. Pokemon Analysis*
    ***********************
    
    This section will narrow down the choices for Pokemon on a team.  Starting 
    with 81 contestants, I'll cut the field significantly, by reviewing each and 
    every one of them (and dismissing quite a few).  Then it's your job to knock 
    it to six in the next section.
    
    Venusaur: If you didn't already know, you soon will: Having a Psychic weakness 
    in this game is almost automatic grounds for disqualification.  Which is 
    unfortunate, since Venusaur is otherwise ranked near the top in Grass.  It has 
    the highest Speed in the type, along with Sleep Powder, Leech Seed, and Body 
    Slam (okay, 60% less likely to PAR than Stun Spore, but at least it deals 
    damage...), the best disabling moves available to the type.  (Just don't try 
    Toxic; poison is a bad mistake here, especially with no way to stop switches.)  
    Razor Leaf is the game's best Grass attack, and Normal attacks are usually 
    worth checking out for consistency purposes.  And yet, all because of that 
    "03" in the second type, it's nearly unviable.  Try it, but not in the 
    presence of Psychics.
    
    Charizard: Some have voted Charizard the best Fire-type in the game.  And 
    that's from people OVER the age of 9.  Obviously, having a second type of 
    Flying will negate one of its physical weaknesses, but it also creates a 
    second weakness (W4) to the other.  You may point out that Charizard happens 
    to get Earthquake to counteract Rock, but here's a general rule: Just because 
    a Pokemon can get a move that's super effective against its W4, doesn't mean 
    it actually does anything.  For example, it takes FOUR Earthquakes to put down 
    Rhydon, whereas even a single Rock Slide before then will result in a 
    miserable death for Charizard.  But EQ isn't all bad; it does give Charizard 
    an advantage against other Fire-types, as well as Electrics (which it does 
    stand SOME chance of beating).  Even though it has a good reputation in the 
    eyes of the little kids, that doesn't AUTOMATICALLY disqualify it...it just 
    means Charizard has a steeper hill to climb.  Or fly over, not that it's a 
    good idea to waste a move slot with Fly.  Give the poor dragon a chance, since 
    it's one of the few versatile Fire-types.
    
    Blastoise: It's been voted the most beneficial starter by many player's guides 
    (I have no idea what gave them this idea), but it's the worst off in battle.  
    Sure, Blastoise learns Ice Beam and Earthquake to cover both its weaknesses, 
    but they don't work as promised.  Special's lower-end among Water-types, and 
    lack of a second type here likely hurts Blastoise.  Try Starmie and Lapras.
    
    Butterfree: There's a reason Butterfree is allowed to reach third stage by 
    L10: because IT NEEDS A BRIEF TIME TO SHINE.  Namely "end of Viridian Forest 
    to Route 24".  Put simply, Butterfree is "a Bug/Flyer with no Bug/Flying moves 
    worth mentioning, but rather a status inflictor who just so happens to pick up 
    Solarbeam and Psychic."  Do we know another status inflictor who just so 
    happens to get Solarbeam and Psychic?  Yep--Exeggutor.  And Eggy is capable of 
    doing other things.  And gets STAB on both of those moves.  And isn't nearly 
    as fragile.  Even the Grass/Poisons, with the huge blemish known as a Psychic 
    weakness, STILL take precedence over Butterfree and its 198 Defense, not to 
    mention six weaknesses (7 if you give a W4 double credit).  After your fourth 
    hour of gameplay, make sure you choose the "Release" option for Butterfree.
    
    Beedrill: Slightly better than Butterfree, but still not a wise idea for top-
    notch teams.  Beedrill is the exclusive holder of what's arguably the best Bug 
    move (Twineedle), is one of two that has the other contender for best Bug move 
    (Pin Missile, along with Jolteon), and gets Swords Dance to pump them up.  As 
    if a 178-Defense bug could ever get away with Swords Dance.  "But Bug beats 
    Psychic!" you say.  Hardly, and in any case Beedrill's second type (Poison) 
    leaves any hopes of this argument on the outskirts of the Logic Chamber.  
    Here's a question...what do Beedrill and Miss Cleo have in common?  They're 
    both branded with the warning: FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY.  That wraps it 
    up.
    
    Pidgeot: Even Ash got something right, when he decided to release his Pidgeot.  
    Sure, it's a good Pokemon with which to waste a slot on Fly.  And it has 
    above-average HP.  But like the other Normal-Flyers, its attacks are limited 
    to those types.  It doesn't even get Drill Peck, the one Flying move that 
    might make it worthwhile.  Granted, Pidgeot does learn Mirror Move, but the 
    chances for that move to shine are highly limited, such as an Ice Beaming 
    Dragonite.  And since Dragonite can't even OHKO itself with Ice Beam, what 
    makes you think Pidgeot can?  The one move that has potential, isn't backed by 
    high enough stats to use it.  And hence Pidgeot gets the stamp of rejection.
    
    Raticate: Raticate's strategy can be packed into two words: "Super Fang".  
    Capable of inflicting 352 on Chansey, 208 on Mewtwo, and a whopping 112 on 
    Diglett, Super Fang is both a Substitute deterrent and a consistent source of 
    damage.  And if I told you that Raticate could use Thunderbolt and Ice Beam, 
    what would you say?  "What Special to they run off?"  That's the spirit.  And 
    the answer, "not enough", pins down Raticate as a one-move wonder.  With low 
    staying power.  A possible metagame choice, against things like Chansey and 
    Snorlax.
    
    Fearow: It's better than Pidgeot, and not because it gets Mirror Move 22 
    levels earlier.  It's all a matter of Drill Peck and a slightly better Speed.  
    Attack is decent (but not as good as Dodrio's), and its types are both 
    supported with STAB moves.  If it weren't for Dodrio, Fearow would be a 
    recommended choice.  But, just as you don't settle for a pistol when you can 
    have an AK-47 (assuming it's LEGAL for you to have an AK-47), you don't choose 
    a Pokemon in the presence of a superior one.
    
    Arbok: As Team Rocket's Jessie has repeatedly demonstrated, Arbok is bad.  Not 
    bad as in "evil", but bad as in "can't hold its own".  Sure, it's the 
    exclusive holder of Glare.  And sure, it has Earthquake to deal with other 
    Poison-types.  But who in their right mind plays with Poison anyway?  And 
    Arbok has NO second type to cover any of the weaknesses that make Poison the 
    second-worst type in the game (rivaling Bug for last)!  CRIKEY!  IT'S A 
    HUNDRED-FORTY-POUND SNAKE!  Unless you're Crocodile Hunter, you have no 
    business dealing with Arbok, and even if you are, don't think you can do much 
    with it.  If you MUST use a mono-Poison, at least grab a Koffing and improve 
    the self-image of Mr. K (administrator at www.azureheights.com, the biggest 
    third-party contributor to my research.)
    
    Raichu: Surf makes it the one Electric that covers the Ground weakness (not 
    always, though; Sandslash can take a Surf and kill in one).  Sound good?  
    Well, bad staying power is never a good thing, but the real question is "Is 
    Surf enough to offset that bad point?"  If only it had 30 extra Defense, 
    Raichu would be in the running for "best Electric."  But as it is, it's just 
    an average option.  Zapdos or Jolteon should normally take precedence.  Use 
    Raichu only when you become bored with those two, or when everyone you know 
    plays six Golems to a team.
    
    Sandslash: Good standing for best Ground-type--it doesn't have the W4s of 
    Rhydon, and Swords Dance doesn't hurt.  Use of Swords Dance + Swift is a good 
    anti-Double-Team measure.  Speed is above average.....FOR A GROUND TYPE!  Hey, 
    at least it outruns Clefable and Lapras.  Worth checking out as an Electric 
    deterrent.
    
    Nidoqueen: Both Nidoking and Nidoqueen are popular among the kids, likely 
    because of their consistently average stats and large TM compatibility 
    (although Clefable and Chansey match 'em).  That would be fine, except for one 
    fact.  Type 1 is POISON.  Ground weakness, Psychic weakness, and the Ground 
    type costs it two more all to get an immunity to Electric.  The idea of 
    turning a Ground-type into an all-around butcher would be nice, but not with 
    the two worst weaknesses you can have.  Send them back to Route 22 where they 
    belong.
    
    Nidoking: Contrary to what previously filled this space, Nidoking isn't just a 
    coin-flip decision with Nidoqueen.  Instead, like Gengar, it seeks to test 
    whether the Poison type is impossible to overcome.  Focus Energy and/or 
    Amnesia helps with this, and the recent possibility of Lovely Kiss certainly 
    turned a few heads (away from Nidoking, that is).  Earthquake, Ice Beam, Surf, 
    Thunderbolt...you name it.  Both Physical and Special, Nidoking has attacks 
    for countless occasions.  And unlike Nidoqueen, it can develop enough power to 
    use them.
    
    Clefable: Fewer HP than Wigglytuff, but Clefable still outdoes it in battle.  
    Defensively, it gets Minimize (something Wiggly can't claim), with 8 more PP 
    than Double Team.  A fairly irrelevant fact, but useful in PP wars.  However, 
    it's those Defense and Special boosts that are of interest.  And since it has 
    incredible move compatibility, just think of Clefable as a Chansey with a 
    pumped physical aspect, at the cost of half its special survivability.  
    Unfortunately, special attacks dominate in RBY, so it looks like Chansey 
    claims another victory.  But Clefable could still score some points for you if 
    you're playing underused.
    
    Ninetales: If there's such a thing as a good Fire-type, Ninetales may be it.  
    Granted, most of Fire's strengths can already be covered by Ice (except for 
    the nigh-worthless Bug and Ice itself, which is usually paired with Water to 
    eliminate the weakness), and Ice has a few more advantages against good types.  
    And Fire's side effect, Burn, is nothing compared to the permanent 
    helplessness of Freeze.  That said, if Charizard is the Articuno of Fire 
    (since Moltres sure isn't), Ninetales is its Lapras.  It's not defensive, but 
    Fire never was a defensive type.  Maybe call it a Dewgong instead of a Lapras.  
    Okay, so it can Confuse Ray, then Body Slam for double disability (for you out 
    there who are intent on status afflictions, you can trade back both Headbutt 
    and the ill-advised Hypnosis).  Attacks aren't nearly as diverse as Lapras (or 
    Dewgong for that matter), but it's Fire.  Paralleling it with red in Magic (an 
    excellent trading card game for which it's highly advisable you read about and 
    play, www.wizards.com/magic), we find that color to be absolutely reckless at 
    doing one thing and one thing only: a barrage of conflagrations aimed at the 
    opponent.  Most Fire-types are that way too; Ninetales at least shows some 
    creativity.  Score some merit for that.  But battles aren't won by creativity.
    
    Wigglytuff: One of the two biggest mascots at Azure Heights (Koffing being the 
    other), Wigglytuff at least has some merit.  483 HP ranks #3; even with sub-
    par defensive stats elsewhere, Wiggly can take a beating.  And with such a 
    wide range of attacks from Double-Edge to Ice Beam to Thunderbolt, it's tough 
    to predict as well.  Good for fun teams, but Chansey still beats it out in the 
    all-purpose department.  Note to all: If you ever see Mr. K on the streets, 
    accompanied by what looks like a malformed bunny in a black ski mask, RUN 
    AWAY.  Lest you take Double-Edge after Double-Edge, land in the ICU, and are 
    forced to pay $300,000 in hospital bills.  Remember, it could happen to YOU.
    
    Golbat: There's a reason Zubat and Golbat are the most common cave inhabitants 
    in the game: because catching them isn't worth much.  Poison/Flying is another 
    one of those very bad type combos, forcing Electric, Ice, AND Psychic 
    weaknesses.  And while Golbat does get Confuse Ray and Haze, Haze is 
    contradictory to Confuse Ray, and both require considerable staying power, 
    which Golbat doesn't have.  Maybe if and when it gets better stats (which, by 
    most calculations, happened after three years), Golbat is worth something.  
    But otherwise, it's just a way to fill the "random encounter" variables.
    
    Vileplume: Before you get any ideas about Vileplume, I'll remind you once 
    again: Don't do drugs.  Vileplume does offer an interesting alternative to 
    Venusaur, at least in pure RBY.  No Razor Leaf, but there is an in-flavor 
    alternative in Petal Dance.  However, GSC changes all that, allowing each of 
    the Grass/Poisons to get both moves.  In Vileplume's slow (198) hands, the 
    criticals on Razor Leaf won't be numerous enough for an average greater than 
    Petal Dance's 90; however, Razor Leaf doesn't self-confuse.  Vileplume does 
    get Swords Dance, but so does Venusaur, and Vileplume doesn't have the staying 
    power to get away with consistent Swords Dances.  Keep it away from the rigors 
    of serious competition.
    
    Parasect: "Inflicts Sleep.  Accuracy: 99.609375%."  How abusive is that?  
    Well, when the only legal user of that move has speed 158, not as much as it 
    could be.  Each time you try to use Spore, the opponent gets a free hit on 
    Parasect (unless you successfully preempt the turn your opponent wakes up, 
    which takes considerable luck).  And with three W4s (Fire, Flying, and 
    Poison), that one hit could very well mean doom.  One of the more annoying 
    Bugs, but the game is decided by plays to win, not to annoy.  However, correct 
    play with Parasect can even lead to the demise of Mewtwo (with one important 
    exception, to be discussed later)!  But that's about it.  Maybe if it beats 
    Mewtwo, it can go on to beat Alakazam in a Mewtwo-free environment.  Show at 
    least SOMEONE that the 2 in "Bug vs. Psychic" on the type chart isn't 
    completely irrelevant, and you'll have satisfied an "Experiments with the 
    Underused" requirement.
    
    Venomoth: A Bug/Poison with Psychic?  Go look up Butterfree, and you'll find 
    that Venomoth is almost a dead-on clone of Butterfree with slightly better 
    stats and a changed type.  Venomoth has the requisite disability moves, little 
    to no STAB support, and the aforementioned Psychic.  Notwithstanding the 
    Speed, Exeggutor wipes Venomoth clean everywhere else.  
    
    Dugtrio: A GROUND-TYPE WITH SPEED?  Yes, but it offers NOTHING else.  Can't 
    attack for much, can't take a hit...well, it CAN hit with Fissure.  That's the 
    one thing Dugtrio has working for it, and even so only 30% of the time, and 
    not at all against Mewtwo, Aerodactyl, Jolteon, or Electrode.  That's just 
    sad: a Ground-type incapable of dealing with Electrics.  What else is the type 
    supposed to be good for?
    
    Persian: "You want your criticals?  I got your criticals RIGHT here!"  If Team 
    Rocket's Meowth were to evolve, that's what it would likely say.  Slash's 70 
    power is nearly sure to be doubled with the awesome speed of Persian, and it's 
    one of only two Normal-types to get the move (to dismiss the other one, 
    Farfetch'd, just read its section).  So we've got consistent 210-power shots 
    from 238 Attack, total 49980--almost as good as Rhydon using Earthquake, 
    especially when Persian only has one weakness.  And did I mention that Persian 
    can get Bubblebeam and Thunderbolt?  Sure, the Special isn't enough to count 
    on those moves as reliable damage.  But when you get the chance (or when 
    you're forced into it, such as against that Rhydon), there are always 
    diversified attacks.  Oh, and it trades back Amnesia in case you're looking 
    for more motivation to use those moves.  If you're looking for Speed, Persian 
    is worth a shot.  Or two.  As long as the shots in question aren't gunshots 
    aimed at its head.  Whiskey shots?  Okay, but only if you're 21 or over (to 
    the Persian, that's just 3 of our years).  Anyway, behold the awesome power of 
    the cat, and if you like it, good for you.
    
    Golduck: Good thing Golduck finally picked up Amnesia--it needed it.  
    Unfortunately, it also needed more.  The stats are all clumped in the 78-85 
    range, a stat balance unsurpassed by all but Ditto and Mew, but unfortunately 
    at a level that only qualifies as "borderline good".  No area of excellence.  
    Slowbro is the much better choice: it has quite a bit more staying power 
    (which is needed for dependable Amnesia use), can disable with T-Wave, and 
    gets Psychic in such a way that doesn't prohibit Amnesia's coexistence.  Try 
    it out (as a Psyduck) in the Petit Cup, but Golduck is by no means a Tier 1 
    competitor.  Or a Tier 2.  3?  Possibly.
    
    Primeape: Best summed up as "a faster Machamp that passes up Earthquake".  
    Ignoring the obvious fact that all other stats are lower than Machamp, that 
    lack of Earthquake simply dooms Primeape.  Failing to obtain the game's 
    strongest drawback-free move, especially in the world of physicals, only makes 
    you lose possible KOs.  Focus Energy supplementing a 95 isn't bad; just under 
    75% of hits would be critical (and criticals mean Primeape can kill such 
    things as Chansey and Charizard).  However, when you're as frail as Primeape 
    (especially with Submission recoils), using one turn for a nondamaging move 
    doesn't provide enough time for the move to pay for itself.  So it's back to 
    basics, and when the basics don't include Earthquake, Machamp beats you down 
    in the quest for "alpha male".  You did give Machamp that 15 DV, didn't you?
    
    Arcanine: Another would-have-been candidate, Arcanine tries to make up for 
    fewer moves than its counterpart, Ninetales, with tougher stats.  Like 
    Ninetales, it's stuck with Dig instead of Earthquake (and Dig is infinitely 
    less valuable), and like Ninetales, it has to get stoned in order to evolve 
    (try to imagine THAT picture).  But there's no Confuse Ray, not enough 
    Physical moves to support that 318 stat, and Special is actually LOWER than 
    its self-proclaimed rival.  Arcanine is overrated, as is the Fire-type as a 
    whole.  Unless you're building a theme team, leave the dog alone.
    
    Poliwrath: Okay, so after something evolves twice, why is it still a 119-pound 
    TADPOLE?  Granted, GSC solves this problem with ease, but it's worth pointing 
    out that this fact defies the meaning of evolution.  Enough with the flavor 
    questions; they already imply that Poliwrath sucks, and it does.  Forget 
    Amnesia; Slowbro uses that move to greater effect, and isn't Psychic-weak.  
    While Poliwrath also delves into the physical world, the 268 Attack pales in 
    comparison with the only two physical attackers approved by the FDA, Machamp 
    and Snorlax.  Surf, Ice Beam, Psychic, Earthquake, Submission...all on the 
    same Pokemon...until Amnesia, stats aren't enough to use it...too vulnerable 
    to use Amnesia in the first place...something tells me this Pokemon will need 
    a cross-time improvement.
    
    Alakazam: When Mewtwo is banned (read: when facing anyone over 12), Alakazam 
    should be your fallback measure.  Special is "only" 368, and there's no 
    Amnesia.  But you can still utilize the offensive aspects of Mewtwo in a less-
    delinquent package (especially after trading back to GSC for your choice of 
    Fire Punch, Ice Punch, or Thunderpunch).  Defense is rather low, but Reflect 
    is always available, and the superior Barrier takes its place after the time 
    warp.  Alakazam rivals Mew for #2 Psychic, and feel free to use either (if 
    you're allowed to).
    
    Machamp:  If Machamp can't overcome the unusability of the Fighting-type, 
    nothing can.  And it's not doing a good job as such.  Even with 358 Attack and 
    the best variety of physical moves, Machamp's list of tasks are generally 
    limited to killing Normals, and the occasional Charizard.  However, once GSC 
    allowed Machamp to trade back Meditate, the position improved.  Offensively, a 
    1-Meditate Machamp is as powerful as Rhydon when it comes to Earthquake and 
    Rock Slide, but defensively a 1-Meditate Machamp may as well be dead from the 
    hit opposite Meditate.  So it didn't improve that much.  Still a good physical 
    threat, but the game is so centralized around special attacks that physicals 
    rarely get the credit they would deserve with more thorough testing by the 
    programmers.
    
    Victreebel: Um...it learns Swords Dance.  So do Venusaur and Vileplume, and 
    they also sport better staying power.  Um...it has 308 Attack.  Swords Dance 
    nullifies that attack difference, since all three are high enough to reach 999 
    from Swords Dances, and no one gets there faster than the others.  Um...it 
    learns Bind.  Go read page 20 for Bind.  Um...Victreebel is just an inferior 
    Venusaur.  1 out of 4 isn't bad, is it?  Oh, it is.  Forget it, then.  NEXT!
    
    Tentacruel: As you should know by now, Psychic-weak Pokemon get to do a lot in 
    order to try and make up for the weakness.  In Tentacruel's case, it comes in 
    the form of 338 Special, highest of all Water-types.  Although it's weak to 
    Mewtwo's Psychic, Tentacruel can still survive it (barring Amnesia) with 100+ 
    HP to spare.  Now, obviously it can't do much in return, but it's a testament 
    to the value of high stats.  And the other weakness, Ground, is countered 
    quite nicely by Surf, plus a Barrier can nullify any Physical weakness for any 
    Pokemon.  However, Tentacruel lacks diversity, and as such is relegated to the 
    Underused.
    
    Golem: Golem is on a divergent path from the Pokemon it most emulates, Rhydon.  
    Golem gets an extra 20 Defense, but the 50 fewer HP puts it on the losing end.  
    Even the Special boost is outweighed by that HP loss, and a 40-point deficit 
    in Attack makes one wonder just what Golem's saving grace is.  It does happen 
    to have one, namely "Rhydon can't learn TM 47".  As it stands, Golem's 
    Explosion trails only a Snorlax's Selfdestruct in the running for "Game's 
    Strongest Legally Attainable Attack".  So it doesn't stick around as long as 
    Rhydon, but it's for that reason that Golem inherits the ability to go BOOM.  
    But if Rhydon has it beat in the stats category, and Snorlax's detonation is 
    still more powerful than Golem's could hope to be, is there even a reason to 
    use The Rock?  Maybe it can be used to study just how 662 pounds of stone fits 
    into a six-inch sphere and is still light enough to be held.  But do everyone 
    a favor, and don't take one of these into the arena unless you know exactly 
    when to detonate.
    
    Rapidash: If the Fire type is bad, Rapidash is simply an even further 
    defacement to the name.  You can try to use it as a Horn Driller (only Tauros 
    and Dugtrio outrace it in the instant-kill department), but that's strictly a 
    "fun" game plan in RBY, and otherwise you're just left with a worse Arcanine.  
    Except for a 20-point Speed advantage, Rapidash's stats are all inferior to 
    Arcanine's.  And it still doesn't get diversified moves to make up for the 
    loss (only Horn Drill is notable, and regardless of how much faster you are, 
    as long as it's more than zero, Horn Drill still hits just 29.688%).  I'm 
    thinking Rapidash belongs at the World Champion Rodeo (can you imagine how 
    those events would turn out?).  Because it doesn't belong here.
    
    Slowbro: One of the more effective Mewtwo slaughterers.  Slowbro is also 
    hailed by beginners since it gets Earthquake, Ice Beam, and Fire Blast (if you 
    didn't already know this, SLOWBRO ISN'T A FOUR-MOVE SWEEPER, so don't make the 
    mistake of trying all those moves).  Once those players realize the power of 
    Recover, most of them will abandon Slowbro temporarily for Starmie.  But the 
    allure of Amnesia can send them right back, and in fact both Water/Psychics 
    are good choices (but in different ways).  Starmie gets Speed and wins the 
    type mirror, but Slowbro has quite a bit more staying power, and the potential 
    for some "savage mising".  It's rather frail in the face of critical hits (and 
    remember, since Electric is the fastest overall type, those Pokemon will get a 
    lot of them), but otherwise you have a tank that, since it doesn't use DT, NO 
    ONE will object to.  Catch one now.
    
    Magneton: A defensive Electric-type?  Yes, that's what Magneton is, and 
    pretty much all that it is.  With such low move compatibility, about your only 
    choice is to play DT-Rest on 303 HP.  Screech + physical attacks are a waste; 
    you have to Screech for every Pokemon, unlike Swords Dance which is permanent 
    until your Pokemon retreats or dies.  Little more than a novelty.
    
    Farfetch'd: Contrary to what my attitude on most Pokemon would allude, 
    Farfetch'd DOES have a niche in my opinion.  Namely, THE PETIT CUP!  The 
    "Crazy Duck" deserves to be fighting with the likes of Pikachu and Gastly, not 
    Chansey and Lapras.  Look at those stats...65's the highest Base Stat...oh 
    wait, it does have another use.  Get your WHOLE ROAST DUCK!  Only $3.99, 
    because it sucked so much when it was alive!
    
    Dodrio: Normal/Flying isn't the most creative combination, or the best-
    aligned.  But of its four representatives out of 81 contestants overall, 
    Dodrio is most likely to make a team.  Attack and Speed are both best of the 
    four, and moves like Drill Peck and Body Slam take advantage of both its types 
    and big Attack score.  Heck, with a quick trip to GSC and back, you can even 
    snag Haze for stopping DT use (just try to avoid Hazing a Paralyzed opponent, 
    got it?)  Normal/Flying is an intrinsically narrow set, but you may as well 
    use the one that pushes its limits, if you use one at all.
    
    Dewgong: Middle ground for the Water/Ice-types?  Instead of the HP of Lapras, 
    or the Defense of Cloyster, Dewgong prefers to take a fairly balanced set of 
    stats.  But unlike Lapras, its repertoire is pretty much limited to STAB 
    moves, Normal moves, and Horn Drill, and unlike Cloyster, Explosion isn't one 
    of those Normal moves.  When you have the worst of both worlds, is it even 
    worth it to live?
    
    Muk: The Pokemon with the "Game's Best Poison Attack".  That's a 60-power 
    Sludge from a stat of 308.  How many of the 81 RBY Pokemon can that attack 
    kill in one hit?  ONE (Parasect).  79% to Butterfree, 58% to Scyther, and 48% 
    to Exeggutor.  What a waste of the type.  When it comes to Psychic-weak 
    physical attackers, Muk pales to Machamp.  Sure, you can also use it to Haze, 
    or Minimize-Rest, but the stats clearly aren't optimized to do that (you 
    might, however, try the detonator).  Either way, you have something trumping 
    it.
    
    Cloyster: If Cloyster had a more physically aligned type setup, it would be a 
    powerhouse on that side of the spectrum.  But it opted instead for Water/Ice, 
    forcing competition with Lapras.  Since HP is involved in both defensive 
    aspects, Cloyster's 160-point disadvantage in that regard means the huge 
    Defense is needed just to give it a SLIGHT advantage over Lapras there, and 
    the Special comparison is just dismal.  No Confuse Ray or Thunderbolt, either, 
    but there is slight hope with Explosion.  What a shame that a Pokemon with 
    such a good defensive stat is forced into blowing up (though admittedly, 340 
    power is kind of fun).  Compare to Lapras, whose plan for near-death is to 
    avoid it.  That second choice sounded much better, didn't it?
    
    Gengar: All I can say about Gengar is "It would be much more powerful, if it 
    weren't for that cursed Type 2."  Indeed, double immunities that cover almost 
    half the game's attacks must surely pack a reprimand, lest Mewtwo earns some 
    company on the Banned List.  In this case, it's a Psychic weakness, but Gengar 
    is so good otherwise that it may still be worth it.  Special is ranked #3, and 
    Gengar learns Psychic itself, along with Thunderbolt.  It also has much to 
    gain from the future, trading back Ice Punch, Fire Punch, and even Haze.  Then 
    there's the detonator from 228 Attack--56% on Mewtwo, anyone?  I thought not.  
    At least not when a life is in imminent danger.  (Interesting Fact: Gengar's 
    Thunderbolt doesn't even take Gyarados down in one; best it can do is 5 HP 
    away.)  There's an odd role Gengar must play; it's a Special sweeper, but is 
    dead to most other Special sweepers.  Play it only if you can grasp that 
    concept.
    
    Onix: 418 Defense.  Ooh, aah.  Defense does no good without the HP to back it 
    up, and Onix's ranks 80th (dead last, when you consider it's a tie with 
    Dugtrio).  So it's fast for its type?  Let's see it use that Speed for a good 
    cause and run away.  158 Special...ugh.  Onix isn't worthy to be a Pokemon at 
    all, much less one that wins "#1 length" in the meaningless game lore.  When 
    HP is factored into Defense, it still pales to both Rhydon and Golem, and 
    Special...just horrible...can't even survive Tentacool's Water Gun...oh, it 
    evolves in GSC?  Well, tell its evolution that it may as well deny any 
    connection with something as bad as this.  Go read Arbok's dismissal, replace 
    the 140 with 463, and you have a suitable dismissal for Onix.
    
    Hypno: If Alakazam is the offensive Psychic of choice in the absence of 
    Mewtwo, then Hypno is the defensive Psychic of choice.  But with one blatant 
    flaw:  NO RECOVER!  While this Pokemon was supposed to be the perfect 
    representation of Hypnosis-Dream Eater, Hypnosis is too inaccurate to make for 
    a competitive combination.  And even if it did, Gengar would still be better 
    at it because of superior Speed.  But anyway, Hypno has the novelty value of 
    being the only 85-base-HP Pokemon in all of RBY, and with its 328 Special and 
    decent Defense, you could actually try Rest and go for the wall.  Especially 
    now that it trades back Amnesia (two uses put Special at 984, best of any non-
    Mewtwo Amnesia user).  You could trade back the Punches as well... 
    
    Kingler: With accuracy applied, Crabhammer still happens to be the most-
    damaging Water-type move.  But Kingler, its only legal user, has a bad 
    Special, so that kind of power is only on the level of Starmie's Hydro Pump, 
    not Snorlax's Selfdestruct.  But check this out...358 Attack!  If Kingler 
    could get Earthquake, it'd be the Surfing Raichu of Water-types!  But it 
    doesn't.  Wasted stat.  The Defense is still good (though it's dwarfed by 
    Cloyster in the physical endurance category), and tradebacks bring it that 
    great comeback move, Amnesia (which, sadly, doesn't help Crabhammer much).
    
    Electrode: Fear not, there is a way to paralyze Mewtwo.  With 20 more speed 
    than anyone else, Electrode can be a major part of a Mewtwo-killing plan.  
    Unfortunately, while it's great at doing the "dirty work", there's just no way 
    to do the clean work.  Thunderbolt with 258 backing just isn't strong enough, 
    and Electrode happens to sport the worst Explosion in the game.  It's not an 
    attacker, but it likes to pave the roads for them.  Get one just in case some 
    cheeseball pulls out a 6-Mewtwo team.  (Yes, as much as I didn't want to, I 
    had to use the word "cheeseball" at least once in this guide.)
    
    Exeggutor: Durable and annoying, Exeggutor is nearly uncontested among Grass.  
    It gets the traditional "Array of Annoyance" that is nearly synonymous with 
    the Grass type, but the ability to learn Psychic (as well as the matching type 
    and a 348 stat) makes most of the opposition turn back at first chance.  While 
    it doesn't get the one good Grass attack (Razor Leaf), who needs that when you 
    can have the consistency and greater power of Psychic?  And did I mention that 
    you can use this thing as a 300-pound stick of dynamite?  Exeggutor is a 
    fervent believer in the flavor text of the Magic card Last-Ditch Effort: "If 
    you're gonna lose, at least make sure they don't win as much."  Take an 
    annoyer, and give it the ability to attack well, and you have Exeggutor.  And 
    it's decidedly good.
    
    Marowak: Is a Ground-type supposed to have access to moves like Bubblebeam and 
    Ice Beam?  I didn't think so, and the 198 Special demonstrates that any 
    attempt to use these moves will be futile.  Bone Club and Bonemerang are 
    unique to Marowak (and Cubone), but both are still inferior to Earthquake.  
    And it doesn't even get Rock Slide until GSC.  Marowak has enough moves, 
    except that they're the WRONG moves.  Forget it for now.  But come back in 
    about three years, and we'll see what happens to it...
    
    Hitmonlee: Does it beat Machamp?  Probably not.  Yes, it's faster, which makes 
    it better at dealing damage, but it has NO staying power, which makes it worse 
    at dealing damage.  The only STAB Psychic that isn't a guaranteed KO on 
    Hitmonlee is Slowbro's, and that's only a 1-in-39 chance of survival.  On the 
    other hand, Machamp at least has a chance to survive Mewtwo's Psychic, and is 
    guaranteed to do so from Alakazam on down.  And since Hitmonlee doesn't get 
    Earthquake or Rock Slide, all it's good for is HJK'ing like the wind.  I've 
    defeated a Hitmonlee with a Chansey who just so happened to be 45 levels down 
    (hint: Minimize is your friend against Hitmonlee).  Utterly inexcusable.
    
    Hitmonchan: In the beginning, Hitmonchan was rather worthless.  With physical 
    attacks that are plain old inferior compared to the proven choices, and three 
    (admittedly diverse) Special moves running off a 168 stat, Sneas...er, 
    Hitmonchan was banished to the NowhereLand that we call the Fighting Dojo.  
    And with help from our time machine, we can now see what Hitmonchan might do 
    in the future.  Let's look...it's being carried off to a remote cave in 
    Johto...now someone else is transporting it somewhere...quick, kids, look 
    away...and the Punching Wonder somehow ended up with Hi Jump KICK!  But in any 
    case, the Attack is 30 points lower than on the Pokemon that bequeathed HJK to 
    it, and the time flicker still does nothing about the Special malady.  Just 
    pick the other Poke Ball, only to neglect it anyway.
    
    Lickitung: Um...right.  Lickitung is a Snorlax without the HP or Attack, and 
    if you go read Snorlax's section, you'll find those two stats to be absolutely 
    vital to its plan.  So without them, or Selfdestruct, what does Lickitung 
    become?  Just plain bad.  That was a quick review.
    
    Weezing: Why did they have to make Koffing evolve?  Granted, 338 Defense is a 
    good countermeasure against the Ground weakness, and blowing up will take out 
    stray Alakazam and Jynx, but in order to hit most Psychics, it has to take a 
    hit first.  Guess what: It can do that.  But Muk can do it better, and Muk 
    isn't exactly the best Pokemon in the first place.  So what does that make 
    Weezing?  Pretty bad.  At least if you keep it a Koffing, you'll have your 
    Azure Heights Mascot for quick identification, in case you ever meet up with 
    another member of The Strategists' Board.
    
    Rhydon: Even though it has Ground/Rock typing, with those two blatant W4s, 
    Rhydon is still a good Pokemon.  Ground-typing provides the crucial Electric 
    immunity, and with 358 Attack and a widespread handle on Physical attacks, 
    Rhydon even has a chance to manhandle the types it's weak to by pummeling them 
    on the switch-in.  Substitute even guarantees survival against a Surf, 
    allowing even more time to let the damage kick in.  Rhydon is much like the 
    Death Star (not the Pokemon): one good shot can take it down, but until then 
    it'll just be inflicting damage left and right.  It's primarily this vs. 
    Sandslash for best Ground.
    
    Chansey: The "Everlasting Spawn of Evil", as I call Chansey, is the most 
    annoying Pokemon you'll face.  New players seem to doubt that Chansey can be 
    any good, mainly because they take a look at a Defense around 40, and 
    naturally assuming their own Pokemon-handling skills are superior to anyone 
    else's, think that typical Chanseys must be lower--around 20 Defense.  Not 
    even the highest-ranked HP in the game can save you with a 20 Defense, but 
    once you look at the chart of maximums, that changes.  True defense is 108, 
    which is still the lowest in the game, but with 703 HP that stat is both 
    necessary and reconcilable.  (Remember, RBY is all about the Specials.)  Even 
    Machamp's Submission and Hitmonlee's Hi Jump Kick come up a bit short of a 
    kill, and Chansey is capable of learning Counter--OUCH.  And when that 700+ HP 
    meets up with Special of over 300, you're looking at near impunity.  Chansey's 
    Overall Defense Rating (HP * [DF + SC]) of 292,448 is first in the game, 
    surpassing even MEWTWO.  Taking advantage of Minimize and Softboiled, 
    Chansey's staying power is near infinite.  Or, alternately, you could use the 
    308 Special for offensive purposes.  Psychic, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam--the three 
    best attacks in the game (if not that, at least the three best Specials)--all 
    here.  Counter, already mentioned (but worthless except against Normal or 
    Fighting); and Bide are also options to turn the seemingly low Defense into an 
    incredible offensive opportunity.  Even if you don't use it regularly, at 
    least have easy access to a Chansey somehow.  You never know when you'll need 
    it.
    
    Tangela: Despite its extremely narrow grasp of moves, Tangela is one of the 
    most popular Grass-types out there.  Why?  Because it lacks a second type!  
    This is one of the instances where one type is good!  Tangela was built with 
    defense in mind, even if the HP bites.  It doesn't get Razor Leaf, and 
    Solarbeam is nothing more than a free switch for the opponent, so offense 
    obviously won't work.  Tangela became even more popular after Uiru took 
    advantage of a tradeback in his own tournament (unfortunately, he told me 
    about it with enough advance notice for me to specifically design a Dragonite 
    to beat it).  But as it stands, Tangela is slightly below Exeggutor in the 
    hierarchy ladder.  Use if you wish, but be sure to test Eggy as well.
    
    Kangaskhan: Of all Pokemon found here, Kangaskhan resembles Tauros more than 
    anyone else.  Bad Special, good Speed and Attack, and a wide move repertoire.  
    Unfortunately, all other things being equal, the slight edges Tauros gets in 
    the key stats (Speed and Attack) more than overcome Kangaskhan's HP edge.  And 
    that's the tale of how the kangaroo lost to the bull.
    
    Seadra: A famous typo in the Versus Books RBY guide pegs Seadra's speed at 
    280, which is 12 above the maximum in a book filled with minimum/close to 
    minimum stats most everywhere else.  Change that to a 200, and then you have a 
    more accurate perspective of Seadra.  No stat really stands out, but for the 
    true dismissal, look at Blastoise.  Seadra is like a Blastoise without the HP 
    (or Earthquake), and as I've mentioned quite a bit, you don't choose a Pokemon 
    in the presence of a better one (especially when the better one is itself a 
    somewhat inferior choice).  Go trade it to GSC, where it'll become good.
    
    Seaking: Ouch.  If Gyarados is a bad Dragonite, then Seaking is a bad 
    Gyarados, and that's just plain bad.  Sure, there's no W4 to worry about.  But 
    HP and Special are nowhere near impressive, and the Defense is almost as bad 
    as Vaporeon's without the 100 extra HP.  Nothing for Seaking to do save 
    Agility-Horn Drill, which is about as good overall as Hypnosis/Dream Eater 
    (and in case you hadn't heard, that's pretty bad).  The wholesome snack that 
    smiles back until you bite their heads off?  Probably.  Except for the 
    "wholesome" part.
    
    Starmie: A highly versatile Water-type.  Defensive stats aren't as good as 
    Lapras or Slowbro, but it does get Recover.  As such, Starmie is much more 
    likely to be an annoyer.  From GSC, it can even pick up Confuse Ray, which 
    combines with Thunder Wave to disable and/or force-switch.  Or, you can make 
    it a Special sweeper, with the player's choice of Psychic, Thunderbolt, Ice 
    Beam, and Surf.  Starmie completely covers the playing field, and possesses 
    the game's best type (albeit not alone).  An excellent choice to consider, 
    rivaling Lapras for best Water.
    
    Mr. Mime: Bah.  So it learns Substitute naturally...TM 50 is universal, and  
    Mime's HP is 79th.  Defense isn't exactly great, and Special is still inferior 
    to both Hypno and 'Kazam.  I don't know what Mr. Mime is supposed to excel in, 
    but I do know that it mustn't have anything to do with battles.  If you're 
    trying to use Mr. Mime on a team, then I think you need that reminder 
    again...DON'T DO DRUGS.  Thank you.
    
    Scyther: In GSC, it's a different story, but until Johto magically "appeared", 
    Scyther was a highly limited Pokemon.  It didn't learn ANY non-Normal attacks 
    until Yellow brought it the "amazing", 35-power, Wing Attack.  So it may as 
    well have been a Normal-type, but it isn't, and as such has six different 
    weaknesses (including a W4).  Physical-centered flyers aren't good by any 
    means, but if you're going to resort to one, at least consider Dodrio, who 
    gets a good move in a second type.
    
    Jynx: Jynx happens to hold the dual honors of "the only Ice-type that isn't 
    Electric-weak" and "fastest Sleep-inducer* in the game".  Unfortunately, its 
    Defense ranks 80th out of 81, and the one lower Defense is accompanied by 
    enough HP to protect it.   Assuming you get lucky enough with Lovely Kiss, 
    Jynx can stick around long enough to deal some damage.  But don't expect to 
    win a damage race (even two Body Slams from a Snorlax will put Jynx down for 
    good).  Use Jynx if you have an unsure vision of a slot on your team.  
    *Excludes Pokemon whose only method of Sleep induction is Hypnosis or Sing.
    
    Electabuzz: Blue version users, take note--steal someone's Red cart now.  
    Electabuzz is in close contention with Sandslash for "best version-exclusive", 
    even if it does lose horribly in the 1-on-1.  Most of this Pokemon's success 
    comes in the tradeback domain, thanks to one move: Ice Punch, which offers a 
    Raichu-like counter to Ground-types with slightly better staying power (even 
    if it is only 10 extra HP and 4 in Defense, at least that's something).  Also, 
    Ice Punch counters the other Electric-resistant type (Grass), something the 
    rat can't do, and there's always that small chance at the FRZ.  Having Psychic 
    was never bad in this game either.  But Zapdos is already designated to be the 
    Grass-beating Electric.  So it's not as good as Zapdos, and is slightly better 
    than Raichu.  Do with that range of values as you wish.
    
    Magmar: Like Electabuzz, Magmar is a special attacker with a type-countering 
    tradeback move (Thunderpunch) and an out-of-type Psychic.  Unlike Electabuzz, 
    it gets Confuse Ray.  However, it's Fire, which I've already mentioned to be a 
    superfluous type in this game, and 268 Special's a bit low to qualify as a 
    sweeper.  Oh well, at least it's a second Fire-type (along with Charizard) 
    that gets good out-of-type moves.  Possible Charizard alternative.
    
    Pinsir: Why does Pinsir even have a type?  Good question.  It can't get Bug 
    moves, but no other type suits its game lore.  Capable of pumping Attack with 
    either Swords Dance or Focus Energy (not that it's much of a contest; Swords 
    Dance is ALWAYS the better option of the two for a physical attacker), Pinsir 
    gets...um...a bunch of Normal attacks, Guillotine, Seismic Toss, and 
    Submission.  But Swords Dance doesn't help out Slash, Guillotine has NO Speed 
    to hit from, and Submission recoils from a pumped attack will put a severe 
    dent in this Pokemon's staying power.  Seismic Toss is the only thing that can 
    hit a Ghost, and you'll have to hope the opponent isn't using Flying...or 
    Fire...or Rock...or just about anything that isn't a Magikarp.  Simply too 
    narrow.
    
    Tauros: Tauros is best described as "the Pokemon that simply works, and few 
    know why it works, but changing it too much will make it stop working."  Good 
    at Physical sweeping, has the moves for Special sweeping (but on a 238 
    Special?  Come on), and there's always the double OHKOs for those who seek 
    nothing more than a fun team.  Tauros works because of its dual strengths in 
    Speed and Attack, allowing both strong and fast hits, and that's a hard engine 
    to race.  Even though this is a Special-dominated game, Tauros is one of about 
    four physical attackers that can hold up.
    
    Gyarados: It may as well be the fish it started out as; Gyarados isn't going 
    to make too many teams.  Not that the W4 puts it out of contention completely; 
    see Charizard, Rhydon, and Exeggutor (if Exeggutor's W4 can be classified as 
    such).  Besides, Gyarados still survives all non-STAB Thunderbolts short of 
    Mewtwo's.  But when you combine that with a 348-point stat that does nothing 
    but waste stat points that could have helped in another department (see 
    Dragonite), and move compatibility that doesn't match up to the less 
    vulnerable Starmie and Lapras, it's tough to find a home for Gyarados.  "But 
    it laughs at Earthquake!"  Yeah, so does Pidgey, and the latter's actually 
    capable of doing something before L20.  The only recommended use for Gyarados 
    is as a test dummy to calm your sadistic tendencies.
    
    Lapras: Despite the fact that you get your Lapras at L15, when your team is 
    stocked with L40s, it's still a powerhouse in disguise.  Peaceful?  Who wants 
    that?  I'd much rather use a 485-pound sea monster as heavy artillery.  Not 
    only does it have sensibly chosen HP of 463, but it gets just about any move 
    it needs (and more).  Not Amnesia, but Surf, Ice Beam, Thunderbolt, Psychic, 
    and Solarbeam are available and worthwhile (except that last one).  Confuse 
    Ray is an excellent disabling move, and Rest is possibly better suited to 
    Lapras than to anyone else.  This thing's a tank, and yet it can still attack 
    fairly well.  Get one.  Or three, sending two to low-level cups.
    
    Ditto: Versatility is the ONLY thing that Ditto has working for it.  Transform 
    can turn it into any other Pokemon, but only what the opponent has active at 
    the time, which you have no control over.  Transforming causes you to copy the 
    opponent's stats...except HP, which remains at 299.  And the opponent gets a 
    free hit while you Transform.  So you play a mirror match, except you start 
    about 2 turns behind.  Not a good proposition.  And did I mention that Mew can 
    also get Transform, with 104 extra in each stat?
    
    Vaporeon: A blob of water has 463 HP?  Yes, although it's realistically 
    inconceivable, this is a matter of symmetry rather than appearance.  The 
    Threevees (a collective nickname for Vaporeon, Jolteon, and Flareon) all hold 
    Base Stats of 60, 65, 65, 110, and 130 in some order.  Vaporeon's defensive 
    lore means its best chances for the 130 are in Defense and HP, and since it 
    needed defense against Water's two weaknesses (both of which are Special), the 
    130 was put in HP where it can have an impact on Special absorbance.   But 
    despite the Acid Armor pumping its (normally frail) Defense beyond any 
    reasonable countermeasure, and Growth pumping its Special for both offensive 
    and defensive uses, Vaporeon isn't quite as good as fellow 463-HP Water-type 
    Lapras.  Granted, it does get Haze, which is one of the best metagaming moves 
    in the game (stopping such annoying DT users as Chansey).  But no STAB on Ice 
    Beam means less consistent damage opportunities than Lapras.  And it doesn't 
    even get Thunderbolt for taking on other Water-types.  Use if you need to calm 
    down a DT-heavy environment (remembering of course that your own boosters will 
    go away as well), but otherwise just go with the dual-type.
    
    Jolteon: Jolteon's plan for success is to stick with the strengths of 
    Electrics: high speed, T-Wave disability, and strong Bolts.  Jolteon has 
    possible sidetracks with Pin Missile and Double Kick.  Pin Missile is 
    excusable, since it gets double damage against the Electric-resistant Grass-
    type (quadruple damage on Venusaur and Exeggutor).  Double Kick, however, 
    isn't.  You may think, "But it hits for double damage on Rhydon, where 
    Thunderbolt hits for zero!"  But Double Kick still tops out at just 71--a six-
    hit kill at best.  Rhydon will make the kill in one, and taking 1/6 of a 
    Rhydon's health is irrelevant when Water and Grass attacks could care less 
    about the health being 83% or 100%; they'll end it in one more turn 
    regardless.  So you accomplish nothing.  That slot could be better filled by 
    Focus Energy, a move Jolteon uses better than any other legal user.  130/128 
    defers to the 99.6 Rule (too bad), but your Thunderbolt is now an effective 
    270 power per turn from a 318 Special.  That kind of power is unmatched on the 
    Special side of the game (barring Amnesia, or the less desirable Growth, which 
    Jolteon now claims as a legal move).  And it makes Jolteon an excellent 
    choice...if you can get around the Defense problem.
    
    Flareon: Flareon is doomed to the same lifestyle as Gyarados and Dragonite.  
    An excellent Attack stat backed by no moves.  Give this thing Earthquake, and 
    it suddenly becomes a highly viable choice.  But deprive "FireFox2" of the 
    move (which is obviously what they did) and it becomes another narrow Pokemon.  
    Like Arcanine, but with less staying power.  When you first get your Eevee, 
    and it's time for it to get stoned (quick reminder again--don't do drugs), 
    give it one of those OTHER stones.  A pyromaniac Eevee is nothing but a menace 
    to society, and an inefficient one at that.
    
    Porygon: I paid 9999 coins for THIS?  Movewise, with Psychic, Ice Beam, 
    Thunderbolt, and even Recover, you'd think Porygon was worth something.  But 
    with only 248 Special to use those moves, and total stats under 1500, Porygon 
    is like a Chansey without defensive capabilities...or offensive 
    capabilities...come to think if it, Porygon CAN be as annoying as Chansey.  
    But whereas Chansey is annoying to the opponent, Porygon is annoying to you.  
    Avoid at all costs, unless you have an expendable P200,000 (which you're 
    better off using to buy Substitute TMs) or an insatiable gambling problem.  I 
    get better luck from the GSC slots anyway.
    
    Omastar: Wow...300+ in Defense AND Special.  Omastar is the only Pokemon that 
    can make that claim.  Mewtwo can't.  Mew can't.  Articuno can't (but with two 
    extra Defense points, it would).  And yet, it can't survive something as 
    simple as Venusaur's Razor Leaf.  That's the problem with Omastar.  On paper, 
    it seems this Pokemon is on par with Chansey as far as tanks are concerned, 
    but there are too many weaknesses, and Omastar's too slow to circumvent them.  
    It's the better fossil, but who said fossils had to be "good"?
    
    Kabutops: Slash from 328 Attack.  That's about the only thing preventing 
    Kabutops from turning into a Gyarados, Dragonite, or the other Pokemon that 
    fit into that category.  Too bad the Speed's surprisingly lower (258) than 
    would be expected for something whose speed is characterized in he Pokedex.  
    Another reason never to trust red computers when it comes to information.  The 
    rest of the moves reflect a Water/Ice-type setup, but Kabutops won't be 
    hurting anything too much (Venusaur could survive three Ice Beams).  It just 
    missed being a waste of Attack, but Special-wise there's no stat TO waste.  
    And hence Kabutops can do little to nothing.
    
    Aerodactyl: The only Rock-type that resists Earthquake pays for that fact with 
    the type's lowest Defense, even counting unevolved Pokemon.  And while 358 
    Speed is never bad, what can that speed be used for?  Not much beyond the 
    flinching power of Bite and Headbutt.  Fire off a Body Slam or two, try to 
    burn something with Fire Blast, try Wing Attack only to find it's stuck in RBY 
    mode and has 35 power, and that's about it.  Aerodactyl gets repetitive fast.  
    To put it this way--On April 19, 1999, I generated my 129th Aerodactyl (due to 
    a cloned Old Amber).  That was before battling became the focal point of the 
    game.  ZERO of those Aerodactyls have survived to the present day.  And they 
    haven't received replacements, either.
    
    Snorlax: Even back in the past, Snorlax is still a force to be reckoned with.  
    The holder of the #2 HP in the game isn't as impenetrable to Specials as 
    Chansey is, but if it's possible for the physical side of the game to make a 
    breakthrough, it'll use Snorlax as a hit man.  All the top physical moves--
    Double-Edge, Body Slam, Earthquake, Rock Slide, and Submission (ha, ha)--
    Snorlax gets 'em all.  And, just for the heck of it, you can play Snorlax as a 
    specialist as well, or any combination of the strategies.  It even gets 
    Amnesia to pump up its somewhat lacking Special for use in that regard.  And 
    it's one of just two Pokemon who gets Selfdestruct but not Explosion (and the 
    entire community would laugh at you for blowing up with the other one).  But 
    in any case, Snorlax's Selfdestruct is the strongest attack in the entire 
    game, capable of 90% to Mewtwo (if it could get Explosion, that hits for 418 
    minimum and instant death).  To summarize, Snorlax is physicalist and 
    specialist, metagamer and rogue, tank and kamikaze, anything and anything 
    else.  Catch it while you can.
    
    Articuno: Zapdos and Moltres are both primarily attackers.  This means they 
    have to compete with the rest of their type's best.  On the other hand, 
    Articuno is a tank, and while there are quite a few of those, tanks don't 
    compete.  (They don't really compete against each other in battle, either.)  
    That W4 sure puts a dent in its suit of armor, but since it's to Rock (as 
    opposed to Electric or Ice) it's somewhat circumventible.  TAKE NOTE:  While 
    Articuno can learn Bubblebeam, that move is of no use.  Bubblebeam's power is 
    60; Ice Beam's is 95 + STAB (an average just barely under 137).  And since 
    type matchups are always in factors of two, and one such point of advantage 
    won't give Bubblebeam the edge, Bubblebeam would have to be more favorable 
    than Ice Beam against BOTH opposing types.  Scanning the chart, the only types 
    on which it makes gains over Ice are Fire, Rock, and Ice itself.  RBY has no 
    Fire/Rock, Ice/Rock, or Fire/Ice Pokemon.  Therefore, Bubblebeam will never 
    get the multipliers it needs to overtake Ice Beam on damage.  And comparing 
    side effects...Attack drop vs. Freeze.  Which would YOU rather inflict?  
    Enough with that thought.  Articuno separates its strategy from the other two 
    birds', finds something to do, and does it well.  Test it and Lapras, and pick 
    the one that works for you.
    
    Zapdos: The best attacker of the three, mainly because it picks up a decent 
    attack in a secondary type (Drill Peck).  The main competition it faces is 
    Jolteon, and the two have different edges.  Jolteon owns the Speed department, 
    whereas Zapdos prefers to lose a bit of Speed to gain some staying power and 
    more "oomph" on Thunderbolt.  That's a point to Zapdos.  But Zappy ends up 
    erasing the Ground weakness...in exchange for an Ice weakness, as well as one 
    to the inevitable Rock Slide that you'll always find on Ground-types.  The Ice 
    weakness is what really makes it a toss-up.
    
    Moltres: This is legendary?  I'm looking for something that does more than 
    Fire Blast, Fire Blast, whoops, out of Fire Blast PP, roll over and die.  
    Moltres didn't have Flamethrower on its original compatibility list in RBY, 
    and couldn't even legally get the move until Stadium 2 and Crystal.  Having a 
    Flying dual-type doesn't help at all; it just adds Electric and Ice 
    weaknesses.  Charizard and its excellent compatibility is almost rendered 
    unviable thanks to the second type; get rid of all the good moves and even 
    with a 348 Special, Moltres won't be going anywhere any time soon, except 
    maybe the "To Be Released" box.
    
    Dragonite: Maybe it's just me, but I'm guessing that the template the game 
    designers had in mind for Dragonite and the finished product it ended up being 
    are worlds apart.  366 Attack, alone at the top of the chart there.  BUT IT 
    CAN'T DO A THING WITH THAT STAT!  Sure, you have a bunch of Normal-type moves.  
    But those moves have no type advantages, cover no weaknesses, and admit "The 
    Special attacks I'm using are helpless in the face of your Pokemon, so I have 
    to hit for non-STAB 1x damage."  Of all the Pokemon that suffer from this 
    syndrome, Dragonite exemplifies it, since it's throwing away the most points 
    and was supposed to have the best image.  With Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Fire 
    Blast (or Flamethrower from GSC), and Surf, it seems that all Dragonite needs 
    to be a powerhouse is Psychic.  WRONG!  Try an Earthquake to put its best stat 
    to use, and Rock Slide would help too.  NOTE TO GAMEFREAK:  Next time, if you 
    want a Pokemon to excel in something, let it do so.  At least for RBY, 
    Dragonite is relegated to the humiliating role of bench warmer, and the W4 to 
    Ice turns it into a "bench-colder".  And if for some reason you care, it 
    trades back Haze.
    
    Mewtwo: Can enough be said about Mewtwo?  Actually, yes.  YOU'RE LUCKY IF 
    SOMEONE ALLOWS YOU TO USE IT.  (Remember, not too many people believe in the 
    USSR, probably based on the acronym.  Go back to page 25 if you don't know 
    which USSR I'm talking about.)  As if a 38-point lead above the #2 Special in 
    the game weren't broken enough, Amnesia can put that stat to 999 in just TWO 
    turns.  And nothing short of detonation will be able to destroy a Mewtwo in 
    those two turns.  Did I mention that Recover and Substitute can counter even 
    those detonators?  And Substitute on the #2 speed leaves it nearly immune to 
    paralysis and sleep?  I thought so.  Mewtwo will claim one-on-one victories 
    against nearly any other Pokemon, with little trouble.  And its move pool is 
    big enough to metagame against the few things that normally do beat it (though 
    not all at the same time, so it's not COMPLETELY invulnerable.)  Hands down, 
    the best choice you can possibly make for a team.  Which is known as 
    "degenerating/centralizing the game".  And that's why you'll always see Mewtwo 
    bans in battles.
    
    Mew: There are some who think that Mew can do anything.  Well, it can't.  It 
    can pull OHKOs, it can take the Swords Dance-Swift approach to DT'ers that 
    Sandslash has already demonstrated, it can Transform on a fun team, it can be 
    as versatile a Special attacker as Chansey or Starmie (and like both, has a 
    one-turn 50% recovery move).  But it can't do everything.  Because Amnesia 
    isn't a TM, a potentially degenerate approach to Mew has been thwarted.  As 
    such, the power level of Mew is about equivalent to Starmie (and functions 
    much the same way).  If you have a Shark, don't hesitate to load a Mew with 
    it.  But be careful only to use TMs for moves. (Unless you're using the 11/11 
    Transform trick, which is allowed less often than Mew itself.)
    
    **********************
    *203. Building a Team*
    **********************
    
    Okay, you have 81 individual Pokemon summaries.  What to do with them?  
    Combine them into a team!  But picking a team from isolated summaries is a 
    waste of your time.  The recourse?  A waste of my time, namely "typing up 
    section 203".
    
    First off, it'll help to decide what kind of player profile you have.  I'll 
    start by explaining...
    
    "The Theory of Timmy, Johnny, and Spike"
    
    Originally explained by Mark Rosewater (a member of the design team for the 
    Magic: The Gathering trading card game), the Theory of Timmy, Johnny, and 
    Spike is general enough that it can be applied to other games, including the 
    GB Pokemon games.
    
    Basically, it states that players fall into three types.  Timmy, the "Power 
    Gamer"; Johnny, the "Master of Creativity"; and Spike, the "Business Player".
    
    Timmy is the player who wants to take the upper hand and stick with it, and 
    wants to hit for lots of damage at a time.  Timmy is usually found using moves 
    like Thunder, Hydro Pump, and Hyper Beam.  Unlike in Magic, very few Pokemon 
    players knowingly and willfully choose the Timmy player type, because the 
    environment is quite limited and Timmy can't be emulated "for fun".  Timmy 
    likes 6-0 and 6-1 wins, but seldom gets them except against other Timmy 
    players.  When facing Timmy in battle, usually your opponent's own ignorance 
    will lead you to an effortless win (but nothing is a sure thing, so remember 
    to bring your focused game plan anyway).  Since they're likely to be doubling 
    and tripling up on same-type attacks, playing types is your surest game plan.
    
    Johnny likes to pull off extravagant plays, such as 12-turn setup sequences 
    that lead to each and every one of your Pokemon's sequential demise, AS LONG 
    AS THEY'RE HIS OWN CREATION.  He doesn't care how practical the game plan is, 
    or how likely it is to be pulled off; as long as Johnny gets his wish once, 
    he's satisfied with the team.  The Johnny standpoint is a very limited 
    position in RBY, but you'll usually find this player using moves like Amnesia, 
    Swords Dance, and the "invincible" Chansey with +6 modifiers in Defense and 
    Evasion.  They're rare, but make sure you can deal with Johnny players (Haze 
    will help a lot).  If you do happen to fall into this category, skip the rest 
    of this section, as I don't want to ruin your search for self-made teams.  
    (If, however, you wish to convert due to a suboptimal winning percentage...I'm 
    still here.)  Run a Find for the string "204", and you'll do just that.
    
    Finally, we have Spike.  If you're still reading this guide at this point, you 
    should be well on your way to becoming Spike.  This player wants to analyze 
    every possible option, is willing to try anything in hopes of finding the best 
    strategy, and cares about nothing more than winning.  It doesn't matter what 
    means are used to achieve the win: DT, Tradebacks, 6-Standard, and so on...as 
    long as Spike wins, and doesn't violate any actual rules, he stays happy.  A 
    loss to Spike is a sign of necessary improvement.  Spike vs. Spike battles are 
    where the game truly starts to unfold.  Metagaming, counter-metagaming, 
    double-countering, and the occasional anti-hate rogue team all have to be 
    dealt with.
    
    Now that you understand the different types of players, you can try to build 
    teams such that you can gain a psychological edge over your opponents after 
    you decode their types.
    
    --The Type Of Choice--
    
    This game was supposed to offer 15 types.  But from a practical standpoint, 
    the number is reduced to 7, and you could argue that most of gameplay revolves 
    around a single type: Psychic.   Nothing resists that type except itself, and 
    most of its Pokemon have a high rank in Special, a stat that does double duty 
    and thus should be weighted twice (but design didn't take that into account 
    when choosing Pokemon stats, so high-Special Pokemon get a big advantage over 
    other Pokemon with supposedly-equal total stats.)
    
    Obviously, Mewtwo is the best Pokemon available, so much so that only the most 
    specialized Pokemon have a shot at the 1-on-1.  Stick with Amnesia and 
    Recover.  The other two attacks can range from Thunderbolt/Ice Beam (no STAB, 
    but no shared resistance) to Psychic/Ice Beam (look out for Starmie and 
    Slowbro) to Psychic/Thunderbolt (look out for Exeggutor) to Psychic/Substitute 
    (resisted by all Psychics, but even more impossible to kill than Chansey).  
    The goal is simply to get to Amnesias ready, then fire away at everything. 
    When using Grep (nickname for Psychic/Substitute/Amnesia/Recover), also make 
    sure you have a Substitute available as often as possible.  It stops Thunder 
    Wave, Special Down from other Psychics, and even Explosion from working.  The 
    only thing with a dependable chance of stopping Grep is a PP-waste team...or 
    another Mewtwo...or a contract by the players to, for all practical purposes, 
    kick it out of the game.  Which is exactly what they've done.  The USSR system 
    allows Mewtwo to play, albeit at L83 (not only is its Special lowered to 337, 
    but the inherent role of Level in the damage formula knocks its effective 
    attacking Special down to 289).  At this level, it becomes a "physical 
    alternative" to Alakazam: It can't strike as fast or as hard, but at least it 
    can't die to a single Snorlax H-Beam.  Tough choice...but that's exactly why I 
    created the USSR.  (<---This line may be added to any signature at no cost.)
    
    Alakazam then tries to contend for the vacated mono-Psychic slot.  Hypno 
    recently acquired a tradeback of Amnesia, which makes this race a bit more 
    exciting.  Special-pumping or a one-turn recovery?  373 HP or 338 Speed?  As 
    of now, this is effectively a toss-up.  Choose Alakazam if you want a quick 
    sweeper, or Hypno if you want to try and stick around for a while in the hopes 
    of eventual obliteration.  Or, what the heck, play both!  Recommended sets: 
    Recover/(three of Thunder Wave, Psychic, Substitute, Reflect, Ice Punch, and 
    Thunderpunch) for Alakazam, Psychic/Amnesia/Rest/(Thunder Wave or a punch) for 
    Hypno.
    
    Dual-type Psychics: Four in number, and ALL of them have uses.  Exeggutor is a 
    durable status inflictor, with Sleep, Paralysis, or (ugh) Toxic/Leech Seed.  
    Or it's a sapper with Leech Seed and Mega Drain, with the intention of 
    enabling more than four Substitutes.  Or it simply beats with Double-Edge, 
    Psychic, and Solarbeam.  And if you ever go down to the red zone, don't be 
    afraid to blow up.  I've seen a lot of Exeggutors lead off teams, and Stun 
    Spore and Explosion help to support this cause, but the Pokemon seems a bit 
    slow and vulnerable to a lead of Substitute.  Recommended sets: Sleep 
    Powder/Stun Spore/Psychic/Mega Drain, Psychic/Substitute/Leech Seed/Sleep 
    Powder, Double-Edge/Psychic/Explosion/some disabler.
    
    Starmie is less durable, but much faster.  It gets all the High-Powered 
    Special Attacks (hereafter referred to as HPSAs) with the exception of 
    Flamethrower (which is inferior to Ice Beam), and variants of Starmie using 
    every one of these both exist and are commonly played.  The real boon comes 
    with Recover, to try and rectify the semi-fragile Defense stats.  The star can 
    also throw around some disabilities with Thunder Wave, Confuse Ray, and the 
    10% crapshoots of HPSAs.  Sounds good to me.  Recommended sets: 
    Recover/Thunder Wave/(two of Psychic, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Surf, or Confuse 
    Ray).
    
    Jynx is the game's fastest dependable Sleep user, the only Ice-type that isn't 
    Electric-weak, and a nice beatdown machine.  If only Body Slam were capable of 
    inflicting damage.  Oh well, you can't have everything in a single Pokemon 
    (unless its name begins with M-E-W).  This is the best potential lead in the 
    type, with recommended set Ice Beam/Psychic/Lovely Kiss/something (Dream 
    Eater's a tradeback, but this is RBY where the move is pointless).
    
    Slowbro is one of the few Pokemon that stands down a legalized L100 Mewtwo 
    (Slowbro's Special is JUST high enough to match 999 from Amnesia, and Slowbro 
    resists Mewtwo's Psychic while the Psycho Kitty can't say the same about a 
    Surf).  The 'Tobybro' (Amnesia, Thunder Wave, Rest, Surf) is obviously good 
    enough to stand down other Psychics as well.  However, this has a hard time 
    covering its weaknesses.  Rework it (with Ice Beam or Earthquake) to counter 
    those, and you lose the stranglehold on Psychic matches.  All in all, I'd 
    rather keep the setup that owns the game's #1 type, and simply leave the 
    weaknesses to someone else.  One more thing: Starmie and Slowbro don't get 
    along well.  Avoid setting up this weakness overlap, and choose one or the 
    other.  Or maybe even none.
    
    A team without a Psychic-type is begging to get swept by one.  Having two of 
    them would help even more.  Heck, I can envision a 6-Psychic team winning many 
    battles even without Mewtwo.
    
    --Other Types--
    
    For the rest of the types, only movesets will be given as far as individual 
    Pokemon are concerned.  Each Pokemon is listed under its more predominant 
    type.
    
    Fire: Completely outdone in the Type Chart by Ice.  Ignore if at all possible.
    Charizard - Fire Blast, Earthquake, Rock Slide, Slash
    Magmar - Fire Blast, Thunderpunch, Psychic, Confuse Ray
    
    Water: So many choices...some of them are bound to be good.  But Water dual-
    types, for the most part, exhibit Water as the less important type, so they're 
    listed under the other type.
    Golduck - Amnesia, Surf, Blizzard, Substitute
    Vaporeon - Surf, Blizzard, Acid Armor, Rest
    
    Ice: Only five Pokemon, but four have standout traits.  The ability to freeze 
    (read: faint) while being immune to a freeze yourself is just too good to pass 
    up.
    Lapras (1) - Surf, Ice Beam, Confuse Ray, Rest
    (2) Ice Beam, Thunderbolt, Confuse Ray, Body Slam
    Articuno - Ice Beam, Double Team, Substitute, Rest
    Cloyster - Surf, Blizzard, Screech, Explosion
    
    Electric: Known for consistency, as well as high Speed.  Unfortunately, a 
    single type renders most of these Pokemon useless.
    Jolteon - Thunderbolt, Focus Energy, Pin Missile, Body Slam
    Zapdos - Thunderbolt, Drill Peck, Thunder Wave, (Reflect/Rest/Light Screen)
    Raichu - Thunderbolt, Surf, Thunder Wave, Seismic Toss
    Electabuzz - Thunderbolt, Ice Punch, Psychic, Thunder Wave
    
    Grass: The game's primary disabling type--too bad it has so many weaknesses, 
    and its best-known members have the worst possible weakness (to Psychic).
    Tangela - Amnesia, Sleep Power, Mega Drain, Body Slam
    Venusaur - Razor Leaf, Sleep Powder, Substitute, Leech Seed
    
    Dragon: Only one Pokemon here, and page 48 tells how drastically screwed it 
    is.
    Dragonite - Double-Edge, Blizzard, Haze, Thunder Wave (be careful not to Haze 
    a Paralyzed or Frozen opponent)
    
    Normal: These fill all possible roles.  Tank, Bazooka, Infantry, and just 
    plain front lines that drop dead in five seconds.
    Snorlax (1) - Body Slam, Earthquake, Rock Slide, Rest
    (2) Body Slam, Selfdestruct, Surf, Hyper Beam (yes, that is a triple-up)
    Chansey - Softboiled, (three of Minimize, Seismic Toss, Thunder Wave, 
    Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Counter, Psychic, or Reflect)
    Tauros - Body Slam, Hyper Beam, Earthquake, Blizzard
    
    Fighting: Doomed to hell for coexisting in a game with Psychics.  Do not use 
    without agreeing not to use Psychics beforehand, or unless the rest of your 
    team consists of five Mewtwos.
    Machamp - Submission, Earthquake, Rock Slide, Meditate
    Hitmonlee - Hi Jump Kick, Body Slam, Meditate, (may as well be empty)
    
    Flying: This type always takes a back seat on dual-types (except for the 
    Normal/Flyers).  Finishes off a type triangle with Electric and Ground.
    Dodrio - Body Slam, Drill Peck, Haze, (possibly Mimic?)
    
    Bug: Even though it isn't Psychic-weak, and in fact supposedly has an 
    advantage over Psychic, the poor quality of Pokemon and moves given to the Bug 
    type leave it ranked 15 out of 15.  Do not use Bugs under any circumstance 
    whatsoever.
    
    Ground: Necessary for preventing Electrics from ruining everything.  
    Unfortunately, they have so many other weaknesses, and low Special.
    Sandslash - Swords Dance, Earthquake, Rock Slide, Double Team
    Golem - Earthquake, Rock Slide, Explosion, (any move just for the hell of it)
    Rhydon - Earthquake, Rock Slide, Substitute, Rest
    
    Rock: This type serves no purpose but to turn an already difficult weakness 
    into a W4.  Not surprisingly, it's always a backseat type.
    
    Ghost: Another one-Pokemon type, Ghost was screwed almost as much as 
    Dragon...but due to type instead of moveset.  If Poison were replaced with any 
    other non-Psychic-weak type, Gengar would see much more use.
    Gengar - Thunderbolt, Ice Punch, Haze, Confuse Ray (Psychic or Explosion may 
    be swapped in for some of these moves)
    
    Poison: The other Psychic-weak type, Poison cites just two type advantages, 
    and is also weak to the metagame-necessitated Ground-type.  Only the best of 
    the type (Gengar, perhaps Venusaur) can overcome the weaknesses, and that's 
    due in full to the first type.
    
    Typically, two Psychics can be found on most teams.  Non-Psychic Special 
    Attackers are also good bets to fill a slot, as is an Annoyer or two.  
    Physical-centered Pokemon are highly vulnerable here.  A team with more than 
    one Physical attacker rarely gets its chance in the sun, but remember--all you 
    have to do is survive one turn against Alakazam and you get a shot at 188 
    Defense.  Make sure that you can actually survive that turn, though.  Speaking 
    of survival, tanks such as Chansey and Lapras can eat PP from the most feared 
    Pokemon like IHOP pancakes, making the job easier for the rest of the team.  I 
    don't see much interest in defense these days by the rest of the community 
    (probably because of their self-imposed rules which reduce the game to little 
    more than a full-fledged shootout), but having a tank is a good idea--after 
    all, you need someone to switch to at times, right?
    
    As for synergy, it's not well-promoted in RBY, but remember that Ice and 
    Electric have no overlapping resistances, triangles such as 
    Electric/Ground/Flying and Water/Ice/Grass are good (try to have one full 
    triangle represented within your team), and don't ever use a Fighting- or 
    Poison-type without a very high average Special across the rest of the team.
    
    And as always, there are fun teams.  These teams are a way for Spike to relax 
    from his always-competitive nature.  Mono-type teams, Threevee teams, TM-less 
    teams, underused teams...these all serve to stretch the boundaries of what 
    Spike can win with.  And if you're normally a Johnny or Timmy, then these 
    teams are just what are normally played.
    
    **********************
    *204. Reference Chart*
    **********************
    
    If section 202 is a lesson in logic, then 204 is the mathematical foundation.  
    It's your user-friendly database of stats and moves.
    
    Key:
    Stats: These are, obviously, the stats.  Each stat is given TWO numbers: the 
    first is the base stat (see page 11 for the use of base stats) and the second 
    represents the highest legally-possible L100 stat.
    Learned Moves: Moves that are learned either at the start, or by level up.  If 
    the unevolved Pokemon can get a move at an earlier level, the earlier level is 
    listed.
    TM Moves: Moves learned by TM or HM.  Since it's RBY, the TMs are organized 
    accordingly.
    GSC Moves: If a Pokemon can get moves by time-warping back and forth, I'll 
    list it here.  Contrary to prior versions, this list is now unabridged and 
    includes every move on a Pokemon's GSC list that isn't on its RBY list and has 
    a move value number of 165 or below.
    Specials: Only two in number, these moves come from Stadium prizes.
    Evolution: The evolution chain behind that Pokemon.  Useful only if you're 
    playing through the game, and aren't yet at the strategy stage.  Or if you're 
    trying to test for lower-level cup compatibility.
    Experience: Whether the Pokemon follows, Fast, Normal, Slow, or Fading growth.  
    Like the above, its use at higher echelons is highly limited.
    
    Venusaur (GRS/PSN)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 82/262, DF 83/264, SP 80/258, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Growl (0), Leech Seed (7), Vine Whip (13), 
    Poisonpowder (20), Razor Leaf (27), Growth (34), Sleep Powder (41), Solarbeam 
    (48)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mega Drain, Solarbeam, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Rest, 
    Substitute, Cut
    GSC Moves: Light Screen, Headbutt, Roar, Defense Curl, Flash, Razor Wind, 
    Petal Dance, Rock Throw
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Bulbasaur -> Ivysaur (L16) -> Venusaur (L32)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Charizard (FIR/FLY)
    Stats: HP 78/359, AT 84/266, DF 78/254, SP 100/298, SC 85/268
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Growl (0), Ember (9), Leer (15), Rage (22), Slash 
    (30), Flamethrower (38), Fire Spin (46)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Swords Dance, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, 
    Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Dragon Rage, 
    Earthquake, Fissure, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, 
    Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Cut, Fly, Strength
    GSC Moves: Wing Attack, Headbutt, Roar, Defense Curl, Fire Punch, Bite, Rock 
    Slide
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Charmander (FIR) -> Charmeleon (FIR - L16) -> Charizard (L36)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Blastoise (WTR)
    Stats: HP 79/361, AT 83/264, DF 100/298, SP 78/254, SC 85/268
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (0), Bubble (8), Water Gun (15), Bite 
    (22), Withdraw (28), Skull Bash (35), Hydro Pump (42)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, 
    Seismic Toss, Rage, Earthquake, Fissure, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, 
    Bide, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Haze, Mist, Confusion, Headbutt, Roar, Ice Punch, Defense Curl, 
    Waterfall
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Squirtle -> Wartortle (L16) -> Blastoise (L36)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Butterfree (BUG/FLY)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 45/188, DF 50/198, SP 80/258, SC 70/238
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), String Shot (0), Harden (7), Confusion (10), 
    Poisonpowder (13), Stun Spore (14), Sleep Powder (15), Supersonic (18), 
    Whirlwind (23), Psybeam (34)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Whirlwind, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mega Drain, Solarbeam, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, 
    Bide, Swift, Rest, Psywave, Substitute, Flash
    GSC Moves: Gust
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Caterpie (BUG) -> Metapod (BUG - L7) -> Butterfree (L10)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Beedrill (BUG/PSN)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 80/258, DF 40/178, SP 75/248, SC 45/188
    Learned Moves: Poison Sting (0), String Shot (0), Harden (7), Fury Attack 
    (12), Focus Energy (16), Twineedle (20), Rage (25), Pin Missile (30), Agility 
    (35)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mega 
    Drain, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, 
    Cut
    GSC Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Weedle -> Kakuna (L7) -> Beedrill (L10)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Pidgeot (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 83/369, AT 80/258, DF 75/248, SP 91/280, SC 70/238
    Learned Moves: Gust (0), Sand-Attack (5), Quick Attack (12), Whirlwind (19), 
    Wing Attack (28), Agility (36), Mirror Move (44)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Whirlwind, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Swift, Sky Attack, Rest, Substitute, 
    Fly
    GSC Moves: Tackle
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Pidgey -> Pidgeotto (L18) -> Pidgeot (L36)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Raticate (NRM)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 81/260, DF 60/218, SP 97/292, SC 50/198
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (0), Quick Attack (9), Hyper Fang (14), 
    Focus Energy (23), Super Fang (34)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice 
    Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Dig, Mimic, Double 
    Team, Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Cut, Strength
    GSC Moves: Counter, Headbutt, Roar, Defense Curl, Screech, Bite, Fury Swipes
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Rattata -> Raticate (L20)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Fearow (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 90/278, DF 65/228, SP 100/298, SC 61/220
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Growl (0), Leer (9), Fury Attack (15), Mirror Move 
    (22), Drill Peck (29), Agility (36)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Whirlwind, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Sky Attack, Rest, Substitute, Fly
    GSC Moves: Quick Attack, Tri Attack
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Spearow -> Fearow (L20)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Arbok (PSN)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 85/268, DF 69/236, SP 80/258, SC 65/228
    Learned Moves: Wrap (0), Leer (0), Poison Sting (10), Bite (17), Glare (24) 
    Screech (31), Acid (38)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mega 
    Drain, Earthquake, Fissure, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Skull Bash, Rest, 
    Rock Slide, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Haze, Headbutt, Slam
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Ekans -> Arbok (L22)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Raichu (ELC)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 90/278, DF 55/208, SP 100/298, SC 90/278
    Learned Moves: Thundershock (0), Growl (0), Thunder Wave (8), Quick Attack 
    (11), Double Team (15), Slam (20), Swift (26), Thunderbolt (26), Agility (33), 
    Thunder (41), Light Screen (50)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Pay Day, Submission, Seismic Toss, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, 
    Mimic, Double Team, Swift, Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder Wave, 
    Substitute, Strength, Flash
    GSC Moves: Tail Whip, Headbutt, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Doubleslap, Dizzy 
    Punch, Sing, Petal Dance
    Specials: Surf
    Evolution: Pikachu -> Raichu (Thunderstone)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Sandslash (GRD)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 100/298, DF 110/318, SP 65/228, SC 55/208
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Sand-Attack (10), Slash (17), Poison Sting (24), 
    Swift (31), Fury Swipes (38)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Submission, Seismic Toss, Rage, Earthquake, Fissure, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, 
    Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Rock Slide, Substitute, Cut, Strength
    GSC Moves: Counter, Defense Curl, Headbutt
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Sandshrew -> Sandslash (L22)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Nidoqueen (PSN/GRD)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 82/262, DF 87/272, SP 76/250, SC 75/248
    Learned Moves: Growl (0), Tackle (0), Scratch (8), Double Kick (12), Poison 
    Sting (14), Tail Whip (21), Body Slam (23), Bite (29), Fury Swipes (36)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, 
    Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Pay Day, 
    Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Earthquake, 
    Fissure, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Rock 
    Slide, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Focus Energy, Lovely Kiss, Headbutt, Roar, Ice Punch, Defense Curl, 
    Thunderpunch, Fire Punch, Flamethrower, Disable, Supersonic
    Specials: None
    Evolution: NidoranF (PSN) -> Nidorina (PSN - L16) -> Nidoqueen (Moon Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Nidoking (PSN/GRD)
    Stats: HP 81/365, AT 92/282, DF 77/252, SP 85/268, SC 75/248
    Learned Moves: Leer (0), Tackle (0), Horn Attack (8), Double Kick (12), Poison 
    Sting (14), Focus Energy (21), Thrash (23), Fury Attack (29), Horn Drill (36)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, 
    Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Pay Day, 
    Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Earthquake, 
    Fissure, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Rock 
    Slide, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Amnesia, Lovely Kiss, Headbutt, Roar, Ice Punch, Defense Curl, 
    Thunderpunch, Fire Punch, Flamethrower, Disable, Supersonic, Confusion
    Specials: None
    Evolution: NidoranM (PSN) -> Nidorino (PSN - L16) -> Nidoking (Moon Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Clefable (NRM)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 70/238, DF 73/244, SP 60/218, SC 90/278
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Growl (0), Sing (13), Doubleslap (18), Minimize 
    (24), Metronome (31), Defense Curl (39), Light Screen (48)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, 
    Seismic Toss, Rage, Solarbeam, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, 
    Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder 
    Wave, Psywave, Tri Attack, Substitute, Strength, Flash
    GSC Moves: Flamethrower, Headbutt, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Fire 
    Punch, Amnesia, Splash, Dizzy Punch, Petal Dance
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Clefairy -> Clefable (Moon Stone)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Ninetales (FIR)
    Stats: HP 73/349, AT 76/250, DF 75/248, SP 100/298, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Ember (0), Tail Whip (0), Quick Attack (16), Roar (21), Confuse 
    Ray (28), Flamethrower (35), Fire Spin (42)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, Dig, 
    Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, 
    Substitute
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Hypnosis, Disable
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Vulpix -> Ninetales (Fire Stone)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Wigglytuff (NRM)
    Stats: HP 140/483, AT 70/238, DF 45/188, SP 45/188, SC 50/198
    Learned Moves: Sing (0), Pound (9), Disable (14), Defense Curl (19), 
    Doubleslap (24), Rest (29), Body Slam (34), Double-Edge (39)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, 
    Seismic Toss, Rage, Solarbeam, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, 
    Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder Wave, 
    Psywave, Tri Attack, Substitute, Strength, Flash
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Fire Punch, 
    Flamethrower, Dizzy Punch
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Jigglypuff -> Wigglytuff (Moon Stone)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Golbat (PSN/FLY)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 80/258, DF 70/238, SP 90/278, SC 75/248
    Learned Moves: Leech Life (0), Screech (0), Supersonic (10), Bite (15), 
    Confuse Ray (21), Wing Attack (28), Haze (36)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Whirlwind, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mega Drain, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Swift, Rest, Substitute
    GSC Moves: Gust, Quick Attack
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Zubat -> Golbat (L22)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Vileplume (GRS/PSN)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 80/258, DF 85/268, SP 50/198, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Absorb (0), Poisonpowder (15), Stun Spore (17), Sleep Powder 
    (19), Acid (23), Petal Dance (33), Solarbeam (46)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mega Drain, Solarbeam, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Rest, 
    Substitute, Cut
    GSC Moves: Razor Leaf, Leech Seed
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Oddish -> Gloom (L21) -> Vileplume (Leaf Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Parasect (GRS/BUG)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 95/288, DF 80/258, SP 30/158, SC 80/258
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Stun Spore (13), Leech Life (20), Spore (27), 
    Slash (34), Growth (41)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mega Drain, Solarbeam, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Skull 
    Bash, Rest, Substitute, Cut
    GSC Moves: Poisonpowder, Screech, Counter, Psybeam, Light Screen
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Paras -> Parasect (L24)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Venomoth (BUG/PSN)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 65/228, DF 60/218, SP 90/278, SC 90/278
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Disable (0), Poisonpowder (24), Leech Life (27), 
    Stun Spore (30), Psybeam (35), Sleep Powder (38), Psychic (43)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Mega Kick, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mega Drain, Solarbeam, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, 
    Bide, Swift, Rest, Psywave, Substitute
    GSC Moves: Supersonic, Confusion, Gust, Screech
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Venonat -> Venomoth (L31)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Dugtrio (GRD)
    Stats: HP 35/273, AT 80/258, DF 50/198, SP 120/338, SC 70/238
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Growl (0), Dig (19), Sand-Attack (24), Slash (31), 
    Earthquake (40)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, 
    Earthquake, Fissure, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Rest, Rock Slide, 
    Substitute, Cut
    GSC Moves: Tri Attack, Screech
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Diglett -> Dugtrio (L26)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Persian (NRM)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 70/238, DF 60/218, SP 115/328, SC 65/228
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Growl (0), Bite (12), Pay Day (17), Screech (24), 
    Fury Swipes (33), Slash (44)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, 
    Hyper Beam, Pay Day, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, 
    Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute
    GSC Moves: Amnesia, Headbutt, Roar, Defense Curl, Dream Eater, Hypnosis
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Meowth -> Persian (L28)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Golduck (WTR)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 82/262, DF 78/254, SP 85/268, SC 80/258
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Tail Whip (28), Disable (31), Confusion (36), Fury 
    Swipes (43), Hydro Pump (52)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Pay Day, Submission, 
    Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, 
    Rest, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Screech, Headbutt, Ice Punch, Waterfall, Psychic, Psybeam, 
    Hypnosis, Light Screen, Petal Dance, Tri Attack
    Specials: Amnesia (this can't coexist with Psychic, Psybeam, Hypnosis, Light 
    Screen, Petal Dance, or Tri Attack) 
    Evolution: Psyduck -> Golduck (L33)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Primeape (FTG)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 105/308, DF 60/218, SP 95/288, SC 60/218
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Leer (0), Karate Chop (15), Fury Swipes (21), 
    Focus Energy (27), Seismic Toss (33), Thrash (39)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Pay Day, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Thunderbolt, 
    Thunder, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Metronome, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, 
    Rock Slide, Substitute
    GSC Moves: Low Kick, Screech, Headbutt, Ice Punch, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, 
    Fire Punch, Meditate
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Mankey -> Primeape (L28)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Arcanine (FIR)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 110/318, DF 80/258, SP 95/288, SC 80/258
    Learned Moves: Bite (0), Roar (0), Ember (18), Leer (23), Take Down (30), 
    Agility (39), Flamethrower (50)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, Dragon 
    Rage, Dig, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Swift, 
    Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Thrash, Fire Spin
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Growlithe -> Arcanine (Fire Stone)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Poliwrath (WTR/FTG)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 85/268, DF 95/288, SP 70/238, SC 70/238
    Learned Moves: Bubble (0), Hypnosis (16), Water Gun (19), Doubleslap (25), 
    Body Slam (31), Amnesia (38), Hydro Pump (45)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, 
    Seismic Toss, Rage, Earthquake, Fissure, Psychic, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, 
    Metronome, Skull Bash, Rest, Psywave, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Ice Punch, Defense Curl, Waterfall, Haze, Mist, Splash, 
    Growth, Lovely Kiss
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Poliwag (WTR) -> Poliwhirl (WTR - L25) -> Poliwrath (Water Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Alakazam (PSY)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 50/198, DF 45/188, SP 120/338, SC 135/368
    Learned Moves: Teleport (0), Kinesis (0), Confusion (16), Disable (20), 
    Psybeam (27), Recover (31), Psychic (38), Reflect (42)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Dig, Psychic, Teleport, 
    Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder Wave, 
    Psywave, Tri Attack, Substitute, Flash
    GSC Moves: Fire Punch, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Barrier, Headbutt, Dream 
    Eater, Light Screen
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Abra -> Kadabra (L16) -> Alakazam (Trade)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Machamp (FTG)
    Stats: HP 90/383 AT 130/358, DF 80/258, SP 55/208, SC 65/228
    Learned Moves: Karate Chop (0), Low Kick (20), Leer (25), Focus Energy (32), 
    Seismic Toss (39), Submission (46)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Earthquake, Fissure, Dig, 
    Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Metronome, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Rock Slide, 
    Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Meditate, Light Screen, Headbutt, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Fire 
    Punch, Flamethrower, Rolling Kick
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Machop -> Machoke (L28) -> Machamp (Trade)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Victreebel (GRS/PSN)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 105/308, DF 65/228, SP 70/238, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Vine Whip (0), Growth (0), Wrap (13), Poisonpowder (15), Stun 
    Spore (18), Sleep Powder (21), Acid (26), Razor Leaf (33), Slam (42)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mega Drain, Solarbeam, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Rest, 
    Substitute, Cut
    GSC Moves: Leech Life, Lovely Kiss
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Bellsprout -> Weepinbell (L21) -> Victreebel (Leaf Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Tentacruel (WTR/PSN)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 70/238, DF 65/228, SP 100/298, SC 120/338
    Learned Moves: Acid (0), Supersonic (7), Wrap (13), Poison Sting (18), Water 
    Gun (22), Constrict (27), Barrier (33), Screech (40), Hydro Pump (48)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, 
    Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mega Drain, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, 
    Bide, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Cut, Surf
    GSC Moves: Aurora Beam, Haze, Confuse Ray
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Tentacool -> Tentacruel (L30)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Golem (GRD/RCK)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 110/318, DF 130/358, SP 45/188, SC 55/208
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Defense Curl (11), Rock Throw (16), Selfdestruct 
    (21), Harden (26), Earthquake (31), Explosion (36)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Earthquake, Fissure, Dig, 
    Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Metronome, Selfdestruct, Fire Blast, Rest, 
    Explosion, Rock Slide, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Roar, Defense Curl, Fire Punch, Flamethrower
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Geodude -> Graveler (L25) -> Golem (Trade)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Rapidash (FIR)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 100/298, DF 70/238, SP 105/308, SC 80/258
    Learned Moves: Ember (0), Tail Whip (30), Stomp (32), Growl (35), Fire Spin 
    (39), Take Down (43), Agility (48)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, 
    Substitute
    GSC Moves: Flamethrower, Tackle, Fury Attack, Headbutt, Thrash, Hypnosis, 
    Quick Attack, Double Kick, Low Kick
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Ponyta -> Rapidash (L40)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Slowbro (WTR/PSY)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 75/248, DF 110/318, SP 30/158, SC 80/258
    Learned Moves: Confusion (0), Disable (18), Headbutt (22), Growl (27), Water 
    Gun (33), Withdraw (37), Amnesia (40), Psychic (48)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice 
    Beam, Blizzard, Pay Day, Rage, Earthquake, Fissure, Dig, Psychic, Teleport, 
    Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, 
    Thunder Wave, Psywave, Tri Attack, Substitute, Surf, Strength, Flash
    GSC Moves: Tackle, Ice Punch, Dream Eater, Flamethrower, Stomp
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Slowpoke -> Slowbro (L37)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Magneton (ELC)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 60/218, DF 95/288, SP 70/238, SC 120/338
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Sonicboom (21), Thundershock (25), Supersonic (29), 
    Thunder Wave (35), Swift (41), Screech (47)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, Thunderbolt, 
    Thunder, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Swift, Rest, Thunder 
    Wave, Substitute, Flash
    GSC Moves: Tri Attack, Agility
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Magnemite -> Magneton (L30)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Farfetch'd (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 52/307, AT 65/228, DF 55/208, SP 60/218, SC 58/214
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Sand-Attack (0), Leer (7), Fury Attack (15), Swords 
    Dance (23), Agility (31), Slash (39)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Swords Dance, Whirlwind, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, 
    Double-Edge, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, 
    Substitute, Cut, Fly
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Mirror Move, Gust, Quick Attack
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Dodrio (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 60/333, AT 110/318, DF 70/238, SP 100/298, SC 60/218
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Growl (20), Fury Attack (24), Drill Peck (30), Rage 
    (36), Tri Attack (40), Agility (44)
    TM Moves: Whirlwind, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Skull Bash, Sky Attack, Rest, Tri 
    Attack, Substitute, Fly
    GSC Moves: Haze, Supersonic, Quick Attack, Low Kick
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Doduo -> Dodrio (L31)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Dewgong (WTR/ICE)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 70/238, DF 80/258, SP 70/238, SC 95/288
    Learned Moves: Headbutt (0), Growl (30), Aurora Beam (35), Rest (40), Take 
    Down (45), Ice Beam (50)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, 
    Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Pay Day, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, 
    Bide, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Waterfall, Disable, Lick, Slam, Peck
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Seel (WTR) -> Dewgong (L34)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Muk (PSN)
    Stats: HP 105/413, AT 105/308, DF 75/248, SP 50/198, SC 65/228
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Disable (0), Poison Gas (30), Minimize (33), Sludge 
    (37), Harden (42), Screech (48), Acid Armor (55)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mega Drain, Thunderbolt, 
    Thunder, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Selfdestruct, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, 
    Explosion, Substitute
    GSC Moves: Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Fire Punch, Flamethrower, Haze, Lick
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Grimer -> Muk (L38)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Cloyster (WTR/ICE)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 95/288, DF 180/458, SP 70/238, SC 85/268
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Withdraw (0), Supersonic (18), Clamp (23), Aurora 
    Beam (30), Leer (39), Ice Beam (50), Spike Cannon (50)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, 
    Selfdestruct, Swift, Rest, Explosion, Tri Attack, Substitute, Surf
    GSC Moves: Screech, Barrier
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Shellder (WTR) -> Cloyster (Water Stone)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Gengar (GHO/PSN)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 65/228, DF 60/218, SP 110/318, SC 130/358
    Learned Moves: Lick (0), Confuse Ray (0), Night Shade (0), Hypnosis (27), 
    Dream Eater (35)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Mega Drain, Thunderbolt, 
    Thunder, Psychic, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Metronome, Selfdestruct, Skull 
    Bash, Dream Eater, Rest, Psywave, Explosion, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Haze, Fire Punch, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Headbutt, Psywave
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Gastly -> Haunter (L25) -> Gengar (Trade)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Onix (GRD/RCK)
    Stats: HP 35/273, AT 45/188, DF 160/418, SP 70/238, SC 30/158
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Screech (0), Bind (15), Rock Throw (19), Rage (25), 
    Slam (33), Harden (43)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Rage, Earthquake, Fissure, 
    Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Selfdestruct, Skull Bash, Rest, Explosion, Rock 
    Slide, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Roar, Defense Curl, Sharpen
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Hypno (PSY)
    Stats: HP 85/373, AT 73/244, DF 70/238, SP 67/232, SC 115/328
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Hypnosis (0), Disable (12), Confusion (17), Headbutt 
    (24), Poison Gas (29), Psychic (32), Meditate (37)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, 
    Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, Skull Bash, Dream Eater, Rest, Thunder 
    Wave, Psywave, Tri Attack, Substitute, Flash
    GSC Moves: Amnesia, Fire Punch, Thunderpunch, Ice Punch, Headbutt, Barrier, 
    Light Screen
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Drowzee -> Hypno (L26)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Kingler (WTR)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 130/358, DF 115/328, SP 75/248, SC 50/198
    Learned Moves: Bubble (0), Leer (0), Vicegrip (20), Guillotine (25), Stomp 
    (30), Crabhammer (35), Harden (40)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, 
    Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, 
    Rest, Substitute, Cut, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Dig, Haze, Slam, Amnesia
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Krabby -> Kingler (L28)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Electrode (ELC)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 50/198, DF 70/238, SP 140/378, SC 80/258
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Screech (0), Sonicboom (17), Selfdestruct (22), 
    Light Screen (29), Swift (36), Explosion (43)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Take Down, Hyper Beam, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Teleport, Mimic, 
    Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Selfdestruct, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder 
    Wave, Explosion, Substitute, Flash
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Agility
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Voltorb -> Electrode (L30)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Exeggutor (GRS/PSY)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 95/288, DF 85/268, SP 55/208, SC 125/348
    Learned Moves: Barrage (0), Hypnosis (0), Reflect (25), Leech Seed (28), Stomp 
    (28), Stun Spore (32), Poisonpowder (37), Solarbeam (42), Sleep Powder (48)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mega Drain, 
    Solarbeam, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Selfdestruct, 
    Egg Bomb, Rest, Psywave, Explosion, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Confusion, Headbutt, Dream Eater
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Exeggcute -> Exeggutor (Leaf Stone)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Marowak (GRD)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 80/258, DF 110/318, SP 45/188, SC 50/198
    Learned Moves: Growl (0), Bone Club (0), Tail Whip (13), Headbutt (16), Leer 
    (25), Focus Energy (31), Thrash (38), Bonemerang (43), Rage (46)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, 
    Seismic Toss, Rage, Earthquake, Fissure, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Fire 
    Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Rock Slide, Swords Dance, Headbutt, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Fire 
    Punch, Flamethrower, Screech
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Cubone -> Marowak (L28)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Hitmonlee (FTG)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 120/338, DF 53/204, SP 87/272, SC 35/168
    Learned Moves: Double Kick (0), Meditate (0), Rolling Kick (33), Jump Kick 
    (38), Focus Energy (43), Hi Jump Kick (48), Mega Kick (53)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Metronome, 
    Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Tackle, Headbutt
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Hitmonchan (FTG)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 105/308, DF 79/256, SP 76/250, SC 35/168
    Learned Moves: Comet Punch (0), Agility (0), Fire Punch (33), Ice Punch (38), 
    Thunderpunch (43), Mega Punch (48), Counter (53)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Metronome, 
    Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Hi Jump Kick, Tackle, Headbutt
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Lickitung (NRM)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 55/208, DF 75/248, SP 30/158, SC 60/218
    Learned Moves: Wrap (0), Supersonic (0), Stomp (7), Disable (15), Defense Curl 
    (23), Slam (31), Screech (39)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Swords Dance, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, 
    Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, 
    Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Earthquake, 
    Fissure, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, 
    Cut, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Lick, Headbutt, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Fire Punch, Dream Eater, 
    Flamethrower, Doubleslap
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Weezing (PSN)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 90/278, DF 120/338, SP 60/218, SC 85/268
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Smog (0), Sludge (32), Smokescreen (37), 
    Selfdestruct (40), Haze (45), Explosion (48)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Hyper Beam, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Mimic, Double Team, 
    Bide, Selfdestruct, Fire Blast, Rest, Explosion, Substitute
    GSC Moves: Poison Gas, Flamethrower, Screech, Psybeam, Psywave
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Koffing -> Weezing (L35)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Rhydon (GRD/RCK)
    Stats: HP 105/413, AT 130/358, DF 120/338, SP 45/188, SC 40/178
    Learned Moves: Horn Attack (0), Stomp (30), Tail Whip (35), Fury Attack (40), 
    Horn Drill (45), Leer (50), Take Down (55)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, 
    Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Pay Day, 
    Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Earthquake, 
    Fissure, Dig, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Rock 
    Slide, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Roar, Thunderpunch, Fire Punch, Flamethrower, Thrash
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Rhyhorn -> Rhydon (L42)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Chansey (NRM)
    Stats: HP 250/703, AT 5/108, DF 5/108, SP 50/198, SC 105/308
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Tail Whip (0), Doubleslap (0), Sing (24), Growl 
    (30), Minimize (38), Defense Curl (44), Light Screen (48), Double-Edge (54)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, 
    Seismic Toss, Rage, Solarbeam, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, 
    Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, Egg Bomb, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, 
    Softboiled, Rest, Thunder Wave, Psywave, Tri Attack, Substitute, Strength, 
    Flash
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Flamethrower, Dream Eater
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fast
    
    Tangela (GRS)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 55/208, DF 115/328, SP 60/218, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Constrict (0), Bind (0), Absorb (27), Vine Whip (29), 
    Poisonpowder (32), Stun Spore (36), Sleep Powder (39), Slam (45), Growth (48)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Mega Drain, Solarbeam, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Skull Bash, Rest, 
    Substitute, Cut
    GSC Moves: Amnesia, Headbutt, Confusion, Reflect
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Kangaskhan (NRM)
    Stats: HP 105/413, AT 95/288, DF 80/258, SP 90/278, SC 40/178
    Learned Moves: Comet Punch (0), Rage (0), Bite (26), Tail Whip (31), Mega 
    Punch (36), Leer (41), Dizzy Punch (46)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, 
    Seismic Toss, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Earthquake, Fissure, Mimic, Double 
    Team, Bide, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Rock Slide, Substitute, Surf, 
    Strength
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Roar, Fire Punch, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Flamethrower, 
    Disable, Focus Energy, Stomp
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Seadra (WTR)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 65/228, DF 95/288, SP 85/268, SC 95/288
    Learned Moves: Bubble (0), Smokescreen (19), Leer (24), Water Gun (30), 
    Agility (37), Hydro Pump (45)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, 
    Substitute, Surf
    GSC Moves: Haze, Headbutt, Waterfall, Aurora Beam, Disable, Splash, Dragon 
    Rage
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Horsea -> Seadra (L32)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Seaking (WTR)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 92/282, DF 65/228, SP 68/234, SC 80/258
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Tail Whip (0), Supersonic (19), Horn Attack (24), 
    Fury Attack (30), Waterfall (37), Horn Drill (45), Agility (54)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Horn Drill, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, 
    Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Swift, Skull 
    Bash, Rest, Substitute, Surf
    GSC Moves: Haze, Psybeam, Hydro Pump, Swords Dance
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Goldeen -> Seaking (L33)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Starmie (WTR/PSY)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 75/248, DF 85/268, SP 115/328, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Water Gun (17), Harden (22), Recover (27), Swift 
    (32), Minimize (37), Light Screen (42), Hydro Pump (47)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice 
    Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Psychic, Teleport, 
    Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder Wave, 
    Psywave, Tri Attack, Substitute, Surf, Flash
    GSC Moves: Confuse Ray, Dream Eater, Waterfall
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Staryu (WTR) -> Starmie (Water Stone)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Mr. Mime (PSY)
    Stats: HP 40/283, AT 45/188, DF 65/228, SP 90/278, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Barrier (0), Confusion (15), Light Screen (23), Doubleslap 
    (31), Meditate (39), Substitute (47)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Solarbeam, Thunderbolt, 
    Thunder, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, 
    Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder Wave, Psywave, Substitute, Flash
    GSC Moves: Psybeam, Headbutt, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Fire Punch, Hypnosis
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Scyther (BUG/FLY)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 110/318, DF 80/258, SP 105/308, SC 55/208
    Learned Moves: Quick Attack (0), Leer (17), Focus Energy (20), Double Team 
    (24), Slash (29), Swords Dance (35), Agility (42), Wing Attack (50)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, 
    Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Cut
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Counter, Razor Wind, Light Screen, Sonicboom
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Jynx (ICE/PSY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 50/198, DF 35/168, SP 95/288, SC 95/288
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Lovely Kiss (0), Lick (18), Doubleslap (23), Ice 
    Punch (31), Body Slam (39), Thrash (47), Blizzard (58)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, 
    Seismic Toss, Rage, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic,
    Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, Skull Bash, Rest, Psywave, Substitute
    GSC Moves: Dream Eater, Petal Dance, Confusion, Sing, Headbutt, Meditate, 
    Dizzy Punch
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Electabuzz (ELC)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 83/264, DF 57/212, SP 105/308, SC 85/268
    Learned Moves: Quick Attack (0), Leer (0), Thundershock (34), Screech (37), 
    Thunderpunch (42), Light Screen (49), Thunder (54)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, 
    Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, Swift, Skull 
    Bash, Rest, Thunder Wave, Psywave, Substitute, Fly, Flash
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Ice Punch, Fire Punch, Karate Chop, Barrier, Rolling 
    Kick, Meditate, Dizzy Punch
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Magmar (FIR)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 95/288, DF 57/212, SP 93/284, SC 85/268
    Learned Moves: Ember (0), Leer (36), Confuse Ray (39), Fire Punch (43), 
    Smokescreen (48), Smog (52), Flamethrower (55)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, 
    Double Team, Bide, Metronome, Fire Blast,
    Skull Bash, Rest, Psywave, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Thunderpunch, Headbutt, Screech, Karate Chop, Barrier, Dizzy Punch
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Pinsir (BUG)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 125/348, DF 50/198, SP 35/168, SC 55/208
    Learned Moves: Vicegrip (0), Bind (21), Seismic Toss (25), Guillotine (30), 
    Focus Energy (36), Harden (43), Slash (49), Swords Dance (54)
    TM Moves: Swords Dance, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Submission, Seismic Toss, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Bide, Rest, Substitute, 
    Cut
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Fury Attack, Rock Throw
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Tauros (NRM)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 100/298, DF 95/288, SP 110/318, SC 70/238
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Stomp (21), Tail Whip (28), Leer (35), Rage (44), 
    Take Down (51)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Ice Beam, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Earthquake, Fissure, Mimic, 
    Double Team, Bide, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Strength
    GSC Moves: Horn Attack, Thrash, Headbutt, Flamethrower, Quick Attack
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Gyarados (WTR/FLY)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 125/348, DF 79/256, SP 81/260, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Splash (0), Tackle (15), Bite (20), Dragon Rage (25), Leer 
    (32), Hydro Pump (41), Hyper Beam (52)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice 
    Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Dragon Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Mimic, 
    Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Surf, 
    Strength
    GSC Moves: Bubble, Thrash, Headbutt, Roar, Flamethrower, Waterfall
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Magikarp (WTR) -> Gyarados (L20)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Lapras (WTR/ICE)
    Stats: HP 130/463, AT 85/268, DF 80/258, SP 60/218, SC 95/288
    Learned Moves: Water Gun (0), Growl (0), Sing (16), Mist (20), Body Slam (25), 
    Confuse Ray (31), Ice Beam (38), Hydro Pump (46)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, 
    Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Solarbeam, Dragon Rage, 
    Thunderbolt, Thunder, Psychic, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Skull Bash, 
    Rest, Psywave, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Dream Eater, Aurora Beam, Bite
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Ditto (NRM)
    Stats: HP 48/299, AT 48/194, DF 48/194, SP 48/194, SC 48/194
    Learned Moves: Transform (0)
    TM Moves: None
    GSC Moves: None (A mechanic prohibited in all major circles allows access to 
    any move except Mirror Move, Mimic, Metronome, Selfdestruct, Explosion, or 
    Struggle)
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Vaporeon (WTR)
    Stats: HP 130/463, AT 65/228, DF 60/218, SP 65/228, SC 110/318
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Sand-Attack (0), Tail Whip (0), Growl (16), Water 
    Gun (16), Quick Attack (23), Bite (30), Focus Energy (36), Aurora Beam (36), 
    Take Down (42), Haze (42), Acid Armor (42), Mist (48), Hydro Pump (52)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice 
    Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Swift, 
    Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Surf
    GSC Moves: Growth, Headbutt, Roar, Waterfall
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Eevee (NRM) -> Vaporeon (Water Stone) / Jolteon (ELC - 
    Thunderstone) / Flareon (FIR - Fire Stone)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Jolteon (ELC)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 65/228, DF 60/218, SP 130/358, SC 110/318
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Sand-Attack (0), Tail Whip (0), Growl (16), 
    Thundershock (16), Quick Attack (23), Bite (30), Double Kick (30), Focus 
    Energy (36), Pin Missile (36), Thunder Wave (40), Take Down (42), Agility 
    (47), Thunder (52)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, 
    Thunderbolt, Thunder, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Swift, Skull Bash, 
    Rest, Thunder Wave, Substitute, Flash
    GSC Moves: Growth, Headbutt, Roar
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Eevee (NRM) -> Vaporeon (WTR - Water Stone) / Jolteon 
    (Thunderstone) / Flareon (FIR - Fire Stone)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Flareon (FIR)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 130/358, DF 60/218, SP 65/228, SC 110/318
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Sand-Attack (0), Tail Whip (0), Growl (16), Ember 
    (16), Quick Attack (23), Bite (30), Focus Energy (36), Fire Spin (36), Take 
    Down (42), Smog (42), Leer (42), Rage (48), Flamethrower (52)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mimic, 
    Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute
    GSC Moves: Growth, Headbutt, Roar, 
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Eevee (NRM) -> Vaporeon (WTR - Water Stone) / Jolteon (ELC - 
    Thunderstone) / Flareon (Fire Stone)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Porygon (NRM)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 60/218, DF 70/238, SP 40/178, SC 75/248
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Sharpen (0), Conversion (0), Psybeam (23), Harden 
    (28), Agility (35), Tri Attack (42)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, 
    Thunderbolt, Thunder, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, 
    Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder Wave, Psywave, Tri Attack, Substitute, Flash
    GSC Moves: Recover, Dream Eater, Barrier
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Omastar (RCK/WTR)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 60/218, DF 125/348, SP 55/208, SC 115/328
    Learned Moves: Water Gun (0), Withdraw (0), Horn Attack (34), Leer (39), Spike 
    Cannon (44), Hydro Pump (49)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, 
    Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Seismic Toss, Rage, 
    Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Skull Bash, Rest, Substitute, Surf
    GSC Moves: Constrict, Bite, Headbutt, Aurora Beam, Haze, Slam, Supersonic, 
    Rock Throw
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Omanyte -> Omastar (L40)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Kabutops (RCK/WTR)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 115/328, DF 105/308, SP 80/258, SC 70/238
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Harden (0), Absorb (34), Slash (39), Leer (44), 
    Hydro Pump (49)
    TM Moves: Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice 
    Beam, Blizzard, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Rest, Substitute, 
    Surf
    GSC Moves: Sand-Attack, Mega Drain, Headbutt 
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Kabuto -> Kabutops (L40)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Aerodactyl (RCK/FLY)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 105/308, DF 65/228, SP 130/358, SC 60/218
    Learned Moves: Wing Attack (0), Agility (0), Supersonic (33), Bite (38), Take 
    Down (45), Hyper Beam (54)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Whirlwind, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Dragon Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Swift, Sky 
    Attack, Rest, Substitute, Fly
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Roar, Earthquake, Flamethrower, Rock Throw
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Snorlax (NRM)
    Stats: HP 160/523, AT 110/318, DF 65/228, SP 30/158, SC 65/228
    Learned Moves: Headbutt (0), Amnesia (0), Rest (0), Body Slam (35), Harden 
    (41), Double-Edge (48), Hyper Beam (56)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Submission, Counter, 
    Seismic Toss, Rage, Solarbeam, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Earthquake, Fissure, 
    Psychic, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, Selfdestruct, Fire 
    Blast, Skull Bash, Rest, Psywave, Rock Slide, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Tackle, Defense Curl, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Fire Punch, 
    Flamethrower, Lick, Splash, Lovely Kiss
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Articuno (ICE/FLY)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 85/268, DF 100/298, SP 85/268, SC 125/348
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Ice Beam (0), Blizzard (51), Agility (55), Mist (60)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Whirlwind, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, 
    Water Gun, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, 
    Swift, Sky Attack, Rest, Substitute, Fly
    GSC Moves: Gust, Roar
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Zapdos (ELC/FLY)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 90/278, DF 85/268, SP 100/298, SC 125/348
    Learned Moves: Thundershock (0), Drill Peck (0), Thunder (51), Agility (55), 
    Light Screen (60)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Whirlwind, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Hyper Beam, 
    Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Swift, Sky 
    Attack, Rest, Thunder Wave, Substitute, Fly, Flash
    GSC Moves: Peck, Roar
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Moltres (FIR/FLY)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 100/298, DF 90/278, SP 90/278, SC 125/348
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Fire Spin (0), Leer (51), Agility (55), Sky Attack 
    (60)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Whirlwind, Toxic, Take Down, Double-Edge, Ice Beam, 
    Hyper Beam, Rage, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Swift, Sky 
    Attack, Rest, Substitute, Fly
    GSC Moves: Wing Attack, Flamethrower, Roar
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Dragonite (DRG/FLY)
    Stats: HP 91/385, AT 134/366, DF 95/288, SP 80/258, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Wrap (0), Leer (0), Thunder Wave (10), Agility (20), Slam (30), 
    Dragon Rage (40), Hyper Beam (50)
    TM Moves: Razor Wind, Toxic, Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Rage, Dragon Rage, 
    Thunderbolt, Thunder, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Fire Blast, Swift, 
    Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder Wave, Substitute, Surf, Strength
    GSC Moves: Haze, Wing Attack, Headbutt, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Fire Punch, 
    Waterfall, Flamethrower, Mist, Supersonic, Light Screen
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Dratini (DRG) -> Dragonair (DRG - L30) -> Dragonite (L55)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Mewtwo (PSY)
    Stats: HP 106/415, AT 110/318, DF 90/278, SP 130/358, SC 154/406
    Learned Moves: Confusion (0), Disable (0), Swift (0), Barrier (63), Psychic 
    (66), Recover (70), Mist (75), Amnesia (81)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Mega Kick, Toxic, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, 
    Bubblebeam, Water Gun, Ice Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Pay Day, Submission, 
    Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, Solarbeam, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Psychic, 
    Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, Selfdestruct, Fire 
    Blast, Swift, Skull Bash, Rest, Thunder Wave, Psywave, Tri Attack, Substitute, 
    Strength, Flash
    GSC Moves: Headbutt, Ice Punch, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Fire Punch, 
    Flamethrower 
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Mew (PSY)
    Stats: HP 100/298, AT 100/298, DF 100/298, SP 100/298, SC 100/298
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Transform (10), Mega Punch (20), Metronome (30), 
    Psychic (40)
    TM Moves: Mega Punch, Razor Wind, Swords Dance, Whirlwind, Mega Kick, Toxic, 
    Horn Drill, Body Slam, Take Down, Double-Edge, Bubblebeam, Water Gun, ice 
    Beam, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Pay Day, Submission, Counter, Seismic Toss, Rage, 
    Mega Drain, Solarbeam, Dragon Rage, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Dig, Fissure, 
    Earthquake, Psychic, Teleport, Mimic, Double Team, Reflect, Bide, Metronome, 
    Selfdestruct, Egg Bomb, Fire Blast, Swift, Skull Bash, Softboiled, Dream 
    Eater, Sky Attack, Rest, Thunder Wave, Psywave, Explosion, Rock Slide, Tri 
    Attack, Substitute, Cut, Fly, Surf, Strength, Flash
    GSC Moves: Flamethrower, Headbutt, Roar, Ice Punch, Defense Curl, 
    Thunderpunch, Fire Punch, Waterfall (A mechanic prohibited in all major 
    circles allows access to any move except Mirror Move or Struggle)
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fading
    
    ---------------
    |Move Database|
    ---------------
    The new feature.  All 165 of the moves in this game represented in...you 
    guessed it...another chart!
    
    Type: One of the 15.  Note that for moves which don't cause damage or a 
    condition to the opponent (like Recover, Swords Dance, or Screech) this is 
    irrelevant, but is still listed.
    Power: If a move has a base power, it's listed here.  If a move is shown as 
    having power of *, then it doesn't actually calculate damage via the formula, 
    but it may inflict damage some other way.
    Accuracy: Instead of listing accuracy as a percentage, accuracies (and effect 
    probabilities) here are listed as two- or three-digit numbers.  In order to 
    find the corresponding percentage, divide by 2.56.  (Or, if your calculator's 
    divide key is broken, you can multiply by 0.390625.)
    PP: This represents the PP Up count.  To find the total without PP Up, 
    subtract the lesser of 37.5% of the figure shown or 21.  (Of course, why are 
    you going without PP Up in the first place?)
    
    Absorb: Grass, Power 20, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  For each 2 damage this attack 
    deals, add 1 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Acid: Poison, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Probability 25 to lower 
    opponent's Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Acid Armor: Poison, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Defense 
    modifier by 2.
    
    Agility: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Raises your Speed modifier by 
    2.
    
    Amnesia: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Raises your Special modifier 
    by 2.
    
    Aurora Beam: Ice, Power 65, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Probability 25 to lower 
    opponent's Attack modifier by 1.
    
    Barrage: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 216, PP 32.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 times 
    in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Barrier: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Raises your Defense modifier 
    by 2.
    
    Bide: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  Skip your next 2-3 turns.  During 
    your next turn, for each 1 damage dealt to you during a turn skipped this way, 
    subtract 2 from the opponent's HP.
    
    Bind: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 191, PP 16.  Strikes for 2-5 turns, or until 
    the opponent switches.  Neither player may select any moves during this time.
    
    Bite: Normal, Power 60, Accuracy 255, PP 40.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Blizzard: Ice, Power 120, Accuracy 229, PP 8.  Probability 25 to freeze the 
    opponent.
    
    Body Slam: Normal, Power 85, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Probability 76 to paralyze 
    the opponent.
    
    Bone Club: Ground, Power 65, Accuracy 216, PP 32.  Probability 25 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Bonemerang: Ground, Power 50, Accuracy 230, PP 16.  Hits twice in one turn.
    
    Bubble: Water, Power 20, Accuracy 255, PP 48.  Probability 25 to lower the 
    opponent's Speed modifier by 1.
    
    Bubblebeam: Water, Power 60, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Probability 25 to lower the 
    opponent's Speed modifier by 1.
    
    Clamp: Water, Power 35, Accuracy 192, PP 16.  Strikes for 2-5 turns, or until 
    the opponent switches.  Neither player may select any moves during this time.
    
    Comet Punch: Normal, Power 18, Accuracy 216, PP 24.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Confuse Ray: Ghost, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  Confuses the opponent.
    
    Confusion: Psychic, Power 50, Accuracy 255, PP 40.  Probability 25 to confuse 
    the opponent.
    
    Constrict: Normal, Power 10, Accuracy 255, PP 56.  Probability 25 to lower the 
    opponent's Speed modifier by 1.
    
    Conversion: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 48.  Your Pokemon's type becomes 
    that of a randomly chosen non-Conversion, non-empty slot in your moveset.
                
    Cotton Spore: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 216, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Speed modifier by 2.
    
    Counter: Fighting, Power *, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Goes last.  If the opponent 
    dealt damage to you this turn with a Normal or Fighting attack, subtract twice 
    that amount from the opponent's HP.
    
    Crabhammer: Water, Power 90, Accuracy 216, PP 16.  Critical Hit odds 
    multiplied by 8.
    
    Cut: Normal, Power 50, Accuracy 242, PP 48.
    
    Defense Curl: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 61.  Raises your Defense 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Dig: Ground, Power 100, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  Requires pre-attack setup turn.  
    User becomes Underground during that turn.
    
    Disable: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 140, PP 32.  Selects one of your opponent's 
    moves randomly.  That Pokemon can't use that move for the next 2-5 turns.
    
    Dizzy Punch: Normal, Power 70, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Probability 51 to confuse 
    the opponent.
    
    Double-Edge: Normal, Power 100, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  For each 4 damage this 
    attack deals, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Double Kick: Fighting, Power 30, Accuracy 255, PP 48.  Strikes 2 times in a 
    single turn.
    
    Doubleslap: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 216, PP 16.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Double Team: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Raises your Evade modifier 
    by 1.
    
    Dragon Rage: Dragon, Power *, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  Subtract 40 from your 
    opponent's Pokemon's HP.
    
    Dream Eater: Psychic, Power 100, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  If the opponent isn't 
    asleep, this attack misses.  For each 1 damage this attack deals, add 1 to 
    your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Drill Peck: Flying, Power 80, Accuracy 255, PP 32.
    
    Earthquake: Ground, Power 100, Accuracy 255, PP 16.
    
    Egg Bomb: Normal, Power 100, Accuracy 191, PP 16.
    
    Ember: Fire, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 40.  Probability 25 to burn the 
    opponent.
    
    Explosion: Normal, Power 170, Accuracy 255, PP 8.  Until end of attack, the 
    opponent's Defense is cut in half.  Your HP becomes 0.
    
    Fire Blast: Fire, Power 120, Accuracy 216, PP 8.  Probability 25 to burn the 
    opponent.
    
    Fire Punch: Fire, Power 75, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Probability 25 to burn the 
    opponent.
    
    Fire Spin: Fire, Power 15, Accuracy 178, PP 24.  Strikes for 2-5 turns, or 
    until the opponent switches.  Neither player may select any moves during this 
    time.
    
    Fissure: Ground, Power *, Accuracy 75, PP 8.  Accuracy 0 against all faster 
    Pokemon.  Sets opponent's HP to 0 if it hits.  
    
    Flamethrower: Fire, Power 95, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Probability 25 to burn the 
    opponent.
    
    Flash: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 178, PP 32.  Lowers the opponent's Accuracy 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Fly: Flying, Power 70, Accuracy 242, PP 24.  Requires pre-attack setup turn.  
    User becomes Airborne during that turn.
    
    Focus Energy: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Until you switch or are 
    KO'd, your Critical Hit odds are multiplied by 4.  If using GB to battle, 
    instead don't change odds, and your critical hit odds become 0 whenever you 
    don't go first.
    
    Fury Attack: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 216, PP 32.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Fury Swipes: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 216, PP 24.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Glare: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 191, PP 48.  Paralyzes the opponent.
    
    Growl: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's Attack 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Growth: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Special modifier by 
    1.
    
    Guillotine: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 75, PP 8.  Accuracy 0 against all faster 
    Pokemon.  Sets opponent's HP to 0 if it hits.
    
    Gust: Flying, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 56.
    
    Harden: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 61.  Raises your Defense modifier by 
    1.
    
    Haze: Ice, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 48.  All stat modifiers and 
    accuracy/evade modifiers become 0.  If the opponent is Asleep, Paralyzed, 
    Burned, Poisoned, or Frozen, that condition is erased.
    
    Headbutt: Normal, Power 70, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Hi Jump Kick: Fighting, Power 85, Accuracy 229, PP 32.  If this attack misses, 
    subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Horn Attack: Normal, Power 65, Accuracy 255, PP 56.
    
    Horn Drill: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 75, PP 8.  Accuracy 0 against all faster  
    Pokemon.  Sets opponent's HP to 0 if it hits. 
    
    Hydro Pump: Water, Power 120, Accuracy 203, PP 8.
    
    Hyper Beam: Normal, Power 150, Accuracy 229, PP 8.  You skip your next turn.
    
    Hyper Fang: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 229, PP 24.  Probability 25 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Hypnosis: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 153, PP 32.  Puts the opponent to sleep.
    
    Ice Beam: Ice, Power 95, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Probability 25 to freeze the 
    opponent.
    
    Ice Punch: Ice, Power 75, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Probability 25 to freeze the  
    opponent.
    
    Jump Kick: Fighting, Power 70, Accuracy 242, PP 40.  If this attack would 
    miss, instead prevent all damage it would deal to the opponent this turn.  For 
    each 8 damage prevented this way, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Karate Chop: Fighting, Power 50, Accuracy 255, PP 40.  Critical Hit odds 
    multiplied by 8.
    
    Kinesis: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 203, PP 24.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Accuracy modifier by 1.
    
    Leech Life: Bug, Power 20, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  For each 2 damage this attack 
    deals, add 1 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Leech Seed: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 229, PP 16.  Until the opponent switches 
    or is KO'd, at end of turn, that Pokemon loses 12.5% of its maximum HP, and an 
    equal amount is added to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Leer: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 48.  Lowers the opponent's Defense 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Lick: Ghost, Power 20, Accuracy 255, PP 48.  Probability 76 to paralyze the 
    opponent.
    
    Light Screen: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Until you switch or are 
    KO'd, whenever you're attacked, your Special stat is doubled until end of 
    attack.
    
    Lovely Kiss: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 191, PP 24.  Puts the opponent to 
    sleep.
    
    Low Kick: Fighting, Power 50, Accuracy 229, PP 32.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Meditate: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Attack modifier 
    by 1.
    
    Mega Drain: Grass, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  For each 2 damage this 
    attack deals, add 1 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Mega Kick: Normal, Power 120, Accuracy 191, PP 8.
    
    Mega Punch: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 216, PP 32.
    
    Metronome: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Select a random attack from 
    the game's list of attacks, and perform that attack normally.
    
    Mimic: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Replace Mimic with a random move 
    from among your opponent's moves until your Pokemon switches or is KO'd.
    
    Minimize: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Increases your Evade modifier 
    by 1.
    
    Mirror Move: Flying, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Attack with the move most 
    recently used by the opponent.
    
    Mist: Ice, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Until you switch or are KO'd, if an 
    opponent's move would decrease one or more of your stat modifiers, those 
    modifiers remain unchanged instead.
    
    Night Shade: Ghost, Power *, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Reduces opponent's HP by a 
    number equal to your level.
    
    Pay Day: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  In GB battles, receive P2 
    times user's level at end of battle.
    
    Peck: Flying, Power 35, Accuracy 255, PP 56.
    
    Petal Dance: Grass, Power 90, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Strikes for 2 or 3 turns; 
    your decision-making ability during those turns is removed.  After those 
    turns, your Pokemon confuses itself.
    
    Pin Missile: Bug, Power 14, Accuracy 216, PP 32.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 times 
    in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Poison Gas: Poison, Power 0, Accuracy 140, PP 61.  Poisons the opponent.
    
    Poisonpowder: Poison, Power 0, Accuracy 191, PP 56.  Poisons the opponent.
    
    Poison Sting: Poison, Power 15, Accuracy 255, PP 56.  Probability 76 to poison 
    the opponent.
    
    Pound: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 56.
    
    Psybeam: Psychic, Power 65, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Probability 25 to confuse 
    the opponent.
    
    Psychic: Psychic, Power 90, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  Probability 76 to lower 
    opponent's Special modifier by 1.
    
    Psywave: Psychic, Power *, Accuracy 203, PP 24.  Reduces opponent's HP by a 
    random number, chosen from a field with lower bound 1 and upper bound 
    (UserLevel * 1.5).
    
    Quick Attack: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 48.  Goes first.
    
    Rage: Normal, Power 20, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Your decision-making ability is 
    removed until your Pokemon is KO'd.  Whenever the opponent deals damage to 
    your Pokemon, your Attack modifier is increased by 1.
    
    Razor Leaf: Grass, Power 55, Accuracy 242, PP 40.  Critical Hit odds are 
    multiplied by 8.
    
    Razor Wind: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 191, PP 24.  Requires pre-attack setup 
    turn.
    
    Recover: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Your Pokemon recovers 50% of 
    its maximum HP.
    
    Reflect: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Until your Pokemon switches 
    or is KO'd, your Defense is doubled.
    
    Rest: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Your Pokemon recovers all HP, 
    and goes to sleep (overwriting any other status).  This sleep has a fixed 
    duration of 2 turns.
    
    Roar: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  In single-player GB battles, end 
    the battle.  Otherwise, do nothing.
    
    Rock Slide: Rock, Power 75, Accuracy 229, PP 16.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Rock Throw: Rock, Power 50, Accuracy 229, PP 24.
    
    Rolling Kick: Fighting, Power 60, Accuracy 216, PP 24.  Probability 76 to make 
    the opponent flinch.
    
    Sand-Attack: Ground, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Accuracy modifier by 1.
    
    Scratch: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 48.
    
    Screech: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 216, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's Defense 
    modifier by 2.
    
    Seismic Toss: Fighting, Power *, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Reduces opponent's HP 
    by a number equal to your level.
    
    Selfdestruct: Normal, Power 130, Accuracy 255, PP 8.  Until end of turn, the 
    opponent's Defense is cut in half.  Your HP becomes 0.
    
    Sharpen: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Raises your Attack modifier by 
    1.
    
    Sing: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 140, PP 24.  Puts the opponent's Pokemon to 
    sleep.
    
    Skull Bash: Normal, Power 100, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Requires pre-attack setup 
    turn.
    
    Sky Attack: Flying, Power 140, Accuracy 242, PP 8.  Requires pre-attack setup 
    turn.
    
    Slam: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 191, PP 32.
    
    Slash: Normal, Power 70, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Critical Hit odds multiplied by 
    8.
    
    Sleep Powder: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 191, PP 24.  Puts the opponent to 
    sleep.
    
    Sludge: Poison, Power 65, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Probability 76 to poison the 
    opponent.
    
    Smog: Poison, Power 20, Accuracy 178, PP 32.  Probability 102 to poison the 
    opponent.
    
    Smokescreen: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Accuracy modifier by 1.
    
    Softboiled: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Your Pokemon recovers 50% 
    of its maximum HP.
    
    Solarbeam: Grass, Power 120, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  Requires pre-attack setup 
    turn.
    
    Sonicboom: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 229, PP 32.  Reduces the opponent's HP by 
    20.
    
    Spike Cannon: Normal, Power 20, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Splash: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Displays "No effect!" on the 
    screen.
    
    Spore: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Puts the opponent to sleep.
    
    Stomp: Normal, Power 65, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Strength: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 255, PP 24.
    
    String Shot: Bug, Power 0, Accuracy 242, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's Speed 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Struggle: Typeless, Power 50, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  For each 2 damage this 
    attack deals, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.  A Pokemon whose moves all 
    have 0 PP will use Struggle as though it had infinite PP.
    
    Stun Spore: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 191, PP 48.  Paralyzes the opponent.
    
    Submission: Fighting, Power 80, Accuracy 203, PP 40.  For each 4 damage this 
    attack deals, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Substitute: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Your Pokemon loses 25% of 
    its maximum HP and gives that HP to a substitute.  If an attack would deal 
    damage to a Pokemon that has a substitute, that attack deals damage to the 
    substitute instead.  If a Pokemon with a substitute would be inflicted with 
    Sleep, Confusion, Paralysis, Poison, Burn, Freeze, or Leech Seed from an 
    opponent's attack, its status remains unchanged instead.
    
    Super Fang: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 229, PP 16.  The opponent's Pokemon 
    loses half its current HP, rounded up.
    
    Supersonic: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 140, PP 32.  Confuses the opponent.
    
    Surf: Water, Power 95, Accuracy 255, PP 24.
    
    Swift: Normal, Power 60, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Ignores accuracy and evade 
    modifiers.  Can hit Airborne or Underground Pokemon.
    
    Swords Dance: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Raises your Attack 
    modifier by 2.
    
    Tackle: Normal, Power 35, Accuracy 242, PP 56.
    
    Tail Whip: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Take Down: Normal, Power 90, Accuracy 216, PP 32.  For each 4 damage this 
    attack deals, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Teleport: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  In single-player GB battles, 
    end the battle.  Otherwise, do nothing.
    
    Thrash: Normal, Power 90, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Strikes for 2 or 3 turns; your 
    decision-making ability during those turns is removed.  After those turns, 
    your Pokemon confuses itself.
    
    Thunder: Electric, Power 120, Accuracy 178, PP 16.  Probability 25 to paralyze 
    the opponent.
    
    Thunder Wave: Electric, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Paralyzes the opponent.
    
    Thunderbolt: Electric, Power 95, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Probability 25 to 
    paralyze the opponent.
    
    Thunderpunch: Electric, Power 75, Accuracy 255, PP 24.  Probability 25 to 
    paralyze the opponent.
    
    Thundershock: Electric, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 48.  Probability 25 to 
    paralyze the opponent.
    
    Toxic: Poison, Power 0, Accuracy 216, PP 16.  Poisons the opponent.  Until the 
    opponent switches or is KO'd, damage taken by Poison starts at 6.25% and 
    increases by 6.25% each turn, instead of the normal constant rate of 6.25%.
    
    Transform: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Until you switch or are 
    KO'd, your Pokemon's species, non-HP stats, and moves become those of the 
    opponent's Pokemon as of the time Transform was used.  If any of those moves 
    have more than 5 PP, their PP count for your Pokemon is reduced to 5.
    
    Tri Attack: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  
    
    Twineedle: Bug, Power 25, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  Strikes twice within a single 
    turn.  Probability 51 to poison the opponent.
    
    Vicegrip: Normal, Power 55, Accuracy 255, PP 48.
    
    Vine Whip: Grass, Power 35, Accuracy 255, PP 16.
    
    Water Gun: Water, Power 40, Accuracy 255, PP 40.
    
    Waterfall: Water, Power 80, Accuracy 255, PP 24.
    
    Whirlwind: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 32.  In single-player GB battles, 
    end the battle.  Otherwise, do nothing.
    
    Wing Attack: Flying, Power 35, Accuracy 255, PP 56.
    
    Withdraw: Water, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Defense modifier 
    by 1.
    
    Wrap: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 216, PP 24.  Strikes for 2-5 turns, or until 
    the opponent switches.  Neither player may select any moves during this time.
    
    <ConfusionDamage>: Typeless, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP N/A.  Each turn your 
    Pokemon is confused, it has probability 128 of hitting itself with this attack 
    instead of using any other move.
    
    *******************
    *205. Variant Play*
    *******************
    
    If this game was all about L100 battling, why would there exist lower levels?
    
    Put those low-level Pokemon to use!  Stadium provides three tournaments in 
    which you can do so.  Fortunately for you, those tournaments have already been 
    cracked, and you too can reap the benefits of their defeat.
    
    First up: Poke Cup.  This is arguably the truest test of skill, since the 
    levels are different than what most people are used to, there's a new test of 
    skill provided by the level divide, and there's an automatic restriction 
    against Mewtwo instead of having to enforce a mutual agreement beforehand.
    
    Functionally, the same Pokemon that flourish under Prime Cup will do so here, 
    since any moves learned after L50 are either irrelevant or exist in TM form.  
    However, the level split was supposed to get you thinking about the best 
    possible distribution...
    
    ...That's already been done.  For best results, set two L55s alongside four 
    L50s.  Why?
    
    --Level 55s get an advantage that 51s and 52s don't.  Not only is the stat 
    boost almost 10%, but don't forget that level itself plays a direct role in 
    damage calculation.  In the (.4 * L) term, L50, 51, and 52 all return a value 
    of 20.  Hence giving each Pokemon a 1-2 level boost provides a net gain of 0 
    in this respect.  L53 and L54 return a 21, and only L55 will give 22 in this 
    term.  So the 10% boost is maintained here.  On the other hand, the failure of 
    a universal 1-2 level increase to provide any boost in the first term of the 
    damage formula actually knocks those levels' damage increases with respect to 
    L50s down, to 1.9% and 3.8%.  On a three-Pokemon team, the edge in total 
    percent advantage over L50s is a full 10% for 55-50-50, but only 9.5% for 52-
    52-51.  0.5% doesn't seem like a large advantage at all, but as long as it's 
    better than the other option, why not do it?
    --Putting your five levels of leeway all into the same Pokemon is known as 
    "efficient resource allocation".  To exaggerate the example, let's imagine 
    there's a six-Pokemon tournament where you can use any levels, but the total 
    of your levels can't exceed 110.  Who would win: someone who uses a powerful 
    L100 and rounds out the team with irrelevant L2s like Pidgey and Spearow, or 
    someone who believes in the even distribution theory and thus fills the team 
    with levels 18 and 19?  I've heard the argument "If your powerhouse goes down, 
    the rest of the team is defenseless."  In this case, the even-distributor has 
    a 16-17 level advantage over the allocator's L2s, but in order to bring the 
    powerhouse down just to GET to the L2s, those Pokemon will need to fight into 
    a massive 80+ level disadvantage.  Some bad.  In a five-level frame, this 
    effect is reduced to the point of near-invisibility, but it's still there.
    --The reason the 55:50 split is best played 4:2 deals with combinatorics.  
    You'll want to have your three-Pokemon subteam right at the 155-level limit, 
    or else you waste potential resources, which is never good.  If there are two 
    L55s, the number of different 155-level teams possible is (1C2)*(2C4) = 2 * 6 
    = 12.  With one L55, it's 1C1 * 2C5 = 10, and with three it's 1C3 * 2C3 = 9.  
    Zero is 0, four is 4, and five on up is illegal (there's no way to construct a 
    155-level three-Pokemon team out of five L55s and a L50).  So two 55s offer 
    the greatest number of reasonable team choices.
    
    What to set at L55?  Typically, you'll want your team's mainstays to receive 
    all the bonuses they can get.  I use Machamp and Chansey at the upper level.  
    Annoyers and specialized Pokemon don't really need the bonus as much, since 
    their job is based on moves and not stats, so put it where it can be exploited 
    most.
    
    Next up is Petit Cup.  Take a hint from the French here--because there's no 
    ending "e", it's pronounced "puh-TEA" instead of "puh-TEET".  Not that you get 
    points from the game for pronunciation, but who ever said Ted Lewis's 
    pronunciation always had to set the standard as the definitive one?
    
    Anyway, this is an easy cup to analyze.  Only 45 entrants allowed, and perhaps 
    12 of these will do you any good.  Similar to before, the 30-30-25-25-25-25 
    distribution proves superior.
    
    Gastly is an obvious strong point.  Not only does it hold the #2 stat total in 
    the Cup (trailing only a much-maligned Omanyte), but it gets Psychic and 
    Thunderbolt, a pair of immunities, Explosion for desperate situations (though 
    I'm not so sure about that Attack...), and an excellent Special to register 
    hits with.  High Speed also helps the crit-hit percentage.  No team should be 
    without Gastly.
    
    Speaking of high Special, Abra's ranks in at #1.  Only two Psychics (this and 
    Exeggcute) are eligible here, so one would think their dominance would be 
    lessened, but those that do have obviously never seen L30 Abra in action.  
    Don't sweat not being able to trade back Triplepunches based on a decree of 
    the proletariat, since only Paras and Exeggcute take significantly more damage 
    from a Punch than from Psychic.  STAB 95-Special, 90-power, stat-depriving 
    attacks simply hurt.  This is one of the Game-Breaking L30s.
    
    Neither Snorlax (yay) nor Chansey (HOW COULD YOU???) are eligible for Petit 
    Cup, but another Normal-type simply dominates the tradeback scene: Meowth.  
    Slash would normally be held to L44, but due to the wonders of GSC Eggs, any 
    Pokemon with a gender can acquire any of its level-up moves as early as L5.   
    When you're looking at tied-for-#2 Speed, along with STAB 70-power 99.6-to-
    critical strikes every turn, it's obvious why tradebacks cross the line when 
    it comes to lower-level cups.  Unless, of course, you pulled out that 
    Gastly...but then again, didn't you just see Amnesia on Persian's tradeback 
    list?  Along with Thunderbolt as a pure-RBY move?
    
    Two more post-RBY Pokemon are viable choices, but these are pre-GSC as well.  
    I'm referring to the Stadium prizes, Amnesia Psyduck and Surfing Rat.  
    Remember that the Clueless Duck can't get Psychic in the same set as Amnesia 
    even under tradeback, so it's not THAT good, but it's still a highly balanced 
    attacker.  Pikachu is as fast as Abra and Meowth, and would cover its one and 
    only weakness very effectively--if it weren't for the crap Special.  It's 
    still the best format-legal Electric, if only due to the diversity.
    
    One final note: Ditto's stats can't support it at L100, but in this Cup, all 
    the opponents have lower base stats.  Ditto is now a bit more usable.  (If 
    you're playing the most extreme form of Tradebacks, post-11/11, you can outfit 
    the Ditto with such moves as Spore, Confuse Ray, and Recover...but good luck 
    finding an opponent willing to play you.)
    
    The great thing about this cup it that teams are customizable.  If you have a 
    signature Pokemon among these 45, don't hesitate to use it!  Mr. K's favorite 
    team consisted of Koffing, Wigglytuff, Hitmonlee, Psyduck, Butterfree, and 
    Snorlax; I was able to recreate this team in the L25-30 range with striking 
    accuracy (while still keeping it a playable team)!  Remember, you don't even 
    use half your team.  If you can remain in flavor, that's what the Petit Cup 
    was designed for.  As long as you have at least a few Pokemon that hold their 
    own against the field.
    
    Last among Stadium's options is Pika Cup.  This cup is overrated, unbalanced, 
    and not at all dominated by its namesake the Rat.  But far too often do I hear 
    of this as a trouble spot.  Here is the Definitive Guide to Beating the Pika 
    Cup, for those who haven't grasped the fundamentals.
    1. No Pokemon are explicitly banned from this cup except Mewtwo and Mew.  If 
    you somehow sharked a L20 Dragonite or Zapdos, the game would let you use it 
    here.  Not that it's a legitimate team for multiplayer battle, but if all you 
    care about is beating the R2 CPU opponents, no one's stopping you.
    2. No opponent has more than 78 HP.  This means that Dragon Rage will down any 
    opponent in two hits.  Try to stock 2-3 team members with D-Rage.
    3. Only one Pokemon has the ability to recover faster than 40 damage per turn: 
    Chansey (148 HP at L20, Softboiled recovers 74).  Use Chansey if at all 
    possible.
    4. Except with Chansey, defense here is too slow and ineffective to be 
    worthwhile.  Two four-attack sweepers stand out here: Alakazam with 
    Psychic/Thunderpunch/Fire Punch/Ice Punch, and (for those occasions where 
    tradebacks are banned) Starmie with Surf/Psychic/Thunderbolt/Ice Beam.  Pick 
    one and stick to it.
    5. Similar to the other cups, ideal level setup is 2 x L20, 4 x L15.  I use 
    Chansey and Starmie/Alakazam for the L20 spots, since they're most vital to 
    the team.
    6. Make sure your team is as close to maximums if possible.  If you have your 
    Shark ready, use it.  If not, just stat-drug up, then keep running around the 
    Daycare for about 1000 battles (dropping a Pokemon off at the Daycare reverts 
    its Level Experience to the minimum possible for its level, so you avoid 
    level-up, but Stat Exp. doesn't disappear).  Doesn't the $20 option seem much 
    more attractive?
    7. Try to make your L15s as impactful as possible.  Most Pika Cup matches are 
    decided by the single highest-level Pokemon, meaning they're effectively 1-on-
    1.  Having a L15 that can compete at five levels down gives you a 2-to-1 
    advantage.  For example, L15 Snorlax is capable of withstanding any HPSA from 
    the L20s listed above, and can go BOOM to deal quite a bit of damage.  Meaning 
    that a L20 of your own has a much easier task.
    
    Okay, fine.  You've tried Nintendo's cups, filled three of your 12 boxes, and 
    are looking for something new to do.  Is there anything interesting to do with 
    RBY anymore?
    
    Well, I'm not sure how interesting it is (due to a lack of players), but an 
    idea of mine has lurked around for quite a while, and offers something new for 
    us to try.  It's called PMPF -- Past Meets Present Format.
    
    How does it work?  Think of it this way...Tinker around with Stadium 2, an RBY 
    cart, and any GSC carts you may own.  Your object is to outfit the RBY cart 
    with a team of your choice, using all available options.
    
    When that's done, you take your team and battle with it...in Stadium 2.  And 
    no rentals, either.
    
    Put another way, it's "battles between RBY teams, with GSC rules."
    
    So what does that mean?  It means Magneton is a Steel-type Pokemon, Bite is a 
    Dark-type move, there are six stats instead of five, and various moves change 
    effect (both for good and for bad).  Interesting new rules to consider.
    
    Of course, it's not full-fledged GSC either.  Such reliable counters as Hidden 
    Power, Skarmory, and Mirror Coat do not exist yet, so all such weaknesses on 
    your team can't be circumvented with so little thought.  You'll have to 
    examine your team extra well.
    
    Some relevant rulings about the PMPF:
    1. Yes, moves on a Pokemon's GSC list are allowed (as long as they're among 
    the 165 RBY moves, of course).  See the editorial on page 24 for why.  Also 
    note that the environment is no longer pure RBY; it's inheriting the GSC 
    ruleset.  And with that ruleset come the moves (at least the moves that exist 
    on the cartridge's database).
    2. Are attached items allowed?  Tough call.  The reasoning that allows 
    tradeback moves above would also allow items, but the mere mention of Thick 
    Club brings up cries of "Overcentrality!"  Furthermore, the moves existed in 
    RBY; the items did not.  Whether items are allowed or not is up to you and 
    your group.
    3. Mewtwo and Mew are not banned, but are rather level-restricted (just like 
    under the USSR set).  Mewtwo's allowed level rises from 83 to 85, mainly 
    because of a shaft in its best stat and best move.  Mew stays at 90.
    
    With so many players accustomed either to playing pure RBY or pure GSC, 
    adapting to a mixture between the two modes provides an interesting challenge.  
    This, of course, is good for the health of the game.
    
    *********************************
    *3. GSC Mechanics and Strategies*
    *********************************
    
    As soon as these games came out, the idea of teamwork in Pokemon was finally 
    given a basis.  Lots of other new tricks were granted as well, and old Pokemon 
    were rebalanced by the addition of a sixth stat, and two new types.  In fact, 
    in late 2001, steps were taken to ensure that this game would evolve 
    continuously (albeit with minor weekly additions to movesets).  Hard to 
    believe that in a month, these games will no longer be current, huh?
    
    ************************
    *300. Help for Starters*
    ************************
    
    I already told you, both in 101 and 200, that if you're new to the game, this 
    isn't the right guide for you.  I will dedicate a section, albeit a small one, 
    to the players who "want to take the game seriously, but haven't played long 
    enough".
    
    The RBY walkthrough took 250 words.  This one may be longer--400 is the goal.
    
    (Note: The walkthrough covers G/S only; most of Crystal's changes, excluding 
    the Battle Tower, are unnecessary story alteration.  And the Battle Tower can 
    effectively be recreated on Stadium.  So I didn't buy that game, and I 
    wouldn't advise you to either.  Besides, the new Egg moves can simply be 
    Sharked on.  As with Yellow, there's little to gain from buying the "story-
    infused" version.)
    
    Now, on with...
    
    "The 400-Word Walkthrough!"
    
    Get starter--preferably Cyndaquil, then find Mr. Pokemon.  Go back to 
    hometown.  With expendable Togepi, threaten Bellsprouts, Pidgeys.  Go past 
    alphabetic ruins; explore Slowpoke Well; stomp bugs; head for forest with more 
    bugs (win Cut).  Pass Daycare to Goldenrod.  Pay P0 for bike, visit radio 
    station (win card) and Bill (win Eevee), fight Miltank over and over.  Take 
    Squirtbottle to Sudowoodo.  Next up to Ecruteak, best Threevees and new 
    companions for Surf.  Burned Tower: Cry 'Havoc!' and let slip the dogs of war.  
    Badge 4 across invisible bridge, guarded by Ghosts.  Sick and wild Miltanks to 
    west--optional Berry expenditure allows Moomoo Milk.  Olivine: empty gym; 
    traverse 6-story lighthouse first.  Then cross ocean, disregarding whirlpools; 
    get Secretpotion, Stormbadge, Fly.  Back to lighthouse, gym reopens.  Burn 'em 
    for quick win.  Backtrack to route 42 for next path (to Mahogany).  Closed 
    Gym?  Ragecandybar?  Team Rocket.  North to Red Gyarados; pathetic, kill it.  
    Team up with Lance for Rocket Dismantling #2: Poke Mart's a hideout; beware 
    alarm system.  Disable it.  Cross the 5x7 "minefield"; two leaders to beat.  
    Kill 3 of 6 Electrodes to halt Magikarp mutation.  Intervention at gym: spiral 
    through slippery floor.  Shock 'n' burn for a badge.  But back to Rockets!  
    They retreat to Goldenrod...follow them!  Ascend Radio Tower to reach (fake) 
    leader; descend underground.  Kill switch guardians, pull 3-2-1.  Emergency 
    switch leads to guards, real leader, first Wing.  Catch L40 bird (at Tin 
    Tower/Whirl Islands).  Ice Path: slippery floor; go right at second for 
    Waterfall.  Return to main path, shoving rocks down holes.  Blackthorn holds 
    badge #8...after battle AND retrieval of Dragon Fang.  Back to New Bark: east 
    to Kanto.  Tohjo Falls, Victory Road conceal Indigo.  Smash E5, begin 
    adventure 2.  Ship goes Olivine-Vermilion.  Right for L50 Snorlax.  Surge: 
    Cut/Surf to Gym; no switches anymore.  Sabrina: walk right in, warp, NW, SW, 
    S.  Erika: Cut in, win easily.  Janine: navigate tricky walls, real one's in 
    center.  Misty: Beat confused Rocket, find Machine Part in Gym, take to Power 
    Plant.  Interrupt date, back to Gym.  Blaine: pass Diglett's Cave, emerge, 
    Surf down.  Cinnabar's destroyed; find Seafoam.  Blue: Back to Cinnabar, spot 
    Blue, follow him to Gym.  Brock: north through bugless forest, easy kill (get 
    wing for second Legendary).  Finally, back to Viridian, left to Route 28.  
    Light up Mt. Silver; beat surprisingly easy Red.  Now explore the game's REAL 
    depth.
    
    Wow.  Only 398 words for a walkthrough of a 2MB game.  Of course, the RPG 
    section is considerably smaller than that, and the coverage of the strategy 
    element will cover far more than 398 words--closer to 56,000.  But in any 
    case, you should now be devoid of obligations to Pokemon as an RPG.  Until RS_ 
    and the 30-something hours it may give you.
    
    ********************************************
    *301. Factoids, Mechanics, and Calculations*
    ********************************************
    
    Yes, this is still a mathematical game, and since GSC hold twice as much data 
    as RBY, there's twice as much "complex stuff", right?  Right, maybe even more.  
    Time to clear it up.
    
    -------------------
    |Changes Since RBY|
    -------------------
    
    1. Critical Hit changes.  The old formula led to too many crit-hits, 
    especially among speedsters like Alakazam.  Those games were too degenerate, 
    and one of the ways to balance (or "skill-i-cize") them is to lower the 
    critical percentage.
    
    The new formula is best expressed by what I call "Critical Hit Domains".  
    There are five of these in all.  Each domain is a set of integers: 
    Domain 1: 0 to 15
    Domain 2: 16 to 31
    Domain 3: 32 to 63
    Domain 4: 64 to 84
    Domain 5: 85 to 127
    Each move starts out with one active domain (#1; each activation takes the 
    lowest-numbered available domain).  Aeroblast, Cross Chop, Crabhammer, Karate 
    Chop, Razor Leaf, Razor Wind, and Slash start with 3.
    Scope Lens activates an additional domain, as does Focus Energy.  Lucky Punch 
    or Stick on the appropriate Pokemon (Chansey/Farfetch'd) activates two 
    domains.  Anything that would somehow activate more than 5 domains is ignored.
    
    Then, a 1-byte (0-255) random number is chosen, similar to a lottery.  If that 
    number falls into an active Critical Hit domain, up goes the x2 bonus.  So 
    Slash is now even less likely to score a critical than any of Mewtwo's, 
    Jolteon's, Aerodactyl's, or Electrode's unadulterated attacks in RBY.  Some 
    bad.
    
    2. New type chart:
    
              D e f e n d e r   T y p e  
    
          N F F B G R G P F W I E G P D S D
          O T L U R C H O I T C L R S R T R
          R G Y G D K O I R R E C S Y G L K
    
      NOR 1 1 1 1 1 1/2 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1/2 1
      FTG 2 1 1/2 1/2 1 2 0 1/2 1 1 2 1 1 1/2 1 2 2
    A FLY 1 2 1 2 1 1/2 1 1 1 1 1 1/2 2 1 1 1/2 1
    t BUG 1 1/2 1/2 1 1 1 1/2 1/2 1/2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1/2 2
    t GRD 1 1 0 1/2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1/2 1 1 2 1
    a RCK 1 1/2 2 2 1/2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1/2 1
    c GHO 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1/2 1/2
    k POI 1 1 1 1 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 1
    e FIR 1 1 1 2 1 1/2 1 1 1/2 1/2 2 1 2 1 1/2 2 1
    r WTR 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1/2 1 1 1/2 1 1/2 1 1
      ICE 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1/2 1/2 1/2 1 2 1 2 1/2 1
    T ELC 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 1/2 1/2 1 1/2 1 1
    y GRS 1 1 1/2 1/2 2 2 1 1/2 1/2 2 1 1 1/2 1 1/2 1/2 1
    p PSY 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1/2 1 1/2 0
    e DRG 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1/2 1
      STL 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1/2 1/2 2 1/2 1 1 1 1/2 1
      DRK 1 1/2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1/2 1/2
    
    3. Banishment of the 99.6 Rule.  That's right, it's GONE!  DEAD!  NONEXISTENT!  
    This is more balanced turf...and also more stable.  No one will ever again 
    have the ground shake from under them, ruining an otherwise-guaranteed hit, 
    and if you do, then I suggest you Thief the opponent's Brightpowder.
    
    Of course, it took quite a while to demonstrate this change.  The default 
    assumption was that the rule was unchanged since RBY, hence the fact that 
    simulators such as GSBot continue supporting 99.6 to this day.  And until July 
    2002, no one ever bothered to perform the 10,000-some trials needed to prove 
    the rule's repeal beyond a reasonable doubt (and Meowth346 finally closed the 
    case with ROM-based evidence).  Even then, until the publication of this 
    guide, it was a highly arcane fact.  But in any case, now you know.
    
    4. Alterations of the moves and stats.  Back in RBY, the use of Blizzard was 
    defensible, since its "accuracy-influenced power" was still higher than any 
    other usable move.  But now, it's just a Thunder with Paralysis replaced by 
    Freeze and half the PP.  No good.  And Psychic, to restore balance, had its 
    stat reduction occurrences cut by 67%, and it only lowers Special D.
    
    That's the other big change.  As you should be aware, one Special stat doesn't 
    exactly allow for offense/defense variations there.  So obviously, they split 
    it up to demonstrate that GAMEFREAK cares about a strategy game.  This also 
    helps achieve balance:  Mewtwo's Special D drops 128 from RBY level, Chansey's 
    SA loses 140, and Machamp's SD gains 40 (in fact, all Fighting-types made an 
    improvement here).  This also allows them to shaft Amnesia.  And need I 
    mention that Shuckle would never have seen the light of day if it weren't for 
    the Special split?
    
    5. A second coloration of all Pokemon.  This alternate coloring is known as 
    "shiny", "rare", or in my case, "a waste of time".  Basically, if a Pokemon's 
    DVs are (0) 2/10/10/10, (8) 3/10/10/10, (0) 6/10/10/10, (8) 7/10/10/10, (0) 
    10/10/10/10, (8) 11/10/10/10, (0) 14/10/10/10, or (8) 15/10/10/10, it somehow 
    manages to exude a metallic aura, even though its stats are at least 44 points 
    away from maximum, and may be as many as 84 off.  Why do these Pokemon even 
    exist?  Just another gimmick for the little kids...never mind that means I 
    have to convert more players.  Ah, the power of Nintendo.
    
    By the way, the X in the damage formula now combines 12 multipliers.  It's 
    officially large enough to be called "The Composite of Extra Little 
    Somethings".
    Each multiplier has default value 1.
    1. Type1 = The type matchup of Attack Type (if called for) against Opponent's 
    Type 1.
    2. Type2 = The type matchup of Attack Type (if called for) against Opponent's 
    Type 2 (if different than Type 1).  If opponent's Type 1 and Type 2 are the 
    same, this is 1.
    3. STAB = 1.5 if Attack Type (if called for) matches either user's Type 1 or 
    Type 2.
    4. Item = 1.1 if Item is of variety Type Boost and Item Boost Type matches 
    Attack Type (if called for).
    5. Sunny Day = If weather is Sun, 1.5 if attack has type Fire, 0.5 if attack 
    has type Water.
    6. Rain Dance = If weather is Rain, 1.5 if attack has type Water, 0.5 if 
    attack has type Fire or is named "Solarbeam".
    7. Pursuit = 2 if opponent's action for turn is "Switch" and if move is named 
    "Pursuit".
    8. Dig = If opponent's status is Underground, 2 if attack is named 
    "Earthquake" or "Magnitude", 1 if attack is named "Fissure", 0 if attack is 
    named anything else.
    9. Fly = If opponent's status is Airborne, 2 if attack is named "Gust" or 
    "Twister", 1 if attack is named "Thunder", 0 if attack is named anything else.
    10. Minimize = 2 if opponent's Evade modifier is greater than 0, if Minimize 
    is responsible for at least one point on evade modifier, and if move is named 
    "Stomp"
    11. Critical Hit = 2 if a random 8-bit number falls into an active Critical 
    Hit Domain.
    12. Random Number = (217 + randInt(0,38)) / 255
    
    Fun indeed.
    
    -----------------------------------------
    |Zen and the Art of Pokemon Reproduction|
    -----------------------------------------
    
    It had to come at some point.  A 6-page-long talk explaining, among other 
    things, why you can leave two Pokemon alone and end up with three in the end.  
    More accurately, it explores what notions of "DNA" were programmed into the 
    game, the secret of knowing exactly how the hatchling will turn out from any 
    given parents, and what the penalty for Pokemon incest is.  Cover your eyes 
    and repeatedly tap the PageDown button (20 times) if this is too sensitive or 
    mature a subject for you; no one else will know.  On the flip side, you'll be 
    the one to miss out on game-defining knowledge.
    
    First things first, leave two Pokemon at the day-care center outside 
    Goldenrod.  If they're compatible species, just give them long enough, and...
    
    Wait a minute!  Did I hear "how can I check for compatibility?"
    
    This calls for a chart.  Each Pokemon has an 8-bit "egg group" number, which 
    should be interpreted as two consecutive 4-bit hex digits.  Two Pokemon are 
    compatible as long as they share at least one digit in common, and that digit 
    is not 0, D, or F.  Also, Ditto (FF), being the player that it is, can do 
    anyone that doesn't have a 0 or F.
    
    (Note: Less-evolved Pokemon take the same numbers as their grown-up forms, 
    except when otherwise listed.)
    
    Venusaur	1 7
    Charizard	1 E
    Blastoise	1 2
    Butterfree	3 3
    Beedrill	3 3
    Pidgeot	4 4
    Raticate	5 5
    Fearow	4 4
    Arbok		5 E
    Pichu		0 0
    Raichu	5 6
    Sandslash	5 5
    NidoranF	1 5
    Nidorina	0 0
    Nidoqueen	0 0
    Nidoking	1 5
    Cleffa	0 0
    Clefable	6 6
    Ninetales	5 5
    Igglybuff	0 0
    Wigglytuff	6 6
    Crobat	4 4
    Vileplume	7 7
    Bellossom	7 7
    Parasect	3 7
    Venomoth	3 3
    Dugtrio	5 5
    Persian	5 5
    Golduck	2 5
    Primeape	5 5
    Arcanine	5 5
    Poliwrath	2 2
    Politoed	2 2
    Alakazam	8 8
    Machamp	8 8
    Victreebel	7 7
    Tentacruel	9 9
    Golem		A A
    Rapidash	5 5
    Slowbro	1 2
    Slowking	1 2
    Magneton	D D
    Farfetch'd	4 5
    Dodrio	4 4
    Dewgong	2 5
    Muk		B B
    Cloyster	9 9
    Gengar	B B
    Steelix	A A
    Hypno		8 8
    Kingler	9 9
    Electrode	D D
    Exeggutor	7 7
    Marowak	1 1
    Tyrogue	0 0
    Hitmonlee	8 8
    Hitmonchan	8 8
    Hitmontop	8 8
    Lickitung	1 1
    Weezing	B B
    Rhydon	1 5
    Blissey	6 6
    Tangela	7 7
    Kangaskhan	1 1
    Kingdra	2 E
    Seaking	C C
    Starmie	D D
    Mr. Mime	8 8
    Scizor	3 3
    Smoochum	0 0
    Jynx		8 8
    Elekid	0 0
    Electabuzz	8 8
    Magby		0 0
    Magmar	8 8
    Pinsir	3 3
    Tauros	5 5
    Gyarados	C E
    Lapras	1 2
    Ditto		F F
    Vaporeon	5 5
    Jolteon	5 5
    Flareon	5 5
    Espeon	5 5
    Umbreon	5 5
    Porygon2	D D
    Omastar	2 9
    Kabutops	2 9
    Aerodactyl	4 4
    Snorlax	1 1
    Articuno	0 0
    Zapdos	0 0
    Moltres	0 0
    Dragonite	2 E
    Mewtwo	0 0
    Mew		0 0
    Meganium	1 7
    Typhlosion	5 5
    Feraligatr	1 2
    Furret	5 5
    Noctowl	4 4
    Ledian	3 3
    Ariados	3 3
    Lanturn	C C
    Togepi	0 0
    Togetic	4 6
    Xatu		4 4
    Ampharos	1 5
    Azumarill	2 6
    Sudowoodo	A A
    Jumpluff	6 7
    Sunflora	7 7
    Yanma		3 3
    Quagsire	2 5
    Murkrow	4 4
    Misdreavus	B B
    Unown		0 0
    Wobbuffet	B B
    Girafarig	5 5
    Forretress	3 3
    Dunsparce	5 5
    Gligar	3 3
    Granbull	5 6
    Qwilfish	C C
    Shuckle	3 3
    Heracross	3 3
    Sneasel	5 5
    Ursaring	5 5
    Magcargo	B B
    Piloswine	5 5
    Corsola	2 9
    Octillery	2 C
    Delibird	2 5
    Mantine	2 2
    Skarmory	4 4
    Houndoom	5 5
    Donphan	5 5
    Stantler	5 5
    Smeargle	5 5
    Miltank	5 5
    Raikou	0 0
    Entei		0 0
    Suicune	0 0
    Tyranitar	1 1
    Lugia		0 0
    Ho-oh		0 0
    Celebi	0 0
    
    Also note that, even if the Pokemon share a group number, if the Defense DVs 
    and last 3 bits of the Special DVs are identical, the game sees that as a key 
    the Pokemon are directly related (read on and you'll know why).  Meaning that 
    if they were to breed, it would be considered incest.  Now, given that the 
    target audience for the game (as Nintendo sees it) is around 8, this game 
    tries to teach them some morals.  One of them is that "incest is wrong", and 
    the best way to teach that is to make said "procedure" impossible.  The alpha 
    Machamp can't rape its daughter Machop (but change one DV, and...)  Also, if 
    you always shark everything (including stats), you probably have few to no 
    Pokemon who were hatched from Eggs.  Nonetheless, the security measure 
    prevents any two max-statters from breeding.
    
    Okay, you've seen the chart, and picked out two Pokemon that share a number 
    and don't share DVs.  Simply bike up and down Goldenrod, waiting for an egg 
    (there's a formula that can tell how long you need to wait for an egg to 
    appear, but it's based on random numbers and is of little consequence).  Once 
    you have the egg, bike up and down Goldenrod some more, until it hatches.  
    This might take as little as 1280 steps (for Magikarp) or 10240 steps (for 
    Dratini).  But in any case, now you have your L5!  And the parents, after all 
    that running around, received an EXP point for each step you traveled!
    
    Of course, with enough information, you can tell what the hatchling will be 
    even before you pick up an egg.  Everything has to be consistent with DNA.
    
    Step 1.  Reduce the mother's species (or father's, in case of a one-night 
    stand with Ditto) to its lowest evolutionary level.  (Exception - When 
    NidoranF is used, the odds are 50-50 that the Egg's Pokedex number will 
    increase by 3, for NidoranM.)  You now know the species.  That was easy!
    
    Step 2.  Throw out a random 4-bit number.  This becomes the Attack DV.
    
    Step 3.  Use the Attack DV to calculate gender based on--you guessed it--
    ANOTHER CHART!
    
    If the DV is lower than the Species Gender Number, the Pokemon will be female.  
    Otherwise, it's male.  -1 is the neutered group.
    
    Table of numbers:
    0: Tyrogue, NidoranM, Tauros
    2: Bulbasaur, Charmander, Squirtle, Eevee, Snorlax, Chikorita, Cyndaquil, 
    Totodile, Togepi, Omastar, Kabutops, Aerodactyl
    4: Growlithe, Machop, Elekid, Magby, Abra
    8: anything not listed
    12: Cleffa, Vulpix, Igglybuff, Corsola, Snubbull
    16: NidoranF, Miltank, Chansey, Kangaskhan, Smoochum
    -1: Magnemite, Voltorb, Staryu, Porygon
    
    Good.  You now know which symbol appears after the level.
    
    Step 4.  Now to find the other three stats.  Use the parent with gender 
    opposite that of the to-be-hatchling (or Ditto, if it's used).  Transfer that 
    parent's Defense and Special DVs down.  Then, there's a 50-50 check that the 
    Special DV will be offset by 8 (lower or higher, whichever has room).  
    Finally, another purely random 0-15 number is used for Speed DV.
    
    Step 5. Stats are dealt with; on to moves.  Here's the basic procedure for 
    setting up moves:
    
    A. Begin with the hatchling's natural L5 move list.  Assign any moves there to 
    the lowest-numbered positive unoccupied element of the list "move1", "move2", 
    "move3"... (hereafter called "MOVES".)
    
    B. Create a 4-element "Inheritance List" (IL) that starts out blank.
    
    C. Perform the first undone task of "GetLevelMoves", "GetEggMoves", and 
    "GetTMMoves".  If all are done, end the process.
    
    D. If an element of MOVES with number 5 or greater is defined, decrement each 
    element's number by 1.  Repeat this process until it is no longer true.
    
    E. If an element of MOVES with number 0 or less is defined, it ceases to 
    exist.  Repeat this process until it is no longer true.
    
    F. Go back to step C.
    
    Task: GetLevelMoves
    
    1. Search both parents' current movesets for any move that appears in both.
    
    2. Put all such moves on the IL.
    
    3. For each move in the IL, scan the baby's level-up move list.  If the move 
    appears on that list, and is not currently in MOVES, put that move into the 
    lowest-numbered positive unoccupied element of MOVES.
    
    Task: GetEggMoves
    
    1. Erase the IL.
    
    2. Copy the father's current moveset to the IL.
    
    3. For each move in the IL, scan the baby's Egg move list.  If the move 
    appears on that list, and is not currently in MOVES, put that move into the 
    lowest-numbered positive unoccupied element of MOVES.
    
    Task: GetTMMoves
    
    1. Erase the IL.
    
    2. Search the father's current moveset for any TM moves (only the 50 from GSC 
    count; the 36 RBY-exclusive TMs don't pass), HM moves, or (in Crystal) 
    Flamethrower, Ice Beam, and Thunderbolt.  Put those moves on the IL.
    
    3. For each move in the IL, scan the baby's TM compatibility list.  If the 
    move appears on that list, and is not currently in MOVES, put that move into 
    the lowest-numbered positive unoccupied element of MOVES.
    
    Now you have the finished product.  Do with it as you wish.  After all, the 
    mother and father will never know--they're stuck at a Daycare Center that 
    takes their minds off of what you're doing with their Egg.  Maybe they'll 
    level up or something.
    
    -------------
    |House Rules|
    -------------
    
    I must say, GAMEFREAK did a better job at checking interactions this time 
    around.  So the game has a bit more merit.  But it still isn't perfect, and 
    any Pokemon game that continues to infuse RPG play into its selling point will 
    necessarily have some optimum Pokemon or team.  So once again the community of 
    players has introduced their own rules into the system.  And just like the 
    equivalent section in chapter 2, you can send in an editorial about the 
    relative necessity of each rule, and it'll appear in the section at the end!
    
    11/11 LOOPHOLE CLOSURE
    
    "Sporing Mewtwo?  Spiking Blissey?  I don't know what the hell you're playing, 
    but it sure isn't Pokemon.  Sketching a move by a Pokemon that isn't naturally 
    a Smeargle should be illegal."
    
    LEGEND BAN 
    
    "A select few Pokemon overcentralize the game.  Dismiss Mewtwo, Mew, Lugia, 
    and Ho-oh from this courtroom.  If I'm not doing drugs, ban Celebi as well.  
    If I am, ban Snorlax.  By the way, how many times does that guide tell us not 
    to do drugs?"
    
    SPECIES LIMIT
    
    "Six Machamps?  Bo-ring.  Why don't you try diversifying?"
    
    SLEEP RESTRICTION
    
    "Come on!  I'm already asleep!  Isn't two simultaneous Spores a little 
    excessive?"
    
    EVADE BAN/RESTRICTION
    
    "Remove those DTs and Minimizes immediately!  I don't want to be here all 
    day!"
    
    ONE-HIT KILL BAN
    
    "This is Pokemon, not Craps.  Fissure, Horn Drill, and Guillotine are simply 
    out of place in this game."
    
    HIDDEN POWER SHUTDOWN
    
    "Wait just a minute.  It would take an average of 9,000 hours to catch a 
    Raikou with that perfect Hidden Power and to determine that it has it.  
    Clearly that wasn't meant to happen.  Remove that move from the team."
    
    ITEM CLAUSE
    
    "We're the game makers, and we can say what we want!  Don't use multiples of 
    items!"
    
    POKECENTER BAN
    
    "What the hell is Nintendo smoking?  These Pokecenter moves are simply there 
    to get us to visit their shop, and no one's allowed to escape that place until 
    they buy $100 of Nintendo products.  I am NOT going to New York City, and such 
    geographical discrimination against players must not exist in this game."
    
    **EDITORIALS**
    
    1 editorial(s) so far.
    
    Me, 2003/01/31:
    
    "Just like RBY, Evasion and Instant Kills are simply ways of keeping the game 
    interesting.  DT ban in particular is a way of undermining one of the few good 
    defensive strategies, and a game without defense is a game not worth playing.
    
    Also as before, Mewtwo and its newfound friends Lugia and Ho-oh are simply 
    there to function as the pinnacle of RPG gameplay.  Try to send them into the 
    strategy game and they come out 160 stat points above everyone else, and with 
    excellent move possibilities to boot.  Such an exponential separation of power 
    levels does nothing but destroy this game (by centralizing and cutting down 
    severely on the number of viable options).
    
    Of course the 11/11 loophole needs closing.  Actually, only the 1/13 loophole 
    really needs closing.  As of 11/11, only Mew and Ditto could run rampant.  Mew 
    is already banned, and Ditto is about as good with 243 moves as Smeargle is.  
    You don't see Smeargle bans everywhere, do you?  Just issue errata saying that 
    for moveset construction, Transform is an off-limits move for Metronome, and 
    we'll be fine.
    
    Item Clause, as unfounded as it is, can still be fun.  Think of it as a 
    variant of the game that forces you to actually think about attached items 
    instead of 'Leftovers, Leftovers, Leftovers...' It doesn't need to be the only 
    form of battle, but it would be nice to see battles where Item Clause is on as 
    well as those where it's off.
    
    Hidden Power is NOT to be banned.  Who cares if the odds are completely absurd 
    that stats yield just the right HP type?  They're just as absurd to be fully 
    maximized, and you don't see anyone hesitate to slap those stats on.  It's a 
    move that puts more complexity into the game than just playing types...which 
    is good for the health of this game.  
    
    Banning of Pokecenter moves is totally and completely unnecessary.  Think of 
    it as a continual source of game evolution.  As soon as the folks at the 
    Center decide to give away a move, everyone with an English-language cart is 
    officially entitled to Shark the move onto the Pokemon in question, and it 
    becomes legal.  After all, how do you think the Center gives the Pokemon with 
    those moves to you?  The same way they give you Mew or Celebi.  If one person 
    can use a mechanic, anyone can.
    
    That's basically all that needs saying.  On to the next subsection."
    
    -----------------
    |What's My Item?|
    -----------------
    
    The game is about more than Pokemon and moves now.  With Gold and Silver, a 
    new aspect of battling came into play: held items.  Each Pokemon can hold one 
    item, and it's up to you to figure out how to make the most of that item.
    
    Hopefully you should know about most of these items, but this is needed for 
    completeness.
    
    EXPENDABLE ITEMS:
    
    Berry: At end of turn, if your Pokemon is missing either half or 128 of its 
    HP, destroy Berry and add 10 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Berry Juice: At end of turn, if your Pokemon is missing either half or 128 of 
    its HP, destroy Berry Juice and add 20 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Gold Berry: At end of turn, if your Pokemon is missing either half or 128 of 
    its HP, destroy Gold Berry and add 30 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Mint Berry: At end of turn, if your Pokemon is Asleep, remove that condition 
    and destroy Mint Berry.
    
    Przcureberry: At end of turn, if your Pokemon is Paralyzed, remove that 
    condition and destroy Przcureberry.
    
    Psncureberry: At end of turn, if your Pokemon is Poisoned, remove that 
    condition and destroy Psncureberry.
    
    Burnt Berry: At end of turn, if your Pokemon is Frozen, remove that condition 
    and destroy Burnt Berry.
    
    Ice Berry: At end of turn, if your Pokemon is Burned, remove that condition 
    and destroy Ice Berry.
    
    Bitter Berry: At end of turn, if your Pokemon is Confused, remove that 
    condition and destroy Bitter Berry.
    
    Miracleberry: Concatenation of Mint Berry, Przcureberry, Psncureberry, Burnt 
    Berry, Ice Berry, and Bitter Berry.
    
    Mysteryberry: At end of turn, if any of your moves have 0 PP, add 5 PP to that 
    move and destroy Mysteryberry.
    
    Berserk Gene: Whenever your Pokemon becomes active, raise its Attack modifier 
    by 2, confuse it, and destroy Berserk Gene.
    
    Outlook - Because these items are destroyed as soon as they get used, they 
    have a natural disadvantage.  First things first, do not use the health-
    restoring berries.  The next item up for review is like having one of those 
    berries EVERY TURN...and it even works when you're at 90% health.  
    Miracleberry seems to render the six above it completely worthless, but in 
    fact it can actually make sense to play Mint Berry in certain cases (when 
    using Rest, which will wipe out pointless burn and poison while restoring all 
    your HP, instead of simply expending the berry on those pointless conditions 
    without getting a chance to recover HP).  Finally, Berserk Gene is primarily a 
    "fun" item, occasionally found on Baton Pass-heavy teams as a zero-turn Swords 
    Dance.  Confusion be damned.
    
    CONTINUOUS ITEMS:
    
    Leftovers: At end of turn, your Pokemon recovers 6.25% of its maximum HP.
    
    Quick Claw: At the beginning of each turn, probability 60 to increase your 
    Speed by 1024 until end of turn.
    
    Brightpowder: All opponents' attacks which could cause damage or a change in 
    status or stat modifiers of your Pokemon have their accuracy reduced by 20.
    
    Scope Lens: Each of your attacks uses an extra Critical Hit Domain.
    
    Focus Band: If an opponent's attack would deal damage to reduce your Pokemon's 
    HP to 0 or less, probability 30 to make that attack reduce its HP to 1 
    instead.
    
    King's Rock: Whenever you use a damage-dealing attack that can't change status 
    or stat modifiers, probability 30 to make the opponent flinch.
    
    Outlook - These six are the most valuable choices in the game (well, except 
    for a certain specialized item...).  Leftovers is the go-to item of the game, 
    and unless you can find a very good reason to use something else, just tack it 
    on.  One of those reasons is "durability so low that Leftovers never has a 
    chance to do anything", in which case Scope Lens, Focus Band, and/or King's 
    Rock are defensive items with a much better chance of saving your Pokemon.  
    Quick Claw helps when you need to go first in order to really do anything 
    (e.g. Sporing Parasect), and Scope Lens can usually be thought of as an 
    average power boost of 6.25%, for those Pokemon that need every possible bit 
    of "oomph" they can get.
    
    BOOST ITEMS:
    
    Pink Bow: Type Boost - Normal
    
    Polkadot Bow: Type Boost - Normal
    
    Black Belt: Type Boost - Fighting
    
    Sharp Beak: Type Boost - Flying
    
    Silverpowder: Type Boost - Bug
    
    Soft Sand: Type Boost - Ground
    
    Hard Stone: Type Boost - Rock
    
    Spell Tag: Type Boost - Ghost
    
    Poison Barb: Type Boost - Poison
    
    Charcoal: Type Boost - Fire
    
    Mystic Water: Type Boost - Water
    
    Nevermeltice: Type Boost - Ice
    
    Magnet: Type Boost - Electric
    
    Miracle Seed: Type Boost - Grass
    
    Twistedspoon: Type Boost - Psychic
    
    Dragon Fang: Type Boost - Dragon
    
    Metal Coat: Type Boost - Steel
    
    Blackglasses: Type Boost - Dark
    
    Outlook - In case you didn't know, THESE ITEMS ARE BAD.  DON'T USE THEM.  New 
    players are quick to flock to the type boosts because they like to take a 
    proactive stance, and these are the only proactive items available (except 
    possibly Quick Claw and the specialized items).  It's almost as though the 
    items are dealing damage!  However, considering that a typical attack only 
    does around 100 damage, the item is paying off just 10 per turn.  Leftovers 
    usually pays off 20 or more each turn, even when you aren't using the one 
    specific attack.  The only times when Type Boosts are desirable is when 
    accompanying a detonation (in which case they contribute a lot more than 10 
    damage) or if there's a situation which expects to come up frequently, and in 
    which your attack would deal 90-99% damage if it weren't for the item (the 
    best known example is Machamp with a Cross Chop on Blissey, where 10% means 
    the difference between a 1,400-damage Counter and a broken egg).
    
    SPECIALIZED ITEMS:
    
    Thick Club: (Cubone) (Marowak) Attack stat is always doubled.
    
    Light Ball: (Pikachu) Special Attack stat is always doubled.
    
    Metal Powder: (Ditto) Defense and Special Defense stats increased by 50%.  
    This boost lasts even after Transforming.
    
    Stick: (Farfetch'd) Each of your attacks uses two extra Critical Hit Domains.
    
    Lucky Punch: (Chansey) Each of your attacks uses two extra Critical Hit 
    Domains.
    
    Outlook - These items are so good that you'd be insane to use the target 
    Pokemon with anything BUT its specialized item.  Unfortunately, with one 
    important exception (press PageDown 18 times to read about it), those Pokemon 
    all suck.  Okay, maybe Ditto doesn't suck if you're playing on your own, but 
    why would anyone use an unevolved Pikachu?  Or Chansey (considering this is 
    GSC)?  Chansey isn't exactly streamlined for taking advantage of Critical Hits 
    anyway.  And Cubone...well, it's pointless since its evolution also gets a x2 
    boost from the same item.
    
    ----------------------------------
    |Everyone's Favorite Complexities|
    ----------------------------------
    
    Yes, this is the subsection for which I wasted my time, so you don't have to.  
    Some of it will help you play the game, while the rest is only worth 
    memorizing if you want to be mistaken for a humanoid robot.  Which, as I can 
    attest to, isn't that bad.
    
    **1. A Not-So-Hidden Power**
    
    Unmistakably the most complex move in the game, what does Nintendo say it 
    does?  "Changes type and power with the Pokemon using it."  True, that's about 
    as good as you can get for a 2-line explanation, but their failure to disclose 
    the true formula in any document ever published by the company only leads me 
    to believe that Nintendo doesn't care about the strategy element of this game 
    (only the money).
    
    To think, I'm typing up over 200 pages about the secrets of a game, for no 
    money, yet the companies that get millions of dollars from the franchise have 
    no plans for such a guide, and probably despise me for making one.  So for 
    those of you who didn't know, here is...
    
    "Hidden Power Made Easy!"
    
    Contrary to the implications given by the game's two-line explanation, Hidden 
    Power (abbreviated HP in this section, but make sure you can differentiate 
    Hidden Power from Hit Points in any given context) is not a species-dependent 
    effect.  It's actually a DV-dependent effect, so to know what you'll get, 
    first go find DVs.
    
    With enough trial and error, and access to the stat formula (see page 11 for 
    that one), you could eventually determine HP with certainty for any Pokemon 
    L50 or above, and for a few cases below that.  But the easiest to discern are 
    L50 and 100.  Make sure the Stat Exp. is either 0, maximized (63 L100 points; 
    31 at L50), or drugged (40 L100; 20 L50).  Or, if you have every bit of Stat 
    Exp. documented, use int((sqrt(E - 1) + 1) / 4) and you could make it work for 
    any number.
    
    Then, it's time to figure out DVs.  Use L100 maximums for Attack, Defense, 
    Speed, and a Special stat.  Add 5 to each and halve them (rounding down) if 
    you're using L50, subtract half the Stat Exp. point correspondence (this gives 
    the starting point), and write down your stat.  Next, write two columns of 
    numbers: one with the starting point, and the other at 15 (the DV).  Until the 
    stat column gives the same number as your current stat, scratch out both 
    numbers, subtract 1 from the DV, and subtract 2 (for L100) or 1 (for L50) from 
    the stat.  Once the figures are the same, the number in the DV column 
    represents the true DV.  Repeat for the other stats.  (You can then find the 
    Hit Points DV as described in 201.)
    
    Now the DVs can give the HP specifics.  Start with a power of 321/2.  If the 
    Attack DV is 8 or more, add 20 to the power.  If the Defense DV is at least 8, 
    add 10.  Repeat for Speed (+5) and Special (+21/2).  Then, if the Special DV is 
    even, subtract 1/2 from the power, and if half the Special DV (rounded down) is 
    even, subtract 1.  Now disregard any 1/2 that may be left in the power.
    
    Congratulations, you now have the strength of your HP.  If it's outside of the 
    31-70 range, you've done something wrong and need to redo the calculations.
    
    For type, take your Attack DV, and "mod-4" it.  In other words, divide by 4 
    and look only at the remainder.  Multiply that number by 4.  Next, mod-4 the 
    Defense DV and add to the previous result.  You'll get a number from 0 to 15, 
    and then it's a simple chart to find the type:
    
    15 = Dark
    14 = Dragon
    13 = Ice
    12 = Psychic
    11 = Electric
    10 = Grass
    9 = Water
    8 = Fire
    7 = Steel
    6 = Ghost
    5 = Bug
    4 = Rock
    3 = Ground
    2 = Poison
    1 = Flying
    0 = Fighting
    
    Finally, note that Normal is the only type missing, yet it's always what HP's 
    type is shown as for the game interface.  This is because Hidden Power only 
    takes its calculated type during your own turn and only on turns when it's 
    used; it's Normal at all other times.  All this means is that HP can always be 
    Countered, and never Mirror Coated, regardless of type; and that Conversion 
    and Conversion2 see it as a Normal attack.
    
    **2. Open Up This Present**
    
    Based on the explanation Nintendo gives you, Present seems a lot like a more 
    powerful, riskier, Triple Kick.  40 power a hit, up to 3 hits (but all are 
    merged into one), but you just might give the opponent a break equivalent to 
    3-4 Leftovers turns.
    
    But as you may know, the people who make "official" guides have other games to 
    write for, so they don't give complete, accurate observations.
    
    What if I told you that a Chansey could use Present to kill a Kingdra in one 
    hit, despite a 95-level disadvantage?  With no illegal means used either way?
    
    It's true.  No one knows how it happened, or whether it was intentional, but 
    Present's method of damage calculation uses completely different variables 
    than any other attack (at least for GS in-game and link battles).
    
    L - Instead of level, this now calls up the Type Number of the opponent's 
    second type:
    
    Normal = 0
    Fighting = 1
    Flying = 2
    Poison = 3
    Ground = 4
    Rock = 5
    Bug = 7 (yes, 6 really is skipped)
    Ghost = 8
    Steel = 9
    Fire = 20 (big gap for Physical/Special separation)
    Water = 21
    Grass = 22
    Lightning = 23
    Psychic = 24
    Ice = 25
    Dragon = 26
    Dark = 27
    
    Remember, for mono-typed Pokemon, Type 2's number is the same as Type 1's.
    
    A - This one's simple.  Instead of attack, A is now the constant number 10 
    (ten).
    
    P - One that's not glitched!  P is the roulette wheel it's correctly reported 
    to be.  40 (40.23%), 80 (30.08%), 120 (9.77%), or ignore the damage formula 
    completely and give back some HP (19.92%).
    
    D - This is the Type Number of your own second type.  For Blissey (the Pokemon 
    who first brought fame to Present's glitch), as well as other Normal-types, 
    this gives them a Defense of 0; then it becomes 1 instead.  Raichu is the 
    worst Present user around, giving the opponent a 23 Defense against your 10 
    Attack.
    
    And the type multiplier step is applied twice.  For a Normal move, all that 
    means is that Rock and Steel are x1/4 instead of x1/2.
    
    Of course, the programmers are more intelligent than the company that hired 
    them.  Upon being informed of this glitch, they decided to make the move work 
    properly in Crystal, and it does.  Ditto for Stadium 2.  But Fanha, operator 
    of the GSBot and hated by everyone, is still oblivious to the thought of 
    updating his system with the revised Present.  Likewise, I'm still oblivious 
    to the thought of using that program, and so should you.
    
    **3. Time Travel...Impossible?  Ha!**
    
    Have you ever noticed the cart's internal clock running slow?  Did you want to 
    try and fix it without spending $20 for a Gameshark?  Are you a fan of complex 
    calculations done for no apparent reason?
    
    Enter the time change code.
    
    If you need to correct the clock time, or simply hijack someone else's quest 
    for the Sunkern they need to complete the Pokedex, this procedure lets you do 
    that.
    
    Who knows why they'd put a feature in if it's password-protected with a 
    password no one was supposed to know (except for the people who could simply 
    mess around with the variables directly), but it sure is fun to outsmart the 
    programmers.
    
    To access the password screen, go to the title screen and hit Down-B-Select.  
    You'll be asked for a password (unless you're playing Crystal, in which case 
    nothing happens and this is TRULY a waste of time).
    
    So what's the password?  Looks like you need to get out of this screen, and go 
    back to the game.  Look for three things:
    -Your money held
    -Your trainer name
    -Your ID No.
    
    At this point, write down a 0.  This is your starting count.
    
    Start with trainer name, since it's easiest to translate.  Only the first five 
    letters count.  Anyway, write down each of those letters, and translate it to 
    a number based on this chart (can you tell I like to use charts?)
    
    <Null-0> 0  
    <End-80> 80 
    <Space> 127 
    <UppercaseLetter> 127 + numeric value of letter (A = 1, B = 2...)
    ( 154 
    ) 155 
    : 156 
    ; 157 
    [ 158 
    ] 159 
    <LowercaseLetter> 159 + numeric value of letter
    e 186
    ' 224
    (PK) 225  
    (MN) 226
    - 227
    ? 230
    ! 231
    <Male> 239
    <MonetaryP> 240 
    <TimesSign> 241
    . 232 or 242
    / 243
    , 244 
    <Female> 245
    <Numbers> 246 + number
    
    You may have recognized this chart from the Missingno. section.  But it still 
    holds true in GS.
    
    (Note that if the name is 4 characters or less, the <End-80> will be in the 5 
    that count, and must be accommodated for.  Everything after that is <Null-0>, 
    which doesn't add to the count.)
    
    Look up each of the first five characters on the chart, adding the value to 
    the count each time.  As an example, my Gold trainer name is (PK)MASTER = 225 
    + 140 + 128 + 146 + 147 = 786.
    
    Next, find your ID No.  It's a 16-bit variable that gets added to the count, 
    but not directly.  First you have to break it up into the 8-bit segments.  The 
    easiest way to do this is to divide the number by 256, ending with an integer 
    and a remainder.  Each one in turn gets added to the count.  Going back to my 
    file, the ID is 19857 = hex 4D91, split into 4D and 91 (hex transfer is a 
    quick way of performing the division once you know how).  h4D = d77, h91 = 
    d145.  Adding both to 786 gives 1008.
    
    Third and finally, you need to know how much money you hold.  Money is a 24-
    bit variable, and each of the three bytes is added individually.  So divide by 
    65536, separate into integer and remainder.  Take the remainder, divide by 
    256, and find both parts again.  There are now three numbers, and add them all 
    to the count to arrive at your final password.  My money held will always be 
    P444,444, which is hex 06C81C.  Again using the short method, take the 1008 
    and add 06 (6), C8 (200), and 1C (28).  Total is 1242.
    
    The highest possible sum of the target bytes is 2550, yet they provide 5 
    digits with which to enter a password.  Why?  For no other reason than to 
    decrease the odds that a random, uneducated guess will be right.  Digit 1 will 
    always be a zero, so in my case I enter 01242 and proceed to warp back to 2:02 
    PM on Friday or any other time I wish.
    
    Did that get your brain going?  I hope so.
    
    **4. The 700...er, 800...no, 900...1000 Club?**
    
    Speaking of changing times, there was a time when Marowak was considered a 
    weakling.  All stats inferior to Sandslash, some exclusive moves that didn't 
    live up to expectations, and not even a Rock Slide to hit Flyers (though it 
    did get Ice Beam, its Special was even worse than Attack).
    
    The GSC designers saw this, and targeted Marowak for improvement.  How could 
    this be done?
    
    Well, yes, they did pump its Special D by 60.  All that did was prevent any 
    perfect-accuracy special attack from scoring a guaranteed KO, even with items.
    
    But there were a few spare item values that were undefined.  Most of them 
    would remain undefined until the end, but I guess there were just too many for 
    the programmers' liking.
    
    The revelation they had to make is "How should we make a Pokemon better, given 
    we can't change any RBY stats except for one Special, and have to stay in-
    flavor?"
    
    Someone found the answer: Pokemon-exclusive items.  Useless when held by just 
    about anyone, but in the hands of the right Pokemon, you get a nice bonus.
    
    And they don't get much nicer than x2 Attack.
    
    Combine the x2 Attack with Rock Slide and (as of Crystal) Swords Dance, and 
    what happens?
    
    Marowak used Earthquake!
    Pikachu took 18 damage!
    
    "What's going on?" was the universal cry of the players.  Pikachu has one of 
    the worst Defense stats known to man (or to Pokemon), and that's a Marowak 
    with +2 Attack modifier and an ADDITIONAL x2 from the Club!  How can it still 
    have 93% health left?
    
    The answer? A mixture of truncation and circumvention.
    
    As you may recall from page 13, stat modifiers have no effect after the target 
    stat reaches 999.  However, the Thick Club is NOT a stat modifier.  It 
    calculates the stat after modifiers have been applied, and multiplies it by 2.  
    Furthermore, no countermeasure was taken to prevent the Thick Club from 
    breaking this rule.  So Thick Club can indeed cause Marowak's Attack to go 
    into 4-digit land.
    
    Now, what can go wrong with a 4-digit attack?  It has to do with how the GB 
    computes damage from stats.  Yes, the A term is still the Attack stat for 
    Earthquake, Rock Slide, and any of Marowak's other physical attacks (unlike 
    with a certain OTHER attack, Present, just two explanations above this one).  
    However, it's not ALL of the attack stat.
    
    Because the Game Boy was a horribly slow system compared to the N64, 
    PlayStation, Dreamcast, and other systems of the day, the programmers needed 
    to make formulas like damage calculation as efficient as possible.  One of the 
    ways of doing this is by transferring fewer bits.
    
    Technically, 16 bits are allotted to each stat (because GB variables could 
    only be allocated in increments of 8 bits).  But in order to speed things up, 
    the game only looks at the last 10 bits of Attack and Defense.  This makes 
    sense, because no stat was supposed to increase beyond 999, and 999 = BIN 
    1111100111, which fits in 10 bits.
    
    However, when a Marowak uses Swords Dance, while holding a Thick Club, attack 
    is 258 x 2 x 2 = 1032.  That's binary 10000001000, which is 11 bits.  What 
    happens when the GB tries to send that?
    
    It sends only the last 10, which have a total value of 8.  An 8-Attack Pokemon 
    isn't going to do much...just ask Shuckle.  So for a while, the word on the 
    street was "don't use Swords Dance with Marowak" and "if you face a Marowak, 
    Swagger to make its Attack reset".
    
    Yet there is a way around this poor planning.  Two ways, in fact.  First is 
    simply to use Stadium 2 as the battle medium.  N64 is fast enough that it 
    doesn't matter whether 10 or 16 bits are transferred, and word of this 
    "glitch" had gotten out prior to the game's release, so the programmers 
    decided to go ahead and use all 16.  You can safely Swords Dance on Stadium 
    without risking reset.
    
    The second way is much more elegant, player-developed, AND usable on GB.  The 
    figure for a maximum-stat Swords Dance is 1032.  If it were just nine points 
    lower, the stat would fit in the requisite 10 bits.  If only there were a way 
    to lower Marowak's Attack...
    
    ...There is.  Who ever said you needed maximum stats?  Lowering the DV by one 
    is worth 8 points after Swords Dance and Thick Club.  So in order to get at 
    least 9 points lower, the Attack DV needs to be lowered by two, to 13.  Swords 
    Dance from that will make the Attack a nice, safe 1016 (1111111000).  Mmmm, 
    donuts.  It works because Marowak's maximum Attack (258) is so close to a 
    power of two that simple DV alteration can reduce the number of binary bits 
    needed to express the number.
    
    (Coincidentally, that 13 Attack DV just happens to work with Marowak's most 
    beneficial Hidden Power type, Bug.  And it doesn't knock down the Hit Points 
    at all, either.  NickWhiz1's discovery of this fact threw the community into a 
    "Metagame Summer".)
    
    Wow.  A page and a half just to describe one item.  I know I could do better, 
    but you don't want to have to read through mindless clutter, do you?  Mindful 
    clutter...now that's a different story.  Unfortunately, there's only one 
    subsection left in 301.
    
    **5. November Eleventh: The Day of Our Discontent**
    
    At this point in Pokemon's history, groundbreaking discoveries are a true 
    rarity.  I'm sure that everyone who ever checks one of the game's many message 
    boards is looking for something new every day.
    
    And on November 11, 2002, one such discovery was made that nearly threw our 
    game into oblivion.
    
    The idea: Transform into a Smeargle (which had to have at least one true 
    attack) with Mew or Ditto (this is easiest to pull off through Mystery-Gifting 
    and the Trainer House), then kill it using whatever attack the Smeargle had.  
    Next, out comes a Pokemon with whatever attack you want.  Wait for it to use 
    the attack, then Sketch it...and once the battle ends, Sketch's permanent 
    effect overrides Transform's temporary effect.  Wow, what a sequence just to 
    get one move.
    
    Later that day, the theory was proven true, and word spread like a lit 
    cigarette at a gas station.  (Don't do drugs.)  The entire community was on 
    DEFCON-1, trying to figure out how to protect their game from complete 
    uselessness.
    
    Eventually, everyone just decided that this was a mechanical interaction on 
    the level of Missingno.  Just like everyone bans L237 Mewtwo from link 
    battles, this Transform trick (which earned the name "Mewtation" by those 
    looking to slap a nametag on it) is only a novelty, and would not be tolerated 
    in multiplayer battles.
    
    So we were at peace for a while.  If nothing else, the game could go on.
    
    But it's not over!  Ever since the creative minds started going to work, one 
    question remained burning.  In an old list of moves compiled by Meowth346, 
    Transform was not among the moves which Metronome was incapable of hitting!  
    Was this simply a misprint, or do another twenty Pokemon get a chance to be 
    super-Smeargles?  (Note: Mimic was discounted quickly, incapable of calling 
    either Transform or Sketch).
    
    We waited over two months--until January 13th of the current year--until this 
    problem was finally resolved by Donald Theriault (author of the guide which 
    serves as chief competition to the one you're reading).  Not surprisingly, it 
    was decided in favor of "Metronome DOES have a 1:242 chance of hitting 
    Transform", and you can figure out what that means.  The Day of Our Discontent 
    expanded to--you guessed it--The Winter Of Our Discontent.
    
    But then, chaos reigned once again, as though the sequence which was played 
    out just two months before simply did not exist!  Maybe it was the ability to 
    spread all those moves to more than just two Pokemon.  Maybe it was an influx 
    of players who had never heard about the 11/11 round.
    
    Either way, it was an important lesson in exploring the game.  Eventually, 
    something like this comes up, and we're left to determine whether "spirit of 
    the game" happens to have any ethical standing at all.
    
    ----------------
    |Gameshark Help|
    ----------------
    
    Move Modifier: 01xx2CDA (first), 01xx2DDA (second), 01xx2EDA (third), 01xx2FDA 
    (fourth)
    
    Key for xx: 
    00 - <empty slot> 
    01 - Pound 
    02 - Karate Chop 
    03 - Double Slap 
    04 - Comet Punch 
    05 - Mega Punch 
    06 - Pay Day 
    07 - Fire Punch 
    08 - Ice Punch 
    09 - Thunderpunch 
    0A - Scratch 
    0B - Vice Grip 
    0C - Guillotine 
    0D - Razor Wind 
    0E - Swords Dance 
    0F - Cut 
    10 - Gust 
    11 - Wing Attack 
    12 - Whirlwind 
    13 - Fly 
    14 - Bind 
    15 - Slam 
    16 - Vine Whip 
    17 - Stomp 
    18 - Double Kick 
    19 - Mega Kick 
    1A - Jump Kick 
    1B - Rolling Kick 
    1C - Sand-Attack 
    1D - Headbutt 
    1E - Horn Attack 
    1F - Fury Attack 
    20 - Horn Drill 
    21 - Tackle 
    22 - Body Slam 
    23 - Wrap 
    24 - Take Down 
    25 - Thrash 
    26 - Double-Edge 
    27 - Tail Whip 
    28 - Poison Sting 
    29 - Twineedle
    2A - Pin Missile 
    2B - Leer 
    2C - Bite 
    2D - Growl 
    2E - Roar 
    2F - Sing 
    30 - Supersonic 
    31 - Sonicboom 
    32 - Disable 
    33 - Acid 
    34 - Ember 
    35 - Flamethrower 
    36 - Mist 
    37 - Water Gun 
    38 - Hydro Pump 
    39 - Surf 
    3A - Ice Beam 
    3B - Blizzard 
    3C - Psybeam 
    3D - Bubblebeam 
    3E - Aurora Beam 
    3F - Hyper Beam 
    40 - Peck 
    41 - Drill Peck 
    42 - Submission 
    43 - Low Kick 
    44 - Counter 
    45 - Seismic Toss 
    46 - Strength 
    47 - Absorb 
    48 - Mega Drain 
    49 - Leech Seed 
    4A - Growth 
    4B - Razor Leaf 
    4C - Solar Beam 
    4D - Poisonpowder 
    4E - Stun Spore 
    4F - Sleep Powder 
    50 - Petal Dance 
    51 - String Shot 
    52 - Dragon Rage 
    53 - Fire Spin 
    54 - Thundershock 
    55 - Thunderbolt 
    56 - Thunder Wave 
    57 - Thunder 
    58 - Rock Throw 
    59 - Earthquake 
    5A - Fissure 
    5B - Dig 
    5C - Toxic 
    5D - Confusion 
    5E - Psychic 
    5F - Hypnosis 
    60 - Meditate 
    61 - Agility 
    62 - Quick Attack 
    63 - Rage 
    64 - Teleport 
    65 - Night Shade 
    66 - Mimic 
    67 - Screech 
    68 - Double Team 
    69 - Recover 
    6A - Harden 
    6B - Minimize 
    6C - Smokescreen 
    6D - Confuse Ray 
    6E - Withdraw 
    6F - Defense Curl 
    70 - Barrier 
    71 - Light Screen 
    72 - Haze 
    73 - Reflect 
    74 - Focus Energy 
    75 - Bide 
    76 - Metronome 
    77 - Mirror Move 
    78 - Selfdestruct 
    79 - Egg Bomb 
    7A - Lick 
    7B - Smog 
    7C - Sludge 
    7D - Bone Club 
    7E - Fire Blast 
    7F - Waterfall 
    80 - Clamp 
    81 - Swift 
    82 - Skull Bash 
    83 - Spike Cannon 
    84 - Constrict 
    85 - Amnesia 
    86 - Kinesis 
    87 - Softboiled 
    88 - Hi Jump Kick 
    89 - Glare 
    8A - Dream Eater 
    8B - Poison Gas 
    8C - Barrage 
    8D - Leech Life 
    8E - Lovely Kiss 
    8F - Sky Attack 
    90 - Transform 
    91 - Bubble 
    92 - Dizzy Punch 
    93 - Spore 
    94 - Flash 
    95 - Psywave 
    96 - Splash 
    97 - Acid Armor 
    98 - Crabhammer 
    99 - Explosion 
    9A - Fury Swipes 
    9B - Bonemerang 
    9C - Rest 
    9D - Rock Slide 
    9E - Hyper Fang 
    9F - Sharpen 
    A0 - Conversion 
    A1 - Tri Attack 
    A2 - Super Fang 
    A3 - Slash 
    A4 - Substitute 
    A5 - Struggle 
    A6 - Sketch 
    A7 - Triple Kick 
    A8 - Thief 
    A9 - Spider Web 
    AA - Mind Reader 
    AB - Nightmare 
    AC - Flame Wheel 
    AD - Snore 
    AE - Curse 
    AF - Flail 
    B0 - Conversion2 
    B1 - Aeroblast 
    B2 - Cotton Spore 
    B3 - Reversal 
    B4 - Spite 
    B5 - Powder Snow 
    B6 - Protect 
    B7 - Mach Punch 
    B8 - Scary Face 
    B9 - Faint Attack 
    BA - Sweet Kiss 
    BB - Belly Drum 
    BC - Sludge Bomb 
    BD - Mud-Slap 
    BE - Octazooka 
    BF - Spikes 
    C0 - Zap Cannon 
    C1 - Foresight 
    C2 - Destiny Bond 
    C3 - Perish Song 
    C4 - Icy Wind 
    C5 - Detect 
    C6 - Bone Rush 
    C7 - Lock-On 
    C8 - Outrage 
    C9 - Sandstorm 
    CA - Giga Drain 
    CB - Endure 
    CC - Charm 
    CD - Rollout 
    CE - False Swipe 
    CF - Swagger 
    D0 - Milk Drink 
    D1 - Spark 
    D2 - Fury Cutter 
    D3 - Steel Wing 
    D4 - Mean Look 
    D5 - Attract 
    D6 - Sleep Talk 
    D7 - Heal Bell 
    D8 - Return 
    D9 - Present 
    DA - Frustration 
    DB - Safeguard 
    DC - Pain Split 
    DD - Sacred Fire 
    DE - Magnitude 
    DF - Dynamicpunch 
    E0 - Megahorn 
    E1 - Dragonbreath 
    E2 - Baton Pass 
    E3 - Encore 
    E4 - Pursuit 
    E5 - Rapid Spin 
    E6 - Sweet Scent 
    E7 - Iron Tail 
    E8 - Metal Claw 
    E9 - Vital Throw 
    EA - Morning Sun 
    EB - Synthesis 
    EC - Moonlight 
    ED - Hidden Power 
    EE - Cross Chop 
    EF - Twister 
    F0 - Rain Dance 
    F1 - Sunny Day 
    F2 - Crunch 
    F3 - Mirror Coat 
    F4 - Psych Up 
    F5 - Extremespeed 
    F6 - Ancientpower 
    F7 - Shadow Ball 
    F8 - Future Sight 
    F9 - Rock Smash 
    FA - Whirlpool 
    FB - Beat Up
    
    Wild Pokemon species modifier: 01xxEDD0
    
    Key for xx: Hex representation of the Pokedex number (much easier than the RBY 
    list, don't you think?)
    
    Wild Pokemon level modifier: 01xxFCD0
    
    Party Pokemon 1 stats:
    
    01xx35DA: HP Stat Exp. 1
    01yy36DA: HP Stat Exp. 2
    01xx37DA: AT Stat Exp. 1
    01yy38DA: AT Stat Exp. 2
    01xx39DA: DF Stat Exp. 1
    01yy3ADA: DF Stat Exp. 2
    01xx3BDA: SP Stat Exp. 1
    01yy3CDA: SP Stat Exp. 2
    01xx3DDA: SA/SD Stat Exp. 1
    01yy3EDA: SA/SD Stat Exp. 2
    01xy3FDA: AT/DF DVs
    01zt40DA: SP/SA/SD DVs.
    
    (For Stat Exp., xx is multiplied by 256, then added to yy)
    
    DV Keys:
    x - 4-bit Attack DV 
    y - 4-bit Defense DV
    z - 4-bit Speed DV
    t - 4-bit Special DV (handles both Special stats)
    
    Item quantity 1: 01xxB9D5 (change the B9 to BB for the second item, BD for the 
    third, etc. adding 2 each time)
    
    Item type 1: 01xxB8D5 (change the B8 to BA for the second item, BC for the 
    third, etc. adding 2 each time)
    
    Key for xx:
    01 - Master Ball 
    02 - Ultra Ball 
    03 - Brightpowder 
    04 - Great Ball 
    05 - Poke Ball 
    06 - TERU-SAMA 
    07 - Bicycle 
    08 - Moon Stone 
    09 - Antidote 
    0A - Burn Heal 
    0B - Ice Heal 
    0C - Awakening 
    0D - Parlyz Heal 
    0E - Full Restore 
    0F - Max Potion 
    10 - Hyper Potion 
    11 - Super Potion 
    12 - Potion 
    13 - Escape Rope 
    14 - Repel 
    15 - Max Ether 
    16 - Fire Stone 
    17 - Thunderstone 
    18 - Water Stone 
    19 - TERU-SAMA 
    1A - HP Up 
    1B - Protein 
    1C - Iron 
    1D - Carbos 
    1E - Lucky Punch 
    1F - Calcium 
    20 - Rare Candy 
    21 - X Accuracy 
    22 - Leaf Stone 
    23 - Metal Powder 
    24 - Nugget 
    25 - Poke Doll 
    26 - Full Heal 
    27 - Revive 
    28 - Max Revive 
    29 - Guard Spec. 
    2A - Super Repel 
    2B - Max Repel 
    2C - Dire Hit 
    2D - TERU-SAMA 
    2E - Fresh Water 
    2F - Soda Pop 
    30 - Lemonade 
    31 - X Attack 
    32 - TERU-SAMA 
    33 - X Defend 
    34 - X Speed 
    35 - X Special 
    36 - Coin Case 
    37 - Item Finder 
    38 - TERU-SAMA 
    39 - Exp. Share 
    3A - Old Rod 
    3B - Good Rod 
    3C - Silver Leaf 
    3D - Super Rod 
    3E - PP UP 
    3F - Ether 
    40 - Max Ether 
    41 - Elixir 
    42 - Red Scale 
    43 - Secretpotion 
    44 - S.S. Ticket 
    45 - Mystery Egg 
    46 - TERU-SAMA 
    47 - Silver Wing 
    48 - Moomoo Milk 
    49 - Quick Claw 
    4A - Psncureberry 
    4B - Gold Leaf 
    4C - Soft Sand 
    4D - Sharp Beak 
    4E - Przcureberry 
    4F - Burnt Berry 
    50 - Ice Berry 
    51 - Poison Barb 
    52 - King's Rock 
    53 - Bitter Berry 
    54 - Mint Berry 
    55 - Red Apricorn 
    56 - Tinymushroom 
    57 - Big Mushroom 
    58 - Silverpowder 
    59 - BLU Apricorn 
    5A - TERU-SAMA 
    5B - Amulet Coin 
    5C - YLW Apricorn 
    5D - GRN Apricorn 
    5E - Cleanse Tag 
    5F - Mystic Water 
    60 - Twistedspoon 
    61 - WHT Apricorn 
    62 - Black Belt 
    63 - BLK Apricorn 
    64 - TERU-SAMA 
    65 - PNK Apricorn
    66 - Blackglasses 
    67 - Slowpoketail 
    68 - Pink Bow 
    69 - Stick 
    6A - Smoke Ball 
    6B - Nevermeltice 
    6C - Magnet 
    6D - Miracleberry 
    6E - Pearl 
    6F - Big Pearl 
    70 - Everstone 
    71 - Spell Tag 
    72 - Ragecandybar 
    73 - TERU-SAMA 
    74 - TERU-SAMA 
    75 - Miracle seed 
    76 - Thick Club 
    77 - Focus Band 
    78 - TERU-SAMA 
    79 - Energypowder 
    7A - Energy Root 
    7B - Heal Powder 
    7C - Revival Herb 
    7D - Hard Stone 
    7E - Lucky Egg 
    7F - Card Key 
    80 - Machine Part 
    81 - TERU-SAMA 
    82 - Lost Item 
    83 - Star Dust 
    84 - Star Piece 
    85 - Basement Key 
    86 - Pass 
    87 - TERU-SAMA 
    88 - TERU-SAMA 
    89 - TERU-SAMA 
    8A - Charcoal 
    8B - Berry Juice 
    8C - Scope Lens 
    8D - TERU-SAMA 
    8E - TERU-SAMA 
    8F - Metal Coat 
    90 - Dragon Fang 
    91 - TERU-SAMA 
    92 - Leftovers 
    93 - TERU-SAMA 
    94 - TERU-SAMA 
    95 - TERU-SAMA 
    96 - Mystery Berry 
    97 - Dragon Scale 
    98 - Berserk Gene 
    99 - TERU-SAMA 
    9A - TERU-SAMA 
    9B - TERU-SAMA 
    9C - Sacred Ash 
    9D - Heavy Ball 
    9E - Flower Mail 
    9F - Level Ball 
    A0 - Lure Ball 
    A1 - Fast Ball 
    A2 - TERU-SAMA 
    A3 - Light Ball 
    A4 - Friend Ball 
    A5 - Moon Ball 
    A6 - Love Ball 
    A7 - Normal Box 
    A8 - Gorgeous Box 
    A9 - Sun Stone 
    AA - Polkadot Bow 
    AB - TERU-SAMA 
    AC - Up-Grade 
    AD - Berry 
    AE - Gold Berry 
    AF - Squirtbottle 
    B0 - TERU-SAMA 
    B1 - Park Ball 
    B2 - Rainbow Wing 
    B3 - TERU-SAMA 
    B4 - Brick Piece 
    B5 - Surf Mail 
    B6 - Litebluemail 
    B7 - Portraitmail 
    B8 - Lovely Mail 
    B9 - Eon Mail 
    BA - Morph Mail 
    BB - Bluesky Mail 
    BC - Music Mail 
    BD - Mirage Mail 
    BE - TERU-SAMA 
    BF - TM 01 - Dynamicpunch 
    C0 - TM 02 - Headbutt 
    C1 - TM 03 - Curse 
    C2 - TM 04 - Rollout 
    C3 - TM 04 - Rollout (yep, #2) 
    C4 - TM 05 - Roar 
    C5 - TM 06 - Toxic 
    C6 - TM 07 - Zap Cannon 
    C7 - TM 08 - Rock Smash 
    C8 - TM 09 - Psych Up 
    C9 - TM 10 - Hidden Power 
    CA - TM 11 - Sunny Day 
    CB - TM 12 - Sweet Scent 
    CC - TM 13 - Snore 
    CD - TM 14 - Blizzard 
    CE - TM 15 - Hyper Beam 
    CF - TM 16 - Icy Wind 
    D0 - TM 17 - Protect 
    D1 - TM 18 - Rain Dance 
    D2 - TM 19 - Giga Drain 
    D3 - TM 20 - Endure 
    D4 - TM 21 - Frustration 
    D5 - TM 22 - Solar Beam 
    D6 - TM 23 - Iron Tail 
    D7 - TM 24 - Dragonbreath 
    D8 - TM 25 - Thunder 
    D9 - TM 26 - Earthquake 
    DA - TM 27 - Return 
    DB - TM 28 - Dig 
    DC - TM 28 - Dig (again) 
    DD - TM 29 - Psychic 
    DE - TM 30 - Shadow Ball 
    DF - TM 31 - Mud-Slap 
    E0 - TM 32 - Double Team 
    E1 - TM 33 - Ice Punch 
    E2 - TM 34 - Swagger 
    E3 - TM 35 - Sleep Talk 
    E4 - TM 36 - Sludge Bomb 
    E5 - TM 37 - Sandstorm 
    E6 - TM 38 - Fire Blast 
    E7 - TM 39 - Swift 
    E8 - TM 40 - Defense Curl 
    E9 - TM 41 - Thunderpunch 
    EA - TM 42 - Dream Eater 
    EB - TM 43 - Detect 
    EC - TM 44 - Rest 
    ED - TM 45 - Attract 
    EE - TM 46 - Thief 
    EF - TM 47 - Steel Wing 
    F0 - TM 48 - Fire Punch 
    F1 - TM 49 - Fury Cutter 
    F2 - TM 50 - Nightmare 
    F3 - HM 1 - Cut 
    F4 - HM 2 - Fly 
    F5 - HM 3 - Surf 
    F6 - HM 4 - Strength 
    F7 - HM 5 - Flash 
    F8 - HM 6 - Whirlpool 
    F9 - HM 7 - Waterfall
    FF - <empty slot>
    (Note: The TERU-SAMA is simply a filler name given to slots with no defined 
    item, much like Missingno. was a filler Pokemon in RBY.  Attaching one to a 
    Pokemon changes it to a random item, usually a Berry.)
    
    Experience Points: 01xx32DA, 01yy33DA, 01zz34DA
    
    (xx multiplied by 65536, yy multiplied by 256, zz not multiplied; maximum 
    values needed for L100 are 13, 12, D0)
    
    ***********************
    *302. Pokemon Analysis*
    ***********************
    
    Once again, it's time to play the role of Simon Cowell, and determine which 
    Pokemon absolutely suck.  139 competitors are trying out this time, and in the 
    end, there can still be only six.  Ultimately, you the players will have to 
    decide, but I'll lead you in the right direction.
    
    Venusaur: The other five starters all have Earthquake.  Venusaur doesn't, and 
    this is one of the many reasons it comes off worse than the rest.  Part of 
    this has to do with weaknesses to Fire, Psychic, Ice, AND Flying.  It's also 
    degraded by the absolute screw-over of its former best attack (Razor Leaf).  
    Poor versatility hurt it as well.  All this conspiring against a Pokemon that 
    wasn't very viable in the first place?  Regardless of what the scales of 
    justice may say or think, Venusaur won't get much use in GSC.  Maybe wait for 
    RS_.
    
    Charizard:  The Dragon That Wasn't just continues to get more versatile, 
    proving that kids know at least one good Pokemon.  Still able to use 
    Flamethrower, Earthquake, and Rock Slide, Charizard adds to that Ancientpower 
    (AP boost is usually an instant win), Dragonbreath (somewhat worthless, but at 
    least it's more usable than Outrage), Wing Attack (now that it has usable 
    power), Hidden Power (yes, everyone can use that, but that doesn't stop me 
    from mentioning it), and most recently Crunch (another boon for the 316 SA).  
    Charizard is still the most versatile Fire-type that isn't casually banned, 
    and is capable of competing with Ho-oh in that regard!  But there's still the 
    trouble of Fire-Flying types, although the transition eliminated the Ice 
    weakness.  Try it as a temporary sweeper.  But Typhlosion should do you 
    better.
    
    Blastoise: As a select Pokemon that gets both Counter and Mirror Coat (albeit 
    not simultaneously), Blastoise is far more usable than fellow double-reflector 
    Wobbuffet.  For one, both defensives are good (which seems to contradict the 
    purpose of reflecting, but keep in mind that the high stats enable it to 
    SURVIVE enough to use the move).  For two, you can outfit Blastoise with Surf, 
    Ice Beam, and/or Earthquake.  And for three, it beats Feraligatr.  It even 
    beats Zapdos in a guessing game--much like Suicune, only easier to find.
    
    Butterfree: Just plain bad.  Bug/Flying is a worthless type combo, and to add 
    insult to (lots of) injuries, it doesn't have any of the boutique tricks that 
    make Scyther the one viable unevolved Pokemon.  It's simply an inferior 
    Jumpluff, (gasp) Venomoth, or even Smeargle.  Somebody eliminate this sorry 
    excuse of a Pokemon from the game code, and replace it with something good.
    
    Beedrill: The Bug-type that's truest to the name is abhorred by the fact that 
    it doesn't get Megahorn, and that the only decent Bug move you can use with it 
    is Hidden Power.  Beedrill's other type also got a power move (Sludge Bomb), 
    and this one is actually on the compatibility list, but remember--Poison is 
    only super effective on one type, which is already covered by Bug!  But 
    ironically enough, Beedrill gets stomped by the other types that Bug hits for 
    double against (STAB Psychic; Houndoom's Flamethrower; Tyranitar's 
    Ancientpower).  And it's for that reason that Beedrill is once again condemned 
    to uselessness.
    
    Pidgeot: The basic flier, as usual, has no tricks to pull off.  And it doesn't 
    even have the necessary brute force to win without said tricks.  So in 
    conclusion, if you only learn three things from this guide, remember: 1} 
    Oxygen is good, 2} competition is bad, and 3} I like Jell-O.  If that's too 
    much to remember, take out #2.  Or take out all three, and replace them with 
    "Pidgeot sucks".
    
    Raticate: Even with Smeargle, Raticate is still the best Super Fang user.  But 
    look out--the Normal Rat still has nothing else to run off except that one 
    move.  Standard Normal attacks did get better (mainly due to the happiness-
    dependent moves), so I suppose you COULD build a four-move set for Raticate.  
    
    Fearow: All I have to say is that it won't beat Dodrio.  Heck, it would have a 
    hard time dealing with Pidgeot.  For one, Mirror Move is too weak to do 
    anything useful (and even Pidgeot gets it).  Not only is Fearow slower than 
    Dodrio, but it doesn't get the broken ability to use Flail.  Come to think of 
    it, can Fearow even Haze?  Can it do ANYTHING good?  No.
    
    Arbok: If anything, Poison got worse in this game, so Arbok's mirror-match 
    advantage of Earthquake is trivial.  However, the move shines because of all 
    the Fire, Electric, and Steel running around today.  Glare is identical in 
    every relevant way to Stun Spore, so it's worth a try.  Because Poison is so 
    bad for attacking, treat Arbok as though it were a Normal-type, except that 
    it's weak to Psychic and to its favorite attack.  And no, Glare isn't an 
    attack.
    
    Raichu: Raichu's still the "outside contender" of Electrics.  Sure, it picks 
    up Rain Dance, which both allows it to use Thunder (although, when you think 
    of Rain Dance as a missed Thunder, it takes 4 turns to make up for the use as 
    opposed to continuous Thunderbolts) and lets Surf deal more than the pittance 
    of damage it normally got in the early days.  But if anything, Raichu is the 
    big LOSER among Electrics over the transition.  Why?  Hidden Power.  Now other 
    Pokemon (with more staying power) have a way to counter the Ground weakness.  
    So now the overgrown rat has no standout stat AND no standout move, which 
    ensures its permanent burial.  As does the poor reputation it gets by evolving 
    from Pikachu (which is still bad, even with a x2 item).
    
    Sandslash: Several years ago, Sandslash was enjoying an upper-level job with 
    decent pay.  Life was good.  But then, a New Economy Representative named 
    Marowak arrived on the scene, and took the whole company by storm.  Sandslash 
    became a pariah to the entire corporate world, and everyone wondered whether 
    the fad started by Marowak would ever end.  Well, Sandslash has decided to 
    take action.  Join the "We Hate Marowak" club, and Sandslash will reward you 
    with...well, compared to what Marowak can give you, I don't think this club is 
    worth it after all.  Stick with the improved bonehead.
    
    Nidoqueen: Whichever Nintendo employee decided that Nidoqueen should get 
    Lovely Kiss, they picked the wrong Pokemon.  Nidoqueen's move compatibility 
    list is already very high, and giving it an effective Sleep Powder will be 
    ignored by most.  It may be a Ground-type, which is more valued than before 
    due to the needed counter for Electrics, but there are better Earthquake users 
    (especially since Nidoqueen is weak to the move itself).
    
    Nidoking: As usual, Nidoking is almost identical to Nidoqueen--it even picked 
    up Lovely Kiss at the same time in Nintendo's Great Giveaway--but the stat 
    alignment divides potential NidoRoyalty sets into two categories.  Nidoqueen 
    wants the attempted tank sets and Fissure/Horn Drill/Rest/Sleep Talk, while 
    Nidoking gets to sweep (though it's the only one of the pair that gets 
    Amnesia, that move is better suited as a tradeback).  However, both have 
    fairly mediocre stats.  But immunity to Toxic and T-Wave?  If only people 
    actually USED those disablers anymore, I'd give more thought to these.  
    Nothing's stopping you from using the NidoRoyalty on a fun team.  Nothing's 
    stopping you from using them in a competitive team for that matter, except the 
    desire to win.
    
    Clefable: The "physically inclined Chansey" gets, among other things, another 
    move that makes it more like Chansey itself: Moonlight.  Only half the PP of 
    Softboiled, but with Sunny Day tossed in, the healing potential is the same 
    (why Sunny Day would help a move called Moonlight is beyond me).  Either Sunny 
    Day or the more recently discovered Belly Drum leads to an abusive Clefable, 
    so catch two. 
    
    Ninetales: Back during RBY, Ninetales had the diversity edge over the other 
    version-specific Fire, even if it was only due to Confuse Ray.  Now, Arcanine 
    gets Crunch and a fairly, um...arcane, attack in Extremespeed.  Meanwhile, 
    what new does Ninetales get?  Not much, and pure Fire isn't exactly the best 
    candidate type for receiving Hidden Power.  And it now trails Arcanine by a 
    full 100 points in total stats.  Did Ninetales grab its own tail, thereby 
    putting a 1000-year curse on itself, or is there some other secret dealing I'm 
    unaware of?
    
    Wigglytuff: At the risk of angering the Almighty God Mr. K, Wigglytuff sucks.  
    It's basically the beggar off the streets, stealing qualities of Clefable, 
    Snorlax, and Blissey.  However, it somehow ended up with all the BAD qualities 
    of those Pokemon.  Hey, it could be worse...Wiggly could end up in prison for 
    such thievery.  No wonder the K-Tuff is always depicted in a black ski mask.
    
    Vileplume: It's about time Vileplume got Razor Leaf--too late, in fact.  Its 
    old favorite, Petal Dance, also takes a hit (losing 20 power).  And the latest 
    option, Giga Drain, only has 8 PP.  Is someone TRYING to shut the type down 
    once and for all?  Because if they are, there's nothing the Grass-types can do 
    about it.  Especially not the Grass/Poisons, and even so Venusaur has an extra 
    90 points in stats over the other two.  At least Vileplume now has a "bail-
    out" counterpart, Bellossom, a Pokemon with only one type, joining the revolt 
    bandwagon started by Tangela.
    
    Parasect: Parasect feels Sandslash's pain.  That's right, it was also put out 
    of a job in GSC.  Back when Parasect was the only Pokemon that could throw 
    around 255-accuracy Sleep, there was a reason to use it.  Nowadays, Spore has 
    a much faster user--Smeargle, of all things, a Pokemon whose stats are 
    supposed to suck.  Well, it outclasses Parasect by 100 points in Speed.  And 
    doesn't have the three W4s either (actually, Parasect magically lost the 
    Poison weakness over the years--let's all celebrate).  Parasect's only use now 
    is to give Spore to a Pokemon it knows will use the move better.  Parasite 
    indeed.
    
    Venomoth: The worst BP'er of them all?  Probably.  For one, the Bug-Poison 
    type (combining the two worst in the game) puts Venomoth in chains from the 
    get-go.  And I don't mean BP chains, either.  The only realistic BP material 
    is Curse and DT, the universal TMs, and if you disregard the SA (which 
    Venomoth doesn't really need) it's just a bad Scyther.  Kill it.
    
    Dugtrio: A change in move mechanics rendered this Pokemon much worse.  Back in 
    the beginning, Dugtrio was the game's best OHKO user.  That was back when it 
    was based on speed.  Now, with Rhydon just as likely to hit a Fissure as 
    Dugtrio, the poor defensive stats shine through and Dugtrio's foundation falls 
    to (under?) the ground.  Such is the cost of having only one decent stat.
    
    Persian: Remember several years back in the WCW when Chris Jericho was touting 
    himself as a "Conspiracy Victim"?  Well, Persian may as well do the same.  1) 
    Now that the Critical Hit system is based on domains, instead of fractions of 
    Speed, the ability to crit-hit with Slash is reduced by 74.6%.  2) Persian is 
    no longer the best Normal-type Slash user: a new Pokemon, Ursaring, has a 358 
    Attack with which to use the move.  3) Pokemon as a whole have become more 
    resistant to physical attacks; the average damage of a critical-hit Slash 
    against every fully-evolved Pokemon has dropped by over 1.5% since RBY.  I 
    guess Giovanni simply neglected his cat too much, and the rest of the species 
    followed in unison.
    
    Golduck: This Pokemon picks up Psychic now, which replaces its ruined Amnesia.  
    (Common point of knowledge: Psychic and Amnesia can't coexist.)  Statwise, 
    Golduck picks up 30 in SA (11.63% of an Amnesia), which is poor compensation 
    indeed.  And Cross Chop, while capable of a whopping 372 damage on Blissey 
    (52%?  What shall I do?), is too situational to count as additional 
    compensation.  Golduck just got a pink slip from a low-level job--proof that 
    not everyone can succeed in an economy.
    
    Primeape: Once again, one is left to wonder why Primeape even exists.  It's 
    like Machamp, only less powerful, less durable, and without Earthquake.  The 
    extra speed makes little difference (except that it's guaranteed to outrun 
    Blissey, which could Counter back the Cross Chop--at least Machamp has an 
    automatic kill).  Primeape has to compete with the HitmonFighters just to get 
    into an Underused team.
    
    Arcanine: The first Pokemon legally able to get Extremespeed (remember, 
    Smeargle can't get it until Arcanine already has it), Arcanine demonstrated 
    that the move was good (especially with 318 Attack) as the experimental 
    specimen, so that it can be given safely to Pokemon like Dragonite.  (Note: 
    Extremespeed is best used with Curse, whose drawback is completely negated by 
    the move.)  Another huge factor in The Unknown Dog's rise to success is 
    Crunch, which not only gives itself (and Flamethrower) more "oomph" with time, 
    but equates to a pair of additional type advantages.  
    
    Poliwrath: As beginners to Stadium 2 might say, "Poliwrath is the most broken 
    Pokemon ever!"  Tip #1: Mind Reader's effect is cancelled when you switch.  
    Counter-Tip #1: Poliwrath can learn Whirlpool.  Random Fact #1: Whirlpool's 
    accuracy is a mere 70%.  Tip #2: Switch to a Flyer first turn, before 
    Whirlpool, and Fissure can't hit.  Counter-Tip #2: Poliwrath can learn Ice 
    Beam.  Random Fact #2: Ice Beam does just 81% to Jumpluff.  Get the picture?  
    That's what's called a metagame.  And Poliwrath appears to be on the losing 
    end of it.
    
    Alakazam: Wasn't this the #3 Pokemon in the world of three years ago?  Yes.  
    Where is it now?  Probably around #43.  Why?  Three things.  Two more type 
    weaknesses (Dark and Ghost), a 100-point drop in SD, and the complete shaft of 
    the Psychic move.  Instead of repeatedly halving the opponent's offensive AND 
    defensive capabilities concurrently with a hapless beatdown, nowadays Psychic 
    doesn't hamper the opponent's counterattacking capability at all, and gets an 
    average of just 1-2 defensive drops throughout its PP span.  Granted, it does 
    get to diversify with the triple punches now, but except for Dark-types and W4 
    hits, the advantage of a weakness is only minor (about 10% more than Psychic).  
    
    Machamp: When Machamp was given a much-needed GSC boost, the "Physical vs. 
    Special" scale was tilted to correct the RBY imbalance.  However, it may be 
    tilted so much as to cause an imbalance the other way.  Special Defense +40--
    now it's GUARANTEED to survive a Mewtwo's Psychic, even with Twistedspoon 
    backing.  Cross Chop--Chansey can evolve all it wants, but it now has to deal 
    with the threat of a one-hit, non-detonation kill.  Light Screen--make that 
    TWO Mewtwo Psychics, or pseudopassing if you prefer that tactic.  Type chart--
    Cross Chop gets double damage against BOTH new types.  Fighters are supposed 
    to be as good as any other type, and now they are.  At least Machamp is.
    
    Victreebel: Along with Muk, Victreebel is now that co-holder (with Muk) of the 
    Game's Strongest Poison Attack, and nowadays it's actually worth something: 
    41% to Blissey!  Special A hasn't changed, but as with Vileplume, the 
    usefulness of its moves has, for the worst.  Special D HAS changed...-80 
    points.  So much for surviving one turn from Moltres.  And Victreebel doesn't 
    even have the bail-out option that Vileplume has.  Being a Blue player sure 
    does suck...
    
    Tentacruel: The "Makeshift Suicune" is clearly not the best idea, based on 
    that nickname alone.  But in lower-level Cups, where Suicune is either banned 
    or can't get the Coat, Tentacruel is a suitable replacement.  There's a Ground 
    weakness, but Tentacruel can wipe that out in one Barrier.  Like Suicune, it 
    survives Thunders by both Zapdos and Pikachu.  But unlike Suicune (and this 
    time for the better), 'Cruel gets a quick kill on Mewtwo.  It uses Psychic, 
    Tentacruel survives by about 100 HP.  Mirror Coat...500 damage...instant kill 
    from 22 UPS points down. (UPS doesn't mean "FedEx rival" in this context--go 
    read 305.)  But that's a highly situational, and highly predictable, plus.  In 
    practice, stick to Suicune if possible.
    
    Golem: Golem didn't gain any significant new moves, but a change in mechanics 
    makes an old one viable.  Explosion's power increased from 170 to 250 (and 
    remember, it gets doubled for an effective gain of 160), meaning Golem can now 
    Explode and kill Mewtwo.  Or quite a few other Pokemon.  But unfortunately, 
    it's just that--a one-time-use explosion--so use it wisely.  If you can, that 
    is.  Good luck setting up a Trap-Paralyze-BP to Golem.
    
    Rapidash: I feel a need to paraphrase Bill O'Reilly's take on rice cakes, so 
    I'll do that now.  "Bad.  There is no excuse for using Rapidash at any time.  
    No matter what they say, you are using burnt embers.  Deficiency.  Crap.  This 
    must have been designed for another game, and mistakenly got labeled as a 
    Pokemon."
    
    Slowbro: Since Amnesia was screwed over in this series (for good reason), 
    Slowbro needs to adapt beyond the 'Tobybro' set.  It does pick up a new move 
    (Belly Drum) that offers a big change, but wasn't Slowbro supposed to be 
    defensive?  I think there's a reason the Slowpoke family can learn Curse 
    naturally.  Maybe it's not on par with Snorlax, but neither is Furret.
    
    Magneton: More resistances than any other Pokemon, but Magneton's second type 
    also makes it W4 to the incredibly common Earthquake.  The Special loss came 
    in Defense, so it can now try to thwart the weakness with 338-SA Rain 
    Dance/Hidden Power, but Magneton is once again plagued by a low Speed, and 
    will have trouble preparing this.  If you want strong Special attacks, at 
    least Moltres has a less exploitable W4.
    
    Farfetch'd: Still bad, and the "hopeful improvement" given to it by the 
    Stadium 2 Squad wasn't much.  Farfetch'd can BP out Swords Dance and Agility, 
    but so can Scizor...and the metallic one actually has a base stat above 65.  
    Endure-Flail here is nothing compared to Dodrio.  Suckiness is topped by 
    Magikarp...or is it?
    
    Dodrio: One of only three things that gets STAB on Flail, and the only one 
    that sports an Attack high enough to kill Starmie with it in the absence of 
    modifiers.  In reality, Flail is all Dodrio is good for now (along with the 
    occasional Drill Peck for Ghosts), but the recent craze demonstrates that such 
    a move, on 298 Attack, is more than enough to work well.  Passing in some 
    Attack boosts, a 1-HP Flail will kill all non-Ghosts except Rhydon (by 3 HP) 
    and Steelix.
    
    Dewgong: It's still an inferior Lapras.  Both get Perish Song, and Dewgong's 
    not nearly as well suited to use it.  Dewgong also gets Safeguard...but once 
    again, Lapras matches it.  Is there anything Lapras can't do, but Dewgong can?  
    Well, there is...Peck.  Could there be a more useless "counter" to a Grass 
    weakness?
    
    Muk: Now that the strongest Poison attack is stronger than 65 power, Muk can 
    actually do some decent damage now.  Muk easily survives any Psychic shot 
    (barring some strange Growth boost), but unfortunately it can't capitalize 
    like Tentacruel can.  At least it's better than Weezing.  I'm sure most of us 
    would take a 198-speed Explosion over a 218-speed D-Bond.
    
    Cloyster: Over the break, Cloyster was originally transformed into a one-way 
    Shuckle.  Bad HP, good Defense stat...but the other Defense stat, down 80.  
    Whoops, KO'd before you could get off a single hit.  Things got better in 
    Crystal, where Cloyster could become a Spiker, but that bad SD limits it to 
    being a "two-turn" Spiker--after Spikes are down, it won't live long enough to 
    do anything except go BOOM.  Needless to say, the Attack stat remains the same 
    since RBY.  And Explosion's 48% markup means that even the two-turn appearance 
    can make an impact.
    
    Gengar: Hmm...what can the original Ghost do now?  Like Misdreavus, it can 
    Perish Trap.  Some good.  It can Curse-Trap.  Not much good, but Johnny might 
    like it.  It can Haze.  Great.  Fastest Destiny Bond user in the game? Better.  
    Fire Punch and Ice Punch to accompany its previous mastery with Psychic and 
    Thunderbolt?  Go see Alakazam.  Like 'Kazam, Gengar is apathetically tossed 
    aside when it comes to SD preservation.  It has the same low defense, but a 
    weakness to Alakazam itself, PLUS the dominant physical type (Ground), PLUS 
    the new Dark types?  Just when you thought Gengar was getting good, it turns 
    out to be...still good.  Just be more careful using it now.  Haze and Destiny 
    Bond won't get much better than on Gengar.
    
    Hypno: This Pokemon gets to remain deprived of Recover, and even the recent 
    pickup of Amnesia leaves Hypno trailing Alakazam in GSC.  And both fall short 
    against several other Pokemon.  They had their time in the spotlight, and now 
    it's time to rotate out.  Maybe when the third string is called back out, 
    Hypno will see play again.  But inferior line rotation is only meaningful to 
    the underused.
    
    Kingler: Contrary to popular rumor, Cross Chop is NOT a Pokecenter move for 
    Kingler, nor can it be acquired by any other legal means as of now.  That's 
    sad, because Kingler would have become a force with it.  There's still 
    Crabhammer (though the Critical Hit Domain system leaves it far below the 144 
    average that move used to enjoy), and Swords Dance makes even Hidden Power an 
    effective counter.  Amnesia can also nullify the weaknesses now (remember, 
    Water's two weaknesses are both Special).  But no Cross Chop means no savage 
    mising for Kingler, and no savage mising means an ineffective sweeper.  So 
    close.
    
    Electrode: After three years on the throne, Electrode's 378 Speed has been 
    surpassed by...no one.  It's still capable of T-Waving prior to anyone else's 
    Substitute, and it still has the game's worst detonation (remember, Sketch 
    can't target a detonation).  Mirror Coat is the new tactic provided by the 
    transition, and it can achieve a sizable surprise.  Especially since Electrode 
    has no Special weaknesses that open the door for the one-shot.
    
    Exeggutor: Too strong for RBY, Exeggutor is another Pokemon who got victimized 
    by the "affirmative action" policy of GSC.  Special Defense -120 is the 
    harshest such decrease (percentage-wise) by any Pokemon during the transition, 
    and there's still no Razor Leaf.  It does get Ancientpower (boost equals 522 
    Special A...donuts...), as well as Moonlight (which is really only good with 
    Sunny Day, and a 228-SD Grass-type is fully responsible for all Fire attacks 
    incurred during its own Sunny Day).  Exeggutor should have newfound potential 
    with the Ancientpower idea, but no one's had any luck bringing it into the 
    limelight--and deservedly so.  Maybe GAMEFREAK knew what they were doing when 
    they altered RBY stats to fit with GSC.
    
    Marowak: This is why x2 items are a bad idea.  Not only does Marowak get to 
    use the Thick Club to trivially circumvent an otherwise strict law (see page 
    100), but even without the entertainment of abusing a mechanic, you're looking 
    at a potential 516 Attack.  Much like with the Necropotence deck in Magic, 
    Marowak drew a good six months of dominance and metagaming.  Even now, it's 
    still an omnipresent threat that has become synonymous with the Ground type.
    
    Hitmonlee: Now that this evolution line has a STAB Priority 3 move, Hitmonlee 
    suddenly gets a bit better.  Now it can Curse to up its low Defense, and 
    ignore the Speed disadvantage with...a 40 power move.  Boo.  The near-90% 
    buffer in Special D means it no longer has to fear Psychics (well, actually it 
    does given its still-bad HP), and Attack is almost good enough to compete with 
    Machamp.  Except Hitmonlee is still taking recoil damage, at least when it's 
    not spending 3 turns to make a Mach Punch equal a Cross Chop.
    
    Hitmonchan: It can pick up Hitmonlee's signature move now, but lacks 30 points 
    of Attack.  Triplepunches are still here, and the same bad SA prevents these 
    moves from being any more useful than they were in RBY.  (SD, on the other 
    hand, is up over 300 now.  Now it takes just 88% from Alakazam's Psychic as 
    opposed to 165%.)  But the lack of Attack and Speed, just to boost Defense, 
    won't cut it for a Pokemon whose role is decidedly offensive.
    
    Lickitung: It's still a bad Snorlax that can't blow up.  Move on.
    
    Weezing: Bad again.  Mr. K just didn't seem to have much luck transferring his 
    Pokemon to the present day, did he?  Weezing can't attack like Muk, and while 
    it does have a substantial Defense, Muk's HP is enough to reduce Weezing's 
    edge in the physical resilience contest to about 10%...and in the Special 
    department, Weezing trails by over 50%.  And the moves aren't substantially 
    different.  Why, oh why did they have to give Koffing an evolution?
    
    Rhydon: Still with the weaknesses of Ground/Rock typing, Rhydon no longer 
    boasts the #1 unboosted Earthquake (or Rock Slide for that matter).  It's no 
    Tyranitar, but you don't want to let Rhydon stay out for too long lest you 
    relive the story of countless Mafia victims.  Remember, the Special stats 
    haven't improved a bit, so even Squirtle gets the automatic kill against 
    Rhydon, and it costs much fewer UPS points than Suicune to boot.  Rhydon's 
    role is more that of a school bully; one who beats on the unprepared.  But not 
    much else.
    
    Tangela: Time for everyone's favorite reminder again: Don't do drugs!  Tangela 
    must have been doing drugs over the transition, losing over 40% of its 
    protection against destructive tendencies (Special Defense).  "Rehabilitation" 
    (Amnesia) was given to Tangela as an attempt to recover from this, but it was 
    turned down as a thing of the past.  If you ever run into Tangela, remember 
    that it's addicted to Sleep Powder, Stun Spore, and the dreaded Toxic.  Don't 
    fall victim to secondhand smoke; burn Tangela to ashes on the spot.  Just make 
    sure you're covering your nose through it all.
    
    Kangaskhan: For a while, this was the only Pokemon with Dizzy Punch.  Not true 
    anymore, but the move was bad anyway.  The low Special held by Kangaskhan in 
    the old days has been rectified, at least on the defensive side; but trying to 
    act as a tank in the same type as Snorlax and Blissey is doomed for utter 
    failure.  And Snorlax pretty much owns Kangaskhan in the attacking department 
    as well.  All it has going for it in the battle of the Normals is a higher 
    Speed, as well as a crapshoot with Roar, and that generally isn't enough.
    
    Seaking: Boo.  Gyarados had most of Seaking's ability in its job description, 
    perhaps maybe the W4 deal.  Now that Octillery is present in GSC, Seaking's 
    last stand is gone.  MAYBE you could use this as a Horn Driller, but can't 
    Lapras do that as well?
    
    Starmie: This Pokemon provided GSC with a metagame.  Sure, other good movesets 
    had been discovered earlier (Umbreon comes to mind).  But throughout early 
    2001, players had been given a choice of starting with Death Starmie, or with 
    an Electric to counter, or to lose.  Nowadays more creative counters have been 
    developed, but they have no practical use anymore, since the DeathStar no 
    longer dominates.
    
    Mr. Mime: It does get a big boost in Special D, but Hypno is still more 
    resilient in that aspect.  All the pseudopasses?  Mr. Mime needs these just to 
    stay alive, much less set them up for another Pokemon.  Meganium would be a 
    safer bet than this.  As if pseudopassing weren't enough, the clown now wants 
    to be able to Baton Pass for real, never mind the extreme moveset strain that 
    ensues.  Do clowns EVER know what they're doing?
    
    Scyther: Why am I listing Scyther if it isn't final-stage anymore?  Because it 
    fails to gain any stat points after evolution, only a type change.  Granted, 
    the type change seems almost invariably better (reducing total weakness count 
    from 6 to 2), but Scyther has improved enough over the three years that it 
    deserves inspection as a different Pokemon.  For one, its original non-Normal 
    move (Wing Attack) has a power that, while still not great, is a valuable 
    endurance resource with that huge PP.  Speaking of endurance, Endure combines 
    with Reversal for the third-fastest inverse move user (the case against the #1 
    and 2 fastest, Jolteon and Espeon, lies in the Attack stat differential).  
    Scyther is still capable of throwing down Swords Dance and Agility, but now it 
    supplements those with a new trick (Baton Pass).  Its unevolved status 
    discounts it in the eyes of most players, but if you can get Scyther to work, 
    don't worry that it isn't final stage.  After all, evolution costs 80 points 
    of Speed, making it that much harder to Reversal successfully.
    
    Jynx: There's now more than one non-Electric-weak Ice-type, so Jynx has to 
    crank up its performance in order to gain recognition.  That it does, with 
    Mean Look, Dream Eater, and Perish Song.  Jynx is the one Dream Eater user 
    worth mentioning, with high speed, type match, and a high opening stat.  It 
    also serves as a nice healing move to round out a Perish-trapping moveset.  
    Whatever happened to Jynx, it certainly let her live up to the challenge.
    
    Electabuzz: Now that the Punches are TMs, Electabuzz becomes a more solid 
    Raichu.  Ice Punch does everything Surf would do, and more (freeze 
    possibility, super effective on Grass).  However, it doesn't stop there.  The 
    expansion draft of movesets provided in Crystal gave Electabuzz ANOTHER chance 
    to improve versatility, with Cross Chop.  Tyranitar?  Bye.  Snorlax?  Oops, no 
    crit-hit, too bad.  Cross Chop's results are variable, but at least it's 
    solely an improvement from the limited RBY days.  And all the other Electrics 
    only add Hidden Power, a minor victory, so Electabuzz might be worth it for 
    once.
    
    Magmar: Likewise, Magmar gets Thunderpunch, to counter its corresponding 
    Special weakness.  And it too acquires Cross Chop in Crystal.  Like 
    Electabuzz, Magmar acquires a strong disabler (Confuse Ray).  For all 
    practical purposes, the two are dead even.
    
    Pinsir: If I ran the NY Pokecenter, there are two moves I would most 
    definitely give away.  One is Aeroblast Dragonite (yes, it would hatch as a L5 
    Dragonite, NOT a Dratini), and the other is Megahorn Pinsir.  Pinsir 
    desperately needed some help from RBY, probably involving a STAB move.  There 
    is Hidden Power, but that move can't even KO a Celebi.  Pinsir is highly 
    deserving of an upgrade--its buddy Scyther got one, after all--and the first 
    possibility of such improvement is about a month away.  Since you can't "trade 
    up" from the older games to RS_, at least not by the Japanese rules of the 
    game, don't count on being able to use your current Pinsir.
    
    Tauros: Let's play a game.  I say a word, you say the first thing that comes 
    to mind.  "Sunny Day?" "Houndoom." "Marketing?" "Pikachu." "Tauros?" 
    "Fish151."  Fish will be known forever for transforming both this Pokemon and 
    the rules of the online community...and to think, I was actually using the set 
    that would later bear his name (albeit with Mew instead of Tauros) on my first 
    Sleep Talk team (way back in December 2000), before dismissing it as "an 
    impractical novelty".  How wrong.  It's already a good, fast physical attacker 
    that can still survive two turns against any HPSA.  With the most potent 
    attacks in the book, this Pokemon single-handedly persuades the Internet 
    battlers into calling for "OHKO Ban".  "OHKO Ban?"  Horn Drill it to death.
    
    Gyarados: This Pokemon was already bad enough in RBY.  Why did it have to get 
    worse?  The Attack is still good for nothing more than Normal moves (plus 
    Hidden Power, though everything else can also get that), but this time the 
    Special Attack was robbed of 80 points--26.85%.  The very least they could 
    have done was give Gyarados a third stage, perhaps Water/Dragon but retaining 
    total RBY stat levels.  But they didn't, and all Gyarados seems to be good for 
    is attempting to cover the W4 with HP Ground (53% to Electrode, 56% to 
    Jolteon, and a whopping 94% on a certain yellow rat).  Looks like it can't do 
    that either.  Abandon Gyarados immediately if you are using it, and either 
    send hate mail to Nintendo or (if you know how) hack your game cartridge such 
    that this thing is finally usable.
    
    Lapras: Still an excellent Pokemon when it comes to naturally acquired 
    movesets, and an even better one when you throw TMs into the picture.  Confuse 
    Ray, Ice Beam, and Body Slam are still there, now accompanied by Perish Song.  
    Whirlpool ensures Perish Song can be used for more than pseudo-hazing.  The 
    tank element is still as present as ever, Special A dropped by just 20, and 
    the Special Attacks are also there.  Find something to do with Lapras, but 
    make sure you keep it for battle.
    
    Ditto: You already know why RBY Ditto is useless.  But now, they decided to 
    give the "1/1 Morphling" a whiff of playability.  Like Pikachu (who remained 
    out of contention) and Marowak (who became the most dominant Pokemon not on 
    the Banned List), Ditto was singled out for an attempted improvement.  Metal 
    Powder provides an extra 50% to each defensive, and--get this--Transforming 
    doesn't take the bonus away.  So your HP remains at the miserable 299, and the 
    Defense stats are 1.5 * the opponent's stat, and as usual you start out a turn 
    behind.  Right away you still trail against Pokemon with 448 or more HP, and 
    the lost turn lowers that number significantly.  But consider the other 
    drawback of Transform--each of your PP banks start at five--and many of the 
    hopeful Transform possibilities are lost.  However, like Mew, Ditto now has 
    all the possibilities of Smeargle (albeit in a way that's held to the Banned 
    List).  Hazing Safeguarding Recovering Heal Beller with double 291 Defense 
    stats and just one weakness, anyone?  Hey, Stadium won't stop you.  It'll yell 
    and scream and highlight the moves in pink...but if you want to Spore someone, 
    then you can.
    
    Vaporeon: G/S didn't exactly bring anything good to Vaporeon, or the other two 
    Threevees, but Crystal sure did.  Mainly because that's when Eevee was 
    entitled to use Baton Pass, and the evolutions can find a way to join in the 
    fun.  Vaporeon can BP Acid Armor, which is as effective as Mr. Mime's BP-
    Barrier, but from a source with more Defense (imagine that) and quite a bit 
    more HP.  But why stop there?  Of the six universal RBY TMs, two of them are 
    excellent Pass choices: Double Team (what Pokemon can't use that?) and 
    Substitute (that's like giving a Pokemon 115 free HP).  The guys up in New 
    York decided to add Growth to Eevee's repertoire.  Haze is still here, 
    although BP and Haze don't mix well, and the 318 SA is still worth using.  I'm 
    sure there's something Vaporeon can do for you.
    
    Jolteon: Or if that isn't so, you can bust out the Pichu instead of the 
    Staryu, and set up your Eevee with speed.  Since RBY, it was a mystery why 
    Jolteon even needed Agility, but it looks like that mystery has now been 
    solved.  Jolteon is a quick BP'er with only one weakness, and that weakness 
    isn't even a W4 like Scizor.  However, the Defense is still rather bad, so be 
    careful.
    
    Flareon: I'm glad to see at least one Pokemon use the transition to recover 
    from "Wasted Attack Syndrome".  Instead of supporting Body Slam, Double-Edge, 
    and little else, Flareon now picks up Shadow Ball and potentially Hidden 
    Power.  Of course, the STAB stat is lowered a bit to make up for this.  As for 
    Baton Pass, Flareon's as bad at utilizing this move as Espeon (actually worse, 
    since it can't Psych Up).  Oh well. 
    
    Omastar: As the #1 SA holder in its type, and a W4, Electric weakness, and 
    weakness to a common type whose primary move has no effect other than damage, 
    immediate parallels are drawn between Omastar and Moltres.  But Omastar trails 
    by 170 in stats, has one more weakness, one fewer resistance, no immunity, and 
    a lower UPS value.  But that's about it...and anyone who tries to use Moltres 
    in a UPS battle obviously needs to get Pounded into oblivion by a Chansey.  
    Somebody get this treasonous Pokemon out of my courtroom.
    
    Kabutops: It has a better base Ancientpower than Omastar, but that's a 
    worthless fact...base Ancientpower is still only 60 power, and a boost 
    essentially say "you win the game" regardless of who gets it.  Earthquake 
    can't be utilized to dodge the obvious Electric weakness, and Hidden Power is 
    a non-option due to already-low HP.  This Pokemon belongs in the past, and 
    that's as in "even before RBY".
    
    Aerodactyl: Don't get duped into trading a Chansey for this.  Chansey can 
    evolve into something good, while Aerodactyl is simply a bad Skarmory.  Yes, 
    it resists the common Curselax, but Skarmory does so with 378 Defense as 
    opposed to Aerodactyl's 228 (the lowest of any Rock-type).  Granted, it does 
    have fast, hard hits (to include an overdue Earthquake) but Tyranitar puts 
    Aerodactyl out of a job even with the Speed disadvantage.
    
    Snorlax:  If I had a nickel for every time "Snorlax used CURSE!", I'd be about 
    as rich as Warren Buffett, if not Bill Gates.  After all, Snorlax is the best 
    candidate for the non-Ghost Curse (and almost uncontestedly better than the 
    Ghosts): a high Attack that gets even higher (after 5 Curses, with Double-Edge 
    and Earthquake, only Skarmory can take a hit), an average Defense that can get 
    the full 4x benefit (getting very close to 999, and still accompanied by 523 
    HP), and a low enough Speed that it could care less about lowering it.  And a 
    lot of physical attacks.  Belly Drum pumps its attack much faster, but costs 
    261 HP and doesn't guard the Defense, which is why Cursing is more popular.  
    After facing Curselax, the question "Why do I want a Hazer?" will be answered 
    once and for all.  Which is obviously why there are now Snorlax sets that 
    don't involve stat boosts, and require completely new counters.  It's got the 
    move compatibility to do it all.  And thanks to the 90-point Special D boost 
    that came with GSC, Snorlax is a lot more likely to do it all.  Don't let such 
    customizable power slip away from a team.
    
    Articuno: Thanks to Rain Dance, the introduction of a Fire/Rock-type, and a 5-
    power boost over the transition, it's now possible for Bubblebeam to outdamage 
    Ice Beam.  However, Articuno's Special A took a 60-point (17.2%) hit over the 
    same time, which has several consequences to include the inability to KO 
    Sandslash with an Ice Beam (yeah, right, who uses Sandslash anymore?)  But 
    it's still possible to get by on defense alone, so Articuno is still usable.
    
    Zapdos: The same things that made Zapdos good in RBY make it good here.  Now 
    with Whirlwind, Zapdos is the most stable portrayer of a tactic known as 
    "parashuffling", the alternating use of Whirlwind and Thunder Wave with the 
    objective of paralyzing as many opponents as possible.  The Electric type is, 
    statistically, the best at using Hidden Power for weakness coverage, and it's 
    so good with Zapdos that most players just dismiss the move as "cheap" to 
    discourage opponents from using it against them.  Obviously Zapdos isn't as 
    good at handling the Ice weakness now, due to both the 70-point SD plunge and 
    the fact that "The percentage of Ice-types that are weak to Electric" has been 
    reduced well below its old 80% figure.
    
    Moltres: One of the few Pokemon reserved for Timmy.  Moltres is best known as 
    the highest-SA Fire-type, and using Fire Blast with Sunny Day and Charcoal 
    really makes that count.  Finally, a Special attack that can kill Blissey in 
    three hits!  But as before, once Moltres expends all eight of its Fire Blasts, 
    little else can be done.  There's pseudohazing potential (Let's just blow away 
    this Curselax in favor of Tyranitar!) and Hidden Power (after all, what's the 
    difference between 359 and 383 HP?)  Unless you're using it for statistical 
    study, keep Moltres tucked away.  Or maybe you can throw it at someone like 
    the rubber chicken it is.
    
    Dragonite: No, Dragonite doesn't get Aeroblast, which would have rendered it 
    fully usable.  It has to settle for the #3 option for physical STAB, Wing 
    Attack.  In the hands of Dragonite, the 60 power of this move is somewhat 
    amplified, but the big improvement for this Pokemon is actually an Ice move--
    albeit one that doesn't damage.  Haze allows Dragonite to stand in the face of 
    Snorlax, calming the threat and walking away with a good 2/3 of its health.  
    In Crystal, another good move popped into the repertoire: Extremespeed, a 
    legitimate reason for using Curse on the Pokemon that's been historically 
    shafted in the physical department.  But it's no longer the only evolution 
    chain with Dragon-types, and Kingdra portrays the type with much more 
    stability.  In fact, Kingdra recently picked up Haze, making it almost 
    universally better.  I'm afraid Dragonite has reached the end of its short 
    stint as a power.
    
    Mewtwo: They say Psychics were weakened in GSC, right?  Mewtwo's Special D 
    took a 128-point (31.53%) hit, Amnesia no longer pumps attacks, and there is 
    more than one type resistant to Psychic now.  But all isn't lost for Mewtwo--
    far from it, in fact.  Because of Dark-types, a move that would otherwise be 
    lost to obscurity (Submission) is now a near-must-have for Mewtwo.  Another 
    good move, this one new, is Safeguard.  The "neo-Substitute-that-doesn't-
    prevent-damage-or-take-HP" finds its best home on its fastest user.  Only 
    Electrode is guaranteed to outrace a Safeguard.  And even without Amnesia, the 
    Special Attack is still brutal.  Mewtwo is still banned, but this time with 
    company.
    
    Mew: There used to be a very thought-out explanation of Mew here.  Second-
    most-diverse Pokemon in the game.  Except that, on November 11, 2002, a user 
    named Jason322 offered a theory that would throw the community into chaos.  
    Supposedly, by Transforming into a Smeargle that still had Sketch, Mew could 
    obtain any move that Smeargle could.  I confirmed the theory later that day, 
    and we all scrambled for a fair way to allow the game to continue.  The 
    wording of the current reprimand against Transform-Sketch moves is too 
    inconcise for my liking, but at least the game can remain stable.  More 
    recently, any Metronome-using Pokemon was discovered to be able to pick up 
    such movesets, but that kind of acquisition is thought of as a glitch (on the 
    status of Missingno.) rather than poorly interacting mechanics, and has been 
    much easier to handle.  Even without that, though, Mew is a monster at 
    diversity.  No Spore or Confuse Ray, but most all other disablers (tip: don't 
    try Attract), and something almost as good as Recover (but with half the PP).  
    And unlike Smeargle, Mew actually has good stats.  A common strategy is to 
    bump up the attack with Swords Dance, then go BOOM for a quick trade, though 
    there are other options.  Still above and beyond the "Pokemon Proletariat", as 
    well as the comprehension thereof.
    
    Meganium: Two major properties of Venusaur are altered to make way for its new 
    counterpart: the switch of Defense and Special A, and more importantly the 
    reduction to a single type.  Addition of Ancientpower and Earthquake to 
    Meganium's repertoire gives it the ability to counter ALL weaknesses--a 
    noteworthy feat when you have five of them--and like Venusaur before it, it 
    just barely survives an unboosted Moltres Fire Blast.  All in all, we have the 
    two weakness-countering moves, three pseudopasses (Meganium is the most stable 
    of the triple-pseudopassing Pokemon), Solarbeam/Sunny Day if you want to take 
    that risk, Razor Leaf if you don't, Synthesis to recover...which moves to 
    choose?
    
    Typhlosion: Like Charizard before it, Typhlosion stands out as a fairly 
    diverse Fire-type.  In fact, Typhlosion's stat distribution is identical to 
    Charizard's in every way, so the type-2 elimination is the only real change.  
    But Typhlosion gets a move Charizard can only dream of--Thunderpunch--meaning 
    the Water weakness now has a proactive counter (as opposed to the reactive 
    thwart brought about by Sunny Day).  Because it has no W4, Typhlosion is far 
    above its predecessor (Charizard does get Rock Slide, which covers nothing 
    except the mirror match, and Belly Drum, which is suicidal for such a poor 
    defensive Pokemon).
    
    Feraligatr: Another diverse Pokemon, like Typhlosion, but there's a problem 
    here.  Feraligatr's STAB attacks fall under a category whose Attack stat 
    begins with 2.  Ancientpower would help rectify this, but Feraligatr's utility 
    of Ancientpower is fairly limited outside the 10% chance (covers no weakness, 
    doesn't inflict significant damage to anything except the obvious W4s).  It 
    can't even Counter or Mirror Coat.  That's what you get for insisting on brute 
    force.
    
    Furret: The "Symbol of the Underused", Furret is viewed as nothing more than a 
    weaker Snorlax in the hands of Spike.  But not everyone is a Spike, and fun 
    teams are still found.  While there may be a metagame shift to Pichu very 
    soon, Furret was the first real underused Pokemon to draw any semblance of a 
    following in GSC.
    
    Noctowl: Fearow and Dodrio, and to a lesser extent Pidgeot, were attackers.  
    Noctowl has a fairly even stat total with them, but most of those points were 
    thrown into HP and Special D, which is good for little more than staving off 
    death against the Electric and Ice weaknesses.  (In reality, all it does is 
    save Noctowl a single turn against the low-Special members of those types.)  
    Come on...198 Attack...identical Defense...and no real Special attacks beyond 
    Hidden Power and a trapless Dream Eater!  Believe it or not, I actually have a 
    Noctowl, but it's named TEDKENNEDY and has done nothing but act as a punching 
    bag for other Pokemon.  0-105 so far, I think.
    
    Ledian: No.  Ledian is nothing more than Butterfree was.  Sure it can 
    Triplepunch, but on what SA does that function?  After all, it's weak to all 
    three of the moves itself!  (To be fair, Special D is considerably higher.)  
    It's just like Butterfree, except with 10 less HP, a weak Baton Pass, and a 
    chance to survive an unboosted Fire Blast from Moltres (good luck).  Good 
    thing I don't own Silver, because there's no point inundating a cartridge with 
    this piece of crap. 
    
    Ariados: As the original DT-Trap-Passer, Ariados has a fit whenever the name 
    of Umbreon is mentioned.  It points out that Spider Web has twice as much PP 
    as Mean Look, Machamp needs four critical Cross Chops to kill Ariados, and 
    that Umbreon completely sucks when it comes to attacking.  Sounds a lot like 
    Al Gore's "fuzzy math"--I could care less about what Ariados has to say.  
    Umbreon has proven itself, and will continue to do so.  Ariados won't.
    
    Crobat: Since Golbat was one of the losers from RBY, it was chosen as part of 
    the New and Improved Generation.  A third stage helps to do that.  Giving that 
    third stage a 358 Speed, for the game's fastest Haze, helps a bit more.  Mean 
    Look-Toxic helps too.  Raising the power of a certain Flying move also helps, 
    but not as much.  Leaving the Psychic weakness doesn't.  Crobat's as good as 
    Poison gets.  The hard part is overcoming the natural tendency to neglect 
    Golbat.
    
    Lanturn: Another conceptual Pokemon designed solely to fill a specific set of 
    types, Lanturn proves to be a success.  Undisputedly the best-aligned Pokemon 
    for Rain Dance, it can also adopt a Starmie-like strategy.  Either way, it's 
    evident that the Electric type was never meant to have this much staying 
    power.  Just imagine if Lanturn got Recover... 
    
    Togetic: The only thing separating Togetic from the likes of Clefable and 
    Wigglytuff is the fact that the latter two can actually do something.  
    Togetic can't attack with anything (counting both stats and moves), and it has 
    three fatal weaknesses above the other Normal-types.  And instead of having to 
    compete with Chansey, Togetic has to compete with Blissey in the defensive 
    department, and it fails miserably.  To quote Donald: "Avoid like the plague!"
    
    Xatu: Charizard is the non-legendary Ho-oh.  Alakazam is the non-legendary 
    Mewtwo.  So what's the non-legendary Lugia?  I don't know, but I do know that 
    it's not Xatu.  All this is is a Gengar without the double immunities...or 
    Destiny Bond...or a specialized Curse...or the triple punches...or a lot of 
    things.  All this for Drill Peck?  Don't count on it.
    
    Ampharos:  Notwithstanding the fact that Raikou does at least as well in every 
    stat, and all Ampharos has for compensation are Thunder Wave and Fire Punch, 
    it's actually okay.  Thunder Wave is necessary given that Ampharos is the 
    slowest fully-evolved Electric, and Fire Punch, while still inferior to 
    Electabuzz's Ice Punch, is a weakness counter that you can realistically get 
    without a Shark (while allowing Ampharos to counter all its weaknesses with HP 
    Water, which hits W4 against Rhydon and Golem at the cost of 16 HP).  328 SA 
    is just plain donuts, even though Zapdos beats it.  In summary, Ampharos isn't 
    the best Pokemon for any Electric trait, but it does fairly well at all of 
    them (excluding the obvious Speed department).  And it isn't even a Legend, 
    for those UPS believers.
    
    Bellossom: As I said before, Bellossom is slightly above its alternative.  But 
    that isn't saying much.  The only stats that changed from Vileplume are a swap 
    of the Specials, and typewise you're giving up a Psychic weakness for a Poison 
    weakness.  I'd do that any day.  Getting a 9% loss in attack potential for a 
    9% boost in staying power is an ambiguous switch, but somewhat helped by the 
    two time-based recoveries (don't be fooled into using them with Sunny Day, or 
    using both at once).  So the advantage isn't that much after all.  It's not 
    like Vileplume or Bellossom were designed as legendaries, right?
    
    Azumarill: What's the one word for Azumarill?  BOO.  Boo like you're a Red Sox 
    fan when Derek Jeter is up to bat in the 9th.  (Good thing I'm not a baseball 
    fanatic.)  If I want a Water-type with a semblance of defense, I'll take 
    Lapras any day.  Or, failing that, Lanturn.  Azumarill is nothing more than 
    the evolution of a Pokemon whose sole purpose is to attract 9-year-olds into 
    the player base.  Such vast numbers of mindless young players means more work 
    for me.  (Remember, I'm not getting paid in the least for this 200-page 
    document).  Somebody throw this thing behind bars.
    
    Sudowoodo: A one-time roadblock.  That's all Sudowoodo is.  Don't listen to 
    the comments about "You only get one chance.  Catch it now!"  Pure Rock isn't 
    the most stellar type, and stats are like Golem, only worse.  Somebody ought 
    to give that type a good attack in RS_.  And while you're at it, make a 
    lumberjack Pokemon that gets guaranteed OHKOs against Sudowoodo.
    
    Politoed: It can't pull off the Guaranteed Three-Turn Kill that its alternate 
    evolution can, but Perish Song is almost as good (four turns, assuming 
    Whirlpool holds that long).  But Politoed has a good deal more staying power, 
    as well as Earthquake to counter its most obvious weakness.  And it can 
    Special-sweep like Starmie!  I guess we finally know what it's like to see a 
    frog in this game, given that Poliwrath had gone through two evolutions while 
    somehow maintaining its "Tadpole" status...
    
    Jumpluff: Just what the Grass type needed.  318 Speed makes for some pretty 
    degenerate Powder possibilities, but no more so than Jynx.  Still, Jumpluff is 
    probably the most switched against Pokemon nowadays.  While Jynx specializes 
    in trapping an opponent, Jumpluff wants to drive them mad with some 
    combination of Encore, Sleep Powder, Stun Spore, and Leech Seed.  And in a 
    surprising revelation for a Grass-type, it's actually GOOD at doing that!  It 
    can't attack, but at least that opponent won't be doing so either.  Unless of 
    course you hit an Ice Punching Alakazam, which has the 20-point Speed edge.  
    When you play Jumpluff, you can't afford to take many hits.  And no, Giga 
    Drain DOESN'T kill a Rhydon.
    
    Aipom: Would you look at those stats...quite reminiscent of Smeargle, no?  But 
    is the move pool anything close to that?  NO!  Just 48 moves...and no Heal 
    Bell, Spikes, one-turn recovery, Thunder Wave, Confuse Ray, Spore...the list 
    goes on.  It's like Raticate--maybe even Rattata--that can't eat half your 
    health.  With a name like "Crackmonkey", it has to be TIME FOR THAT MESSAGE!  
    DON'T DO DRUGS!
    
    Sunflora: It has the honor of evolving from the lowest-stat Pokemon in the 
    game, but if Gyarados was a disgrace, Sunflora brings shame to everyone who 
    took part in its creation.  It has the lowest move compatibility of any final-
    stage Pokemon not on the TM-less list, and the stats are still rather bad 
    except for a Special A that's just 10 points above the triumvirate of 
    Grass/Poisons.  See if you can capitalize on it, but if you can't, don't 
    complain to me.
    
    Yanma: If Butterfree was crap incarnate, Yanma is crap reincarnate.  Yes, it's 
    well-known that Yanma is faster than Tyranitar, and that Reversal after an 
    Endured Ancientpower does enough damage to kill the monster (assuming it 
    doesn't get that boost...).  But other than that highly situational 
    circumstance, it's Butterfree without the ability to disable the opponent.  
    And that's NOT good.
    
    Quagsire: I'd like you to sit back and remember when you first got GSC.  
    Wooper was probably among the first ten Pokemon you caught, and its type 
    combination (Electric-resistant Water-type) made you desperate to find a use 
    for it.  Right?  Finding a use for Quagsire is harder than most originally 
    thought.  The attacking capabilities aren't stellar at all, and any attempt to 
    cover the W4 to Grass (think Ice Beam) will fall well short.  Even Jumpluff 
    still manages to finish off Quagsire before succumbing to Beams.  Haze and 
    Mist are better used by other Pokemon (actually, Mist is better not used at 
    all), and Amnesia is both less useful and more vulnerable than it would have 
    been in RBY.  It could have had many successful uses, but other Pokemon 
    outclass it in all of them.  Blame Nintendo.
    
    Espeon: Even though Morning Sun's compatible Pokemon list numbers more than 
    two now, Espeon's value hasn't gone down.  Not that it was high in the first 
    place.  Historically, Espeon's most prized tactic has been the Sunny Day/HP 
    Fire/Morning Sun routine, which unfortunately breaks down upon comparative 
    inspection to Alakazam.  Not only does HP Fire knock the HP below Alakazam's 
    313, but 32 Recovers will more than compensate for eight 99.7% Morning Suns 
    (it can't recover 100% because you have to have at least 1 Hit Point to be 
    able to use it).  And 'Kazam gets Fire Punch, which would still outpower HP 
    (Alakazam can also learn Sunny Day, not that it ever uses it).  Hence Espeon 
    is forced to find another tactic if it is to excel.  And no, Tail 
    Whip/Charm/Psych Up/Baton Pass isn't it.  Growth may well be, though.  Espeon 
    already has a huge SA--now being able to boost it by 179 each turn makes it 
    almost like Mewtwo...except with no diversity, and actually balanced for once.  
    Thank the Pokecenter for making a Pokemon viable once again.
    
    Umbreon: An even better tank than Vaporeon.  While the Water Threevee had 
    maligned Defense, Umbreon puts all the 90+ base stats in the tank department.  
    This is so effective that it can actually survive a Cross Chop from Machamp.  
    It's the only trap-BP'er besides Ariados and Smeargle, and as such excels at 
    the skill.  Just don't try attacking with Umbreon--that's like trying to use a 
    BB gun to fend off the entire Iraqi army.  And people will laugh at you for 
    it.
    
    Murkrow: If it weren't for the last-place-among-evolved-Pokemon Special 
    Defense, Murkrow would be an interesting experiment.  Both of Dark's 
    weaknesses are cancelled by Flying (but unfortunately all of Flying's 
    weaknesses remain), and Murkrow's move pool includes Mean Look, Night Shade, 
    Drill Peck, and Mirror Move.  It would be great if Murkrow could do something 
    with those moves, but the stats are simply too low.  Give it time and see if 
    Murkrow can improve in the future.
    
    Slowking: Imagine Slowbro with the Defense and SD stats switched.  Which one 
    ends up better?  If only because Slowking has its 318 stat aligned to negate 
    the effect of its primary weaknesses, I'd give the nod to the new addition.  
    However, Starmie is typically preferred because it can disable, as well as use 
    a one-turn recovery.  Slowking was deserving, but it never got a chance to 
    work because of another, more focused Pokemon.  If this teaches you any 
    lesson, don't try and enter into competition with already-proven opposition.  
    I guess that's why I'm doomed to work for Microsoft.
    
    Misdreavus: Let me guess: The first time you saw Misdreavus, you wanted to 
    catch it.  And you did.  And at the status screen, your initial impulse was to 
    yell "A GHOST THAT ISN'T PSYCHIC-WEAK?  WOOHOO!"  Indeed, the dropping of the 
    second type puts Missy far above Gengar (although these days, it's because of 
    the Ground weakness instead of the Psychic weakness).  And in case you've 
    accidentally been locked in an isolation box for these past two years, there 
    are a couple of cool new moves.  One's called Mean Look, and the other's 
    called Perish Song.  And I heard they're lots of fun to use--some people have 
    given up at the mere sight of one!  Maybe we should go along with the fourth-
    hand rumors and try this Pokemon out.
    
    Unown: Wow, a Pokemon that gets ONE MOVE.  But unlike Ditto, that move happens 
    to be a universal TM.  Stats are nearly identical to Ditto's, except with +48 
    Attack and Special A.  Unfortunately, Ditto at least gets the Metal Powder to 
    crank its defenses by 97 apiece, so it's still out-statted.  Interestingly 
    enough, your Unown's letter can help determine its Hidden Power type, but 
    that's the only point of interest for Unown.  Other Pokemon have better stats 
    in all areas, and can obviously learn HP anyway.  About the only thing Unown 
    is good for is Stat Exp. (its lowest Base Stat is 48, meaning Stat Drugs and 
    780 Unowns will finish your training, and you'll always be fighting L5s, so 
    you get low Level Experience and can max the stats out at a low level.)
    
    Wobbuffet: Allow me to say...if Unown got one move, and Wobbuffet gets five, 
    then Wobbuffet must be better than Unown...but not by much.  For one, none of 
    its moves are direct attacks; they depend on the opponent (although Mimic can 
    certainly become a direct attack with the right opponent).  A patient opponent 
    can put Wobbuffet to waste by simply switching 112 times in a row; doing this 
    will even allow them to fully recover with Leftovers.  And even if they aren't 
    so patient, remember that a Ghost using physical attacks or a Dark using 
    special attacks can strike without fear of Counter or Mirror Coat (because 
    they're immune to those moves' respective types).  And Destiny Bond, while it 
    is a cute countermeasure to Curselax, just won't go first often enough to do 
    anything.  And Mimic can be stopped by simply avoiding moves like Recover.  
    But winning with Wobbuffet can be one of the most satisfying feats in the 
    game, so get one just long enough to do this.  You'll laugh as Focus Band 
    catches a Fissure, then you gleefully watch Wobbuffet use Counter.  (Yes, I've 
    actually been on the wrong end of an 1164-damage Mew pummeling.)
    
    Girafarig: One of the three primary Baton Pass users that use the move to pass 
    stats, Girafarig certainly has the most interesting type combo of the three.  
    Normal eliminates the Ghost weakness, and Psychic neutralizes Fighting.  And 
    Girafarig is the only non-Smeargle Pokemon that can pass Amnesia.  However, BP 
    is primarily a Johnny tactic, so not many competitive teams would welcome 
    Girafarig.  Scizor at least resists 11 types, and passes proactive stats.
    
    Forretress: The original Spiker is still useful for something, given that it 
    has only one weakness (albeit a W4), and for a while it defined an entire team 
    archetype (Spikes/Toxic/Sandstorm, which has broadened out while declining 
    popularity at the same time).  However, that low Special D really kills it--
    even Snorlax has a guaranteed kill with Fire Blast.  Then again, isn't 
    Cloyster even worse, and on lower HP?  And with fewer resistances?  My, it 
    seems the programmers knew what they were doing when choosing candidates for 
    Spikes.
    
    Dunsparce: I've seen Dunsparce being advertised as an annoyer, with some 
    combination of Glare, Spite, Pursuit, Rollout, Defense Curl, and other random 
    moves, but these are sayings originating from the Johnny school of thought.  
    Only a select few annoyers are worthy of Spike's stamp of approval, and 
    Dunsparce isn't among them...for starters, it's too slow.  But you don't have 
    to play as Spike all the time.  You can cut yourself a little slack now and 
    then and use Dunsparce--even though I don't.
    
    Gligar: Until Stadium 2, Gligar was simply an abandoned experimental Pokemon.  
    Gligar is the Flying type's version of Quagsire, telling little kids "You can 
    use this type without being weak to Electric!", but unfortunately most of us 
    know about Hidden Power (and those that don't can simply check out page 96), 
    and that pure-Electric is the most welcoming type to that move, and that Ice 
    is #1 on the list of desirable Hidden Power types for Electric users.  Until 
    then, you can use Gligar to trick the neighborhood kids (as long as you can 
    brainwash them into thinking this guide doesn't exist).
    
    Steelix: After seeing how bad Onix was in RBY, you'd think the rectification 
    known as Steelix would be significantly better.  And, of course, that would be 
    right.  It's the most physically-resistant Pokemon in the game (at least 
    numerically; Skarmory tends to see more play for the role since it has no 
    physical weaknesses), it resists Toxic and Thunder Wave, and it can blow up.  
    And it means that the "Longest Pokemon in the Game" is actually a good one 
    now.  
    
    Granbull: The Underused Heal Beller of choice, Granbull happens to be the best 
    attacker of the bunch.  However, the reason that it's held as underused is 
    because Heal Belling is an inherently defensive role, so Granbull has 
    undergone some misallocation of stats.  Just picture Ursaring with Heal Bell 
    instead of Earthquake...yeah, that's Granbull in a nutshell (or, in this case, 
    a Poke Ball).
    
    Qwilfish: Granted, it is the fastest Spiker (not counting Mew and the new 
    gang...), but it's the least durable non-Smeargle user (and Smeargle has 
    better things to do).  It doesn't even play into that durability with 
    Explosion.  Unless you fear Raikou that much, and are willing to take a 15% 
    chance (Qwilfish is 15% to survive Thunderbolt; Cloyster is 0%), keep Qwilfish 
    away.  And when it swarms...well, run the other way.
    
    Scizor: Forretress is a Bug-Steel with Spikes, so what's Scizor? A Bug-Steel 
    that appeals to Spike. (Go read page 49 for the theory of Timmy, Johnny, and 
    Spike.)  Johnny also likes it, for BP potential (Swords Dance and Agility, but 
    be warned--Scizor can't legally BP Substitute), and Timmy enjoys beating the 
    crap out of Pidgeys with a 358 Attack H-Beam.  But Spike enjoys the Agility-
    Endure-Reversal sequence that takes advantage of the probable Fire switch-in, 
    and Spike is the stingiest player type, so he gets top billing.  Really, 
    everyone can find a use for Scizor.
    
    Shuckle: The first time you received a Shuckle in G/S, you likely wondered 
    what was so special about it.  When the Shuckle leveled up to 100 and you saw 
    a pair of defensive stats beginning with 5, you probably wanted to find a use 
    for it right away.  But after you read this guide (or, for more advanced 
    readers, whichever guide you attributed most to your realization of the game), 
    Shuckle doesn't (didn't?) look so good.  Think of it as a reverse Blissey.  
    Instead of leading HP and crap Defense, the two are switched (although both 
    have excellent Special D, and Blissey gets to combine it with the monster HP 
    stat).  And--the most important part--move compatibility is drastically 
    reduced.  Sludge Bomb and Earthquake...on a 118 Attack?  No standout move such 
    as Heal Bell or Softboiled?  That differentiates Shuckle from Blissey for 
    good.  Or, in Shuckle's case, for bad.  It can try to annoy with Toxic-Wrap, 
    or it can go for the crapshoot (that, when it works, can KO all five of the 
    Universal Banned List) with Defense Curl-Rollout.  Or it can just die to 
    Seismic Toss.  Don't risk the third option.  Don't catch Shuckle, and don't do 
    drugs that might delude you into catching Shuckle. 
    
    Heracross: Similar to Dodrio, Heracross is best known for STAB on an inverse-
    HP move.  348 Attack, 200 power, base multiplier 1.65 = donuts.  (Yes, 
    Megahorn is THAT low-profile, mainly because Heracross is weak to the very 
    type that Megahorn is supposed to stop.)  The only problem is that unlike the 
    bird, Heracross could use a bit more speed.  And that W4 concept can afford to 
    go, not that it will do so anytime soon.
    
    Sneasel: Card game players, don't expect too much of Sneasel anymore.  It has 
    two Special types, but only a 168 stat to support them.  To put it this way, 
    even if Sneasel could learn Crunch, it's still three hits to kill Alakazam.  
    Not counting Recover.  So you're forced to use Physical attacks that make 
    Sneasel's type irrelevant, except that it's W4 to the vastly-improved Machamp.  
    Plenty of attacks, but no stats to use them with.  So who needs Energy Removal 
    when you can stop Sneasel just by placing it in the GB environment?
    
    Ursaring: Despite having an extra 40 in Attack, and a Slash that's 50% more 
    powerful than Persian's, Ursaring is nothing more than a less abusive Snorlax.  
    Indeed, Ursaring's move list looks almost identical to Snorlax's, except 
    without the RBY assets, so the best plan is to rip shamelessly off the master 
    and hope that Copyright Law doesn't come down hard on Ursaring.
    
    Magcargo: This was one of the experimental type combinations that DIDN'T turn 
    out so well.  Surf and Earthquake are both found just about everywhere, and 
    Magcargo takes W4s to both.  As good as its move pool is, Pokemon's actual 
    types are indeed a factor in this game, and Magcargo's simply proves too hard 
    to overcome.  Oh well, experiments don't always succeed.
    
    Piloswine: Now there's another type that had to be mixed with Ground!  Are 
    they TRYING to shaft Electrics?  Who knows, but I'll take a 308-Attack 
    Earthquake on a Pokemon with no W4s.  However, as much type-canceling as these 
    two types do, Piloswine still has 5 weaknesses, with only a resistance to 
    Poison and the 0 against Electric.  Never mind.
    
    Corsola: How can one of the game's weakest Pokemon be so vital for the game?  
    Indeed, if game lore depicts Corsola as "defensive", those stats don't scream 
    out at all.  If Omastar and Kabuto are rejected, lowering the stats won't make 
    it any better.  Recover does help some, but if one hit can kill you, what good 
    will Recover do?  Not much.  So where's the idea coming from that Corsola is 
    so good?  Here's a hint: Ask Ditto.  It's not that Corsola is a good fighter, 
    but without it we wouldn't have such things as Ancientpower Tyranitar or 
    Mirror Coat Blastoise.  Sometimes the weak are responsible for more than we 
    give them credit for.  This is one of those times.  That said, get your 
    Tyranitar and your Blastoise, then send Corsola out into the streets.
    
    Octillery: As the only nonlegendary that sports double 300s in the Attack 
    stats, Octillery can set up some savage mising.  Think of it as an offensive 
    Vaporeon (sans Growth).  If only it had Earthquake, Blastoise would be put to 
    shame in trying to attack (the Grass weakness can be stopped by either Ice 
    Beam or Flamethrower).  But just like Gyarados, the physical end of the stick 
    is looking mighty short.  Throw on Hidden Power and you lose quite a few HP, 
    significant when you're trying to counter the fastest average type with a slow 
    Pokemon.  At least Octillery's Special repertoire (and stats) can make up for 
    it.
    
    Delibird: No...I think not.  Articuno massacres Delibird in all but two 
    respects.  One is the ability to use Present.  Present is only ever useful in 
    GS link, and even so, Blissey, Miltank, and other Normal-types will still deal 
    3 times as much damage as Delibird.  The second, more recent reason, is 
    Spikes.  As a Spiker that takes no damage from an opponent's use of the move, 
    Delibird is actually a viable novelty user.  Of course, so is Smeargle 
    (possibly even more so than Delibird).  If Delibird is the best at anything 
    useful, let me know.
    
    Mantine: Unlike its Silver counterpart, Mantine has little practical use.  For 
    one, its 378 stat is in a department where it has a weakness...a big one.  And 
    it has no way of pumping SA for the big blast.  I thought any other Water-
    Flying would have to be better than Gyarados, but...I'm right on that one.  
    Mantine can at least Haze or Confuse.
    
    Skarmory: Steel/Flying.  The most beneficial type combo in the game?  Maybe.  
    ELEVEN different resistances/immunities (topped only by Electric/Steel with 
    13, but Magneton has that blatant W4).  And with a 378 Defense in a type with 
    no physical weaknesses, Skarmory is the supreme Physical stopper in this game.  
    It would be even more so if it weren't for the poor HP.  In my own words, 
    Skarmory is "the universal metagamer", an oxymoronic term, but possibly even 
    accurate.  Obviously, if it holds up to well to physicals, the programmers 
    needed to give it a Special weakness...or two.  Both Fire and Electric can 
    shoot this Pokemon out of the sky.  Think of those types as desperation 
    Kryptonite, because IT'S A BIRD!  IT'S A PLANE!  IT'S SKARMORY!
    
    Houndoom: Prior to Tyranitar, this was the offensive Dark-type of choice.  It 
    stood out more in the beginning because of 20 extra SA points, a second STAB 
    move running off the huge attacking stat, a way to power up that move by 50%, 
    and another Special move (also helped by the power-up) that covers a type 
    weakness.  But in the modern day, it's pretty obvious that Tyranitar meets all 
    but the first of those as well, and does so with defensive stats higher than 
    Butterfree's.  So the Dark Dog had to retreat back to the dark crevasses of 
    "that big red inferno".
    
    Kingdra: Another excellent type combo, Water/Dragon limits the number of 
    possible super effective attacks to 4, and one of those is a rarely-used 
    Hidden Power type.  Kingdra's basic plan is damage limitation, with a balanced 
    stat layout.  DT-Rest was a popular game plan, but recently it was discovered 
    that the NY Pokecenter gave away Haze for Kingdra, and something tells me that 
    will become very popular.  Since it's already one of the hardest Pokemon to 
    kill, why not make it even harder for things like Curselax to stop it?  Just 
    remember, Haze DOES wash away any DTs you have in place, so mixing the old 
    Kingdra with the new one isn't recommended.  Stick to one, but make sure you 
    try it eventually.
    
    Donphan: Well, it rivals Sandslash.  Double 338s in the physical stats, and 
    trails "Raichu-in-Disguise" in Speed only.  Unfortunately, Marowak eats them 
    both for lunch, and dinner for that matter.  Donphan can be used as a 
    pseudohazer (when using Ancientpower, that's actually better than Haze 
    itself), but really, would you pay all but two of your HP just to make Marowak 
    lose its Swords Dance?
    
    Porygon2: Porygon was like Windows 3.1--poor graphics, bad at its supposed 
    strong points, and outdated.  Appropriately enough, the Up-Grade turns in into 
    a more up-to-date digital Pokemon.  The stats add up well above 1500 now, and 
    with a continued monopoly on "Normal-type Recover users" except for that 
    Library of Congress known as Smeargle, it fares quite well with the move.  
    Heck, there's even a story of Lock-On being used as a pseudohazing move.  
    Technology is officially good now.
    
    Stantler: Okay.  Why this Pokemon is sitting on the outskirts of legendary 
    enumeration, I don't know.  All Stantler is is a mediocre Normal-type that 
    tries to emulate Hypno, but like anything using Hypnosis/Dream Eater, will 
    fail with that mindset.  In Donald's FAQ, he notes Stantler is "overlooked 
    unless you're making a Pokemon team centered around Christmas".  I won't 
    disappoint, given the original release date of this guide.  Delibird (Santa 
    Claus), Stantler (reindeer), Blissey (Christmas joy), Pikachu (corporate 
    merchandise), Sudowoodo (the tree), and Smeargle (adapts to anything I left 
    out), with Present used on all four Pokemon that can learn it.  Plan on using 
    Stantler outside of that team?  Don't.
    
    Smeargle: Can it do EVERYTHING?  Sadly, no (Sketch has built-in restrictions 
    against 8 attacks), but none of what it's missing would serve any practical 
    use.  Basically, Smeargle is "the best of everything", with one restriction: 
    Total stats under 1200.  Don't count on attacking directly by any means 
    (except Super Fang, Seismic Toss, or Night Shade).  Having a Spore user faster 
    than 158 is nearly broken (throw in a BP'd Agility and you'll know why so many 
    GSC players insist on Sleep Clause), and indeed Spore is the most-commonly-
    played move on competitive Smeargle.  Other wise investments include Thunder 
    Wave, Confuse Ray, Recover, and Baton Pass--but that's already 5 moves, and 
    the list isn't done by any means (if using BP, for example, you'll need stat 
    moves).  The hardest part about playing Smeargle is deciding on a final 
    moveset.  If you can make it work, Smeargle is whatever support position you 
    want, so go ahead and catch multiples.
    
    Hitmontop: Some bad.  It's sacrificing the Attack given by its brethren for 
    Defense, and at low HP, not even a 288 Defense will save you from much.  At 
    least with a higher Attack, it could have killed something before then.  The 
    first qualifier for Stantler also applies to Hitmontop.
    
    Miltank: Nowadays it's in tight competition with Blissey (and is losing), but 
    in the beginning, Miltank was THE Heal Beller.  Defense and Speed aren't 
    usually thought of as correlative stats, but Miltank scores well in both, as 
    well as in HP.  Miltank was dominant in the days when the game was believed to 
    have completely turned around (thus making it all about Physicals), but that's 
    too extreme of a thought to last, and we now recognize that the game is fairly 
    balanced.  Thus Miltank's Defense is less important, and it has less merit for 
    use.
    
    Blissey: If Chansey was good, then Blissey must be better.  The competition 
    improved, but Chansey answered them by becoming VERY happy.  713 HP is the 
    highest that can be obtained under the current formula ((2B + 2D + S) * L / 
    100 + X), and Blissey gets just that.  Did I mention the Special D was cranked 
    by 60, making it even more invincible in that regard?  Of course, to avoid 
    degeneration, its Defense couldn't have improved much, gaining a lousy 10.  
    The 118 can still be supplemented via Curse or Defense Curl, the latter having 
    almost four times as many PP but failing to allow the seemingly oxymoronic 
    "Physical Attacking Blissey" to be used.  But two new moves make the GSC 
    incarnation even more powerful than RBY Chansey could ever hope to be: Heal 
    Bell and Present.  Heal Bell, just as with Miltank, is both a disability 
    deterrent and a boon with Rest.  Present only "works" in non-Crystal link 
    battles (see page 96), but is the one way for Blissey to inflict much damage, 
    since even evolution has Special A taking a 60-point drop.  But Blissey is as 
    defensive has they come, so who needs offense?
    
    Raikou: Does it live up to Zapdos' level?  Possibly.  1853 stats, tying it.  A 
    good move in a second type.  And for a while, neither Thunder Wave nor 
    Thunderbolt.  (With Crystal, T-Bolt became possible, but Wave still isn't.)  
    Is that shortfall enough to render a Pokemon useless?  Not by any means, 
    especially since (like Zapdos) it gets an 80-power, secondary type attack 
    (Crunch, which runs off the 300+ stat, unlike Drill Peck, and has the added 
    bonus of a probability-51 stat fall).  True, it doesn't have the protective 
    second type that Zapdos does, but it still can't go down to one unboosted 
    Earthquake (Rhydon deals 369 at most, 377 when HP Ice is used.  For HP Water, 
    there's a 15% chance you go down in one, which is exactly twice the odds that 
    Raikou would get the one-shot the other way.)  This one is definitely worth 
    studying.
    
    Entei: Fire-type legends seem to get the short end of the stick, don't they?  
    Indeed Entei fulfills that curse.  Much in the style of Gyarados, Dragonite, 
    and RBY Flareon, Entei has its highest base stat in Attack, yet gets nothing 
    but Normal moves to use it with.  You could try a Hidden Power, but it will 
    end up lowering both that Attack and the equally high HP.  If anything of 
    Entei's is worth a try, it's Sunny Day-Solarbeam.  248 SD is downright bad for 
    a legend, so Sunny Day is needed to block out the Water weakness.  Fire is the 
    one type whose legendaries (save Ho-oh, which no one allows anymore) are 
    existent, but not at the top of the type.  Try a "less objectionable" Pokemon, 
    and you'll actually do better.
    
    Suicune: Given the limit on total base stats of the tier-2 legends, Suicune's 
    stat distribution couldn't be better.  403 HP and double 328 defenses prevent 
    it from taking a 100% damage hit from all but the cheesiest setups (neither 
    Magnetized Zapdos nor Light Ball Pikachu can Thunder it to death, and 5-Cursed 
    Snorlax can't even do the job with Return or Frustration).  That means Rest 
    will get at least one chance to do its job, and as for those electric attacks?  
    "Hey, Pikachu!  I'm sure you wouldn't mind if I shove 700 damage down your 
    throat, would you?"  If Pokemon could speak more than their 1-4 assigned 
    syllables, this is what Suicune would say to the rat.
    
    Tyranitar: Dragonite's poor stat management had it living in shadows.  Now out 
    of those shadows comes Tyranitar, a much better testament to the "pseudo-
    legendary physical attacker" outline.  Like Dragonite, it also delves into the 
    world of Specials, and it gets STAB on a limited type's strongest attack.  But 
    that special type actually has a strength against a type other than itself, 
    and that includes such things as Lugia, Mewtwo, and Misdreavus.  And that's 
    more than Dragonite can claim.  After all, everyone will agree that 
    Tyranitar's Attack stat isn't wasted.
    
    Lugia: If it weren't for Blissey, Lugia would be the #1 Pokemon that comes to 
    mind for defense.  As it is, it holds exclusive ownership to the premier 
    physical attack in this game (Smeargle would have to be insane to use 
    Aeroblast), and says "Oh, I have weaknesses?  Who cares?  358 DF...406 SD...go 
    ahead and throw rocks, snow, and high voltage at me...I'll take them all and 
    ask for more."  Though it does have the Psychic type, this type can and is 
    ignored on Lugia by the players, as well as by the storyline (game lore would 
    leave it better suited as Water/Flying--not that we care about game lore).  
    Possibly a displacement to Mewtwo alone at the top, and at least a sensible 
    alternative.  If you have permission to use it, that is.
    
    Ho-oh: Finally, a diverse Fire-type!  And not surprisingly, people ban it!  
    It's unique as a Fire-type Recover user, and exclusive with Sacred Fire, but 
    other than that Ho-oh (called Houou by a rebellious few; I see no point in 
    this) plays much like Charizard.  Except instead of having to lose 24 HP to 
    counter the Water weakness (ha ha--406 SD essentially nullifies that on the 
    spot), Thunderbolt works much more efficiently.  Ho-oh was meant for 
    attacking, and won't let anyone down there.
    
    Celebi: The new Mew?  Not really.  For one, Psychic/Grass has more weaknesses 
    than any other type combination currently in use.  And TM compatibility is 
    nowhere near as great, although Celebi gets to make up for it with non-TM 
    moves like Leech Seed, Recover, and Heal Bell.  Can't do as much, but what it 
    can do is at least good.  The worst of the Banned Five, and people 
    occasionally allow Celebi to go unbanned.  That's your opportunity to use it--
    try not to let it go to waste, unless you have something better to do.
    
    **********************
    *303. Building a Team*
    **********************
    
    With almost twice as many Pokemon, team building gets a lot harder now.  And 
    since I rarely participate in online battles, I'll let you learn team building 
    from someone who does, namely Shadowdude.  His comments will be posted, then 
    after each section, I'll give comments and clarifications, separated (in 
    classic C++ fashion) by /* and */.
    
    Go!
    
    MAKING A MOVESET 
     
    To make a moveset is much simpler than its counterpart, the team. The moveset 
    has but a few simple guidelines. 
     
    1) Play by your stats - You want to utilize your stats as well as possible. 
    Using Surf on a Snorlax is a waste, simply because his SpAtk is so low that it 
    won't even OHKO a Rhydon. That means it sucks. Now look at Dragonite's attack. 
    It's awesome. This means that you should try your best to fit in at least one 
    Physical Attack into any of its movesets. 
    
    /*That is, if Dragonite HAD Physical Attacks.  Go read its section.*/
     
    2) Don't use more than one attack of the same type - Don't use Fire Blast and 
    Flamethrower in the same moveset. Ever. They nullify each other in that using 
    one means neglecting another, essentially leaving you with three attacks. 
    That's not cool. But Mud-Slap and Earthquake doesn't count. Why? Because Mud-
    Slap is an annoyance move, not an attack.  
    
    /*But a one-Swords-Danced Marowak can kill Magnemite with a single Mud-Slap!  
    Sure it's an attack!  Anyway, for more in the case against doubles, go see 
    page 19, "71/2 Habits...", part 5.  Also note that the other big exception to 
    this rule is a detonation alongside another Normal move.*/
     
    3) Play by role - If your Umbreon is your main attacker, something is wrong. 
    If it's your supporter, don't give it a Curser set. If it's your trapper, 
    don't give it Pursuit. Don't use moves that conflict with each other like Rain 
    Dance and Sunny Day on the same team. Surf/Earthquake is a common combo that 
    points out redundancy. Surf covers three types, two of which Earthquake 
    already does. Not too cool. 
    
    /*This is why Fire sucked so much in RBY.  Moves with even slight dissynergy, 
    like Ancientpower and Haze, should not coexist.*/
     
    4) Keep in mind type coverage and weaknesses - Surf and Earthquake cover very 
    few types for all of your moves, six, and have many shared weaknesses. The 
    standard Sunny Day Houndoom covers nine with few resisters, and an Ice Beam 
    Tyranitar covers thirteen with no Pokemon that resists all. That means Surf 
    and Earthquake probably aren't the best two coexistent attacks. But you want 
    to cover your weaknesses at the same time. This is when Earthquake/Surf 
    becomes useful. Blastoise has an Electric weakness and can dish out a two hit 
    knockout on any Electric type with Earthquake. That's awesome. While making 
    you dead to Grass and Flying enemies, this can be a good combo. Since 
    Typhlosion has a Rock weakness, Earthquake is useful, and Thunderpunch is good 
    for its Water weakness. 
    
    /*Technically, Blastoise can't two-shot Zapdos with either Earthquake or Ice 
    Beam.  And while covering weaknesses is a good idea, trying to cover W4s (i.e. 
    Ice Beam on Quagsire, HP Flying on Tyranitar) is a bad idea.  They never deal 
    enough damage to outrace their weaknesses, and the slot could be better spent 
    on something else.  And this coverage doesn't take non-STAB moves into 
    consideration.  But some self-coverage is still a good idea.*/
     
    5) Thunder Wave 0wnz - It just does. Any status infliction attack with 100% 
    accuracy rules. Spore, Thunder Wave, Confuse Ray, and Attract all make well 
    for this. Pairing these inflictions together is a common strategy for 
    annoyers. 
    
    /*Just remember, Poison is bad.  It doesn't disable the opponent at all, but 
    rather puts them on a fairly irrelevant 8-turn clock (15 turns with 
    Leftovers).  And Poison prevents the use of Paralysis, Sleep, or Freeze.*/
     
    6) As a general rule, don't use those "Super Moves" - Normally you should 
    avoid attacks like Thunder. They have high power but are usually unreliable. 
    Stick to Thunderbolt in most cases. When dealing with low SpAtk Pokemon, 
    however, Thunder and Fire Blast are more used. (Though Fire Blast is good 
    anyway). NEVER use Blizzard. Hyper Beam, usually, is only for Baton Passing 
    Scizors for pseudo-Hazers and Cursing Ursaring. 
    
    /*Adding Rain Dance to Thunder still isn't too great--Rain Dance can be 
    thought of as a missed Thunder, and the accuracy is effectively pumped up to 
    83% at best (just 5.26% better damage than Thunderbolt, even when you get all 
    five Thunders).  The same reasoning can be used to dismiss Lock-On/Zap Cannon 
    or Dynamicpunch.  As for the ultimate in Super Moves, the one-hit kills, they 
    aren't as bad as you think.  Just look at Tauros.*/
     
    7) Items attached - Usually it's Scope Lens on Resting attackers, Mint Berry 
    for weak Resters, Miracleberry for fast non-Resters and/or leads, and 
    Leftovers for pretty much anything else. 
    
    /*Except Marowak.*/
     
    8) There IS such a thing as a bad moveset - Get over yourself.  It's not grade 
    school. You're not special. Every Pokemon can be determined as "good" or 
    "bad". There IS such thing as a bad moveset. But don't worry. Follow the above 
    guidelines and you won't ever get flamed for bad movesets. 
    
    /*How true, how true.  In order for something to be good, something else must, 
    comparatively, be bad.  If you don't like it, quit playing the game.  Less 
    work for me that way.*/
     
    So follow these guidelines and a moveset will be fine.
    
    <('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(
    >'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<(
    '.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('
    .'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.
    ')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')><('.'<)<('.')>(>'.')>
    
    /*Um...yes.  Kirby DOES survive three critical-hit Thunders from Pikachu (as 
    long as it isn't in Dream Land).  I'm cutting the rest of these 
    intermissions.*/
    
    MAKING A TEAM 
     
    How do you make a team? Well, there are many different ways. Let's start with 
    the simplest way - typewise. 
     
    Typewise, your team should represent as many different strengths as possible 
    and as few shared weaknesses as possible. This doesn't mean that you can't 
    have an Umbreon and Tyranitar on the same team - quite the contrary. Just to 
    counter the 3x Fighting and 2x Bug weaknesses, you could put in Skarmory. 
    Tyranitar has many other weaknesses - Ground, Water, Grass, and Steel. To 
    counter the Ground weakness, you could put Charm on Umbreon to stop them and 
    Ice Beam on Tyranitar. Also, Skarmory's Defense stops many Ground types dead 
    in their tracks. Also throw in Cloyster with Reflect and Surf and Ground is no 
    problem. Water type attacks are almost always on Water type Pokemon, so a 
    Zapdos would help there. Grass is easily countered by Skarmory and Zapdos. 
    Steel, an uncommon attack type, is almost never used except on Scizor. A Fire 
    type, Charizard, easily beats him. Skarmory's Fire and Electric weaknesses can 
    be stopped by Umbreon's ability to take Special attacks. Tyranitar with 
    Earthquake and Rock Slide also down them. Cloyster has an Electric, Fighting, 
    Grass, and Rock weakness. Let's take a look. Electric, Fighting, and Grass 
    have been already countered. The Rock weakness is self-countering - Surf is 
    strong against Rock. Also Charizard can use Earthquake despite its weakness. 
    Zapdos and his Ice weakness can be taken by Lapras (and Thunderbolt) and 
    Charizard. Okay, now you've got a team of Umbreon, Tyranitar, Skarmory, 
    Zapdos, Charizard, and Lapras. Uh-oh. Let's look at the standard Machamp - 
    Earthquake, Rock Slide, Cross Chop, Fire Blast. Is there a single Pokemon here 
    not weak to it? Maybe drop Skarmory for a Dodrio, or Zapdos for an Alakazam. 
    Typewise your team should not be excessively weak to any single Pokemon.
    
    /*Nice explanation, but dropping Skarmory for Dodrio?  Skarmory is THE first 
    Pokemon you take into consideration when playing types, and if you only used 
    Pokemon that Machamp isn't super effective against, you'd have a very narrow 
    team that would die just as easily to, say, Raikou.  Skarmory can still down 
    Machamp about as easily as Dodrio (and is only weak to Fire Blast, an attack 
    that is usually left out on Machamp, whereas Dodrio is weak to the always-
    present Rock Slide).  2-point weaknesses are easily circumventible by a type 
    counter, 3-point requires the rest of the team to be fully aligned against the 
    type in question, and 4 or more weaknesses to a single type will simply fail 
    in any attempt to seal off the abyss.  Types that can be safely ignored when 
    computing weakness points include Poison (nothing good; only one advantage), 
    Steel (bad coverage; no power-accuracy dual strong point), Ghost (Dark does 
    the same thing; Ghosts can do better than low-Attack STAB), and Dragon (choice 
    between two weak attacks and an undependable strong one).  Do NOT ignore Bug; 
    its Hidden Power is all the rage on modern physical attackers.*/
    
    Now let's get to another way to approach it - team type. 
     
    Organize your team by team type. What type of team do want? A tank team, a 
    defense team, an attack team, an annoyance team, a TSS team, a pseudo-pass 
    team, a Baton Pass team, a UU team, a fun team, a kamikaze team, or a fairly 
    standard team?  
     
    (A fun team will not be discussed as it can be anything.)
    
    TEAM 1
    
    A Tank team focuses on having Pokemon that are extremely hard to take out. 
    Pokemon you see here are Skarmory, Blissey, Snorlax, Slowbro, and more. They 
    have very few harmonized weaknesses. They all counter their own weaknesses 
    excellently. An example of this team would be: 
     
    Cloyster - Spikes, Reflect, Rest, Surf 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Skarmory - Whirlwind, Curse, Rest, Drill Peck 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Blissey - Ice Beam, Light Screen, Softboiled, Heal Bell 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Quagsire - Roar, Rest, Earthquake, Ancientpower 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Clefable - Moonlight, Curse, Amnesia, Return 
    ~ Miracleberry 
    Dragonite - Rest, Safeguard, Return, Haze 
    ~ Leftovers 
     
    Look at those recovery moves! Rest on four Pokemon -- two others have half 
    recovery moves! And then pseudo-pass around the board -- Reflect on Cloyster 
    to help out Blissey and Clefable, Light Screen on Blissey to help out 
    Forretress, Skarmory, Quagsire, and Dragonite, and Safeguard on Dragonite to 
    ensure a healthy team. Cloytser and Skarmory, due to amazing Defense, are free 
    to Leftovers-rest. Dragonite can Rest because it's free to switch out. There 
    are no stat-ups. With all of the support, Clefable is free to set up with 
    Curse/Amnesia/Moonlight, and since it doesn't sleep, it's more efficient.  
    
    /*Heal Bell is very important on a team like this.  I'm not sure if Cloyster 
    should be Resting on a 178 SD, especially with the bad HP; detonation would be 
    wiser, at which point it loses flavor in this team.  The lack of Suicune in 
    this team is highly questionable; only two weaknesses, both of which are 
    stopped cold by Mirror Coat?  And 403 HP backing double 328s?  Some good.  One 
    final note: Pokemon with W4s take a big hit in annoyance factor here, so think 
    twice if you were trying to use Dragonite and Quagsire.*/
     
    A tank is a team that would be a pain in the ass to take out.
    
    TEAM 2
    
    A Defense team is VERY similar to a tank team, except that this time there is 
    more attack and less stat-upping. They may or may not power themselves up 
    before battling. They can cover for each other if needed, but a sacrifice can 
    be afforded if necessary. For example: 
     
    Smeargle - Spikes, Leech Seed, Light Screen, Spore 
    ~ Miracleberry 
    Arcanine - Roar, Rest, Fire Blast, Double-Edge 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Blastoise - Haze, Rest, Surf, Double-Edge 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Miltank - Body Slam, Curse, Milk Drink, Heal Bell 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Umbreon - Charm, Mean Look, Baton Pass, Rest 
    ~ Miracleberry 
    Dewgong - Ice Beam, Substitute, Return, Horn Drill 
    ~ Leftovers 
     
    This time the battle is a bit harder. The choices you have are more limited, 
    as you have to take into consideration both of each Pokemon's defenses. There 
    are many recovery moves, Dewgong and Smeargle being exceptions. 
    Substitute/Leftovers while taking an elemental advantage serves its recovery. 
    For the Machamp weakness there's Blastoise and Umbreon (with its Charm), and 
    the Starmie weakness there's Miltank. 
    
    /* No Blissey this time? =P  If you choose Pokemon based on stats here, 
    Smeargle is HIGHLY doubtful, and Suicune should get to replace Blastoise.  
    Just like team 1, this may as well include a Restbell subtheme (a Heal Bell 
    negating the two-turn wait for up to five Rests simultaneously).  Put another 
    way, this should be a team full of counters.  Haze, Pseudohaze, and either 
    Counter or Mirror Coat (or maybe both) are all good ideas.  And needless to 
    say, you won't be able to defend well with multiple three- and four-point 
    weaknesses.*/
     
    A defense team revolves around Pokemon with high Defense and SpDef.
    
    TEAM 3
    
    A TSS team is a Toxic Sandstorm Spikes team. It revolves around Steel, Ground, 
    and Rock Pokemon and forcing switches. It's quite out of date now and rarely 
    will you see it being used around the metagame. Though not as popular as it 
    once was, TSS is still a useful team strategy. 
     
    Forretress - Spikes, Toxic, Sandstorm, Explosion 
    ~ Miracleberry 
    Skarmory - Toxic, Whirlwind, Rest, Drill Peck 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Suicune - Roar, Toxic, Rest, Surf 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Blissey - Toxic, Ice Beam, Heal Bell, Softboiled 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Tyranitar - Rock Slide, Sandstorm, Earthquake, Crunch 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Raikou - Crunch, Thunderbolt, Reflect, Rest 
    ~ Leftovers 
     
    See? Forretress and Skarmory are always there. Tyranitar is a common sight for 
    Rock and Ground support. Raikou here is for Skarmory, and Toxic is all around 
    the board. Sandstorm on Tyranitar and Forretress whittles away at the enemy's 
    health while Skarmory blows away non-Rock/Ground types. Toxic on Skarmory is 
    for more switches on Spikes. 
    
    /*These teams are natural foils to BP teams, because of the large amount of 
    switching they invoke through Toxic and Whirlwind.  Note that TSS teams are 
    the one place where Toxic doesn't suck; think of Toxic in this case as a 
    Whirlwind that deals damage in the process (one particularly good Pokemon that 
    was left off the above team is Crobat, with Toxic/Whirlwind/Confuse Ray/Fly -- 
    358 speed Confuse Rays get annoying fast).  Also, while it may seem 
    antithetical to play non-Rock/Ground/Steels in a Sandstorm, it's necessary to 
    do so lest you create a five-point weakness to Water or Ground.*/
     
    A TSS team involves Rock/Ground/Steel Pokemon, Forretress, Skarmory, and 
    Toxic.
    
    TEAM 4
    
    A Pseudo-Pass team is a pretty simple team that's easy to play. The strategy 
    is pretty much pass around Safeguard, Reflect, and Light Screen while picking 
    away at the enemy's health. It creates strong Pokemon that are hard to take 
    out. For example: 
     
    Cloyster - Reflect, Surf, Spikes, Explosion 
    ~ Miracleberry 
    Electabuzz - Reflect, Light Screen, Thunderbolt, Ice Punch 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Alakazam - Psychic, Reflect, Light Screen, Recover 
    ~ Miracleberry 
    Blissey - Light Screen, Ice Beam, Softboiled, Counter 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Kangaskhan - Safeguard, Double-Edge, Rest, Roar 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Dragonite - Safeguard, Rest, Return, Fire Blast 
    ~ Leftovers 
     
    Notice that this team has no Heal Beller and a few shared weaknesses. This is 
    not a big problem, as Alakazam and Electabuzz cover pretty much every Pokemon 
    so that there will be no OHKO's on your team. Light Screen on three Pokemon 
    ensures Dragonite will be able to Leftovers-Rest for a while. Safeguard/Rest 
    means that a Heal Beller is rather redundant here. 
    
    /*Of course, the big risk in going without a Heal Beller is that your opponent 
    may lead with a T-Wave Jolteon and paralyze before the Safeguard can come up.  
    Make sure that your Reflects, Light Screens, and Safeguards match up with the 
    Pokemon using them: Cloyster isn't exactly the best Reflect user, nor does 
    Blissey get much from Light Screen (though people have been known to assault 
    Blissey with pure Special attacks to avoid drawing out Skarmory, so you'll 
    find that move being used anyway).  Notably absent from this team is Meganium, 
    who can get all three pseudopasses on decent stats, but then again, that only 
    leaves one slot for attack.  Regardless of how fun it is to juggle Reflect and 
    Light Screen, there's still only one way to win: by dealing damage.  Make sure 
    your team has a way to do that.*/
     
    A Pseudo-Pass team passes several Light Screens, Reflects, and Safeguards to 
    protect from any sweepage.
    
    TEAM 5
    
    The Baton Passing team is simple in theory but monstrous to play. You pass 
    around stat-ups throughout the team to make each Pokemon stronger. 
    
    Umbreon - Charm, Mean Look, Rest, Baton Pass 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Smeargle - Amnesia, Baton Pass, Spore, Growth 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Scizor - Swords' Dance, Agility, Baton Pass, Return 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Celebi - Psychic, Recover, Heal Bell, Baton Pass 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Mr. Mime - Return, Fire Punch, Barrier, Baton Pass 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Vaporeon - Surf, Substitute, Baton Pass, Double-Edge 
    ~ Leftovers 
     
    This is a complicated web of Baton Passing. Umbreon traps the enemy, Charms 
    down and Rests, and proceeds to pass to Smeargle. Smeargle sleeps the enemy 
    and Growth's up before passing to Vaporeon or Scizor. Celebi can be used to 
    Heal Bell without breaking the chain. After every KO, Umbreon is to come back 
    out and trap the enemy. If a Hazer comes in, it's okay, but it's still hard to 
    play. 
    
    /*In terms of Timmy, Johnny, and Spike, a BP team is Johnny's favorite.  After 
    all, what can be more creative than turning <RandomPokemon> into a 999-stat 
    monster?  How about making it a Haze-proof 999-stat monster?  Well, that's 
    pretty much impossible.  When it comes to BP, you lose to Haze, Whirlwind, 
    Roar, and Psych Up, all with little recourse.  So be aware that people DO use 
    those moves, for the very reason of countering teams like this one.  As for 
    changes on the team, try giving Celebi an Ancientpower to pass.  And finally, 
    note that all the slots taken up with BP and stat boosts give you few attacks, 
    so make the most of them if you plan on a 6-BP'er team.*/
     
    A Baton Pass team passes stat-ups around the board.
    
    TEAM 6
    
    The annoyance team is very fun to play, but based much on luck. The idea is 
    similar to TSS in that you cause switches, but this is, IMO, much more fun to 
    play. You place status ailments randomly, Attract the enemy, and do other 
    stuff. 
     
    Jolteon - Substitute, Thunder Wave, Thunderbolt, Charm 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Qwilfish - Sludge Bomb, Spikes, Toxic, Rest 
    ~ Mint Berry 
    Miltank - Body Slam, Attract, Milk Drink, Heal Bell 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Jumpluff - Sleep Powder, Stun Spore, Encore, Leech Seed 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Kangaskhan - Substitute, Body Slam, Attract, Earthquake 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Gengar - Destiny Bond, Encore, Mean Look, Perish Song 
    ~ Leftovers 
     
    Plenty of paralysis around Jolteon, Miltank, Jumpluff, and Kangaskhan, and 
    Attract on Miltank and Kangaskhan. Encore on Jumpluff and Gengar is fun, and 
    Qwilfish with Spikes does Toxic work. Jumpluff can Sleep enemies, and Gengar 
    just forces switches. Using Substitute stops the enemy from more attacks.  
    
    /*Just make sure that you never put a Spiker in any slot other than lead, got 
    it?  Thunder Wave is good here (especially with Whirlwind/Roar for the 
    parashuffle), Leech Seed is good, Attract is good, Confuse Ray is good, Sleep 
    moves are good (if for little more than exhausting a Mint Berry earlier than 
    expected).  Also try to have one Spite user, so you can nullify the opponent's 
    Heal Bell at the first sign.  Finally, Magikarp is NOT good.  Don't put it on 
    this team.*/
     
    An annoyance team pushes the enemy away, stops attacks, and forces switches 
    onto Spikes.
    
    TEAM 7
    
    An Attack team is filled with sweepers with staying power that three hit KO 
    pretty much any Pokemon. They may or may not use stat uppers to achieve this. 
    These teams are hard to use well but pwn if used right. 
     
    Raikou - Thunderbolt, Crunch, Rest, Reflect 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Snorlax - Double-Edge, Earthquake, Fire Blast, Selfdestruct 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Cloyster - Explosion, Screech, Surf, Spikes 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Zapdos - Whirlwind, Drill Peck, Rest, Thunderbolt 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Granbull - Rest, Sleep Talk, Heal Bell, Return 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Alakazam - Substitute, Fire Punch, Thunderpunch, Psychic 
    ~ Leftovers 
     
    Some quick workers here. Raikou is a powerful sweeper, and with Rest/Reflect 
    it's quite deadly. Snorlax with Selfdestruct can do major damage to any 
    Pokemon. It leaves the path clear for Cloyster with Spikes. Zapdos with 
    Whirlwind works awesome as a sweeper, and Granbull is the most offensive Heal 
    Beller. Alakazam can sweep with its SpAtk and Speed. 
    
    /*Most all of these Pokemon (with Granbull the notable exception) could be 
    used as starters.  That's known as "overcommitment to one role."  If this team 
    hits a tank, it loses.  That's why an attacking team wants at least one Curse 
    abuser.  Why isn't Machamp on here?  I don't know.  And why is this looking 
    like Restbell almost as much as it is sweeper?*/
     
    Attack teams sweep as fast as possible before having to switch.
    
    TEAM 8
    
    An UnderUsed team is one with very rarely seen Pokemon. These possibilities 
    are amazing, and they include many, many different Pokemon. 
     
    Golem - Explosion, Rock Slide, Earthquake, Substitute 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Sudowoodo - Rock Slide, Earthquake, Curse, Rest 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Qwilfish - Spikes, Hydro Pump, Sludge Bomb, Rest 
    ~ Mint Berry 
    Celebi - Psychic, Recover, Leech Seed, Heal Bell 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Ninetales - Reflect, Roar, Flamethrower, Confuse Ray 
    ~ Leftovers 
    Hypno - Thunder Wave, Seismic Toss, Attract, Rest 
    ~ Leftovers 
     
    Pokemon that aren't commonly seen on the bots, right? This is a fairly 
    standard UU team. It has a Spiker, Curser, kamikaze, pseudo-Hazer, Heal 
    Beller, and annoyer. 
    
    /*If people didn't ban Celebi, it obviously wouldn't qualify as underused.  
    Other than that, Underused teams try to "make good of the Pokemon I've 
    dismissed as bad".  People often post stories of 6-0 sweeps with underused 
    teams--because they really are valuable wins.  And about the only guideline to 
    making this team is to have diverse types.  Remember, these teams are supposed 
    to be creative ways of winning, not "Just Plain Crap" with no such 
    intention.*/
    
    /*By the way, I don't cover underused teams in this guide.  Part of the fun of 
    playing underused is coming up with the team...and for that, you don't need my 
    help.*/
     
    UU teams have endless possibilities as they only focus on underused Pokemon.
    
    Okay, we've been through the TSS, the annoyance, the tanks, the defense, the 
    attacks, the kamikazes, the pseudo-passers, the Baton Passers, and the UU. 
    Now, we get to the standard, Pokemon battling team. 
    
    /*To be read as: The team that wins.  Spike's favorite kind of team.*/
     
    What is the standard team? Well, it has roles - 
     
    ~ Annoyer 
    ~ Baton Passer 
    ~ Spiker 
    ~ Trapper 
    ~ Heal Beller 
    ~ SpAtk-er 
    ~ PhysAtk-er 
    ~ Tank 
    ~ Pseudo-Passer 
    ~ Stat-upper 
    ~ Hazer 
    ~ Pseudo-Hazer 
    ~ Supporter 
    ~ Common Killer 
     
    And this brings us to another way of creating a team: By Role.
    
    /*That's 14 roles.  It's very tough to fit them into 6 Pokemon.*/
    
    Way One: 
     
    1) Opener - Usually a Spiker or annoyer, the Opener is meant to give your team 
    a good start. Jolteon is a common opener, with Substitute, Thunder Wave, 
    Attract, Thunderbolt, or similar. I use Snorlax w/Body Slam, Attract, 
    Substitute, Selfdestruct because it can paralyze and Attract while being safe 
    behind the Substitute. Selfdestruct when I come to a tough Pokemon like Zapdos 
    so that I can take it out. That way I have a fresh start with Cloyster to 
    Spike. 
    
    /*No, kids, Substitute does NOT prevent the detonation from killing you, nor 
    does it survive for your next Pokemon to use.  Another good opener is Starmie: 
    With Surf, Thunder Wave, Confuse Ray, and Recover (DeathStar), this Pokemon 
    dominated the Opener role for almost a year, and drew the kind of metagaming 
    that Snorlax and Skarmory see today.*/
     
    2) Hazer - Able to come in the form of Haze or Roar/Whirlwind, the Hazer is 
    essential on your team to prevent from Curselax sweeps or Marowak destruction. 
    I use a Zapdos w/Whirlwind, Rest, Drill Peck, and Thunderbolt for this job, as 
    Whirlwind will also cause Spikes damage. 
    
    /*Remember that Whirlwind always goes last.  Haze is the faster clear-out, but 
    Whirlwind still has a niche when accompanied by Psych Up.  Copy their stat 
    modifiers, then destroy the originals like Enron documents!*/
     
    3) Attacker - The Attacker does immense damage to the opponent. Usually it 
    includes powerful STAB attacks to defeat the enemy more easily with. My 
    Machamp w/Cross Chop, Rock Slide, Earthquake, and Fire Blast does this. It can 
    do extreme damage to any Pokemon in the game. 
    
    /*Machamp's attacks are so far-reaching that the easiest way to plan an answer 
    is through a counter-offense, not a team of Pokemon that try to resist it.  
    Note that not even Mewtwo can take down Machamp in one, though.  Maybe this 
    thingy they call Machamp really is good.*/
     
    4) Heal Beller - A Pokemon with Heal Bell and a recovery move. A Blissey is a 
    common Heal Beller. I use a Cursing Miltank to do this job - Curse, Body Slam, 
    Heal Bell, Milk Drink. 
    
    /*Miltank used to own this role, but now the baton has been "passed" to 
    Blissey.  And when Celebi is allowed, people use it as a Heal Beller, too 
    (especially considering it's the only one that doesn't take heavy damage from 
    Cross Chop).  Note that those Pokemon get Milk Drink, Softboiled, and Recover, 
    respectively; the 50% recoveries should always be used.*/
     
    5) Cleaner - A Pokemon that will finish off a Pokemon that has just given you 
    a pounding. An Alakazam can do this with its high Speed. I use Alakazam 
    w/Reflect, Thunder Wave, Psychic, Recover to do this job. 
    
    /*Bear in mind that Alakazam gets punches now, so it can clean more than just 
    Machamp.  Basically, find the popular Sweepers, figure out type weaknesses 
    that they haven't already covered, and use a Pokemon that uses that attack 
    type.*/
     
    6) Sweeper - Like the Attacker, but different. :x It has to plow through many 
    Pokemon, and is expendable to a certain degree. Usually it has high Speed 
    and/or SpAtk. I use a Dragonite w/Haze, Rest, Return, Reflect. Not the best 
    example of one though ;.;
    
    /*Here's a hint: Sweepers should have more than one attack.*/
    
    Way Two: 
     
    Baton Passer - A Pokemon w/Baton Pass. It also has BP'able moves - stat ups. 
    Mean Look, Swords Dance, Meditate, Barrier, Acid Armor, Double Team, Agility, 
    Amnesia, Perish Song, and Growth are BP'able moves. It powers up your team. 
    Umbreon - Charm, Rest, Mean Look, Baton Pass @Leftovers 
    
    /*Why would anyone want to BP a Perish Song for non-masochistic reasons?  Top 
    BP honors go to Scizor (Swords Dance, Agility, DT), Jolteon (Agility, Growth, 
    occasional Substitute), Girafarig (Agility, Amnesia), Umbreon (Mean Look, 
    Double Team), and Vaporeon (Acid Armor, Growth, game's best Substitute pass).  
    While Smeargle can pass things that no other Pokemon can (Belly Drum, Growth), 
    remember that Smeargle can typically be shot down on the second turn.*/
     
    Pseudo-Passer - A Pokemon w/Reflect, Light Screen, and/or Safeguard. These 
    attacks can be passed onto your other Pokemon without Baton Pass, so they come 
    in very handy. They spare Rests/Safeguards. 
    Mr. Mime - Safeguard, Light Screen, Psychic, Thunderbolt 
    
    /*Again, note that Mime is better off passing Reflect than Light Screen.  
    Reflect belongs on Defense 228 or lower, Light Screen on SD 228 or lower, and 
    Safeguard on Speed 298 or higher, as a general rule.  However, if a Pokemon 
    fits none of these categories and you wish to pseudopass, prioritize Reflect 
    first, Light Screen second, and Safeguard last.  Technically, Sunny Day, Rain 
    Dance, and Sandstorm are also pseudopasses, but those are typically designed 
    to benefit the Pokemon that uses them.*/
    
    Supporter - The Circle gets bigger. It can be a pseudo-passer, a Baton Passer, 
    a filler, or anything - It fills in a random role that your team is missing 
    and must be used if you have only five Pokemon. 
    Vaporeon - Haze, Substitute, Surf, Baton Pass @Leftovers 
    
    /*Why is this a category if all it is is a collection of other categories?*/
     
    Annoyer - A Pokemon that, well, annoys. It stalls while slowly extracting 
    damage. Little by little with Toxic, Sandstorm, Pseudo-Haze/ Spikes, Encore, 
    Leech Seed, Sleep, Paralysis, Attract, Confusion, Flinch, Protect, and 
    sometimes even more.  
    Lanturn - Surf, Attract, Confuse Ray, Thunder Wave 
    
    /*The most severe form of annoyance is known by several name permutations: 
    "confatuated paraflinch", "paracontractifusion", or (by the younger players) 
    "cheating".  But the goal of any annoyer is to try and bring a psychological 
    factor into this game.  If the opponent is frustrated to the point of play 
    mistakes, Annoyers are a quick path to victory.  If you ever face one, 
    remember that Annoyers aren't nearly as dangerous as they appear.  Don't 
    overreact.*/
    
    Trapper - A Pokemon with Whirlpool/Clamp/Mean Look. It forces the Pokemon to 
    stay in and then slowly or quickly depletes its health. Sometimes it's 
    combined with Toxic or Baton Pass. Usually you see it with Perish Song. 
    Gengar - Mean Look, Destiny Bond, Ice Punch, Thunderbolt @Leftovers 
    
    /*Don't forget Gengar can sing the Song of Death!  Also, be cautious when 
    using Temporary Traps: none are more accurate than 85%, and they don't last 
    longer than 5 turns.*/
     
    Spiker - A Pokemon with Spikes. It lays down the Spikes and does whatever 
    other mission it's expected to do. Works awesome with a Pseudo-Hazer with good 
    attacks. 
    Cloyster - Surf, Screech, Spikes, Explosion @Leftovers 
    
    /*Just make sure that if you use Cloyster, you have time to Spike before the 
    178 SD kills you.  Typically you'll go Turn 1 Spikes, Turn 2 detonate to kill 
    and force Spikes damage.  Also be aware that Flying-types can safely switch 
    into Spikes, and Rapid Spin will blow Spikes off the board.*/
    
    Heal Beller - A Pokemon with Heal Bell. Because there are only four, it's hard 
    to have an unpredictable Heal Beller. However, people do use non-standard 
    Granbull and Celebi, and even unpredictable Miltanks. 
    Miltank - Body Slam, Psych Up, Milk Drink, Heal Bell @Leftovers 
    
    /*I thought this had already been discussed.*/
     
    Hazer - A Pokemon with Haze. Usually this requires good staying power because 
    you might get pounded in the process. Usually it has Rest to ensure its stay. 
    Blastoise - Ice Beam, Earthquake, Haze, Rest @Leftovers
    
    /*Same here.*/
    
    Pseudo-Hazer - A Pokemon with Roar, Whirlwind, or some sort of other attack 
    that forces a switch. This is to stop Cursers, Baton Passing chains, and the 
    like.  
    Zapdos - Thunderbolt, Drill Peck, Rest, Whirlwind @Leftovers 
    
    /*Amazingly enough, a Perish Trapper can fill this role by getting in a non-
    Trap P-Song, then the opponent is forced to halt their sweeping practices in 
    the next three turns.  But obviously, Whirlwind is the most preferential, 
    because it's widely compatible, works right away, and has the small advantage 
    over Roar by hitting Fly users.  That's not much of an advantage, but it's the 
    only difference between the two, and I'll take it.  Crobat can be annoying, 
    after all.*/
     
    Stat Upper - A Pokemon that uses stat-upping attacks. Swords Dance, Agility, 
    and stuff are all here. They can be very deadly, and hopefully you won't see 
    too many Curselaxen ^^ 
    Politoed - Curse, Amnesia, Rest, Return @Leftovers 
    
    /*Think of it as a BP'er that doesn't use a slot on BP.  Except in that one 
    degenerate case known as Curselax, in which case you treat it as you would an 
    axe-murderer who walks right up to your door.*/
     
    Tank - A Pokemon that's extremely hard to take out. Pokemon instantly that 
    come to mind are Miltank, Blissey, Snorlax, Blastosie, Suicune, etc. Sometimes 
    they use stat ups to become even stronger. 
    Kingdra - Hydro Pump, Double-Edge, Sleep Talk, Rest @Leftovers 
    
    /*If you want a formula, determine "tankiness" with HP * (DF + SD).  The top 
    tanks are: Blissey (346518), Lugia (317060), Snorlax (285558), Ho-oh (283860), 
    Shuckle (271188), Umbreon (265668), Suicune (264368), Steelix (256278), Lapras 
    (252798), and Wobbuffet (249524).  Chansey, though unevolved, is technically 
    third with a 292,448.  Of course, Pokemon that get Recover get an additional 
    boost here.*/
     
    SpAtk-er - A Pokemon with all or mostly SpAtks. They sweep through most 
    Pokemon with relative ease. Some Pokemon that use these are Electabuzz, 
    Alakazam, etc. 
    Magmar - Fire Blast, Cross Chop, Thunderpunch, Hidden Power (Ice) @Leftovers 
    
    /*Why does Magmar need HP Ice?  Typically, Pokemon that qualify for this role 
    should have SA 298 or greater, as well as basic type-countering attacks.  Very 
    few Pokemon make good four-move sweepers for this category or the next, or at 
    least can't be put to better use in another role.*/
     
    PhysAtk-er - A Pokemon with all or mostly Physical attacks. They're pretty 
    much the same as SpAtk-ers except they have Physical moves. 
    Sandslash - Swords Dance, Earthquake, Rock Slide, Substitute @Leftovers 
    
    /*Unless you're following UPS, that Sandslash should be a Marowak.  And 
    Substitute defies the concept of an attacker.*/
     
    Common Killer - A Pokemon that is designed to kill the Pokemon that it's most 
    likely to be up against. They're much like sweepers except with custom 
    attacks. Cloud's Nidoking is meant to take on openers and stuff. 
    Nidoking - Lovely Kiss, Earthquake, Ice Beam, Thunderbolt @Leftovers
    
    /*I'd equate this role to hiring the mob.  They'll do one thing for you, but 
    demand too much and you'll be disappointed.  In other words, simple but 
    limited.*/
    
    That was nice, Shadowdude.  Now, kids, did you understand that informal speak 
    after being exposed to over 100 pages of my style of writing (which uses very 
    little online-talk or abbreviation)?  If not, good for you.
    
    Now, on to the actual moveset construction.  Here are 41 movesets (soon to be 
    more, as always) that have proven their worth over time.  Below some sets are 
    tips on playing it.  If a set only works with a specific item, the item is 
    listed before the moves, and if a set has a widely known nickname, it's listed 
    after the moves.  Remember, these are Spike movesets, ones meant purely for 
    winning.  Timmy and Johnny need no help designing sets to suit their needs 
    (and in fact are better off when not helped), so sheer quantity of sets is 
    cast aside in favor of ensuring the GOOD ones are all here.
    
    Clefable Sunny Day/Solarbeam/Flamethrower/Moonlight
    Three Sunny Day-boostable moves make Clefable the most efficient exploiter of 
    Sunny Day (though Houndoom's type match and 318 stat make it the best overall 
    user).  Flamethrower is called for instead of the Blast, since Clefable will 
    probably be sticking around for a while.
    
    Clefable Belly Drum/Shadow Ball/Return/(Moonlight or Rest)
    Like the Snorlax version, only faster.  Shoot down to 50% health, hope the 
    opponent doesn't Haze you (or Encore, or Whirlwind...), and recover next turn.  
    Then start blasting things, and if Misdreavus tries to trap you, bash the 
    fool's head in for 500.
    
    Arcanine Fire Blast/Crunch/Extremespeed/Curse
    This one's easy to figure out.  You can replace Fire Blast with Flamethrower 
    if you're too worried about missing.  Extremespeed still strikes first whether 
    you've used 1 Curse or 6.
    
    Alakazam Psychic/Recover/Thunder Wave/(insert element)Punch
    Still viable?  Probably.  Since Substitute is far less prevalent in this 
    realm, and Safeguard users are all slower except for one Pokemon that's 
    usually banned, T-Wave should cripple much more than it did before.  Then beat 
    away.  Each of the Punches has its situation, and experience will show you 
    which one to use.
    
    Machamp Earthquake/Rock Slide/Cross Chop/(random move) "Boring"
    Needs no explanation.  Final slot is your choice of Rest, Light Screen, Focus 
    Energy, Fire Blast, Hidden Power, Meditate, or Curse.
    
    Dodrio Endure/Flail/Drill Peck/Agility
    As long as you've been passed a +5 Attack modifier, this Pokemon can redefine 
    your image of the Normal-Flying group.  Agility for the crucial ability to 
    outrun Jolteon and Alakazam, then Drill Peck until you're almost ready to die, 
    and Endure.  Then keep Flailing away to kill anything, except that Rhydon only 
    takes 410, Steelix takes a somewhat tame 279, and the Ghosts take 0.  Drill 
    Peck, however, deals more than lethal damage to Gengar and Missy.  Just as 
    long as you can GET the modifiers passed...
    
    Marowak@thick club Earthquake/Rock Slide/Hidden Power (Bug)/Swords Dance 
    "Nickwak"
    The result of the ingenuity mentioned in pages 100 and 101 (credit to Nick 
    Moore for linking the 13 Attack DV with HP Bug), this Marowak will KO anything 
    except Skarmory in two shots, and only 21 others are even able to survive one 
    turn.  For more fun, throw an Agility to it, courtesy of Jolteon, Scyther, or 
    Scizor.
    
    Starmie Thunder Wave/Confuse Ray/Surf/Recover "DeathStar"
    The first Pokemon ever to receive the metagame treatment.  Confuse the 
    opponent and paralyze them--right away, they're up to 62.5% to miss you 
    completely.  The item, Brightpowder or King's Rock (note--KR only works on 
    turns when you use Surf), pumps that even more.  Recover helps control any 
    hits that go through your barrier, and Surf allows you to deal damage.  After 
    all, you can't win JUST by annoying--you have to annoy for the psychological 
    effect, then deal damage.
    
    Tauros@leftovers Fissure/Horn Drill/Rest/Sleep Talk "Fish"
    As I said earlier, don't worry that your attacks are only 30%--you'll get so 
    many chances that, on average, you'll hit 8.89 times.  Last I checked, it only 
    took 6 hits to win.  If you lose to this, don't blame me.  Blame Fish.  Blame 
    Fish for everything.
    
    Lapras Perish Song/Whirlpool/Confuse Ray/Rest
    Trap the opponent with Whirlpool, hope it lasts long enough for a P-Song (see 
    Misdreavus for more details), and Confuse the opponent in the mean time.  
    Lapras can take a beating, especially with Rest, so multiple traps are 
    possible within a match. 
    
    Jolteon Thunderbolt/Baton Pass/Agility/(Substitute or Hidden Power)
    We all know the three Hidden Power types that work (and, unless you KNOW there 
    are a bunch of Rhydons or Quagsires where you play, that Ice is the best of 
    these).  Typically used to pass Agility to something like Marowak.
    
    Snorlax Curse/(Normal attack)/Earthquake/Rest "Curselax"
    Fun to play, not to oppose.  Curse as many times as you're allowed (or until 
    you fear Haze), then strike with your Normal attack (Double-Edge, Frustration, 
    Return, or Body Slam) or Earthquake against the ghosts.  You'll be attacking 
    second throughout this ordeal, so Rest is there to negate any hits that get 
    through.  Item is typically Leftovers or Mint Berry (though Mint Berry's 
    exhaustive nature limits its effectiveness, so I use Leftovers).
    
    Snorlax@pink bow Selfdestruct/Body Slam/Fire Blast/Earthquake
    If there are far too many Pokemon with Haze, Whirlwind, Roar, Psych Up, and 
    various and sundry attacks in your local play area, here's a Snorlax that 
    requires no setup.  Many people vow by it as a starter, but it can fare just 
    fine without the leadoff pressure.  Feel free to go out with the most powerful 
    unboosted shot in the game.
    
    Zapdos Thunder/Rain Dance/Hidden Power/(Drill Peck or Thunder Wave)
    Water is the preferred HP type for Zapdos, due to Rain Dance and the second 
    type.  Drill Peck is probably the better choice here, since Zapdos inflicts 
    enough damage (and is fast enough) that it could care less about disabling.
    
    Mewtwo Psychic/Submission/Safeguard/Recover
    You mean it was weakened?  If Tyranitar was designed as a Mewtwo counter, the 
    designers obviously forgot about Submission, that arcane move of the past.  
    Mewtwo has about a 62% chance of winning 1-on-1 against its supposed counter, 
    as long as it has Submission.  Safeguard can stop any disabling team save one 
    that's led by an Electrode.
    
    Typhlosion Sunny Day/Flamethrower/Thunderpunch/Earthquake
    The best moveset of all six starters.  Water is stopped by a combination of 
    Sunny Day and/or Thunderpunch, Earthquake gets the mirror, and the rest can 
    take a 318-SA, 95-power attack with a base multiplier of 225%.  If you want, 
    you can replace it with Fire Blast.
    
    Crobat@leftovers Mean Look/Toxic/Confuse Ray/Fly
    This Pokemon is somehow good despite using two of the most overrated moves in 
    existence: Toxic and Fly.  Individually they do suck, but put them together 
    and it's quite a combo.  First trap the opponent, then bring on the confusion 
    and poison (since they no longer have access to the #1 tactic of switching).  
    Fly effectively slows down the battle to half speed...but that means that your 
    Leftovers recovery and their Toxic damage have more time to take effect!
    
    Lanturn Surf/Thunder/Rain Dance/Ice Beam
    Not played as often as it should, if you ask me.  Maybe that's due to the 
    inability to recover, and the unimpressive speed.  Rain Dance makes Surf a 
    x2.25 base multiplier, Thunder a VHPSA with the accuracy of a regular HPSA, 
    and Ice Beam does get the subtle benefit of stopping random thaws, while 
    putting big damage to the face of Grasses.
    
    Ampharos Thunderbolt/Thunder Wave/Fire Punch/Hidden Power
    Because of Fire Punch, this is one of the few cases where Water outdoes Ice 
    for Hidden Power type.  And because Quagsire is more of a threat than Rhydon, 
    you could even step down to Grass for the situational.  It's like Raichu, only 
    less stigmatized.
    
    Quagsire Haze/Surf/Ancientpower/(roulette wheel of Quagsire's moves)
    Building a Quagsire moveset has such an anticlimactic feel to it.  It's 
    supposed to be a power, but it isn't (despite having only one weakness, to a 
    type that got SEVERELY undercut in GSC).  Move 4 can be just about anything, 
    but remember that Blizzard and Ice Beam DO NOT help this Pokemon out at all.  
    (They're usually faster than Quagsire anyway, and one Giga Drain or even Razor 
    Leaf will be the end.)
    
    Espeon Psychic/Growth/Morning Sun/Hidden Power
    As far as I'm concerned, the Hidden Power can be any Special type you choose 
    (though Psychic would be a little pointless).  Ice or Dark may be the best, 
    since they don't cut into Espeon's HP.  Growth as often as you can, then if 
    you can hit two turns of attacks, the Growths have paid for themselves.  
    Everything after that is gravy.
    
    Umbreon Double Team/Mean Look/Moonlight/Baton Pass
    It's as versatile as your team lets it be.  Against practically anything 
    except Machamp, trap the opponent, get in as many DTs as possible, and force 
    the opponent to fight its least favorite member of your team.  Very fun.
    
    Misdreavus Mean Look/Perish Song/Pain Split/Destiny Bond "I Win"
    How fun can Pokemon torture be?  Try Misdreavus, and you'll have an answer.  
    Trap anything, start the three-turn bomb, then if you get low on health you 
    can either Pain Split to suck the opponent's blood, or Bond to ensure a death, 
    then at the 1 count, switch.  Mean Look is still in effect at the start of the 
    turn, so the opponent can't switch in turn, and will fall.  Repeat five more 
    times, or until you're rushed to the hospital with a Game Boy or N64 
    controller through the skull (courtesy of your enraged opponent).
    
    Forretress@pink bow Spikes/Explosion/Hidden Power/Toxic
    Forretress is a litmus test for the opponent's team.  If the opponent has a 
    leadoff Fire, switch.  Otherwise, use Spikes and if there's a Fire-type 
    anywhere in the opponent's team, it will pop out, at which point you go BOOM.  
    If not, use Hidden Power over and over (for best results, make it a Bug-type 
    move) and blow up at the most inopportune time.  Fun. 
    
    Scizor Hidden Power/Swords Dance/Agility/Baton Pass
    Bug is the preferred HP type, given that there's no other decent STAB move 
    allowed (you could also choose Steel and its +4 Defense benefit, but that type 
    fares worse overall type-wise).  You can SD and Agility up with Scizor, then 
    either take the opponent on your own or BP to your favorite physical sweeper.
    
    Heracross Earthquake/Megahorn/Endure/Reversal
    Just like Dodrio.  It doesn't NEED an Attack boost, but it would help, along 
    with a Speed boost.  Just keep at Earthquake and Megahorn while you're still 
    in safe range, Endure a would-be death, then start firing away 300-power 
    shots.  Sayonara, Snorlax.
    
    Octillery Surf/Flamethrower/Ice Beam/(random move)
    Basically, this is the Special-attacking version of Machamp.  Heck, that last 
    slot can be a happiness-based move...or Haze...or Rest...or Amnesia...or Focus 
    Energy...or Hidden Power...just like the struggle for Machamp's fourth slot.  
    Attack as you please.
    
    Skarmory Curse/Rest/Drill Peck/Whirlwind
    The Anti-Snorlax.  On its own, Skarmory is the one and only Pokemon that a +5 
    Snorlax can't take down with a single well-placed hit, and Curses only let it 
    live longer.  Ideally you switch it in as soon as you suspect a Curse user, 
    keep the Curse race a close one, then Drill Peck if it'll do decent damage or 
    blow the opponent away if it won't.  Congratulations, you now get to fire a 
    999-attack airplane incarnate at a normal-stat opponent.  This Pokemon will 
    teach one specific lesson to a stubborn opponent: Don't do drugs.
    
    Houndoom Sunny Day/Fire Blast/Solarbeam/Crunch
    Under Sunny Day, you're looking at a 120-power move that lowers SD, another 
    120-power move that counters three weaknesses, and a whopping 270-power poke 
    in the ass.  Fire Blast is preferred over Flamethrower here because of 
    horrible durability.
    
    Kingdra@leftovers Surf/(Dragonbreath or Ice Beam)/Rest/(Haze or Double Team)
    Believe it or not, Kingdra has a field day thwarting any attempts to exploit 
    its one weakness.  Use DT if you're trapped indoors during a snowstorm without 
    a Gameshark in a place that isn't New York City.  Or if your name is Cat-Gonk.
    
    --**SMEARGLE MOVESETS**--
    I'm counting all these as one.  There are so many ways to play Smeargle that 
    to count each one separately would ruin the representation of the others.  
    Note that if you're playing on your own (and thus not subject to the 
    inculcated beliefs of the community), Ditto and Mew, as well as any Metronome 
    user, can play these sets as well.
    
    Spider Web/Spore/Mind Reader/Horn Drill: This set is a mixture of Timmy and 
    Johnny playing styles.  You can knock out any non-Ghost in four turns, and if 
    you're lucky, they won't be able to respond.  Note that Spider Web is 
    preferred over Mean Look, due to the number of PP.
    
    Baton Pass/(three stat-boosting moves): The fun thing about Smeargle as a 
    BP'er is that it can boost any desired combination of stats.  It's the lone 
    candidate for passing (the suicidal) Belly Drum, and combinations like Swords 
    Dance/Barrier/Agility (Super Curselax Setup) are begging for abuse.  And a 
    313-HP Pokemon is going to try and abuse them.  Good luck!
    
    Counter/Mirror Coat/Destiny Bond/Recover: The mini-Wobbuffet, as I call it.  
    Except that it can stick around for a bit longer (okay, maybe not) with 
    Recover.  Destiny Bond will come in very handy most of the time.
    
    Thunder Wave/Super Fang/Whirlwind/Recover: This is my contribution to the 
    world of Smeargle.  IF you can get it to work, here's the plan: Paralyze the 
    opponent, take half their health, then force in a new opponent and repeat.  
    1000 damage by a Smeargle?  Hey, it could happen.
    
    Spikes/Heal Bell/Haze/Pain Split: Use Heal Bell to clear status, Haze to clear 
    stat modifiers from the opponent (good luck), or Spikes if that move needs 
    some action.  Then, since you're probably low on health, suck the opponent's 
    blood away (works best on Snorlax, Wobbuffet, and Blissey).  It just might 
    have a use as a Curselax exterminator.
    --**END SMEARGLE MOVESETS**--
    
    Miltank Heal Bell/(Body Slam or Earthquake)/Milk Drink/(Psych Up or Attract)
    This Heal Beller still can't hold up well to Machamp, but it can against, say, 
    Tyranitar.  And with Psych Up, it can fend off Snorlax for a while.
    
    Blissey Thunder Wave/Counter/Softboiled/Seismic Toss
    This is the "RBY-ified" way to play Blissey.  Rhydon/Marowak uses 
    Earthquake...now that move can be Countered.  That's enough for a kill.  No 
    Minimize because it conflicts with Counter.
    
    Blissey@leftovers Curse/Double-Edge/Heal Bell/Softboiled
    Never thought you'd see the day where Blissey could use Normal attacks?  After 
    all forms of Hazing and all Machamps have been eradicated from the opponent's 
    side, this Pokemon will dominate like nothing this side of Curselax.  Six 
    Curses pump the Attack to a respectable 472.  You won't get automatic KOs on 
    everything...but this Pokemon is IMPERVIOUS when and if the sixth Curse falls, 
    and winning by defense is much more satisfying than winning by offense, isn't 
    it?
    
    Raikou Thunderbolt/Crunch/(Reflect or Hidden Power)/Rest
    Reflect is for the people who never learn.  1-in-4096 odds isn't a just cause 
    to ban a move--how many of those people go out and maximize their stats 
    anyway?  That's 16 times less likely!  Anyway, if you just woke up, come 
    recite the mono-Electric HP types once more: "Ice, Water, and Grass, in 
    descending preferential order."
    
    Suicune Surf/Roar/Mirror Coat/Rest
    After RBY's Bug v. Psychic case was resolved, this was GSC's first testament 
    to "A 2 in the Type Chart isn't always a good thing."  Zapdos and Pikachu can 
    try to Thunder this to death all they want, but unless the next four coin 
    flips all come up heads, those Pokemon end up eating their words--in the form 
    of 700 damage shoved down their throats.  And there's even a way for Suicune 
    to use its type in a proactive manner!  Luckily for it, GAMEFREAK decided that 
    the concept of a Fire-type with Mirror Coat was simply out of flavor.  Item is 
    the standard Curselax choice: save two turns or preserve the item 
    indefinitely?
    
    Tyranitar Ancientpower/Earthquake/Crunch/(HPSA)
    If you've forgotten, HPSA stands for High-Powered Special Attack (Thunderbolt, 
    Ice Beam, Flamethrower, Psychic, Surf; as opposed to the VHPSAs like Blizzard 
    that I don't often recommend).  Basically, you should find something the 
    opponent is weak to, or failing that, try Ancientpower for a 10% chance of 
    winning the game immediately.  
    
    Lugia Aeroblast/Earthquake/Curse/Recover
    Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to disarm a Pokemon with 
    Overall Defense Rating of 317,060.  You will be given six Pokemon of your own.  
    The enemy's weaponry consists of Aeroblasts accompanied by an Attack stat 
    pumped to 400 or even 800, as well as Anti-Electric Guns for denial against 
    the most obvious approach.  Good luck.
    
    Ho-oh Recover/Sacred Fire/Thunderbolt/Earthquake
    Another challenging Pokemon to stop, though not as challenging due to the lack 
    of setup and presence of a W4.  Eat 300+-attack, 95-100 power moves, turn 
    after turn.  If you can do that, though, Ho-oh won't be looking so good.
    
    Celebi@leftovers Leech Seed/Recover/Heal Bell/Psychic
    This Celebi can regain about 250 of its own HP every turn, which is an engine 
    that most Pokemon are hard-pressed to race.  Replace Psychic with Giga Drain 
    to increase that number even more.  Oh, and it can Heal Bell to effectively 
    act as five Miracleberries kicking in at once.
    
    More movesets will fill this space eventually.
    
    **********************
    *304. Reference Chart*
    **********************
    
    It's back, and much bigger.
    
    Key:
    Name: The species name.  Not much to say.  Only final-stage Pokemon are 
    listed, with the notable exception of Scyther (since its stat total is 
    identical to that of its evolution).
    Stats: Like last time, each stat receives two numbers, in base/max format.  
    Each has its uses.
    Learned Moves: Moves a Pokemon learns naturally.  The number in parentheses 
    represents the level at which it can be learned, based on the fastest-learning 
    member of the evolution chain.
    TM Moves: Moves acquired through TM, HM, or Move Tutor.  Moves with * are only 
    accessible from RBY.
    Egg Moves: Moves only accessible by getting them on a hatchling.  Any moves in 
    CAPS are beyond the 165 RBY moves, and thus can't be combined with any move 
    that receives a *.
    Specials: Moves acquired through other means, such as Stadium Prizes or NY 
    Pokecenter.  They can't be combined with each other or with Egg Moves unless 
    otherwise stated.
    Evolution: The evolution chain behind that Pokemon.  Useful only if you're 
    playing through the game, and aren't yet at the strategy stage (or if you've 
    created a level-limit tournament, and need to know what can get in).
    Experience: Yeah, yeah, yeah.  Who needs it.  Just in case you want to know 
    such random facts, they're now here for your perusal.
    
    Venusaur (GRS/PSN)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 82/262, DF 83/264, SA 100/298, SD 100/298, SP 80/258
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Growl (4), Leech Seed (7), Vine Whip (10), 
    Poisonpowder (15), Sleep Powder (15), Razor Leaf (20), Sweet Scent (25), 
    Growth (32), Synthesis (39), Solarbeam (46)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, 
    Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, 
    Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Defense Curl, Rest, 
    Attract, Fury Cutter, Cut, Flash, Swords Dance*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, 
    Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: SAFEGUARD, Light Screen, Skull Bash, CHARM, Razor Wind, Petal Dance
    Specials: ANCIENTPOWER, Rock Throw
    Evolution: Bulbasaur -> Ivysaur (L16) -> Venusaur (L32)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Charizard (FIR/FLY)
    Stats: HP 78/359, AT 84/266, DF 78/254, SA 109/316, SD 85/268, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Growl (0), Ember (7), Smokescreen (13), Rage (19), 
    Scary Face (25), Flamethrower (31), Wing Attack (36), Slash (37), Dragon Rage 
    (43), Fire Spin (49)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Dragonbreath, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Swift, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Steel Wing, 
    Fire Punch, Fury Cutter, Cut, Fly, Strength, Flamethrower, Mega Punch*, Swords 
    Dance*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Submission*, 
    Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Dragon Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Reflect*, 
    Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Rock Slide, Bite, OUTRAGE, ANCIENTPOWER, BELLY DRUM, BEAT UP
    Specials: CRUNCH
    Evolution: Charmander (FIR) -> Charmeleon (FIR - L16) -> Charizard (L36)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Blastoise (WTR)
    Stats: HP 79/361, AT 83/264, DF 100/298, SA 85/268, SD 105/308, SP 78/254
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (4), Bubble (7), Withdraw (10), Water Gun 
    (13), Bite (18), Rapid Spin (23), Protect (28), Rain Dance (33), Skull Bash 
    (40), Hydro Pump (47)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, 
    Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, 
    Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double 
    Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Surf, 
    Strength, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Submission*, Counter*, 
    Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Haze, FLAIL, Mist, Confusion, FORESIGHT, MIRROR COAT
    Specials: ZAP CANNON
    Evolution: Squirtle -> Wartortle (L16) -> Blastoise (L36)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Butterfree (BUG/FLY)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 45/188, DF 50/198, SA 80/258, SD 80/258, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), String Shot (0), Harden (7), Confusion (10), 
    Poisonpowder (13), Stun Spore (14), Sleep Powder (15), Supersonic (18), 
    Whirlwind (23), Gust (28), Psybeam (34), Safeguard (40)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Psychic, 
    Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Rest, Attract, Nightmare, Flash, 
    Razor Wind*, Whirlwind*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, 
    Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Psywave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Caterpie (BUG) -> Metapod (BUG - L7) -> Butterfree (L10)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Beedrill (BUG/PSN)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 80/258, DF 40/178, SA 45/188, SD 80/258, SP 75/248
    Learned Moves: Poison Sting (0), String Shot (0), Harden (7), Fury Attack 
    (10), Focus Energy (15), Twineedle (20), Rage (25), Pursuit (30), Pin Missile 
    (35), Agility (40)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Swift, Rest, Attract, Fury Cutter, Cut, Swords 
    Dance*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, 
    Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Weedle (BUG) -> Kakuna (BUG - L7) -> Beedrill (L10)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Pidgeot (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 83/369, AT 80/258, DF 75/248, SA 70/238, SD 70/238, SP 91/280
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Sand-Attack (5), Gust (9), Quick Attack (15), 
    Whirlwind (21), Wing Attack (29), Agility (37), Mirror Move (47)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, 
    Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Fly, Razor Wind*, Whirlwind*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Sky Attack*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: PURSUIT, FAINT ATTACK, FORESIGHT, STEEL WING
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Pidgey -> Pidgeotto (L18) -> Pidgeot (L36)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Raticate (NRM)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 81/260, DF 60/218, SA 50/198, SD 70/238, SP 97/292
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (0), Quick Attack (7), Hyper Fang (13), 
    Focus Energy (20), Pursuit (27), Super Fang (34)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, 
    Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron 
    Tail, Thunder, Return, Dig, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Swift, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Thief, Cut, Strength, Thunderbolt, 
    Ice Beam, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, 
    Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Screech, Counter, FLAME WHEEL, Bite, REVERSAL, Fury Swipes
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Rattata -> Raticate (L20)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Fearow (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 90/278, DF 65/228, SA 61/220, SD 61/220, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Growl (0), Leer (7), Fury Attack (13), Pursuit (25), 
    Mirror Move (31), Drill Peck (37), Agility (43)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Protect, Endure, 
    Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, 
    Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Fly, Razor Wind*, Whirlwind*, Take 
    Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Sky Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: SCARY FACE, FAINT ATTACK, Quick Attack, Tri Attack, FALSE SWIPE
    Specials: Sonicboom
    Evolution: Spearow -> Fearow (L20)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Arbok (PSN)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 85/268, DF 69/236, SA 65/228, SD 79/256, SP 80/258
    Learned Moves: Wrap (0), Leer (0), Poison Sting (9), Bite (15), Glare (23), 
    Screech (29), Acid (37), Haze (43)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, 
    Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Rest, Attract, Thief, Strength, Body 
    Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, 
    Skull Bash*, Rock Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: SPITE, PURSUIT, Slam, BEAT UP, CRUNCH
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Ekans -> Arbok (L22)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Raichu (ELC)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 90/278, DF 55/208, SA 90/278, SD 85/268, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Thundershock (0), Charm (0), Growl (0), Tail Whip (6), Thunder 
    Wave (8), Sweet Kiss (11), Quick Attack (11), Double Team (15), Slam (20), 
    Thunderbolt (26), Swift* (26), Agility (33), Thunder (41), Light Screen (50)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Hidden 
    Power, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Thunder, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Defense 
    Curl, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Strength, Flash, 
    Thunderbolt, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Pay Day*, Submission*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull 
    Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: ENCORE, Doubleslap, Bide, REVERSAL, PRESENT
    Specials: Surf* (this can coexist with Doubleslap, Dizzy Punch, Sing, Petal 
    Dance, and Bide), Dizzy Punch, Sing, Petal Dance, SCARY FACE
    Evolution: Pichu -> Pikachu (Happy) -> Raichu (Thunderstone) 
    Experience: Normal
    
    Sandslash (GRD)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 100/298, DF 110/318, SA 45/188, SD 55/208, SP 65/228
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Defense Curl (6), Sand-Attack (11), Poison Sting 
    (17), Slash (23), Swift (30), Fury Swipes (37), Sandstorm (45)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Sandstorm, Swift, Defense Curl, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fury Cutter, 
    Cut, Strength, Swords Dance*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Submission*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Rock 
    Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Counter, RAPID SPIN, FLAIL, SAFEGUARD, METAL CLAW
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Sandshrew -> Sandslash (L22)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Nidoqueen (PSN/GRD)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 82/262, DF 87/272, SA 75/248, SD 85/268, SP 76/250
    Learned Moves: Growl (0), Tackle (0), Scratch (8), Double Kick (12), Poison 
    Sting (17), Tail Whip (23), Body Slam (23), Bite (30), Fury Swipes (38)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, 
    Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Thunder, Earthquake, Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-
    Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, 
    Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Fury 
    Cutter, Surf, Strength, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega 
    Kick*, Horn Drill*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water 
    Gun*, Pay Day*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, 
    Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Rock Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: CHARM, Counter, Disable, Focus Energy, Supersonic, BEAT UP, Take 
    Down
    Specials: Lovely Kiss, SWEET KISS, MORNING SUN
    Evolution: NidoranF (PSN) -> Nidorina (PSN - L16) -> Nidoqueen (Moon Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Nidoking (PSN/GRD)
    Stats: HP 81/365, AT 92/282, DF 77/252, SA 85/268, SD 75/248, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Leer (0), Tackle (0), Horn Attack (8), Double Kick (12), Poison 
    Sting (17), Focus Energy (23), Thrash (23), Fury Attack (30), Horn Drill (38)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, 
    Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Thunder, Earthquake, Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-
    Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, 
    Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Fury 
    Cutter, Surf, Strength, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega 
    Kick*, Horn Drill*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water 
    Gun*, Pay Day*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, 
    Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Rock Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Counter, Disable, Supersonic, Amnesia, Confusion, BEAT UP, Take 
    Down
    Specials: Lovely Kiss, SWEET KISS, MOONLIGHT
    Evolution: NidoranM (PSN) -> Nidorino (PSN - L16) -> Nidoking (Moon Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Clefable (NRM)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 70/238, DF 73/244, SA 85/268, SD 90/278, SP 60/218
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Charm (0), Growl (0), Encore (4), Sing (8), Sweet 
    Kiss (13), Doubleslap (13), Minimize (19), Defense Curl (26), Metronome (34), 
    Moonlight (43), Light Screen (53)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, 
    Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Iron Tail, Thunder, Return, Psychic, Shadow 
    Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire Blast, 
    Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Fire Punch, 
    Nightmare, Strength, Flash, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, 
    Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, 
    Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, 
    Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Tri Attack*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Amnesia, Splash, BELLY DRUM, PRESENT, Mimic, Metronome
    Specials: Dizzy Punch, Swift, Petal Dance, SCARY FACE
    Evolution: Cleffa -> Clefairy (Happy) -> Clefable (Moon Stone)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Ninetales (FIR)
    Stats: HP 73/349, AT 76/250, DF 75/248, SA 81/260, SD 100/298, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Ember (0), Tail Whip (0), Quick Attack (7), Roar (13), Confuse 
    Ray (19), Safeguard (25), Flamethrower (31), Fire Spin (37)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Return, Dig, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire Blast, Swift, Rest, Attract, Flamethrower, Body 
    Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: SPITE, Disable, Hypnosis, FLAIL, FAINT ATTACK
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Vulpix -> Ninetales (Fire Stone)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Wigglytuff (NRM)
    Stats: HP 140/483, AT 70/238, DF 45/188, SA 75/248, SD 50/198, SP 45/188
    Learned Moves: Sing (0), Charm (0), Defense Curl (4), Pound (9), Disable (14), 
    Rollout (19), Doubleslap (24), Rest (29), Body Slam (34), Double-Edge (39)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, 
    Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Thunder, Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-
    Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire Blast, Defense Curl, 
    Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Fire Punch, Nightmare, 
    Strength, Flash, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, 
    Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Submission*, 
    Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull 
    Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Tri Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: FAINT ATTACK, PRESENT, PERISH SONG
    Specials: Dizzy Punch, SCARY FACE, Mimic
    Evolution: Igglybuff -> Jigglypuff (Happy) -> Wigglytuff (Moon Stone)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Vileplume (GRS/PSN)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 80/258, DF 85/268, SA 100/298, SD 90/278, SP 50/198
    Learned Moves: Absorb (0), Sweet Scent (7), Poisonpowder (14), Stun Spore 
    (16), Sleep Powder (18), Acid (23), Moonlight (32), Petal Dance (39), 
    Solarbeam* (46)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Rest, Attract, Cut, Flash, Swords 
    Dance*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Mimic*, 
    Reflect*, Bide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: SYNTHESIS, FLAIL, Razor Leaf, Swords Dance, CHARM
    Specials: Leech Seed
    Evolution: Oddish -> Gloom (L21) -> Vileplume (Leaf Stone) / Bellossom (GRS - 
    Sun Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Parasect (GRS/BUG)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 95/288, DF 80/258, SA 60/218, SD 80/258, SP 30/158
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Stun Spore (7), Poisonpowder (13), Leech Life 
    (19), Spore (25), Slash (31), Growth (37), Giga Drain (43)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, 
    Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, 
    Return, Dig, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Rest, Attract, 
    Thief, Fury Cutter, Cut, Flash, Swords Dance*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-
    Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Screech, Counter, Psybeam, FLAIL, FALSE SWIPE, SWEET SCENT, Light 
    Screen, PURSUIT
    Specials: SYNTHESIS
    Evolution: Paras -> Parasect (L24)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Venomoth (BUG/PSN)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 65/228, DF 60/218, SA 90/278, SD 70/238, SP 90/278
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Disable (0), Foresight (0), Supersonic (9), 
    Confusion (17), Poisonpowder (20), Leech Life (25), Stun Spore (28), Gust 
    (31), Psybeam (33), Sleep Powder (36), Psychic (41)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Psychic, 
    Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Swift, Rest, Attract, Thief, 
    Flash, Razor Wind*, Whirlwind*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, 
    Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Psywave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Screech, BATON PASS, GIGA DRAIN
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Venonat -> Venomoth (L31)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Dugtrio (GRD)
    Stats: HP 35/273, AT 80/258, DF 50/198, SA 50/198, SD 70/238, SP 120/338
    Learned Moves: Tri Attack (0), Scratch (0), Growl (5), Magnitude (9), Dig 
    (17), Sand-Attack (25), Slash (33), Earthquake (41), Fissure (49)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Rest, Attract, Thief, Cut, Body Slam*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, Rock Slide*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Screech, PURSUIT, ANCIENTPOWER, FAINT ATTACK, BEAT UP
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Diglett -> Dugtrio (L26)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Persian (NRM)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 70/238, DF 60/218, SA 65/228, SD 65/228, SP 115/328
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Growl (0), Bite (11), Pay Day (20), Faint Attack 
    (28), Screech (35), Fury Swipes (41), Slash (46)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron 
    Tail, Thunder, Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Swift, Defense Curl, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, 
    Nightmare, Thunderbolt, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, 
    Water Gun*, Pay Day*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: CHARM, SPITE, Hypnosis, Amnesia
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Meowth -> Persian (L28)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Golduck (WTR)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 82/262, DF 78/254, SA 95/288, SD 80/258, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Tail Whip (5), Disable (10), Confusion (16), 
    Screech (23), Psych Up (31), Fury Swipes (40), Hydro Pump (50)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Psych Up, Hidden 
    Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Iron Tail, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Rest, Attract, Fury Cutter, Surf, Strength, Flash, 
    Whirlpool, Waterfall, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take 
    Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Pay Day*, Submission*, Counter*, 
    Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Psybeam, Psychic, Hypnosis, Light Screen, FORESIGHT, FUTURE SIGHT, 
    Ice Beam, CROSS CHOP
    Specials: Amnesia*, Petal Dance, Tri Attack
    Evolution: Psyduck -> Golduck (L33)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Primeape (FTG)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 105/308, DF 60/218, SA 60/218, SD 70/238, SP 95/288
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Leer (0), Low Kick (9), Karate Chop (15), Fury 
    Swipes (21), Focus Energy (27), Rage (28), Seismic Toss (33), Cross Chop (39), 
    Screech (45), Thrash (51)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Psych Up, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Thunder, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, 
    Strength, Thunderbolt, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, 
    Double-Edge*, Pay Day*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mimic*, 
    Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, Rock Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: REVERSAL, BEAT UP, FORESIGHT, Meditate, Rock Slide, Counter
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Mankey -> Primeape (L28)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Arcanine (FIR)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 110/318, DF 80/258, SA 100/298, SD 80/258, SP 95/288
    Learned Moves: Bite (0), Roar (0), Ember (9), Leer (18), Take Down (26), Flame 
    Wheel (34), Agility (42), Flamethrower (50), Extremespeed (50)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, 
    Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Dragonbreath, 
    Return, Dig, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire Blast, Swift, Rest, 
    Attract, Flamethrower, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Dragon 
    Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Thrash, CRUNCH, SAFEGUARD, Fire Spin, Body Slam
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Growlithe -> Arcanine (Fire Stone)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Poliwrath (WTR/FTG)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 85/268, DF 95/288, SA 70/238, SD 90/278, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Bubble (0), Hypnosis (7), Water Gun (13), Doubleslap (19), Rain 
    Dance (25), Body Slam (31), Submission (35), Belly Drum (37), Amnesia* (38), 
    Hydro Pump (43), Mind Reader (51)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Earthquake, Return, Psychic, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Defense Curl, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Surf, 
    Strength, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Submission*, Counter*, 
    Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, 
    Psywave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Haze, MIND READER, Mist, Splash, Bubblebeam
    Specials: Growth, SWEET KISS, Lovely Kiss
    Evolution: Poliwag (WTR) -> Poliwhirl (WTR - L25) -> Poliwrath (Water Stone) / 
    Politoed (WTR - Trade while holding King's Rock)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Alakazam (PSY)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 50/208, DF 45/198, SA 135/368, SD 85/268, SP 120/338
    Learned Moves: Teleport (0), Kinesis (0), Confusion (16), Disable (18), 
    Psybeam (21), Recover (26), Future Sight (31), Psychic (38), Reflect (45)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, 
    Return, Dig, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Nightmare, 
    Flash, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, 
    Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Tri Attack*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: ENCORE, Barrier, Light Screen
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Abra -> Kadabra (L16) -> Alakazam (Trade)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Machamp (FTG)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 130/358, DF 80/258, SA 65/228, SD 85/268, SP 55/208
    Learned Moves: Low Kick (0), Leer (0), Focus Energy (7), Karate Chop (13), 
    Seismic Toss (19), Foresight (25), Vital Throw (31), Cross Chop (37), Scary 
    Face (43), Submission (49)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, 
    Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire 
    Blast, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Strength, 
    Flamethrower, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, 
    Metronome*, Skull Bash*, Rock Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: ENCORE, Light Screen, Rolling Kick, Meditate
    Specials: FALSE SWIPE
    Evolution: Machop -> Machoke (L28) -> Machamp (Trade)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Victreebel (GRS/PSN)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 105/308, DF 65/228, SA 100/298, SD 60/218, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Vine Whip (0), Growth (6), Wrap (11), Sleep Powder (15), 
    Poisonpowder (17), Stun Spore (19), Acid (23), Sweet Scent (30), Razor Leaf 
    (37), Slam (45)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Rest, Attract, Cut, Flash, Swords 
    Dance*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Mimic*, 
    Reflect*, Bide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: ENCORE, Leech Life, SYNTHESIS, Swords Dance, Reflect
    Specials: Lovely Kiss, SWEET KISS
    Evolution: Bellsprout -> Weepinbell (L21) -> Victreebel (Leaf Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Tentacruel (WTR/PSN)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 70/238, DF 65/228, SA 80/258, SD 120/338, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Poison Sting (0), Supersonic (6), Constrict (12), Acid (19), 
    Water Gun* (22), Bubblebeam (25), Wrap (30), Barrier (36), Screech (43), Hydro 
    Pump (49)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, 
    Protect, Rain Dance, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Rest, Attract, Cut, Surf, Whirlpool, Ice 
    Beam, Swords Dance*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Rage*, 
    Mega Drain*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Aurora Beam, Haze, RAPID SPIN, SAFEGUARD, MIRROR COAT
    Specials: Confuse Ray
    Evolution: Tentacool -> Tentacruel (L30)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Golem (GRD/RCK)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 110/318, DF 130/358, SA 55/208, SD 65/228, SP 45/188
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Defense Curl (6), Rock Throw (11), Magnitude (16), 
    Selfdestruct (21), Harden (26), Rollout (31), Earthquake (36), Explosion (41)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, 
    Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Fire Punch, Fury Cutter, 
    Strength, Flamethrower, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, 
    Double-Edge*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, 
    Bide*, Metronome*, Selfdestruct*, Explosion*, Rock Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Mega Punch, Rock Slide
    Specials: RAPID SPIN
    Evolution: Geodude -> Graveler (L25) -> Golem (Trade)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Rapidash (FIR)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 100/298, DF 70/238, SA 80/258, SD 80/258, SP 105/308
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Growl (4), Tail Whip (8), Ember (13), Stomp (19), 
    Fire Spin (26), Take Down (34), Fury Attack (40), Agility (43), Fire Blast 
    (53)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, 
    Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Fire Blast, Swift, Rest, Attract, Flamethrower, Horn Drill*, Body Slam*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Thrash, CHARM, FLAME WHEEL, Hypnosis, Quick Attack, Double Kick
    Specials: Low Kick
    Evolution: Ponyta -> Rapidash (L40)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Slowbro (WTR/PSY)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 75/248, DF 110/318, SA 100/298, SD 80/258, SP 30/158
    Learned Moves: Curse (0), Tackle (0), Growl (6), Water Gun (15), Confusion 
    (20), Disable (29), Headbutt (34), Withdraw (37), Amnesia (43), Psychic (48)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych 
    Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, 
    Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Psychic, 
    Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire 
    Blast, Swift, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Fury Cutter, Nightmare, Surf, 
    Strength, Flash, Flamethrower, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Pay Day*, Submission*, 
    Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, 
    Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Tri Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: SAFEGUARD, BELLY DRUM, Stomp, FUTURE SIGHT
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Slowpoke -> Slowbro (L37) / Slowking (Trade while holding King's 
    Rock)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Magneton (ELC/STL)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 60/218, DF 95/288, SA 120/338, SD 70/238, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Thundershock (6), Supersonic (11), Sonicboom (16), 
    Thunder Wave (21), Lock-On (27), Swift (33), Tri Attack (35), Screech (39), 
    Zap Cannon (45)
    TM Moves: Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Hidden Power, Snore, Hyper Beam, 
    Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Thunder, Return, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Rest, Flash, Thunderbolt, Take Down*, Double-
    Edge*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Thunder Wave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: Agility
    Evolution: Magnemite -> Magneton (L30)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Farfetch'd (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 52/307, AT 65/228, DF 55/208, SA 58/214, SD 62/222, SP 60/218
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Sand-Attack (7), Leer (13), Fury Attack (19), Swords 
    Dance (25), Agility (31), Slash (37), False Swipe (44)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Cut, 
    Fly, Razor Wind*, Swords Dance*, Whirlwind*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-
    Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Mirror Move, Gust, FLAIL, Quick Attack, FORESIGHT, STEEL WING
    Specials: BATON PASS, FURY CUTTER
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Dodrio (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 60/333, AT 110/318, DF 70/238, SA 60/218, SD 60/218, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Growl (0), Pursuit (9), Fury Attack (13), Tri Attack 
    (21), Rage (25), Drill Peck (33), Agility (37)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, 
    Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Fly, Whirlwind*, Body Slam*, Take 
    Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Sky Attack*, 
    Tri Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Haze, FLAIL, Supersonic, Quick Attack, FAINT ATTACK
    Specials: Low Kick
    Evolution: Doduo -> Dodrio (L31)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Dewgong (WTR/ICE)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 70/238, DF 80/258, SA 70/238, SD 95/288, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Headbutt (0), Growl (5), Aurora Beam (16), Rest (21), Take Down 
    (32), Ice Beam (37), Safeguard (48)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, 
    Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Rest, Attract, Surf, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Ice Beam, Horn 
    Drill*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun, Pay 
    Day*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: ENCORE, Disable, Lick, Slam, Peck, PERISH SONG
    Specials: FLAIL
    Evolution: Seel -> Dewgong (L34)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Muk (PSN)
    Stats: HP 105/413, AT 105/308, DF 75/248, SA 65/228, SD 100/298, SP 50/198
    Learned Moves: Poison Gas (0), Pound (0), Harden (5), Disable (10), Sludge 
    (16), Minimize (23), Screech (31), Acid Armor (40), Sludge Bomb (50)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, 
    Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Thunder, Return, 
    Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Fire 
    Blast, Thunderpunch, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Flamethrower, 
    Thunderbolt, Body Slam*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Mimic*, Bide*, Selfdestruct*, 
    Explosion*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: PURSUIT, Haze, MEAN LOOK, Lick
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Grimer -> Muk (L38)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Cloyster (WTR/ICE)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 95/288, DF 180/458, SA 85/268, SD 45/188, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Withdraw (0), Supersonic (9), Aurora Beam (17), 
    Protect (25), Leer (33), Spikes (33), Clamp (41), Spike Cannon (41), Ice Beam 
    (49)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, 
    Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Swift, Rest, Attract, Surf, Whirlpool, Ice Beam, Take Down*, Double-
    Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, 
    Selfdestruct*, Explosion*, Tri Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Screech, RAPID SPIN, Barrier, Bubblebeam, Take Down
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Shellder (WTR) -> Cloyster (Water Stone)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Gengar (GHO/PSN)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 65/228, DF 60/218, SA 130/358, SD 75/248, SP 110/318
    Learned Moves: Hypnosis (0), Lick (0), Spite (8), Mean Look (13), Curse (21), 
    Night Shade (21), Confuse Ray (28), Dream Eater (33), Destiny Bond (36)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych 
    Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Giga 
    Drain, Endure, Frustration, Thunder, Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Double 
    Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Rest, 
    Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Nightmare, Strength, Thunderbolt, Mega Punch*, 
    Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Submission*, Counter*, 
    Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Mimic*, Bide*, Metronome*, Selfdestruct*, 
    Skull Bash*, Psywave*, Explosion*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Haze, PERISH SONG, Psywave
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Gastly -> Haunter (L25) -> Gengar (Trade)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Hypno (PSY)
    Stats: HP 85/373, AT 73/244, DF 70/238, SA 73/244, SD 115/328, SP 67/232
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Hypnosis (0), Disable (10), Confusion (18), Headbutt 
    (25), Poison Gas (31), Meditate (36), Psychic (40), Psych Up (43), Future 
    Sight (45)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, 
    Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Fire Punch, Nightmare, Flash, Mega 
    Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Submission*, 
    Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, 
    Metronome*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Tri Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Barrier, Light Screen
    Specials: Amnesia
    Evolution: Drowzee -> Hypno (L26)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Kingler (WTR)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 130/358, DF 115/328, SA 50/198, SD 50/198, SP 75/248
    Learned Moves: Bubble (0), Leer (5), Vicegrip (12), Harden (16), Stomp (23), 
    Guillotine (27), Protect (34), Crabhammer (41)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, 
    Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fury Cutter, Cut, Surf, 
    Strength, Whirlpool, Ice Beam, Swords Dance*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-
    Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Dig, Haze, FLAIL, Slam, Amnesia
    Specials: METAL CLAW
    Evolution: Krabby -> Kingler (L28)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Electrode (ELC)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 50/198, DF 70/238, SA 80/248, SD 80/248, SP 140/378
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Screech (9), Sonicboom (17), Selfdestruct (23), 
    Rollout (29), Light Screen (33), Swift (37), Explosion (39), Mirror Coat (41)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Hidden Power, Snore, 
    Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Thunder, Return, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Rest, Flash, Thunderbolt, Take Down*, Rage*, 
    Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Selfdestruct*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, 
    Explosion*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: Agility
    Evolution: Voltorb -> Electrode (L30)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Exeggutor (GRS/PSY)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 95/288, DF 85/268, SA 125/348, SD 65/228, SP 55/208
    Learned Moves: Barrage (0), Hypnosis (0), Reflect (7), Leech Seed (13), 
    Confusion (19), Stomp (19), Stun Spore (25), Poisonpowder (31), Egg Bomb (31), 
    Sleep Powder (37), Solarbeam (43)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, 
    Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, 
    Return, Psychic, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Dream Eater, 
    Rest, Attract, Thief, Nightmare, Strength, Flash, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Rage*, Mega Drain*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Selfdestruct*, Egg 
    Bomb*, Psywave*, Explosion*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: ANCIENTPOWER, SYNTHESIS, MOONLIGHT, Reflect, Mega Drain
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Exeggcute -> Exeggutor (Leaf Stone)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Marowak (GRD)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 80/258, DF 110/318, SA 50/198, SD 80/258, SP 45/188
    Learned Moves: Growl (0), Tail Whip (5), Bone Club (9), Headbutt (13), Leer 
    (17), Focus Energy (21), Bonemerang (25), Rage (29), False Swipe (33), Thrash 
    (37), Bone Rush (41)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Endure, 
    Frustration, Iron Tail, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, 
    Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Strength, Flamethrower, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, 
    Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, 
    Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull 
    Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Screech, Rock Slide, ANCIENTPOWER, BELLY DRUM, PERISH SONG, Skull 
    Bash, Swords Dance
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Cubone -> Marowak (L28)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Hitmonlee (FTG)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 120/338, DF 53/204, SA 35/168, SD 110/318, SP 87/272
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Double Kick (0), Meditate (6), Rolling Kick (11), 
    Jump Kick (16), Focus Energy (21), Hi Jump Kick (26), Mind Reader (31), 
    Foresight (36), Endure (41), Mega Kick (46), Reversal (51)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Strength, Mega 
    Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Submission*, 
    Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: RAPID SPIN, MIND READER, Hi Jump Kick, MACH PUNCH
    Specials: DIZZY PUNCH
    Evolution: Tyrogue -> Hitmonchan (L20 AT < DF) / Hitmonlee (L20 AT > DF) / 
    Hitmontop (L20 AT = DF)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Hitmonchan (FTG)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 105/308, DF 79/256, SA 35/168, SD 110/318, SP 76/250
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Comet Punch (0), Agility (7), Pursuit (13), Fire 
    Punch (26), Thunderpunch (26), Ice Punch (26), Mach Punch (32), Mega Punch 
    (38), Detect (44), Counter (50)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, Attract, 
    Thief, Fire Punch, Strength, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, 
    Double-Edge*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, 
    Metronome*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: RAPID SPIN, MIND READER, Hi Jump Kick, MACH PUNCH
    Specials: DIZZY PUNCH
    Evolution: Tyrogue -> Hitmonchan (L20 AT < DF) / Hitmonlee (L20 AT > DF) / 
    Hitmontop (L20 AT = DF)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Lickitung (NRM)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 55/208, DF 75/248, SA 60/218, SD 75/248, SP 30/158
    Learned Moves: Lick (0), Supersonic (7), Defense Curl (13), Stomp (19), Wrap 
    (25), Disable (31), Slam (37), Screech (43)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Psych Up, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain 
    Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Thunder, Earthquake, Return, Shadow 
    Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire 
    Blast, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire 
    Punch, Nightmare, Cut, Surf, Strength, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, 
    Mega Punch*, Swords Dance*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, 
    Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: BELLY DRUM, MAGNITUDE, Body Slam
    Specials: Doubleslap
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Weezing (PSN)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 90/278, DF 120/338, SA 85/268, SD 70/238, SP 60/218
    Learned Moves: Poison Gas (0), Tackle (0), Smog (9), Selfdestruct (17), Sludge 
    (21), Smokescreen (25), Haze (33), Explosion (44), Destiny Bond (51)
    TM Moves: Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Thunder, Return, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Fire Blast, Rest, Attract, Thief, 
    Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Selfdestruct*, Explosion*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: PAIN SPLIT, Screech, Psybeam, Psywave, DESTINY BOND
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Koffing -> Weezing (L35)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Rhydon (GRD/RCK)
    Stats: HP 105/308, AT 130/358, DF 120/338, SA 45/188, SD 45/188, SP 40/178
    Learned Moves: Horn Attack (0), Tail Whip (0), Stomp (13), Fury Attack (19), 
    Scary Face (31), Horn Drill (37), Take Down (49), Leer* (50), Earthquake (55)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, 
    Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, 
    Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Thunder, Earthquake, Return, Dig, 
    Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, 
    Thunderpunch, Rest, Attract, Fire Punch, Fury Cutter, Surf, Strength, 
    Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Horn Drill*, 
    Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Pay Day*, 
    Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull 
    Bash*, Rock Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Thrash, PURSUIT, Counter, CRUNCH, REVERSAL, MAGNITUDE, Rock Slide
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Rhyhorn -> Rhydon (L42)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Tangela (GRS)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 55/208, DF 115/328, SA 100/298, SD 40/178, SP 60/218
    Learned Moves: Constrict (0), Sleep Powder (4), Absorb (10), Poisonpowder 
    (13), Vine Whip (19), Bind (25), Mega Drain (31), Stun Spore (34), Slam (40), 
    Growth (46)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet 
    Scent, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, 
    Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Rest, Attract, Thief, 
    Cut, Flash, Swords Dance*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega 
    Drain*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: FLAIL, Amnesia, Confusion, Reflect, Mega Drain
    Specials: SYNTHESIS
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Kangaskhan (NRM)
    Stats: HP 105/413, AT 90/278, DF 80/258, SA 40/178, SD 80/258, SP 90/278
    Learned Moves: Comet Punch (0), Leer (7), Bite (13), Tail Whip (19), Mega 
    Punch (25), Rage (31), Endure (37), Dizzy Punch (43), Reversal (49)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain 
    Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Thunder, Earthquake, Return, Shadow 
    Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire 
    Blast, Thunderpunch, Rest, Attract, Fire Punch, Fury Cutter, Surf, Strength, 
    Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take 
    Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic 
    Toss*, Rage*, Thunderbolt, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Rock Slide*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Disable, Focus Energy, SAFEGUARD, Stomp, FORESIGHT
    Specials: FAINT ATTACK
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Seaking (WTR)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 92/282, DF 65/228, SA 65/228, SD 80/258, SP 68/234
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Tail Whip (0), Supersonic (10), Horn Attack (15), 
    Flail (24), Fury Attack (29), Waterfall (38), Horn Drill (43), Agility (52)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, 
    Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Swift, Rest, Attract, Surf, Waterfall, Ice Beam, Horn Drill*, Take 
    Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull 
    Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Haze, Psybeam, Hydro Pump
    Specials: Swords Dance
    Evolution: Goldeen -> Seaking (L33)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Starmie (WTR/PSY)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 75/248, DF 85/268, SA 100/298, SD 85/268, SP 115/328
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Harden (0), Water Gun (7), Rapid Spin (13), Recover 
    (19), Swift (25), Bubblebeam (31), Minimize (37), Confuse Ray (37), Light 
    Screen (43), Hydro Pump (50)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, 
    Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Thunder, 
    Return, Psychic, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Dream Eater, Rest, 
    Attract, Nightmare, Surf, Flash, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, 
    Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Tri Attack*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: TWISTER
    Evolution: Staryu (WTR) -> Starmie (Water Stone)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Mr. Mime (PSY)
    Stats: HP 40/283, AT 45/188, DF 65/228, SA 100/298, SD 120/338, SP 90/278
    Learned Moves: Barrier (0), Confusion (6), Substitute (11), Meditate (16), 
    Doubleslap (21), Light Screen (26), Reflect (26), Encore (31), Psybeam (36), 
    Baton Pass (41), Safeguard (46)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, 
    Thunder, Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire 
    Punch, Nightmare, Flash, Thunderbolt, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, 
    Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, 
    Psywave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Hypnosis, FUTURE SIGHT, Mimic
    Specials: MIND READER
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Scyther (BUG/FLY)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 110/318, DF 80/258, SA 55/208, SD 80/258, SP 105/308
    Learned Moves: Quick Attack (0), Leer (0), Focus Energy (6), Pursuit (12), 
    False Swipe (18), Agility (24), Wing Attack (30), Slash (36), Swords Dance 
    (42), Double Team (48)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Fury Cutter, Cut, 
    Swords Dance*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Counter, Razor Wind, REVERSAL, SAFEGUARD, BATON PASS, Light Screen
    Specials: Sonicboom
    Evolution: Scyther -> Scizor (BUG/STL - Trade while holding Metal Coat)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Jynx (ICE/PSY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 50/198, DF 35/168, SA 115/328, SD 95/288, SP 95/288
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Lick (0), Sweet Kiss (9), Lovely Kiss (9), Powder 
    Snow (13), Confusion (21), Doubleslap (21), Sing (25), Ice Punch (25), Mean 
    Look (33), Psychic (37), Body Slam (41), Perish Song (45), Thrash* (47), 
    Blizzard (49)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sweet 
    Scent, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Thief, Nightmare, Ice Beam, 
    Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, 
    Water Gun*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, 
    Reflect*, Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, Psywave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Meditate, Lovely Kiss
    Specials: Dizzy Punch, Metronome, Petal Dance
    Evolution: Smoochum -> Jynx (L30)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Electabuzz (ELC)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 83/264, DF 57/212, SA 95/288, SD 85/268, SP 105/308
    Learned Moves: Quick Attack (0), Leer (0), Thunderpunch (9), Light Screen 
    (17), Swift (25), Screech (33), Thundershock* (34), Thunderbolt (41), Thunder 
    (49)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Thunder, Return, Psychic, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Swift, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Strength, 
    Flash, Thunderbolt, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-
    Edge*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, 
    Reflect*, Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Karate Chop, Barrier, Rolling Kick, Meditate, CROSS CHOP
    Specials: Dizzy Punch, PURSUIT
    Evolution: Elekid -> Electabuzz (L30)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Magmar (FIR)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 95/288, DF 57/212, SA 100/298, SD 85/268, SP 93/284
    Learned Moves: Ember (0), Leer (7), Smog (13), Fire Punch (19), Smokescreen 
    (25), Sunny Day (31), Flamethrower (37), Confuse Ray (43), Fire Blast (49)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Return, 
    Psychic, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire Blast, Thunderpunch, 
    Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Strength, Flamethrower, Mega Punch*, 
    Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Submission*, Counter*, 
    Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, 
    Psywave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Screech, Karate Chop, Barrier, Mega Punch, CROSS CHOP
    Specials: Dizzy Punch, FAINT ATTACK
    Evolution: Magby -> Magmar (L30)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Pinsir (BUG)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 125/348, DF 100/298, SA 55/208, SD 70/238, SP 35/168
    Learned Moves: Vicegrip (0), Focus Energy (7), Bind (13), Seismic Toss (19), 
    Harden (25), Guillotine (31), Submission (37), Swords Dance (43), Slash* (49)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fury Cutter, Cut, Strength, Swords Dance*, Body 
    Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Submission*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mimic*, 
    Bide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: FLAIL, Fury Attack
    Specials: SWEET KISS, Rock Throw
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Tauros (NRM)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 100/298, DF 95/288, SA 40/178, SD 70/238, SP 110/318
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (4), Rage (8), Horn Attack (13), Scary 
    Face (19), Stomp* (21), Pursuit (26), Rest (34), Leer* (35), Thrash (43), Take 
    Down (53)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny 
    Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron 
    Tail, Thunder, Earthquake, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire 
    Blast, Rest, Attract, Surf, Strength, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, 
    Horn Drill*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, 
    Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: Quick Attack
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Gyarados (WTR/FLY)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 125/348, DF 79/256, SA 60/218, SD 100/298, SP 81/260
    Learned Moves: Splash (0), Thrash (0), Tackle (15), Bite (20), Dragon Rage 
    (25), Flail (30), Leer (30), Twister (35), Hydro Pump (40), Rain Dance (45), 
    Hyper Beam (50)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Dragonbreath, Thunder, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Rest, Attract, Surf, Strength, Whirlpool, Waterfall, 
    Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Rage*, Dragon Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull 
    Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: REVERSAL, Bubble
    Evolution: Magikarp (WTR) -> Gyarados (L20)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Lapras (WTR/ICE)
    Stats: HP 130/463, AT 85/268, DF 80/258, SA 85/268, SD 95/288, SP 60/218
    Learned Moves: Water Gun (0), Growl (0), Sing (0), Mist (8), Body Slam (15), 
    Confuse Ray (22), Perish Song (29), Ice Beam (36), Rain Dance (43), Safeguard 
    (50), Hydro Pump (57)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Snore, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron 
    Tail, Dragonbreath, Thunder, Return, Psychic, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Nightmare, Surf, Strength, Whirlpool, 
    Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Horn Drill*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Bubblebeam*, Water Gun, Rage*, Solarbeam, Dragon Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, 
    Bide*, Skull Bash*, Psywave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Aurora Beam, FORESIGHT
    Specials: Bite, FUTURE SIGHT
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Ditto (NRM)
    Stats: HP 48/299, AT 48/194, DF 48/194, SA 48/194, SD 48/194, SP 48/194
    Learned Moves: Transform (0) (A mechanic prohibited in all major circles 
    allows access to any move except Selfdestruct, Explosion, Mirror Move, 
    Metronome, Mimic, Sketch, Sleep Talk, or Struggle)
    TM Moves: None
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Vaporeon (WTR)
    Stats: HP 130/463, AT 65/228, DF 60/218, SA 110/318, SD 95/288, SP 65/228
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (0), Sand-Attack (8), Growl (16), Water 
    Gun (16), Quick Attack (23), Bite (30), Focus Energy* (36), Baton Pass (36), 
    Aurora Beam (36), Take Down (42), Haze (42), Acid Armor (47), Mist* (48), 
    Hydro Pump (52)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron 
    Tail, Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, 
    Detect, Rest, Attract, Surf, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Ice Beam, Body Slam*, Take 
    Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, 
    Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: CHARM, FLAIL
    Specials: Growth
    Evolution: Eevee (NRM) -> Vaporeon (Water Stone) / Jolteon (ELC - 
    Thunderstone) / Flareon (FIR - Fire Stone) / Espeon (PSY - Happy 4:00 AM - 
    5:59 PM) / Umbreon (DRK - Happy 6:00 PM - 3:59 AM)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Jolteon (ELC)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 65/228, DF 60/218, SA 110/318, SD 95/288, SP 130/358
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (0), Sand-Attack (8), Growl (16), 
    Thundershock (16), Quick Attack (23), Bite (30), Double Kick (30), Focus 
    Energy* (36), Baton Pass (36), Pin Missile (36), Take Down (42), Thunder Wave 
    (42), Agility (47), Thunder (52)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, 
    Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Thunder, Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Flash, Thunderbolt, Body Slam*, Take Down*, 
    Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: CHARM, FLAIL
    Specials: Growth
    Evolution: Eevee (NRM) -> Vaporeon (WTR - Water Stone) / Jolteon 
    (Thunderstone) / Flareon (FIR - Fire Stone) / Espeon (PSY - Happy 4:00 AM - 
    5:59 PM) / Umbreon (DRK - Happy 6:00 PM - 3:59 AM)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Flareon (FIR)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 130/358, DF 60/218, SA 95/288, SD 110/318, SP 65/228
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (0), Sand-Attack (8), Growl (16), Ember 
    (16), Quick Attack (23), Bite (30), Focus Energy* (36), Baton Pass (36), Fire 
    Spin (36), Take Down (42), Smog (42), Leer (47), Rage* (48), Flamethrower (52)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, 
    Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire Blast, 
    Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Flamethrower, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-
    Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: CHARM, FLAIL
    Specials: Growth
    Evolution: Eevee (NRM) -> Vaporeon (WTR - Water Stone) / Jolteon (ELC - 
    Thunderstone) / Flareon (Fire Stone) / Espeon (PSY - Happy 4:00 AM - 5:59 PM) 
    / Umbreon (DRK - Happy 6:00 PM - 3:59 AM)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Omastar (RCK/WTR)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 60/218, DF 125/348, SA 115/328, SD 70/238, SP 55/208
    Learned Moves: Constrict (0), Withdraw (0), Bite (13), Water Gun (19), Leer 
    (31), Horn Attack* (34), Protect (37), Spike Cannon (40), Ancientpower (49), 
    Hydro Pump (55)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Snore, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, 
    Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Rest, Attract, Thief, 
    Surf, Whirlpool, Ice Beam, Horn Drill*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Submission*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, 
    Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Aurora Beam, Haze, Slam, Supersonic, Bubblebeam
    Specials: Rock Throw
    Evolution: Omanyte -> Omastar (L40)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Kabutops (RCK/WTR)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 115/328, DF 105/308, SA 65/228, SD 70/238, SP 80/258
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Harden (0), Absorb (10), Leer (19), Sand-Attack 
    (28), Endure (37), Slash (40), Mega Drain (46), Hydro Pump* (49), Ancientpower 
    (55)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Snore, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Giga Drain, Endure, 
    Frustration, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Rest, 
    Attract, Thief, Fury Cutter, Cut, Surf, Whirlpool, Ice Beam, Razor Wind*, 
    Swords Dance*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, 
    Water Gun*, Submission*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull 
    Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Dig, Aurora Beam, RAPID SPIN, FLAIL, Bubblebeam
    Specials: Rock Throw
    Evolution: Kabuto -> Kabutops (L40)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Aerodactyl (RCK/FLY)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 105/308, DF 65/228, SA 60/218, SD 75/248, SP 130/358
    Learned Moves: Wing Attack (0), Agility (8), Bite (15), Supersonic (22), 
    Ancientpower (29), Scary Face (36), Take Down (43), Hyper Beam (50)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Dragonbreath, 
    Earthquake, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, 
    Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Steel Wing, Fly, Flamethrower, Razor Wind*, 
    Whirlwind*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Dragon Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, 
    Bide*, Sky Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: PURSUIT, FORESIGHT, Whirlwind, STEEL WING
    Specials: Rock Throw
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Snorlax (NRM)
    Stats: HP 160/523, AT 110/318, DF 65/228, SA 65/228, SD 110/318, SP 30/158
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Amnesia (8), Defense Curl (15), Belly Drum (22), 
    Headbutt (29), Snore (36), Rest (36), Harden* (41), Body Slam (43), Double-
    Edge (48), Rollout (50), Hyper Beam (57)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock 
    Smash, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy 
    Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Thunder, 
    Earthquake, Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Rest, 
    Attract, Fire Punch, Surf, Strength, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Mega 
    Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water 
    Gun*, Pay Day*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, 
    Reflect*, Bide*, Metronome*, Selfdestruct*, Skull Bash*, Psywave*, Rock 
    Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Lick, CHARM
    Specials: Splash, SWEET KISS, Lovely Kiss
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Articuno (ICE/FLY)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 85/268, DF 100/298, SA 95/288, SD 125/348, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Gust (0), Powder Snow (0), Peck* (0), Mist (13), Agility (25), 
    Mind Reader (37), Ice Beam (49), Reflect (61), Blizzard (73)
    TM Moves: Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, 
    Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Swift, Detect, 
    Rest, Steel Wing, Fly, Ice Beam, Razor Wind*, Whirlwind*, Take Down*, Double-
    Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Sky Attack*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Zapdos (ELC/FLY)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 90/278, DF 85/268, SA 125/348, SD 90/278, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Thundershock (0), Thunder Wave (13), Agility (25), 
    Detect (37), Drill Peck (49), Light Screen (61), Thunder (73)
    TM Moves: Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, 
    Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Thunder, Return, 
    Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Swift, Detect, Rest, 
    Steel Wing, Fly, Flash, Thunderbolt, Razor Wind*, Whirlwind*, Take Down*, 
    Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Sky Attack*, Thunder Wave*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Moltres (FIR/FLY)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 100/298, DF 90/278, SA 125/348, SD 85/268, SP 90/278
    Learned Moves: Wing Attack (0), Ember (0), Peck* (0), Fire Spin (13), Agility 
    (25), Endure (37), Flamethrower (49), Safeguard (61), Sky Attack (73)
    TM Moves: Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Swift, Detect, Rest, Steel 
    Wing, Fly, Flamethrower, Razor Wind*, Whirlwind*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, 
    Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Sky Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Dragonite (DRG/FLY)
    Stats: HP 91/385, AT 134/366, DF 95/288, SA 100/298, SD 100/298, SP 80/258
    Learned Moves: Wrap (0), Leer (0), Thunder Wave (8), Twister (15), Dragon Rage 
    (22), Slam (29), Agility (36), Safeguard (43), Outrage (50), Wing Attack (55), 
    Hyper Beam (57) 
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Iron Tail, Dragonbreath, Thunder, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Swift, Thunderpunch, 
    Detect, Rest, Attract, Steel Wing, Fire Punch, Fury Cutter, Fly, Surf, 
    Strength, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Horn 
    Drill*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Rage*, 
    Dragon Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Haze, Mist, Supersonic, Light Screen
    Specials: EXTREMESPEED
    Evolution: Dratini (DRG) -> Dragonair (DRG - L30) -> Dragonite (L55)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Mewtwo (PSY)
    Stats: HP 106/415, AT 110/318, DF 90/278, SA 154/406, SD 90/278, SP 130/358
    Learned Moves: Confusion (0), Disable (0), Barrier (11), Swift (22), Psych Up 
    (33), Future Sight (44), Mist (55), Psychic (66), Amnesia (77), Recover (88), 
    Safeguard (99)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych 
    Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, 
    Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Iron Tail, Thunder, Return, 
    Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Fire Blast, Swift, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Fire Punch, 
    Nightmare, Strength, Flash, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, 
    Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Pay 
    Day*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, 
    Reflect*, Bide*, Metronome*, Selfdestruct*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, 
    Psywave*, Tri Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Mew (PSY)
    Stats: HP 100/403, AT 100/298, DF 100/298, SA 100/298, SD 100/298, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Transform (10), Mega Punch (20), Metronome (30), 
    Psychic (40), Ancientpower (50) (A mechanic prohibited in all major circles 
    allows access to any move except Sketch, Mirror Move, or Struggle)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, 
    Rock Smash, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Blizzard, 
    Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, 
    Solarbeam, Iron Tail, Dragonbreath, Thunder, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Psychic, 
    Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge 
    Bomb, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Swift, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, 
    Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Fire Punch, Fury Cutter, Nightmare, 
    Cut, Fly, Surf, Strength, Flash, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Flamethrower, 
    Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Razor Wind*, Swords Dance*, Whirlwind*, Mega Kick*, 
    Horn Drill*, Body Slam*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, 
    Pay Day*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Dragon 
    Rage*, Fissure*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Selfdestruct*, Egg Bomb*, 
    Skull Bash*, Softboiled*, Sky Attack*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Explosion*, 
    Rock Slide*, Tri Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fading
    
    Meganium (GRS)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 82/262, DF 100/298, SA 83/264, SD 100/298, SP 80/258
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Growl (0), Razor Leaf (8), Reflect (12), 
    Poisonpowder (15), Synthesis (22), Body Slam (29), Light Screen (36), 
    Safeguard (43), Solarbeam (50)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet 
    Scent, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, 
    Iron Tail, Earthquake, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Detect, Rest, Attract, Fury Cutter, Cut, Strength, Flash
    Egg Moves: Counter, Ancientpower, Flail, Vine Whip, Leech Seed, Swords Dance
    Specials: Petal Dance
    Evolution: Chikorita -> Bayleef (L16) -> Meganium (L32)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Typhlosion (FIR)
    Stats: HP 78/359, AT 84/266, DF 78/254, SA 109/316, SD 85/268, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Leer (0), Smokescreen (6), Ember (12), Quick Attack 
    (19), Flame Wheel (27), Swift (36), Flamethrower (46)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron 
    Tail, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Fire Blast, Swift, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, Attract, Fire 
    Punch, Fury Cutter, Cut, Strength, Flamethrower
    Egg Moves: Thrash, Reversal, Fury Swipes, Foresight, Quick Attack, Submission
    Specials: Double-Edge
    Evolution: Cyndaquil -> Quilava (L14) -> Typhlosion (L36)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Feraligatr (WTR)
    Stats: HP 85/373, AT 105/308, DF 100/298, SA 79/256, SD 83/264, SP 78/254
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Leer (0), Rage (7), Water Gun (13), Bite (20), 
    Scary Face (27), Slash (35), Screech (43), Hydro Pump (52)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Iron Tail, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice 
    Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Detect, Rest, Attract, Fury Cutter, Cut, Surf, 
    Strength, Whirlpool, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Thrash, Rock Slide, Razor Wind, Crunch, Ancientpower, Hydro Pump
    Specials: Submission
    Evolution: Totodile -> Croconaw (L18) -> Feraligatr (L30)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Furret (NRM)
    Stats: HP 85/373, AT 76/250, DF 64/226, SA 45/188, SD 55/208, SP 90/278
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Defense Curl (5), Quick Attack (11), Fury Swipes 
    (17), Slam (25), Rest (33), Amnesia (41)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny 
    Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Return, Dig, 
    Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, 
    Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Fury 
    Cutter, Cut, Surf, Strength
    Egg Moves: Pursuit, Focus Energy, Reversal, Slash, Double-Edge
    Specials: Dizzy Punch
    Evolution: Sentret -> Furret (L15)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Noctowl (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 100/403, AT 50/198, DF 50/198, SA 76/250, SD 96/290, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Growl (0), Foresight (6), Peck (11), Hypnosis (16), 
    Reflect (22), Take Down (38), Confusion (34), Dream Eater (48)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, 
    Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Nightmare, Fly, 
    Flash
    Egg Moves: Mirror Move, Faint Attack, Supersonic, Wing Attack, Whirlwind, Sky 
    Attack
    Specials: Night Shade
    Evolution: Hoothoot -> Noctowl (L20)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Ledian (BUG/FLY)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 35/168, DF 50/198, SA 55/208, SD 110/318, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Supersonic (8), Comet Punch (15), Light Screen 
    (22), Reflect (22), Safeguard (22), Baton Pass (29), Swift (36), Agility (43), 
    Double-Edge (50)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny 
    Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, 
    Solarbeam, Return, Dig, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, 
    Thunderpunch, Rest, Attract, Thief, Flash
    Egg Moves: Bide, Psybeam, Light Screen
    Specials: Barrier
    Evolution: Ledyba -> Ledian (L18)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Ariados (BUG/PSN)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 90/278, DF 70/238, SA 60/218, SD 60/218, SP 40/178
    Learned Moves: Poison Sting (0), String Shot (0), Scary Face (6), Constrict 
    (11), Night Shade (17), Leech Life (23), Fury Swipes (30), Spider Web (37), 
    Screech (45), Agility (45), Psychic (53)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, 
    Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Dig, Psychic, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Rest, Attract, Thief, Flash
    Egg Moves: Pursuit, Disable, Psybeam, Sonicboom, Baton Pass
    Specials: Growth
    Evolution: Spinarak -> Ariados (L22)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Crobat (PSN/FLY)
    Stats: HP 85/373, AT 90/278, DF 80/258, SA 70/238, SD 80/258, SP 130/358
    Learned Moves: Leech Life (0), Screech (0), Supersonic (6), Bite (12), Confuse 
    Ray (19), Wing Attack (27), Mean Look (36), Haze (46)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, 
    Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Fly, Razor Wind*, Whirlwind*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Mimic*, Bide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: PURSUIT, Gust, FAINT ATTACK, Quick Attack, Whirlwind
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Zubat -> Golbat (L22) -> Crobat (Happy)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Lanturn (WTR/ELC)
    Stats: HP 125/453, AT 58/214, DF 58/214, SA 76/250, SD 76/250, SP 67/232
    Learned Moves: Bubble (0), Thunder Wave (0), Supersonic (5), Flail (13), Water 
    Gun (17), Spark (25), Confuse Ray (29), Take Down (37), Hydro Pump (41)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Hidden Power, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, 
    Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Thunder, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Rest, Attract, Surf, Flash, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Screech, Flail, Supersonic
    Specials: Light Screen
    Evolution: Chinchou -> Lanturn (L27)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Togetic (NRM/FLY)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 40/178, DF 85/268, SA 80/258, SD 105/308, SP 40/178
    Learned Moves: Growl (0), Charm (0), Metronome (7), Sweet Kiss (18), Encore 
    (25), Safeguard (31), Double-Edge (38)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych Up, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire Blast, Swift, Defense Curl, Dream Eater, Detect, 
    Rest, Attract, Steel Wing, Fly, Flash, Flamethrower
    Egg Moves: Mirror Move, Peck, Present, Foresight, Future Sight
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Togepi -> Togetic (Happy)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Xatu (PSY/FLY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 75/248, DF 70/238, SA 95/288, SD 70/238, SP 95/288
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Leer (0), Night Shade (10), Teleport (20), Future 
    Sight (30), Confuse Ray (30), Psychic (40)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, 
    Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Psychic, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, 
    Nightmare, Fly, Flash
    Egg Moves: Haze, Faint Attack, Quick Attack, Drill Peck, Steel Wing
    Specials: Safeguard
    Evolution: Natu -> Xatu (L25)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Ampharos (ELC)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 75/248, DF 75/248, SA 115/328, SD 90/278, SP 55/208
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Growl (0), Thundershock (9), Thunder Wave (16), 
    Cotton Spore (23), Light Screen (30), Thunderpunch (30), Thunder (37)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Thunder, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Defense Curl, 
    Thunderpunch, Rest, Attract, Fire Punch, Strength, Flash, Thunderbolt
    Egg Moves: Screech, Thunderbolt, Safeguard, Take Down, Body Slam, Reflect
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Mareep -> Flaaffy (L15) -> Ampharos (L30)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Bellossom (GRS)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 80/258, DF 85/268, SA 90/278, SD 100/298, SP 50/198
    Learned Moves: Absorb (0), Sweet Scent (7), Poisonpowder (14), Stun Spore 
    (16), Sleep Powder (18), Acid (23), Moonlight (32), Petal Dance (39), 
    Solarbeam (55)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Rest, Attract, Cut, Flash, Swords Dance*, Take 
    Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mega Drain*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: SYNTHESIS, FLAIL, Razor Leaf, Swords Dance, CHARM
    Specials: Leech Seed
    Evolution: Oddish (GRS/PSN) -> Gloom (GRS/PSN - L21) -> Vileplume (GRS/PSN - 
    Leaf Stone) / Bellossom (Sun Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Azumarill (WTR)
    Stats: HP 100/403, AT 50/198, DF 80/258, SA 50/198, SD 80/258, SP 50/198
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Defense Curl (3), Tail Whip (6), Water Gun (10), 
    Rollout (15), Bubblebeam (21), Double-Edge (28), Rain Dance (36)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Iron Tail, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Swift, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Surf, Strength, Whirlpool, 
    Waterfall, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Supersonic, Amnesia, Belly Drum, Light Screen, Present, Perish 
    Song, Future Sight, Foresight
    Specials: Hydro Pump, Dizzy Punch, Scary Face
    Evolution: Marill -> Azumarill (L18)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Sudowoodo (RCK)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 100/298, DF 115/328, SA 30/158, SD 65/228, SP 30/158
    Learned Moves: Rock Throw (0), Mimic (0), Flail (10), Low Kick (19), Rock 
    Slide (28), Faint Attack (37), Slam (46)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Psych Up, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, 
    Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, 
    Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Strength
    Egg Moves: Selfdestruct
    Specials: Substitute
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Politoed (WTR)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 75/248, DF 75/248, SA 90/278, SD 100/298, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Bubble (0), Hypnosis (7), Water Gun (13), Doubleslap (19), Rain 
    Dance (25), Body Slam (31), Perish Song (35), Belly Drum (37), Amnesia (38), 
    Hydro Pump (43), Swagger (51)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Earthquake, Return, Psychic, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Defense Curl, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Surf, 
    Strength, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Submission*, Counter*, 
    Seismic Toss*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, Metronome*, Skull Bash*, 
    Psywave*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Haze, MIND READER, Mist, Splash, Bubblebeam
    Specials: Growth, SWEET KISS, Lovely Kiss
    Evolution: Poliwag -> Poliwhirl (L25) -> Poliwrath (WTR/FTG - Water Stone) / 
    Politoed (Trade while holding King's Rock)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Jumpluff (GRS/FLY)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 55/208, DF 70/238, SA 55/208, SD 85/268, SP 110/318
    Learned Moves: Splash (0), Synthesis (0), Tail Whip (5), Tackle (10), 
    Poisonpowder (13), Stun Spore (15), Sleep Powder (17), Leech Seed (20), Cotton 
    Spore (25), Mega Drain (30)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, 
    Hyper Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, 
    Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Flash
    Egg Moves: Encore, Double-Edge, Amnesia, Growl, Pay Day, Confusion, Reflect
    Specials: Agility
    Evolution: Hoppip -> Skiploom (L18) -> Jumpluff (L27)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Aipom (NRM)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 70/238, DF 55/208, SA 40/178, SD 55/208, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Tail Whip (0), Sand-Attack (6), Baton Pass (12), 
    Fury Swipes (19), Swift (27), Screech (36), Agility (46)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Thunder, 
    Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, 
    Fire Punch, Fury Cutter, Nightmare, Cut, Strength, Thunderbolt
    Egg Moves: Spite, Pursuit, Doubleslap, Counter, Slam, Beat Up, Agility, 
    Screech
    Specials: Mimic
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fast
    
    Sunflora (GRS)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 75/248, DF 55/208, SA 105/308, SD 85/268, SP 30/158
    Learned Moves: Absorb (0), Growth (4), Mega Drain (10), Razor Leaf (10), Sunny 
    Day (19), Synthesis (31), Petal Dance (31), Giga Drain (46), Solarbeam (46)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Hyper 
    Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Rest, Attract, Cut, Flash
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: Splash
    Evolution: Sunkern -> Sunflora (Sun Stone)
    Experience: Fading
    
    Yanma (BUG/FLY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 65/228, DF 45/188, SA 85/268, SD 45/188, SP 95/288
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Foresight (0), Quick Attack (7), Double Team (13), 
    Sonicboom (19), Detect (25), Supersonic (31), Swift (37), Wing Attack (37), 
    Screech (43)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Protect, 
    Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Return, Double Team, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Flash
    Egg Moves: Reversal, Leech Life, Whirlwind
    Specials: Steel Wing, Sweet Kiss
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Quagsire (WTR/GRD)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 85/268, DF 85/268, SA 65/228, SD 65/228, SP 35/168
    Learned Moves: Water Gun (0), Tail Whip (0), Slam (11), Amnesia (21), 
    Earthquake (31), Rain Dance (41), Mist (51), Haze (51)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Sludge Bomb, Sandstorm, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Surf, Strength, 
    Flash, Whirlpool, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Ancientpower, Safeguard, Body Slam
    Specials: Belly Drum
    Evolution: Wooper -> Quagsire (L20)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Espeon (PSY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 65/228, DF 60/318, SA 130/358, SD 95/288, SP 110/318
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (0), Sand-Attack (8), Growl (16), 
    Confusion (16), Quick Attack (23), Bite (30), Swift (30), Focus Energy* (36), 
    Baton Pass (36), Psybeam (36), Take Down (42), Psych Up (42), Psychic (47), 
    Morning Sun (52)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny 
    Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Nightmare, Cut, Flash, Body Slam*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: CHARM, FLAIL
    Specials: Growth
    Evolution: Eevee (NRM) -> Vaporeon (WTR - Water Stone) / Jolteon (ELC - 
    Thunderstone) / Flareon (FIR - Fire Stone) / Espeon (Happy 4:00 AM - 5:59 PM) 
    / Umbreon (DRK - Happy 6:00 PM - 3:59 AM)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Umbreon (DRK)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 65/228, DF 110/318, SA 60/218, SD 130/358, SP 65/228
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Tail Whip (0), Sand-Attack (8), Growl (16), Pursuit 
    (16), Quick Attack (23), Bite (30), Confuse Ray (30), Focus Energy* (36), 
    Baton Pass (36), Faint Attack (36), Take Down (42), Mean Look (42), Screech 
    (47), Moonlight (52)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny 
    Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Nightmare, Cut, Flash, Body Slam*, 
    Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: CHARM, FLAIL
    Specials: Growth
    Evolution: Eevee (NRM) -> Vaporeon (WTR - Water Stone) / Jolteon (ELC - 
    Thunderstone) / Flareon (FIR - Fire Stone) / Espeon (PSY - Happy 4:00 AM - 
    5:59 PM) / Umbreon (Happy 6:00 PM - 3:59 AM)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Murkrow (DRK/FLY)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 85/268, DF 42/182, SA 85/268, SD 42/182, SP 91/280
    Learned Moves: Peck (0), Pursuit (11), Haze (16), Night Shade (26), Faint 
    Attack (31), Mean Look (41)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Icy Wind, 
    Protect, Endure, Frustration, Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel 
    Wing, Nightmare, Fly
    Egg Moves: Mirror Move, Wing Attack, Quick Attack, Drill Peck, Whirlwind, Sky 
    Attack
    Specials: Beat Up
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fading
    
    Slowking (WTR/PSY)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 75/248, DF 80/258, SA 100/298, SD 110/318, SP 30/158
    Learned Moves: Curse (0), Tackle (0), Growl (6), Water Gun (15), Confusion 
    (20), Disable (29), Headbutt (34), Amnesia (43), Swagger (43), Psychic (48)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych 
    Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, 
    Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Psychic, 
    Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire 
    Blast, Swift, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Fury Cutter, Nightmare, Surf, 
    Strength, Flash, Whirlpool, Flamethrower, Ice Beam, Body Slam*, Take Down*, 
    Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Pay Day*, Rage*, Fissure*, Teleport*, 
    Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Tri Attack*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: SAFEGUARD, BELLY DRUM, Stomp, FUTURE SIGHT
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Slowpoke -> Slowbro (L37) / Slowking (Trade while holding King's 
    Rock)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Misdreavus (GHO)
    Stats: HP 60/323, AT 60/218, DF 60/218, SA 85/268, SD 85/268, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Growl (0), Psywave (0), Spite (6), Confuse Ray (12), Mean Look 
    (19), Psybeam (27), Pain Split (36), Perish Song (46)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny 
    Day, Snore, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Thunder, Return, 
    Psychic, Shadow Ball, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Defense Curl, 
    Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Thief, Nightmare, Flash, Thunderbolt
    Egg Moves: Screech, Destiny Bond
    Specials: Hypnosis
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fast
    
    Unown (PSY)
    Stats: HP 48/299, AT 72/242, DF 48/194, SA 72/242, SD 48/194, SP 48/194
    Learned Moves: Hidden Power (0)
    TM Moves: None
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Wobbuffet (PSY)
    Stats: HP 190/583, AT 33/164, DF 58/214, SA 33/164, SD 58/214, SP 33/164
    Learned Moves: Counter (0), Mirror Coat (0), Safeguard (0), Destiny Bond (0)
    TM Moves: None
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: Mimic
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Girafarig (NRM/PSY)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 80/258, DF 65/228, SA 90/278, SD 65/228, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Growl (0), Confusion (0), Stomp (0), Agility (20), 
    Baton Pass (30), Psybeam (41), Crunch (54)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych Up, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Thunder, 
    Earthquake, Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Swift, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Thief, Nightmare, Strength, 
    Thunderbolt
    Egg Moves: Take Down, Amnesia, Beat Up, Foresight, Future Sight
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Forretress (BUG/STL)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 90/278, DF 140/378, SA 60/218, SD 60/218, SP 40/178
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Protect (0), Selfdestruct (8), Take Down (15), 
    Rapid Spin (22), Spikes (29), Explosion (36), Bide (43), Double-Edge (50)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny 
    Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, 
    Solarbeam, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Defense Curl, 
    Rest, Attract, Strength
    Egg Moves: Flail, Swift, Pin Missile, Reflect
    Specials: Substitute
    Evolution: Pineco -> Forretress (L31)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Dunsparce (NRM)
    Stats: HP 100/403, AT 70/238, DF 70/238, SA 65/228, SD 65/228, SP 45/188
    Learned Moves: Rage (0), Defense Curl (5), Glare (13), Spite (18), Pursuit 
    (26), Screech (30), Take Down (38)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych Up, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, 
    Solarbeam, Iron Tail, Thunder, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Defense Curl, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Thief, Nightmare, 
    Strength, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt
    Egg Moves: Rock Slide, Bide, Bite, Ancientpower, Rage
    Specials: Horn Drill, Fury Attack
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Gligar (GRD/FLY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 75/248, DF 105/308, SA 35/168, SD 65/228, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Poison Sting (0), Sand-Attack (6), Harden (13), Quick Attack 
    (20), Faint Attack (28), Slash (36), Screech (44), Guillotine (52)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Sludge Bomb, Sandstorm, Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fury 
    Cutter, Cut, Strength
    Egg Moves: Counter, Razor Wind, Wing Attack, Metal Claw
    Specials: Earthquake (this can coexist with Counter, Wing Attack, and Metal 
    Claw)
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fading
    
    Steelix (STL/GRD)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 85/268, DF 200/498, SA 55/208, SD 65/228, SP 30/158
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Screech (0), Bind (10), Rock Throw (14), Harden 
    (23), Rage (27), Sandstorm (36), Slam (40), Crunch (49)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, 
    Dragonbreath, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Sandstorm, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Cut, Strength, Body Slam*, Take 
    Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Fissure*, Mimic*, Bide*, Selfdestruct*, Skull 
    Bash*, Explosion*, Rock Slide*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: FLAIL, Rock Slide
    Specials: Sharpen
    Evolution: Onix (GRD/RCK) -> Steelix (Trade while holding Metal Coat)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Granbull (NRM)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 120/338, DF 75/248, SA 60/218, SD 60/218, SP 45/188
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Scary Face (0), Tail Whip (4), Charm (8), Bite 
    (13), Lick (19), Roar (26), Rage (34), Take Down (43)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Thunder, Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Detect, Rest, 
    Attract, Thief, Fire Punch, Strength, Thunderbolt
    Specials: Lovely Kiss
    Evolution: Snubbull -> Granbull (L23)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Qwilfish (WTR/PSN)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 95/288, DF 75/248, SA 55/208, SD 55/208, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Poison Sting (0), Spikes (0), Harden (10), Minimize 
    (10), Water Gun (19), Pin Missile (28), Take Down (37), Hydro Pump (46)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Icy 
    Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Swift, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Surf, Whirlpool, 
    Waterfall, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Haze, Flail, Supersonic, Bubblebeam
    Specials: Double-Edge
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Normal
    
    Scizor (BUG/STL)
    Stats: HP 70/343, AT 130/358, DF 100/298, SA 55/208, SD 80/258, SP 65/228
    Learned Moves: Quick Attack (0), Leer (0), Focus Energy (6), Pursuit (12), 
    False Swipe (18), Agility (24), Wing Attack (30), Metal Claw (30), Slash (36), 
    Swords Dance (42), Double Team (48)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Sandstorm, Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Fury Cutter, 
    Cut, Strength, Swords Dance*, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Mimic*, Bide*, 
    Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Counter, Razor Wind, REVERSAL, SAFEGUARD, BATON PASS, Light Screen
    Specials: Sonicboom
    Evolution: Scyther (BUG/FLY) -> Scizor (Trade while holding Metal Coat)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Shuckle (BUG/RCK)
    Stats: HP 20/243, AT 10/118, DF 230/558, SA 5/108, SD 230/558, SP 10/118
    Learned Moves: Constrict (0), Withdraw (0), Wrap (9), Encore (14), Safeguard 
    (23), Bide (28), Rest (37)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny 
    Day, Snore, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, 
    Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Sandstorm, Defense Curl, Rest, 
    Attract, Strength, Flash
    Egg Moves: Sweet Scent
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fading
    
    Heracross (BUG/FTG)
    Stats: HP 80/363, AT 125/348, DF 75/248, SA 40/178, SD 85/268, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Leer (0), Horn Attack (6), Endure (12), Fury Attack 
    (19), Counter (27), Take Down (35), Reversal (44), Megahorn (54)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Protect, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, Return, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fury Cutter, Cut, Strength
    Egg Moves: Harden, Bide, Flail
    Specials: Seismic Toss, Rock Throw
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Sneasel (DRK/ICE)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 95/288, DF 55/208, SA 35/168, SD 75/248, SP 115/328
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Leer (0), Quick Attack (9), Screech (17), Faint 
    Attack (25), Fury Swipes (33), Agility (41), Slash (49), Beat Up (57), Metal 
    Claw (65)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Psych Up, Hidden 
    Power, Snore, Blizzard, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, 
    Iron Tail, Return, Dig, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Defense Curl, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, 
    Thief, Fury Cutter, Nightmare, Cut, Surf, Strength, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Spite, Counter, Bide, Foresight, Reflect
    Specials: Moonlight
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fading
    
    Ursaring (NRM)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 130/358, DF 75/248, SA 75/248, SD 75/248, SP 55/208
    Learned Moves: Scratch (0), Leer (0), Lick (8), Fury Swipes (15), Faint Attack 
    (22), Rest (29), Slash (36), Snore (43), Thrash (50)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, 
    Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, 
    Frustration, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Rest, Attract, Thief, 
    Fire Punch, Fury Cutter, Cut, Strength
    Egg Moves: Counter, Crunch, Focus Energy, Seismic Toss, Take Down, Metal Claw
    Specials: Sweet Scent
    Evolution: Teddiursa -> Ursaring (L30)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Magcargo (FIR/RCK)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 50/198, DF 120/338, SA 80/258, SD 80/258, SP 30/158
    Learned Moves: Smog (0), Ember (8), Rock Throw (15), Harden (22), Amnesia 
    (29), Flamethrower (36), Rock Slide (43), Body Slam (50)
    TM Moves: Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, Return, Mud-Slap, Double 
    Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Fire Blast, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Strength, 
    Flamethrower
    Egg Moves: Acid Armor
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Slugma -> Magcargo (L38)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Piloswine (ICE/GRD)
    Stats: HP 100/403, AT 100/298, DF 80/268, SA 60/218, SD 60/218, SP 50/198
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Powder Snow (10), Endure (19), Take Down (28), Fury 
    Attack (33), Mist (37), Blizzard (46), Amnesia (55)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Snore, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, 
    Earthquake, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Defense Curl, 
    Detect, Rest, Attract, Strength, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Rock Slide, Bite, Ancientpower, Body Slam, Take Down
    Specials: Whirlwind
    Evolution: Swinub -> Piloswine (L33)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Corsola (RCK/WTR)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 55/208, DF 85/268, SA 65/228, SD 85/268, SP 35/168
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Harden (7), Bubble (13), Recover (19), Bubblebeam 
    (25), Spike Cannon (31), Mirror Coat (37), Ancientpower (43) 
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny 
    Day, Snore, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, Return, 
    Psychic, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Defense Curl, 
    Rest, Attract, Surf, Strength, Whirlpool, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Screech, Rock Slide, Mist, Safeguard, Amnesia
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fast
    
    Octillery (WTR)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 105/308, DF 75/248, SA 105/308, SD 75/248, SP 45/188
    Learned Moves: Water Gun (0), Lock-On (11), Constrict (11), Psybeam (22), 
    Aurora Beam (22), Bubblebeam (22), Octazooka (25), Focus Energy (33), Ice Beam 
    (44), Hyper Beam (55)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, 
    Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Swift, Defense Curl, Rest, Attract, Thief, Surf, Whirlpool, Flamethrower, Ice 
    Beam
    Egg Moves: Screech, Octazooka, Haze, Supersonic, Aurora Beam
    Specials: Amnesia, Mist
    Evolution: Remoraid -> Octillery (L25)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Delibird (ICE/FLY)
    Stats: HP 45/293, AT 55/208, DF 45/188, SA 65/228, SD 45/188, SP 75/248
    Learned Moves: Present (0)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Icy Wind, 
    Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Fly, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Aurora Beam, Rapid Spin, Quick Attack, Splash, Future Sight
    Specials: Pay Day, Spikes
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fast
    
    Mantine (WTR/FLY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 40/178, DF 70/238, SA 80/258, SD 140/378, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Bubble (0), Supersonic (10), Bubblebeam (18), Take 
    Down (25), Agility (32), Wing Attack (40), Confuse Ray (49)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Icy Wind, 
    Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Rest, Attract, Surf, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Ice 
    Beam
    Egg Moves: Haze, Slam, Twister, Hydro Pump
    Specials: Gust
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Skarmory (STL/FLY)
    Stats: HP 65/333, AT 80/258, DF 140/378, SA 40/178, SD 70/238, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Leer (0), Peck (0), Sand-Attack (13), Swift (19), Agility (25), 
    Fury Attack (37), Steel Wing (49)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Protect, Endure, 
    Frustration, Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, 
    Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Steel Wing, Cut, Fly
    Egg Moves: Pursuit, Drill Peck, Whirlwind, Sky Attack
    Specials: Fury Cutter
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Houndoom (DRK/FIR)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 90/278, DF 50/198, SA 110/318, SD 80/258, SP 95/288
    Learned Moves: Leer (0), Ember (0), Roar (7), Smog (13), Bite (20), Faint 
    Attack (27), Flamethrower (35), Crunch (43)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, 
    Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Iron Tail, Return, 
    Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sludge Bomb, Fire 
    Blast, Swift, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Nightmare, Strength, 
    Flamethrower
    Egg Moves: Rage, Spite, Pursuit, Counter, Reversal, Beat Up, Fire Spin
    Specials: None
    Evolution: Houndour -> Houndoom (L24)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Kingdra (WTR/DRG)
    Stats: HP 75/353, AT 95/288, DF 95/288, SA 95/288, SD 95/288, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Bubble (0), Smokescreen (8), Leer (15), Water Gun (22), Twister 
    (29), Agility (36), Hydro Pump (43)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Hidden Power, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, 
    Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Dragonbreath, Return, 
    Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Rest, Attract, Surf, Whirlpool, 
    Waterfall, Ice Beam, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Rage*, 
    Mimic*, Bide*, Skull Bash*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: Aurora Beam, OCTAZOOKA, Disable, FLAIL, Splash, Dragon Rage
    Specials: Haze
    Evolution: Horsea (WTR) -> Seadra (WTR - L32) -> Kingdra (Trade while holding 
    Dragon Scale)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Donphan (GRD)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 120/338, DF 120/338, SA 60/218, SD 60/218, SP 50/198
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Growl (0), Defense Curl (9), Flail (17), Fury 
    Attack (25), Rollout (33), Rapid Spin (41), Earthquake (49)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, 
    Return, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Defense Curl, 
    Rest, Attract, Strength
    Egg Moves: Focus Energy, Body Slam, Ancientpower, Water Gun
    Specials: Absorb
    Evolution: Phanpy -> Donphan (L25)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Porygon2 (NRM)
    Stats: HP 85/373, AT 80/258, DF 90/278, SA 105/308, SD 95/288, SP 60/218
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Conversion (0), Conversion2 (0), Agility (9), 
    Psybeam (12), Recover (20), Sharpen (24), Harden* (28), Lock-On (32), Tri 
    Attack (36), Zap Cannon (44)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron 
    Tail, Thunder, Return, Psychic, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, 
    Defense Curl, Dream Eater, Rest, Thief, Nightmare, Flash, Thunderbolt, Ice 
    Beam, Take Down*, Double-Edge*, Rage*, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, 
    Skull Bash*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Tri Attack*, Substitute*
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: Barrier
    Evolution: Porygon -> Porygon2 (Trade while holding Up-Grade)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Stantler (NRM)
    Stats: HP 73/357, AT 95/288, DF 62/222, SA 85/268, SD 65/228, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Leer (8), Hypnosis (15), Stomp (23), Sand-Attack 
    (31), Take Down (40), Confuse Ray (49)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, 
    Snore, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Earthquake, Return, Psychic, 
    Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Swift, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, 
    Attract, Thief, Nightmare, Flash
    Egg Moves: Spite, Disable, Bite, Light Screen, Reflect
    Specials: Safeguard
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Smeargle (NRM)
    Stats: HP 55/313, AT 20/138, DF 35/168, SA 20/138, SD 45/188, SP 75/248
    Learned Moves: Sketch (0, 11, 21, 31, 41, 51, 61, 71, 81, 91), which can be 
    used to create any move except Selfdestruct, Explosion, Struggle, Transform, 
    Metronome, Mimic, Sleep Talk, or Mirror Move
    TM Moves: None
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fast
    
    Hitmontop (FTG)
    Stats: HP 50/303, AT 95/288, DF 95/288, SA 35/168, SD 110/318, SP 70/238
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Rolling Kick (0), Focus Energy (7), Pursuit (13), 
    Quick Attack (19), Rapid Spin (25), Counter (31), Agility (37), Detect (43), 
    Triple Kick (49)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, 
    Protect, Endure, Frustration, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Swift, Detect, Rest, Attract, Thief, Strength
    Egg Moves: RAPID SPIN, MIND READER, Hi Jump Kick, MACH PUNCH
    Specials: Dizzy Punch, Rage
    Evolution: Tyrogue -> Hitmonchan (L20 AT < DF) / Hitmonlee (L20 AT > DF) / 
    Hitmontop (L20 AT = DF)
    Experience: Normal
    
    Miltank (NRM)
    Stats: HP 95/393, AT 80/258, DF 105/308, SA 40/178, SD 70/238, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Tackle (0), Growl (4), Defense Curl (8), Stomp (13), Milk Drink 
    (19), Bide (26), Rollout (34), Body Slam (43), Heal Bell (53)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock 
    Smash, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper 
    Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Thunder, 
    Earthquake, Return, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Ice Punch, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Defense Curl, Thunderpunch, Rest, Attract, Fire Punch, 
    Surf, Strength, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: Reversal, Seismic Toss, Present
    Specials: Mega Kick
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Blissey (NRM)
    Stats: HP 255/713, AT 10/118, DF 10/118, SA 75/248, SD 135/368, SP 55/208
    Learned Moves: Pound (0), Growl (4), Tail Whip (7), Softboiled (10), 
    Doubleslap (13), Minimize (18), Sing (23), Egg Bomb (28), Defense Curl (33), 
    Light Screen (40), Double-Edge (47)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Rollout, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock 
    Smash, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, 
    Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, Thunder, Return, Psychic, 
    Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire 
    Blast, Defense Curl, Dream Eater, Rest, Attract, Strength, Flash, 
    Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Mega Punch*, Mega Kick*, Body Slam*, Take 
    Down*, Double-Edge*, Bubblebeam*, Water Gun*, Submission*, Counter*, Seismic 
    Toss*, Rage*, Thunderbolt, Teleport*, Mimic*, Reflect*, Bide*, Metronome*, Egg 
    Bomb*, Skull Bash*, Softboiled*, Thunder Wave*, Psywave*, Tri Attack*, 
    Substitute*
    Egg Moves: HEAL BELL, PRESENT, Metronome
    Specials: SWEET SCENT
    Evolution: Chansey -> Blissey (Happy)
    Experience: Fast
    
    Raikou (ELC)
    Stats: HP 90/383, AT 75/248, DF 85/268, SA 115/328, SD 100/298, SP 115/328
    Learned Moves: Bite (0), Leer (0), Thundershock (11), Roar (21), Quick Attack 
    (31), Spark (41), Reflect (51), Crunch (61), Thunder (71)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych Up, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Iron Tail, Thunder, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Swift, Detect, Rest, Cut, Strength, Flash, Thunderbolt
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Entei (FIR)
    Stats: HP 115/433, AT 115/328, DF 85/268, SA 90/278, SD 75/248, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Bite (0), Leer (0), Ember (11), Roar (21), Fire Spin (31), 
    Stomp (41), Flamethrower (51), Swagger (61), Fire Blast (71)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Psych Up, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, 
    Solarbeam, Iron Tail, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Swift, Detect, Rest, Cut, Strength, Flash, Flamethrower
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Suicune (WTR)
    Stats: HP 100/403, AT 75/248, DF 115/328, SA 90/278, SD 115/328, SP 85/268
    Learned Moves: Bite (0), Leer (0), Water Gun (11), Bubblebeam (11), Roar (21), 
    Rain Dance (21), Gust (31), Aurora Beam (41), Mist (51), Mirror Coat (61), 
    Hydro Pump (71)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Psych Up, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, 
    Frustration, Iron Tail, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep 
    Talk, Sandstorm, Swift, Detect, Rest, Cut, Surf, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Ice 
    Beam
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Tyranitar (RCK/DRK)
    Stats: HP 100/403, AT 134/366, DF 110/318, SA 95/288, SD 100/298, SP 61/220
    Learned Moves: Bite (0), Leer (0), Sandstorm (8), Screech (15), Rock Slide 
    (22), Thrash (29), Scary Face (36), Crunch (43), Earthquake (50), Hyper Beam 
    (57)
    TM Moves: Dynamicpunch, Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Rock Smash, Hidden 
    Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Endure, Frustration, 
    Iron Tail, Dragonbreath, Earthquake, Return, Dig, Mud-Slap, Double Team, 
    Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire Blast, Detect, Rest, Attract, Fire Punch, 
    Fury Cutter, Nightmare, Cut, Surf, Strength, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt, Ice 
    Beam
    Egg Moves: Pursuit, Focus Energy, Outrage, Ancientpower, Stomp
    Specials: Rage
    Evolution: Larvitar (GRD/RCK) -> Pupitar (GRD/RCK - L30) -> Tyranitar (L55)
    Experience: Slow
    
    Lugia (PSY/FLY)
    Stats: HP 106/415, AT 90/278, DF 130/358, SA 90/278, SD 154/406, SP 110/318
    Learned Moves: Aeroblast (0), Safeguard (11), Gust (22), Recover (33), Hydro 
    Pump (44), Rain Dance (55), Swift (66), Whirlwind (77), Ancientpower (88), 
    Future Sight (99)
    TM Moves: Headbutt, Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych Up, 
    Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Snore, Blizzard, Hyper Beam, Icy Wind, Protect, Rain 
    Dance, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Iron Tail, Dragonbreath, Thunder, 
    Earthquake, Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, 
    Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Swift, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Steel Wing, 
    Nightmare, Fly, Surf, Strength, Whirlpool, Waterfall, Thunderbolt, Ice Beam
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Ho-oh (FIR/FLY)
    Stats: HP 106/415, AT 130/358, DF 90/278, SA 110/318, SD 154/406, SP 90/278
    Learned Moves: Sacred Fire (0), Safeguard (11), Gust (22), Recover (33), Fire 
    Blast (44), Sunny Day (55), Swift (66), Whirlwind (77), Ancientpower (88), 
    Future Sight (99)
    TM Moves: Curse, Roar, Toxic, Zap Cannon, Rock Smash, Psych Up, Hidden Power, 
    Sunny Day, Snore, Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Giga Drain, Endure, 
    Frustration, Solarbeam, Dragonbreath, Thunder, Earthquake, Return, Psychic, 
    Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, Sandstorm, Fire 
    Blast, Swift, Dream Eater, Detect, Rest, Steel Wing, Nightmare, Fly, Strength, 
    Flash, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Slow
    
    Celebi (PSY/GRS)
    Stats: HP 100/403, AT 100/298, DF 100/298, SA 100/298, SD 100/298, SP 100/298
    Learned Moves: Leech Seed (0), Confusion (0), Recover (0), Heal Bell (0), 
    Safeguard (10), Ancientpower (20), Future Sight (30), Perish Song (40), Baton 
    Pass (50)
    TM Moves: Curse, Toxic, Psych Up, Hidden Power, Sunny Day, Sweet Scent, Snore, 
    Hyper Beam, Protect, Rain Dance, Giga Drain, Endure, Frustration, Solarbeam, 
    Return, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Mud-Slap, Double Team, Swagger, Sleep Talk, 
    Sandstorm, Swift, Defense Curl, Detect, Rest, Nightmare, Flash
    Egg Moves: None
    Specials: None
    Evolution: None
    Experience: Fading
    
    -------------------
    |Move Encyclopedia|
    -------------------
    
    Ah, yes.  Another meaningless chart that does nothing but make the file look 
    about 50KB larger.  After all, you know all this information, right? 
    
    Remember: Type first, then power (0 means no damage; * means specialty damage 
    that may or may not use the formula), then accuracy (out of 256), then the 
    maximum PP.  If there's an effect, that's in sentence 2...or beyond.  And 
    except in rare cases, these descriptions only apply to link or Stadium 
    battles.
    
    A reference to 'CELS' refers to the Composite of Extra Little Somethings.  
    Let's bring that up again:
    
    1. Type1 = The type matchup of Attack Type (if called for) against Opponent's 
    Type 1.
    2. Type2 = The type matchup of Attack Type (if called for) against Opponent's 
    Type 2 (if different than Type 1).  If opponent's Type 1 and Type 2 are the 
    same, this is 1.
    3. STAB = 1.5 if Attack Type (if called for) matches either user's Type 1 or 
    Type 2.
    4. Item = 1.1 if Item is of variety Type Boost and Item Boost Type matches 
    Attack Type (if called for).
    5. Sunny Day = If weather is Sun, 1.5 if attack has type Fire, 0.5 if attack 
    has type Water.
    6. Rain Dance = If weather is Rain, 1.5 if attack has type Water, 0.5 if 
    attack has type Fire or is named "Solarbeam".
    7. Pursuit = 2 if opponent's action for turn is "Switch" and if move is named 
    "Pursuit".
    8. Dig = If opponent's status is Underground, 2 if attack is named 
    "Earthquake" or "Magnitude", 1 if attack is named "Fissure", 0 if attack is 
    named anything else.
    9. Fly = If opponent's status is Airborne, 2 if attack is named "Gust" or 
    "Twister", 1 if attack is named "Thunder", 0 if attack is named anything else.
    10. Minimize = 2 if opponent's Evade modifier is greater than 0, if Minimize 
    is responsible for at least one point on evade modifier, and if move is named 
    "Stomp"
    11. Critical Hit = 2 if a random 8-bit number falls into an active Critical 
    Hit Domain.
    12. Random Number = (217 + randInt(0,38)) / 255
    
    Now, on with the moves!
    
    Absorb: Grass, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  For each 2 damage this attack 
    deals, add 1 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Acid: Poison, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 25 to lower 
    opponent's Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Acid Armor: Poison, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Defense 
    modifier by 2.
    
    Aeroblast: Flying, Power 100, Accuracy 243, PP 8.  Uses two extra Critical Hit 
    Domains.
    
    Agility: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Raises your Speed modifier by 
    2.
    
    Amnesia: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Raises your Special Defense 
    modifier by 2.
    
    Ancientpower: Rock, Power 60, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Probability 25 to raise all 
    your stat modifiers by 1.
    
    Attract: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  If the two players' Pokemon 
    are of opposite gender, then until a Pokemon switches or is KO'd, the opponent 
    has probability 128 to lose each of its turns.
    
    Aurora Beam: Ice, Power 65, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 25 to lower 
    opponent's Attack modifier by 1.
    
    Barrage: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 217, PP 32.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 times 
    in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Barrier: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Raises your Defense modifier 
    by 2.
    
    Baton Pass: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Switch to a Pokemon of your 
    choice.  All stat modifiers and accuracy/evade modifiers remain intact, as do 
    Trap Effects (both temporary and permanent), Perish Song, Substitute, Leech 
    Seed, and others.
    
    Beat Up: Dark, Power 10, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Each Pokemon on your team whose 
    status is "OK" will attack once, substituting its base Attack for the Special 
    Attack stat, and the opponent's base Defense for the Special Defense stat 
    (yes, this functions as a physical attack).  Ignores CELS multipliers 1, 2, 
    and 3.
    
    Belly Drum: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Raises your Attack modifier 
    by 2.  Your Pokemon loses half its maximum HP, rounded up, if possible.  If it 
    does, your Attack modifier is increased by an additional 8 (note that it can't 
    go above +6).
    
    Bide: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Skip your next 2-3 turns.  During 
    your next turn, for each 1 damage dealt to you during a turn skipped this way, 
    subtract 2 from the opponent's HP.
    
    Bind: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 192, PP 16.  The opponent can't switch for 2-
    5 turns.  At the end of each of those turns, that Pokemon loses 6.25% of 
    maximum HP.
    
    Bite: Dark, Power 60, Accuracy 256, PP 40.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Blizzard: Ice, Power 120, Accuracy 179, PP 8.  Probability 25 to freeze the 
    opponent.
    
    Body Slam: Normal, Power 85, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 76 to paralyze 
    the opponent.
    
    Bone Club: Ground, Power 65, Accuracy 217, PP 32.  Probability 25 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Bone Rush: Ground, Power 25, Accuracy 204, PP 16.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 times 
    in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Bonemerang: Ground, Power 50, Accuracy 230, PP 16.  Hits twice in one turn.
    
    Bubble: Water, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Probability 25 to lower 
    opponent's Speed modifier by 1.
    
    Bubblebeam: Water, Power 65, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 25 to lower 
    opponent's Speed modifier by 1.
    
    Charm: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Lowers the opponent's Attack 
    modifier by 2.
    
    Clamp: Water, Power 35, Accuracy 192, PP 16.  The opponent can't switch for 2-
    5 turns.  At the end of each of those turns, that Pokemon loses 6.25% of 
    maximum HP.
    
    Comet Punch: Normal, Power 18, Accuracy 217, PP 24.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Confuse Ray: Ghost, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Confuses the opponent.
    
    Confusion: Psychic, Power 50, Accuracy 256, PP 40.  Probability 25 to confuse 
    the opponent.
    
    Constrict: Normal, Power 10, Accuracy 256, PP 56.  Probability 25 to lower the 
    opponent's Speed modifier by 1.
    
    Conversion: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Your Pokemon's type becomes 
    that of a randomly chosen non-Curse, non-Conversion, non-empty slot in your 
    moveset.
    
    Conversion 2: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  If the opponent's last 
    action was a non-Curse, non-Struggle move, your Pokemon's type becomes a 
    randomly chosen type from among those which cause that type of attack to be 
    multiplied by 0 or 1/2.
                
    Cotton Spore: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 217, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Speed modifier by 2.
    
    Counter: Fighting, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Goes last.  If it does, and 
    if the opponent dealt damage to you this turn with a Physical attack, subtract 
    twice that amount from the opponent's Pokemon's HP.
    
    Crabhammer: Water, Power 90, Accuracy 217, PP 16.  Uses two extra Critical Hit 
    Domains.
    
    Cross Chop: Fighting, Power 100, Accuracy 204, PP 8.  Uses two extra Critical 
    Hit Domains.
    
    Crunch: Dark, Power 80, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 51 to lower the 
    opponent's Special Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Curse: Typeless, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 10.  Raises your Attack and Defense 
    modifiers by 1.  Lowers your Speed modifier by 1.  If your Pokemon is Ghost-
    type, instead do not change any modifiers, your Pokemon loses half its maximum 
    HP, and until the opponent switches or is KO'd, at end of turn, that Pokemon 
    loses 25% of its maximum HP.
    
    Cut: Normal, Power 50, Accuracy 243, PP 48.
    
    Defense Curl: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Defense 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Destiny Bond: Ghost, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  If the opponent's next 
    action is an attack that KO's your Pokemon, the opponent's HP is reduced to -
    0.  Poison, Sandstorm, Perish Song, etc. do not cause Destiny Bond to trigger.
    
    Detect: Fighting, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 8.  Goes first (priority 2).  If 
    the opponent's move this turn would change your HP, status, or stat modifiers, 
    that move does nothing instead.  For each prior consecutive turn on which 
    Protect, Detect, or Endure were used, subtract 1 from accuracy, then divide it 
    by 2.
    
    Dig: Ground, Power 60, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Requires pre-attack setup turn.  
    User becomes Underground during that turn (see CELS multiplier 8).
    
    Disable: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 141, PP 32.  If the opponent's last action 
    was a move, that Pokemon can't use that move for 2-5 turns or until it 
    switches or is KO'd.
    
    Dizzy Punch: Normal, Power 70, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 51 to confuse 
    the opponent.
    
    Double-Edge: Normal, Power 120, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  For each 4 damage this 
    attack deals, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Double Kick: Fighting, Power 30, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Strikes 2 times in a 
    single turn.
    
    Doubleslap: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 217, PP 16.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Double Team: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Raises your Evade modifier 
    by 1.
    
    Dragon Rage: Dragon, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Subtract 40 from your 
    opponent's Pokemon's HP.
    
    Dragonbreath: Dragon, Power 60, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 76 to 
    paralyze the opponent.
    
    Dream Eater: Psychic, Power 100, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  If the opponent isn't 
    asleep, this attack misses.  For each 2 damage this attack deals, add 1 to 
    your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Drill Peck: Flying, Power 80, Accuracy 256, PP 32.
    
    Dynamicpunch: Fighting, Power 100, Accuracy 128, PP 8.  Whenever Dynamicpunch 
    deals damage, the opponent becomes confused.
    
    Earthquake: Ground, Power 100, Accuracy 256, PP 16.
    
    Egg Bomb: Normal, Power 100, Accuracy 192, PP 16.
    
    Ember: Fire, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 40.  Probability 25 to burn the 
    opponent.
    
    Encore: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  If the opponent's last action 
    was a move, then for 2-5 turns or until that Pokemon switches, it can't use 
    any other move. 
    
    Endure: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  Goes first (priority 2).  If 
    the opponent's move this turn would reduce your HP to 0 or less, that move 
    reduces it to 1 instead.  For each prior consecutive turn on which Protect, 
    Detect, or Endure were used, subtract 1 from accuracy, then divide it by 2.
    
    Explosion: Normal, Power 250, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Until end of turn, the 
    opponent's Defense is cut in half.  Your HP becomes 0.
    
    Extremespeed: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Goes first (priority 3).
    
    Faint Attack: Dark, Power 60, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Ignores accuracy and evade 
    modifiers.
    
    False Swipe: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  If this attack would 
    reduce a Pokemon's HP to 0 or less, that Pokemon's HP becomes 1 instead.
    
    Fire Blast: Fire, Power 120, Accuracy 217, PP 8.  Probability 25 to burn the 
    opponent.
    
    Fire Punch: Fire, Power 75, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 25 to burn the 
    opponent.
    
    Fire Spin: Fire, Power 15, Accuracy 179, PP 24. The opponent can't switch for 
    2-5 turns.  At the end of each of those turns, that Pokemon loses 6.25% of 
    maximum HP.
    
    Fissure: Ground, Power *, Accuracy 76, PP 8. Accuracy 0 against all higher-
    level Pokemon.  Sets opponent's HP to 0 if it hits.  
    
    Flail: Normal, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Power +20 if user has less than 
    68.75% of its maximum HP.  Power +40 if user has less than 35.42% of its 
    maximum HP.  Power +20 if user has less than 20.83% of its maximum HP.  Power 
    +50 if user has less than 10.42% of its maximum HP.  Power +50 if user has 
    less than 4.17% of its maximum HP.  Uses no Critical Hit Domains.  CELS 
    multiplier 12 has fixed value of 1.
    
    Flame Wheel: Fire, Power 60, Accuracy 256, PP 40.  A Frozen Pokemon can use 
    this attack, and in doing so changes its status to OK.  Has a 9.77% chance of 
    burning the opponent.
    
    Flamethrower: Fire, Power 95, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 25 to burn the 
    opponent.
    
    Flash: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 179, PP 32.  Lowers the opponent's Accuracy 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Fly: Flying, Power 70, Accuracy 243, PP 24.  Requires pre-attack setup turn.  
    User becomes Airborne during that turn (see CELS multiplier 9).
    
    Focus Energy: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Until you switch or are 
    KO'd, all attacks you use receive an extra Critical Hit Domain.
    
    Foresight: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Until a Pokemon switches or 
    is KO'd, the opponent's Evade and your Accuracy modifier are treated as 0. 
    NRM-GHO and FTG-GHO entries in the Type Chart become 1.
    
    Frustration: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Power +0.4 for each point 
    of Happiness the user has less than 255.
    
    Fury Attack: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 217, PP 32.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Fury Cutter: Bug, Power 10, Accuracy 243, PP 32.  For each prior consecutive 
    turn during which your Pokemon used Fury Cutter and hit, the power of Fury 
    Cutter is doubled.  It can't be doubled more than 4 times this way.  
    
    Fury Swipes: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 217, PP 24.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Future Sight: Psychic, Power 80, Accuracy 230, PP 24.  Attack is delayed until 
    the end of the turn after next turn.  Ignores CELS multipliers 1, 2, and 3.
    
    Giga Drain: Grass, Power 60, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  For each 2 damage this 
    attack deals, add 1 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Glare: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 192, PP 48.  Paralyzes the opponent.
    
    Growl: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's Attack 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Growth: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Special Attack 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Guillotine: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 76, PP 8.  Accuracy 0 against all 
    higher-level Pokemon.  Sets opponent's HP to 0 if it hits.
    
    Gust: Flying, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 56.
    
    Harden: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Defense modifier by 
    1.
    
    Haze: Ice, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  All stat modifiers and 
    accuracy/evade modifiers become 0.
    
    Headbutt: Normal, Power 70, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Heal Bell: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Removes Sleep, Burn, Poison, 
    Paralyze, and/or Freeze from all Pokemon on your team.
    
    Hi Jump Kick: Fighting, Power 85, Accuracy 230, PP 32.  If this attack would 
    miss, instead prevent all damage it would deal to the opponent this turn.  For 
    each 8 damage prevented this way, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Hidden Power: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Power = int(31 + 20 * 
    (ATDV > 7) + 10 * (DFDV > 7) + 5 * (SPDV > 7) + 2.5 * (SCDV > 7) + 1/2 * 
    mod(SCDV, 4)), and type is treated as typeconvert(X + (X > 5) + 11 * (X > 8)), 
    where X = (4 * mod(ATDV, 4) + mod(DFDV, 4)) until end of attack.  See page 96 
    for more details.
    
    Horn Attack: Normal, Power 65, Accuracy 256, PP 56.
    
    Horn Drill: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 76, PP 8.  Accuracy 0 against all 
    higher-level Pokemon.  Sets opponent's HP to 0 if it hits. 
    
    Hydro Pump: Water, Power 120, Accuracy 204, PP 8.
    
    Hyper Beam: Normal, Power 150, Accuracy 230, PP 8.  You skip your next turn.
    
    Hyper Fang: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 230, PP 24.  Probability 25 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Hypnosis: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 154, PP 32.  Puts the opponent to sleep.
    
    Ice Beam: Ice, Power 95, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 25 to freeze the 
    opponent.
    
    Ice Punch: Ice, Power 75, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 25 to freeze the  
    opponent.
    
    Icy Wind: Ice, Power 55, Accuracy 243, PP 24.  Whenever Icy Wind deals damage, 
    the opponent's Speed modifier is lowered by 1.
    
    Iron Tail: Steel, Power 100, Accuracy 192, PP 24.  Probability 76 to lower the 
    opponent's Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Jump Kick: Fighting, Power 70, Accuracy 243, PP 40.  If this attack would 
    miss, instead prevent all damage it would deal to the opponent this turn.  For 
    each 8 damage prevented this way, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Karate Chop: Fighting, Power 50, Accuracy 256, PP 40.  Uses two extra Critical 
    Hit Domains.
    
    Kinesis: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 204, PP 24.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Accuracy modifier by 1.
    
    Leech Life: Bug, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  For each 2 damage this attack 
    deals, add 1 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Leech Seed: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 230, PP 16.  Until the opponent switches 
    or is KO'd, at end of turn, that Pokemon loses 12.5% of its maximum HP, and an 
    equal amount is added to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Leer: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Lowers the opponent's Defense 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Lick: Ghost, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Probability 76 to paralyze the 
    opponent.
    
    Light Screen: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  For 5 turns, your 
    Special Defense is cut in half, and the opponent's Special Attack is reduced 
    to 25%.  Any new Pokemon switched within these 5 turns will still undergo this 
    modification.
    
    Lock-On: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  If the opponent doesn't switch 
    next turn, any move you use during that turn has accuracy 256, and ignores 
    accuracy and evade modifiers.
    
    Lovely Kiss: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 192, PP 24.  Puts the opponent to 
    sleep.
    
    Low Kick: Fighting, Power 50, Accuracy 230, PP 32.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Mach Punch: Fighting, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Goes first (priority 3).
    
    Magnitude: Ground, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Random power from among 7 
    possibilities, listed in Number/Power/Probability form: 4/10/14, 5/30/25, 
    6/50/51, 7/70/77, 8/90/51, 9/110/25, 10/150/13.
    
    Mean Look: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  The opponent can't switch 
    until you switch or a Pokemon is KO'd.
    
    Meditate: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Attack modifier 
    by 1.
    
    Mega Drain: Grass, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  For each 2 damage this 
    attack deals, add 1 to your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Mega Kick: Normal, Power 120, Accuracy 192, PP 8.
    
    Mega Punch: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 217, PP 32.
    
    Megahorn: Bug, Power 120, Accuracy 217, PP 16.
    
    Metal Claw: Steel, Power 50, Accuracy 243, PP 56.  Probability 25 to raise 
    your Attack modifier by 1.
    
    Metronome: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Select a random attack from 
    the game's list of attacks, and perform that attack normally.
    
    Milk Drink: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Your Pokemon recovers 50% 
    of its maximum HP.
    
    Mimic: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  If the opponent's last action 
    was a move, replace Mimic with that move until your Pokemon switches or is 
    KO'd.
    
    Mind Reader: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  If the opponent doesn't 
    switch next turn, any move you use next turn has accuracy 256, and treats 
    accuracy and evade modifiers as 0.
    
    Minimize: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Increases your Evade modifier 
    by 1.
    
    Mirror Coat: Psychic, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Goes last.  If it does, 
    and if the opponent dealt damage to you this turn with a Special attack, 
    subtract twice that amount from the opponent's Pokemon's HP.
    
    Mirror Move: Flying, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Attack with the move most 
    recently used by the opponent.
    
    Mist: Ice, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Until you switch or are KO'd, if an 
    opponent's move would decrease one or more of your stat modifiers, those 
    modifiers remain unchanged instead.
    
    Moonlight: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Your Pokemon recovers 50% of 
    its maximum HP.  If playing on GB from 4:00 AM to 5:59 PM, instead your 
    Pokemon recovers 25% of its maximum HP.
    
    Morning Sun: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Your Pokemon recovers 50% 
    of its maximum HP.  If playing on GB from 10:00 AM to 3:59 AM, instead your 
    Pokemon recovers 25% of its maximum HP.
    
    Mud-Slap: Ground, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Accuracy modifier by 1.
    
    Night Shade: Ghost, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Reduces opponent's HP by a 
    number equal to your level.
    
    Nightmare: Ghost, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  If the opponent isn't asleep, 
    this attack does nothing.  Otherwise, until that Pokemon wakes up, at end of 
    turn, that Pokemon loses 25% of its maximum HP.
    
    Octazooka: Water, Power 65, Accuracy 217, PP 16.  Probability 128 to lower the 
    opponent's Accuracy modifier by 1.
    
    Outrage: Dragon, Power 90, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Strikes for 2 or 3 turns; 
    your decision-making ability during those turns is removed.  After those 
    turns, your Pokemon confuses itself.
    
    Pain Split: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Adds your Pokemon's 
    remaining HP and the opponent's, then divides this total evenly among the two.
    
    Pay Day: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  In GB battles, receive P2 
    times user's level at end of battle.
    
    Peck: Flying, Power 35, Accuracy 256, PP 56.
    
    Perish Song: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Each Pokemon receives a 
    Perish Count of 3.  At end of each subsequent turn, any Pokemon with a Perish 
    Count decrements 1 from that count.  A Pokemon with a Perish Count of 0 has 
    its HP set to 0.  When a Pokemon switches, its Perish Count is removed.
    
    Petal Dance: Grass, Power 70, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Strikes for 2 or 3 turns; 
    your decision-making ability during those turns is removed.  After those 
    turns, your Pokemon confuses itself.
    
    Pin Missile: Bug, Power 14, Accuracy 217, PP 32.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 times 
    in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Poison Gas: Poison, Power 0, Accuracy 141, PP 61.  Poisons the opponent.
    
    Poisonpowder: Poison, Power 0, Accuracy 192, PP 56.  Poisons the opponent.
    
    Poison Sting: Poison, Power 15, Accuracy 256, PP 56.  Probability 76 to poison 
    the opponent.
    
    Pound: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 56.
    
    Powder Snow: Ice, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 40.  Probability 25 to freeze the 
    opponent.
    
    Present: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 230, PP 24.  Probability 103 for power 40.  
    Probability 77 for power 80.  Probability 25 for power 120.  Probability 51 
    for power 0, and addition of 80 to the opponent's Pokemon's HP.  These 
    probabilities are nonoverlapping.  When link-battling with a Gold or Silver 
    cartridge, also treats your Attack as a constant of 10, your Level as 
    typenumber(OppType2), and the opponent's Defense as typenumber(UserType2), and 
    applies CELS multipliers 1 and 2 twice.
    
    Protect: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 255, PP 16.  Goes first (priority 2).  If 
    the opponent's move this turn would change your HP, status, or stat modifiers, 
    that move does nothing instead.  For each prior consecutive turn on which 
    Protect, Detect, or Endure were used, subtract 1 from accuracy, then divide it 
    by 2.
    
    Psybeam: Psychic, Power 65, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 25 to confuse 
    the opponent.
    
    Psych Up: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Each of the opponent's stat 
    modifiers and accuracy/evade modifiers are copied to your own.
    
    Psychic: Psychic, Power 90, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Probability 25 to lower 
    opponent's Special Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Psywave: Psychic, Power *, Accuracy 204, PP 24.  Reduces opponent's HP by a 
    random number, chosen from a field with lower bound 1 and upper bound 
    (UserLevel * 1.5).
    
    Pursuit: Dark, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  If the opponent elects to 
    switch, until end of turn, Pursuit's priority becomes 0 until end of turn 
    (strikes before switch).  See CELS multipier 7.
    
    Quick Attack: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Goes first (priority 3).
    
    Rage: Normal, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Your decision-making ability is 
    removed until your Pokemon is KO'd.  Whenever the opponent deals damage to 
    your Pokemon, Rage's power is increased by 10.
    
    Rain Dance: Water, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Ends effects of Sunny Day or 
    Sandstorm.  For 5 turns, changes weather to Rain, removes the end-of-turn 
    probability for a Frozen Pokemon to thaw, increases the accuracy of Thunder to 
    256 and causes that move to ignore accuracy and evade modifiers, and halves 
    effectiveness of Morning Sun, Synthesis, and Moonlight.  See CELS multiplier 
    6.
    
    Rapid Spin: Normal, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Ends effects of opponent's 
    Spikes, Leech Seed, Bind, Clamp, Fire Spin, Whirlpool, and/or Wrap.
    
    Razor Leaf: Grass, Power 55, Accuracy 243, PP 40.  Uses two extra Critical Hit 
    Domains.
    
    Razor Wind: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 192, PP 24.  Requires pre-attack setup 
    turn.  Uses two extra Critical Hit Domains.
    
    Recover: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Your Pokemon recovers 50% of 
    its maximum HP.
    
    Reflect: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  For 5 turns, your Defense is 
    cut in half, and the opponent's Attack is reduced to 25%.  Any new Pokemon 
    switched within these 5 turns will still undergo this modification.
    
    Rest: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Your Pokemon recovers all HP, 
    and goes to sleep (overwriting any other status).  This sleep has a fixed 
    duration of 2 turns.
    
    Return: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Power +0.4 for each point of 
    Happiness the user has.
    
    Reversal: Fighting, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Power +20 if user has less 
    than 68.75% of its maximum HP.  Power +40 if user has less than 35.42% of its 
    maximum HP.  Power +20 if user has less than 20.83% of its maximum HP.  Power 
    +50 if user has less than 10.42% of its maximum HP.  Power +50 if user has 
    less than 4.17% of its maximum HP.  Uses no Critical Hit Domains.  CELS 
    multiplier 12 has a fixed value of 1.
    
    Roar: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Goes last.  If it does, the 
    opponent's Pokemon is withdrawn in favor of another randomly-chosen Pokemon on 
    its team.  
    
    Rock Slide: Rock, Power 75, Accuracy 230, PP 16.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Rock Smash: Fighting, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 128 to lower 
    the opponent's Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Rock Throw: Rock, Power 50, Accuracy 230, PP 24.
    
    Rolling Kick: Fighting, Power 60, Accuracy 217, PP 24.  Probability 76 to make 
    the opponent flinch.
    
    Rollout: Rock, Power 30, Accuracy 230, PP 32.  Lasts 5 turns, or until a miss.  
    As long as Rollout is in effect, your decision-making ability is removed.  
    Power doubles for each prior turn in the duration of the current Rollout, and 
    doubles again if your current Pokemon has used Defense Curl since its most 
    recent entry onto the field.
    
    Sacred Fire: Fire, Power 100, Accuracy 243, PP 8.  A Frozen Pokemon can use 
    this attack, and in doing so changes its status to OK.  Probability 128 to 
    burn the opponent.
    
    Safeguard: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 40.  For 5 turns, if an 
    opponent's Pokemon would poison, freeze, paralyze, burn, sleep, or confuse one 
    of your Pokemon, your status remains unchanged instead.
    
    Sand-Attack: Ground, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Accuracy modifier by 1.
    
    Sandstorm: Rock, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  For 5 turns: At end of turn, 
    all active non-Rock, non-Ground, non-Steel Pokemon lose 12.5% of their maximum 
    HP.
    
    Scary Face: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 230, PP 16.  Lowers the opponent's Speed 
    modifier by 2.
    
    Scratch: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 48.
    
    Screech: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 217, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's Defense 
    modifier by 2.
    
    Seismic Toss: Fighting, Power *, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Reduces opponent's HP 
    by a number equal to your level.
    
    Selfdestruct: Normal, Power 200, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Until end of turn, the 
    opponent's Defense is cut in half.  Your HP becomes 0.
    
    Shadow Ball: Ghost, Power 80, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 51 to lower 
    the opponent's Special Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Sharpen: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Raises your Attack modifier by 
    1.
    
    Sing: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 141, PP 24.  Puts the opponent's Pokemon to 
    sleep.
    
    Sketch: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 1.  If the opponent's last action 
    was a move, replace Sketch with that move until end of battle.  If playing 
    single-player GB, instead replace Sketch with that move permanently.
    
    Skull Bash: Normal, Power 100, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Requires pre-attack setup 
    turn.  During that turn, your Defense modifier is raised by 1.
    
    Sky Attack: Flying, Power 140, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Requires pre-attack setup 
    turn.
    
    Slam: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 192, PP 32.
    
    Slash: Normal, Power 70, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Uses two extra Critical Hit 
    Domains.
    
    Sleep Powder: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 192, PP 24.  Puts the opponent to 
    sleep.
    
    Sleep Talk: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  This attack does nothing if 
    your Pokemon isn't asleep.  Selects one of your other three attacks, and 
    performs that attack normally.
    
    Sludge: Poison, Power 65, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 76 to poison the 
    opponent.
    
    Sludge Bomb: Poison, Power 90, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Probability 76 to poison 
    the opponent.
    
    Smog: Poison, Power 20, Accuracy 179, PP 32.  Probability 102 to poison the 
    opponent.
    
    Smokescreen: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Accuracy modifier by 1.
    
    Snore: Normal, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  This attack misses if your 
    Pokemon isn't asleep.  Probability 76 to make the opponent flinch.
    
    Softboiled: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Your Pokemon recovers 50% 
    of its maximum HP.
    
    Solarbeam: Grass, Power 120, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Requires pre-attack setup 
    turn.
    
    Sonicboom: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 230, PP 32.  Reduces the opponent's HP by 
    20.
    
    Spark: Electric, Power 65, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 76 to paralyze 
    the opponent.
    
    Spider Web: Bug, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  The opponent can't switch 
    until you switch or a Pokemon is KO'd.
    
    Spike Cannon: Normal, Power 20, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Strikes 2, 3, 4, or 5 
    times in a single turn, with uniform probability.
    
    Spikes: Ground, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Until the end of the battle, 
    whenever the opponent switches to a non-Flying-type Pokemon, that Pokemon 
    loses 12.5% of its maximum HP.
    
    Spite: Ghost, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  If the opponent used a move 
    during its most recent turn, that move's PP is reduced by 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, 
    chosen randomly.
    
    Splash: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Displays "No effect!" on the 
    screen.
    
    Spore: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Puts the opponent to sleep.
    
    Steel Wing: Steel, Power 70, Accuracy 230, PP 40.  Probability 25 to increase 
    your Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Stomp: Normal, Power 65, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 76 to make the 
    opponent flinch.  See CELS multiplier 10.
    
    Strength: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 256, PP 24.
    
    String Shot: Bug, Power 0, Accuracy 243, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's Speed 
    modifier by 1.
    
    Struggle: Typeless, Power 50, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  For each 4 damage this 
    attack deals, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.  A Pokemon whose moves all 
    have 0 PP will use Struggle as though it had infinite PP.
    
    Stun Spore: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 192, PP 48.  Paralyzes the opponent.
    
    Submission: Fighting, Power 80, Accuracy 204, PP 40.  For each 4 damage this 
    attack deals, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Substitute: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Your Pokemon loses 25% of 
    its maximum HP and gives that HP to a substitute.  If an attack would deal 
    damage to a Pokemon that has a substitute, that attack deals damage to the 
    substitute instead.  If a Pokemon with a substitute would be inflicted with 
    Sleep, Confusion, Paralysis, Poison, Burn, Freeze, or Leech Seed, its status 
    remains unchanged instead.
    
    Sunny Day: Fire, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Ends effects of Rain Dance or 
    Sandstorm.  For 5 turns, changes weather to Sun, reduces accuracy of Thunder 
    to 128, removes effect from Solarbeam, and doubles effectiveness of Morning 
    Sun, Synthesis, and Moonlight.  See CELS multiplier 5.
    
    Super Fang: Normal, Power *, Accuracy 230, PP 16.  The opponent's Pokemon 
    loses half its current HP, rounded up.
    
    Supersonic: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 141, PP 32.  Confuses the opponent.
    
    Surf: Water, Power 95, Accuracy 256, PP 24.
    
    Swagger: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 230, PP 16.  Confuses the opponent.  Their 
    Attack modifier is raised by 2.
    
    Sweet Kiss: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 192, PP 16.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Attack modifier by 2.
    
    Sweet Scent: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Evade modifier by 1.
    
    Swift: Normal, Power 60, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Ignores accuracy and evade 
    modifiers.
    
    Swords Dance: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  
    
    Synthesis: Grass, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 8.  Your Pokemon recovers 50% of 
    its maximum HP.  If playing on GB from 6:00 PM to 9:59 AM, instead your 
    Pokemon recovers 25% of its maximum HP.
    
    Tackle: Normal, Power 35, Accuracy 243, PP 56.
    
    Tail Whip: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Lowers the opponent's 
    Defense modifier by 1.
    
    Take Down: Normal, Power 90, Accuracy 217, PP 32.  For each 4 damage this 
    attack deals, subtract 1 from your Pokemon's HP.
    
    Teleport: Psychic, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32. In single-player GB battles, 
    end the battle.  Otherwise, do nothing.
    
    Thief: Dark, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  If your Pokemon has no item, the 
    opponent's item is removed and given to your Pokemon.
    
    Thrash: Normal, Power 90, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Strikes for 2 or 3 turns; your 
    decision-making ability during those turns is removed.  After those turns, 
    your Pokemon confuses itself.
    
    Thunder: Electric, Power 120, Accuracy 179, PP 16.  Probability 25 to paralyze 
    the opponent.
    
    Thunder Wave: Electric, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Paralyzes the opponent.
    
    Thunderbolt: Electric, Power 95, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 25 to 
    paralyze the opponent.
    
    Thunderpunch: Electric, Power 75, Accuracy 256, PP 24.  Probability 25 to 
    paralyze the opponent.
    
    Thundershock: Electric, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 48.  Probability 25 to 
    paralyze the opponent.
    
    Toxic: Poison, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Poisons the opponent.  Until the 
    opponent switches or is KO'd, damage taken by Poison starts at 6.25% and 
    increases by 6.25% each turn, instead of the normal constant rate of 12.5%.
    
    Transform: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Until you switch or are 
    KO'd, your Pokemon's species, non-HP stats, and moves become those of the 
    opponent's Pokemon as of the time Transform was used.  If any of those moves 
    have more than 5 PP, their PP count for your Pokemon is reduced to 5.
    
    Tri Attack: Normal, Power 80, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Can burn, freeze, or 
    paralyze opponent, each with probability 17.  These probabilities do not 
    overlap.
    
    Triple Kick: Fighting, Power 10, Accuracy 230, PP 16.  Probability 230 to 
    attack a second time within the same turn with power 20.  If this happens, 
    probability 230 to attack a third time within the same turn with power 40.
    
    Twineedle: Bug, Power 25, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Strikes twice within a single 
    turn.  Probability 51 to poison the opponent.
    
    Twister: Dragon, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Probability 51 to make the 
    opponent flinch.
    
    Vicegrip: Normal, Power 55, Accuracy 256, PP 48.
    
    Vine Whip: Grass, Power 35, Accuracy 256, PP 16.
    
    Vital Throw: Fighting, Power 70, Accuracy 256, PP 16.  Goes last.  Ignores 
    accuracy and evade modifiers.
    
    Water Gun: Water, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP 40.
    
    Waterfall: Water, Power 80, Accuracy 256, PP 24.
    
    Whirlpool: Water, Power 15, Accuracy 179, PP 24.  The opponent can't switch 
    for 2-5 turns.  At the end of each of those turns, that Pokemon loses 6.25% of 
    maximum HP.
    
    Whirlwind: Normal, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 32.  Goes last.  If it does, the 
    opponent's Pokemon is withdrawn in favor of another randomly-chosen Pokemon on 
    its team.    Is unaffected by Airborne status.
    
    Wing Attack: Flying, Power 65, Accuracy 256, PP 56.
    
    Withdraw: Water, Power 0, Accuracy 256, PP 61.  Raises your Defense modifier 
    by 1.
    
    Wrap: Normal, Power 15, Accuracy 217, PP 24.  The opponent can't switch for 2-
    5 turns.  At the end of each of those turns, that Pokemon loses 6.25% of 
    maximum HP.
    
    Zap Cannon: Electric, Power 100, Accuracy 128, PP 8.  Whenever Zap Cannon 
    deals damage, the opponent becomes paralyzed.
    
    <ConfusionDamage>: Typeless, Power 40, Accuracy 256, PP N/A.  Each turn your 
    Pokemon is confused, it has probability 128 of hitting itself with this attack 
    instead of using any other move.
    
    *******************
    *305. Variant Play*
    *******************
    
    Once again, there's more to the game than unrestricted battles of L100s.  
    Stadium comes with three "underling modes", and I'll include a fourth, player-
    designed mode (which puts Nintendo's choices to shame) in the same category.
    
    First up, the Poke Cup.  Still the most skill-testing Stadium cup, it's also 
    the most accommodative to the basic Prime Cup mindset.  Think of it as basic 
    Prime Cup with automatic bans on the ubers, as well as the Dogs of War (since 
    their L50 sets pretty much suck).  And there's still the level split issue.
    
    As with RBY, the best level split is 2x55, 4x50.  Your normal Prime Cup team 
    should work, barring the use of legends (in which case you simply replace them 
    with the closest legally-admitted Pokemon).  Pick your two most valued 
    competitors, and put them at L55, where they'll receive all the "oomph" they 
    can get.  Good choices for the level boost are Tyranitar (considering it's 
    only eligible at L55), Dragonite (same reason), Snorlax, Blissey, Alakazam, 
    and Machamp.  If, like me, you commit three boxes to Poke Cup, consider 
    creating L50 versions of these as well, so you can still use them in the 
    presence of two established L55s.
    
    Then, just go read 303, and finish up your team!
    
    The next mode is Little Cup.  While this one is interesting under a purely-RPG 
    ruleset, where finding the proper breeding chains is most of the challenge, 
    once players have played long enough (or Sharked) to convert the game to 51% 
    strategy (the remaining 49% being luck), this Cup becomes Battle of the 
    Standards V29.2, much like RBY.  In case you haven't cracked it yet, you might 
    want to take one final, hapless newbie run through the cup, before my advice 
    saves the day...
    
    ...
    
    ...
    
    ...
    
    ...
    
    ...
    
    ...
    
    ...
    
    Okay.  I'm ready to let you win the Little Cup.  Just remember these three 
    Pokemon:
    
    CHANSEY@gold berry Tri Attack/Reflect/Light Screen/Softboiled
    SCYTHER@miracleberry Agility/Swords Dance/Baton Pass/Hidden Power (Steel) or 
    Steel Wing
    CUBONE@thick club Earthquake/Ancientpower/Hidden Power (Bug)/Growl
    
    Make sure these Pokemon have maximum stats.  (Yes, it's theoretically possible 
    to get true maximums at L5.  Battle low-level Pokemon to get Stat Exp., but 
    before enough Level Experience to reach L6, deposit the Pokemon in Daycare.  
    Take 1 step left, 1 step right, pay P100 to get your Pokemon back, and 
    discover that the Level Experience is back to what it was when it was hatched 
    as a L5.  Repeat until all Stat Exp. banks hit 63002.)  Luckily for you, you 
    have the Gameshark (hopefully) to reap all the benefits of this 900-hour 
    procedure without making "time spent on game" a direct factor in who wins a 
    strategy game.  It's been proven possible according to internal game rules, 
    and that's all the justification you need.
    
    Now, here's how you play the team:
    
    1. Put up a Reflect with Chansey.
    2. Put up Light Screen.
    3. Switch to Scyther.
    4. Use Agility.
    5. Use Swords Dance.
    6. BP to Cubone.
    7-9: KO, KO, KO.  Cubone should have 56 Attack, and that's high enough to 
    knock out any unenhanced opponent in one hit.
    
    Some notes.  One, Growl is NOT a misprint.  There's already the instant KO 
    between Earthquake, Ancientpower, and Hidden Power.  Hence no attack or attack 
    boost is needed (plus, Swords Dance can't coexist with Ancientpower, and Rock 
    Slide won't take over Ancientpower's spot due to imperfect accuracy and the 
    fact that AP already does everything it needs to do).  The question is what 
    could possibly have an effect.  Agility-Endure-Reversal Scyther is a threat 
    you'll need to plan for, and an Agility for Scyther is faster than an Agility 
    for Cubone.  Try an AP and it gets Endured, then Scyther strikes with Swords 
    Danced Reversal for 35 damage and a kill.  Not even an AP boost can save you.  
    So how to stop it?  That's where Growl comes in.  Instead of trying an 
    Ancientpower to lead, use Growl on the first available turn.  This should get 
    Endured, to no avail.  Growl can reduce Scyther's Attack to the point where 
    it's safe to attack (though this can be nullified with Swords Dance, that move 
    becomes suicide), but more importantly, the 100% accuracy Endure was wasted.  
    If you try an Ancientpower next turn, a possible Endure will only work half 
    the time.  And if they try another move to reset the accuracy, then you just 
    got a free kill.  (All this to demonstrate that Growl actually has a use.)
    
    Second, after a while your opponents can get used to this team and figure out 
    ways to stop it (most of which involve stopping Chansey and Scyther from 
    starting the chain).  It helps to round out your team with some standalone 
    Pokemon.  Here's the best of the lot:
    
    Houndour Crunch/Fire Blast/Sunny Day/Solarbeam
    Abra Psychic/Fire Punch/Ice Punch/Thunderpunch
    Gastly Psychic/Thunderbolt/Destiny Bond/Confuse Ray
    Staryu Surf/Psychic/Thunderbolt/Ice Beam
    Machop Cross Chop/Earthquake/Hidden Power (Rock)
    Elekid Thunderbolt/Cross Chop/Ice Punch/Psychic
    
    Challenge Cup doesn't deserve an explanation, or its 25x oversized arena.  
    Basically both players get thrown a random team, and it's called "a game of 
    who fights best with many different Pokemon", notwithstanding the fact that 
    not all of them are good, and some teams will simply turn out better than 
    others and undermine the skill of the battlers involved.  Part of battling is 
    recognizing which Pokemon aren't even worthy to be on teams (see section 303).  
    In fact, the only reason I'm listing it here is because it's a mandatory clear 
    for Stadium 2.  Just remember that the Reset button is your friend, and there 
    is a Shark code out there for "8 continues, all the time".  Treasure your 
    high-power 100-accuracy moves as much as possible, and if you're lucky enough 
    to get a Pokemon with Recover or Leftovers, use it as much as you can.
    
    If you must play Challenge Cup against another player (though some like this 
    mode, hence the creation of a "RandBat" online server which simulates just 
    such a battle), I would suggest mandating a best-of-3 match between the same 
    teams, so you can actually simulate the idea of adapting to your team over 
    time.  Isn't that supposed to be part of the game?  (This last question is 
    directed at Nintendo, not the casual reader.)
    
    All those rule systems are either pointless or restricting.  Instead of 
    cutting all Pokemon to half size, watching kids kill each other, or using a 
    one-shot random number generator to (effectively) decide who wins, there 
    should be a format where no Pokemon are actually banned, but there's a valid 
    reason to use the less powerful ones (so that team building becomes less 
    boring).
    
    Jump to March 2002.  Uiru, renowned writer of feature articles on Pokemon, is 
    thinking of a new discovery to release to the world.  I don't know what the 
    inspiration was; maybe it was an article on a sports team over the salary cap, 
    or a breakdown for a government spending pie chart, but some brainstorming 
    session gave rise to a potentially rewarding format.
    
    And it was called the Point System, and it was good.
    
    Here's a quick overview of the system.  You start with a salary cap for 
    points.  Those points must be used to buy your team.  The Official Rules are 
    as follows:
    
    THE POINT SYSTEM 
     
    Introduction 
     
    These rules shall have jurisdiction over all Pokemon battles and tournaments 
    to which they are agreed upon as a limiting factor in team construction.  
     
    These rules have version number 108. If the second row of the primary table 
    depicted on the Official Point System Site (as given in Appendix A) ever 
    displays a version number higher than this version's number, these rules shall 
    be entirely void. 
     
    The Overall Salary Cap is currently 44 points. 
     
    1. Pokemon Values 
     
    Inclusion of each Pokemon adds to a team's Point Value a number of points 
    equal to the number at the beginning of the paragraph that Pokemon appears in. 
     
    28: Mewtwo*, Lugia* 
     
    27: Ho-oh* 
     
    23: Mew* 
     
    21: Zapdos*, Suicune* 
     
    19: Celebi* 
     
    17: Articuno*, Raikou* 
     
    14: Moltres*, Entei* 
     
    12: Machamp, Snorlax, Skarmory  
     
    11: Kingdra, Smeargle, Blissey, Tyranitar  
     
    10: Umbreon, Misdreavus, Forretress, Heracross, Ursaring, Miltank 
     
    9: Starmie, Tauros, Lapras, Jolteon, Dragonite, Scizor 
     
    8: Crobat, Clefable, Arcanine, Alakazam, Dodrio, Muk, Cloyster, Steelix, 
    Exeggutor, Espeon, Ampharos, Jumpluff, Quagsire, Jynx, Houndoom 
     
    7: Blastoise, Poliwrath, Tentacruel, Slowbro, Gengar, Marowak, Chansey, 
    Scyther, Electabuzz, Aerodactyl, Typhlosion, Lanturn, Slowking, Donphan, 
    Porygon2 
     
    6: Venusaur, Charizard, Fearow, Sandslash, Nidoqueen, Nidoking, Ninetales, 
    Vileplume, Bellossom, Golduck, Politoed, Golem, Dewgong, Hypno, Hitmonlee, 
    Hitmonchan, Hitmontop, Rhydon, Magmar, Vaporeon, Omastar, Meganium, Piloswine, 
    Octillery 
     
    5: Raichu, Wigglytuff, Primeape, Machoke, Victreebel, Rapidash, Electrode, 
    Weezing, Kangaskhan, Pinsir, Gyarados, Flareon, Kabutops, Feraligatr, Noctowl, 
    Girafarig, Gligar, Shuckle, Mantine 
     
    4: Beedrill, Pidgeot, Raticate, Arbok, Golbat, Parasect, Venomoth, Dugtrio, 
    Persian, Magneton, Haunter, Kingler, Lickitung, Tangela, Seaking, Mr. Mime, 
    Dragonair, Furret, Xatu, Sudowoodo, Aipom, Yanma, Murkrow, Dunsparce, 
    Granbull, Corsola, Stantler, Pupitar 
     
    3: Butterfree, Ledian, Ariados, Togetic, Azumarill, Sunflora, Qwilfish, 
    Sneasel, Magcargo  
     
    2: Farfetch'd, Unown, Wobbuffet, Delibird 
     
    1: any Pokemon not listed 
     
    0: Zubat, Togepi, Cleffa, Sentret, Igglybuff, Wooper, <empty slot> 
     
    -1: Tyrogue, Metapod, Kakuna, Pichu, Magikarp, Caterpie, Weedle, Sunkern 
     
    No more than two Pokemon of value 0 or less may be used on a team. "*" 
    indicates Pokemon appears on the Legendary List. 
     
    2. Move Prices 
     
    Inclusion of a move whose name precedes a colon in any paragraph in this 
    section causes an addition of points to the team's Point Value as per the last 
    sentence in the paragraph that applies to the Pokemon in question, or to the 
    other Pokemon on the team if so directed by the sentence. 
     
    Present: 7 when battle medium is GSBot or G/S link battle. 0 when battle 
    medium is Stadium 2 or Crystal link battle. 
     
    Hidden Power: 2 when calculated Hidden Power type differs from all of the 
    user's type(s). 0 when calculated Hidden Power type matches one of the user's 
    types. 0 if Hidden Power appears on the user's level-up list. 4 when the user 
    is a member of the Legendary List. 
     
    Horn Drill, Fissure, and Guillotine: 4 if move appears on the user's TM list 
    or Special list. 2 if move appears on the user's level-up list or Egg move 
    list. 10 if more than one of Fissure, Horn Drill, and Guillotine are used in 
    the same moveset. 
     
    Horn Drill, Fissure, and Guillotine - Part 2: 5 if more than one Pokemon on 
    team has Fissure, Horn Drill, and/or Guillotine. 
     
    Double Team and Minimize: 2 if move appears on user's TM list or Special list. 
    1 if move appears on the user's level-up list or Egg move list. 
     
    Baton Pass: 1. 
     
    Heal Bell: 2, plus an additional 1 for each Pokemon on team whose moveset 
    includes Rest. 
     
    Curse: 1, plus an additional 1 for each of the following conditions met by the 
    user: base Attack 100 or greater; base Defense 51 or less; base Speed 51 or 
    less; member of Legendary List; Selfdestruct, Explosion, Recover, Rest, Milk 
    Drink, or Softboiled in same moveset as Curse. If user is Ghost-type, instead 
    cost is 0. 
     
    3. Item Prices 
     
    For each Pokemon on a team, points are added to the team's Point Value 
    according to that Pokemon's attached item: 
     
    0 for a given item's first and second appearances in a team.  
    1 for a given item's third, fourth, fifth, and sixth appearances in a team. 
    10 for attachment of Thick Club. 
    8 for attachment of Light Ball. 
    1 for attachment of Metal Powder, Stick, or Lucky Punch. 
     
    4. Refunds 
     
    Each paragraph in this section shall be examined, and if it applies to a team 
    or a Pokemon contained therein, then the team's Point Value shall be reduced 
    by an amount equal to the number immediately following the first colon in that 
    paragraph. 
     
    Item Clause 4: 2 if team holds at least four total items, and all are 
    different. 
     
    Item Clause 6: 2 if team holds six total items, and all are different. 
    (Cumulative with Item Clause 4) 
     
    No Item 1: 1 for each Pokemon that lacks an item. 
     
    No Item 6: 2 if team contains six Pokemon, and all lack items. (Cumulative 
    with No Item 1) 
     
    All-Natural 1: 1 if a Pokemon's moveset contains four moves, all of which 
    appear on its level-up list 
     
    All-Natural 6: 4 if a team has 24 moves, all of which appear on their users' 
    level-up lists (Cumulative with All-Natural 1) 
     
    Blank Move 1: 1 for each Pokemon whose moveset includes three or fewer moves. 
    Multiple blank slots on the same Pokemon do not provide cumulative refunds. 
     
    Appendix A: Rulings 
     
    1. If a team's Point Value exceeds the Overall Salary Cap at the start of a 
    match, that team is considered to have lost by disqualification. Point totals 
    are only compared to the Salary Cap at the start of a match. Mid-battle 
    actions which cause a team's point value to increase beyond the Salary Cap 
    (such as Thief to acquire a Thick Club, or Mimic replacing itself with Present 
    in a GSBot battle) may be taken without incident. 
     
    2. If a team contains at least one Pokemon that possesses at least one move 
    not on its level-up, TM, Egg move, or Special lists at the start of a match, 
    that team is considered to have lost by disqualification. The official source 
    for determining Pokemon's level-up, TM, Egg move, and Special lists shall be 
    UPDB, found at <http://database.stumpnet.net>. 
     
    3. This Point System is entitled to undergo revision at any time. When and if 
    this happens, the revisions shall not have jurisdiction over any standalone 
    matches or multi-match tournaments started prior to the new revision's 
    placement on the Official Point System Site. The Official Point System Site is 
    currently 
    <http://www.math.miami.edu/~jam/azure/forum/tuff/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;
    f=9;t=000700>. 
     
    4. For purposes of calculating move prices, Smeargle's level-up list is 
    considered to contain all moves except Selfdestruct, Explosion, Struggle, 
    Transform, Mirror Move, Mimic, Metronome, and Sleep Talk; its TM list is null. 
    Hence Smeargle will always qualify for an All-Natural 1 refund as long as it 
    has four moves. 
     
    5. If the battle medium is something other than the four media mentioned in 
    these rules, the battle medium shall be considered to be Stadium 2 if, when a 
    default L100 Miltank uses Present, the medium's "damage calculation" 
    subroutine refers its second cross-reference to a value greater than 164. 
    Otherwise, the battle medium shall be considered to be GSBot. 
     
    6. Due to the discoveries of 2002/11/11, all moves not known to be in a 
    Pokemon's TM, Level-Up, Egg, or Special lists prior to that date (as regulated 
    by White Cat's gsdex.txt file for the former three categories, and Golden 
    Ursaring's nypc.html file for the fourth, and exempting moves added to Special 
    lists according to the latter between 2002/11/11 and 2003/03/16), but that 
    have been achieved afterwards without the use of external RAM modification, 
    shall be considered to belong to a fifth move category, known as the 
    "Transform List". Moves appearing on a Pokemon's Transform List may not 
    legally be used for that Pokemon in a UPS battle. 
    
    This ruleset allows you to use any Pokemon, but those who try and cram in 
    several high-pointers will have to make some suboptimal choices for the rest 
    of the team.  Either choose between consistency at a level slightly above 
    average, or try and build your team around 1-2 mind-blowingly strong Pokemon 
    (but if they go down, you're effectively doomed).  The choice is there, and as 
    of yet is undecided.  And that's enough to keep the game exciting even after 
    the release of RS_.
    
    ***************
    *4. Conclusion*
    ***************
    
    Almost the end!  Basically, Part 4 is here to ensure I don't end up in court. 
    (Though based on what you've seen, wouldn't I make a good lawyer?)
    
    ***********************
    *400. The Error Policy*
    ***********************
    
    Here's the deal.  I'm a stickler for accuracy, and I want to make sure that 
    all 200+ pages of this guide are error-proof.  Daunting task, huh?
    
    Well, let's just say that you, the readers, now get a chance to be editors.  
    Here's what to do: If you spot a misplaced stat, forgotten move, improper 
    calculation, or even (gasp!) a spelling error, simply e-mail me.  Not only 
    will I fix the error in the next version, but you'll get an entry into the 
    Editing Hall of Fame!
    
    Current Hall-of-Famers:
    
    Phil Erwin, who turned up 21 spelling errors.  Based on 80,000 total words, 
    that translates to 99.974% accuracy--not bad for a first release--but it's 
    still not 100%, and Phil was the first to bring it up.
    
    Hipmonlee, who found two STATISTICAL errors in 202.  NOOOOOOO!  NOT 
    STATISTICAL ERRORS!
    
    Stan64, who found a spelling error in a newly-typed portion of 301 just three 
    days after it saw print.  Quick corrections are always good.
    
    ***************
    *401. Glossary*
    ***************
    
    Okay, so you've read through everything I have to tell you about Pokemon.  Now 
    you're free to wander about with the big guns, right?  Well, yes, but be 
    warned:  They speak an entirely different language from what you've become 
    accustomed to for the last 205 pages.  (Part of this is due to the fact that 
    my research methods are cut off from everyone else, so I've developed a 
    completely different lexicon than the intertwined group found online.)  So 
    I've taken the liberty of making one last effort to let you understand the 
    rest of the world.
    
    1337 or 31337: Hackerspeak misspellings of "elite".  Both of them mean just 
    that.
    
    Own, Pwn, 11, > : To be certain of beating (a Pokemon).  Also, to repeatedly 
    destroy a specific player.
    
    Teh, 00ber, kewl, liek, etc.: I don't know what drives them to do it, but the 
    online society has a knack for intentionally misspelling words.  I'll start 
    you off with these four, which mean "the", "uber", "cool", and "like" 
    respectively.  If you ever come across others, use common sense to convert it 
    to proper English spelling.  Or Spanish, French, Japanese, or any other 
    language you may speak.
    
    Ro><or, su><or, ownZor...: Another popular convention you'll come across is 
    the addition of the Z-O-R suffix to the sound of a word.  For words that end 
    in K, such as "rock" and "suck", the (C-)K-Z combine to form an X sound, which 
    is usually represented as >< to reinforce the idea that "We don't need no 
    stinking letter keys!" (I don't include myself in this 'we').  An inefficient 
    idea, as is the typing of the suffix itself.  Adding "zor" or "xor" or "><or" 
    or whatever it may be...none of them change the word's meaning at all.
    
    B0rked: Broken.  Alternately, "just plain bad."
    
    YSB: "yeah...stupid Bellsprout."  Don't ask me where it came from.  I live in 
    an entirely different world from the lunatic society that created this line.  
    Or at least it seems that way.
    
    AYB: "All Your Base (are belong to us)."  Originating from a word-for-word 
    translated spoof of American culture by those pesky Japanese, this phrase has 
    come to mean "We own you."  
    
    *****************
    *402. References*
    *****************
    
    If, for some strange reason, you've read through the last 200-something pages 
    and still need help, hopefully you can find what you're looking for somewhere 
    in this list of websites.
    
    http://database.stumpnet.net: UPDB (Uiru's Pokemon DataBase).  If you like my 
    system of using charts for as much as possible, you'll love UPDB.  You'll find 
    about 600 charts there, as well as some makeshift stat calculators that should 
    satiate your calculating needs (at least until my project is released in final 
    form).
    
    http://www.geocities.com/thelegendarydogs: PokeFAQs.  Run by Phil Erwin, this 
    site features (among other things) explanations of entry-level mechanics in 
    terms that entry-level players are used to, a detailed analysis of the most 
    efficient way to play Pokemon without a Gameshark, and a theme song that'll 
    have you humming to yourself for days on end.  The real draw is a program that 
    rates teams (at least to as much an extent as a computer is capable of), and a 
    program that does reverse stat calculation--i.e., you input the stats and it 
    tells you DVs.
    
    http://www.azureheights.com: Azure Heights RBY Research Center.  It doesn't 
    get updated often, but it's generally accepted as the Official List of RBY 
    Errata.  If I forgot a mechanic somewhere in section 201, they probably 
    didn't.
    
    http://www.angelfire.com/pa4/jman/home1.html: Metalloid Research.  Azure's own 
    members were furious about their home site not updating for GSC, so a separate 
    group of players went on to build this site, which is exactly like the above, 
    but for the newer games.
    
    http://www.pokemon.com: The Picture On The Dartboard.  If you're angered by 
    this game to the point of uncontrollability, first open up your Web browser 
    and hop to this site.  THEN feel free to punch the screen out.
    
    **************
    *403. Credits*
    **************
    
    Me: For persevering through several misfortunes, all to write one book-length 
    guide.  Call me crazy...it worked, didn't it?
    
    You: For giving me a REASON to drive myself insane for over a year.  What 
    other reason is there for writing books than to have people read them?
    
    CJayC: For allowing people to send in guides like this one, even when his 
    website already holds 300,000 others like it.  How crowded must his house (and 
    hard drive) be?
    
    Fortune City: For finally giving me my own website!  Now I actually want to be 
    able to use it for something!  Like this document!
    
    Donald: For making a number of guides for me to compete with; yet another 
    reason I had to ultimately release the document you're reading now
    
    Uiru, Meowth346, MewtwoSama, White Cat, and MK: For doing various pieces of 
    the research quoted herein
    
    Shadowdude: For setting up the coverage in section 303
    
    Bill Gates: For creating the dream company, responsible for redefining 
    corporate strategy, publishing the Word and Excel programs I use to distribute 
    my research, and headquartered close enough to Nintendo that they can pelt NOA 
    staffers with hot Starbucks coffee on demand!  THANKS, BILL!
    
    Al Gore: Because I have to attribute the Internet to someone, and he claims 
    more credit for its existence than anyone else.  That, and his philosophy of 
    "fight until you're dead, and possibly even afterwards" was useful in my long 
    struggle to complete the project you're looking at.
    
    Any of the 9,000,000 or so other people who helped make anything I may have 
    used in the making of this guide: For whatever infinitesimally insignificant 
    credit you'd need to avoid a lawsuit
    
    The Federal Anti-Drug Commission: For helping me get the point across...
    
    DON'T DO DRUGS!
    
    Though I should stick "Have fun, and " in front of that phrase.
    
    You should get the point.  Until next time...
    
    END