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Super Smash Bros. Melee
Nostalgia FAQ
An In-Depth FAQ by CyricZ
Version 1.0
E-mail: cyricz42@yahoo.com
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Table of Contents

1. Introduction
2. FAQ
3. Characters
   3A. Starting Characters
   3B. Unique Secret Characters
   3C. Related Secret Characters
4. Character Moves
   4A. Starting Characters
   4B. Unique Secret Characters
   4C. Related Secret Characters
5. Stages
   5A. Melee Stages
   5B. Adventure Stages
   5C. Others
6. Items
7. Music Analysis
   7A. Opening
   7B. Character Stages
   7C. Alternate Stage Music
   7D. Victory Jingles
   7E. 1-P Stage Music
   7F. Menus
   7G. Other Stage Music
   7H. All Other Music and Jingles
8. Standard Guide Stuff
   8A. Legal
   8B. E-mail Guidelines
   8C. Credits
   8D. Version Updates
   8E. The Final Word

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1. INTRODUCTION
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Howdy!  Welcome to my Super Smash Bros. Melee Nostalgia FAQ!  I created 
this In-Depth FAQ because this game is nostalgia incarnate for Nintendo 
fans.  So much Nintendo lore is packed into the game and, with so many 
new Nintendo fans cropping up these days, it's tough for them to keep 
up on all of Nintendo's past.  Here in this guide, I'll provide a 
history to all the characters, moves, stages, items, and music in the 
game.  Enjoy!

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2. FAQ
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Q: Did you know you're missing some games from the Character list?

A: I'm sure I am, particularly for the Mario characters.  HOWEVER, don't 
 bother telling me about games that were released after 2002.  Since 
 SSBM came out in 2001, we're only concerning games released or announced 
 at that time, and I've chosen 2002 as a cutoff date.

Q: Is the Beam Sword a lightsaber from Star Wars?

A: Hell, no.  Sure, it's retractable, and glows, but those are the only 
 connections.  For one, lightsabers don't have hilt guards like the Beam 
 Sword, and also, the Beam Sword has an angled edge at the top, which 
 lightsabers do not have.  And lastly, NINTENDO DIDN'T MAKE STAR WARS.

Q: Isn't the Home Run Bat an item that Ness had from EarthBound?

A: Nope.  There was never a bat with that exact name in EarthBound.  
 Further, the trophy lists it as being "from Super Smash Bros."

Q: Isn't the Paper Fan an item that Peach had in Super Mario RPG?

A: No.  The biggest tip off is that Peach's War Fan is lavender and 
 turquoise, not white and red.

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3. CHARACTERS
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Each of the characters has a history to him/her/it.  This details the 
character's history in games, as well as games he/she/it has starred 
in or was a major supporting character.  I won't be listing games in 
which the characters have had cameo appearances.  I may do so later, 
though.

=========================
3A. Starting Characters =
=========================

Mario

Well, unless you've been in a coma for the last twenty years, chances 
are you know this guy.  Mario is a plumber by trade from Brooklyn.  He 
first started his adventures saving his girlfriend Pauline from the 
gigantic ape, Donkey Kong, before branching into his more famous roles, 
when he was thrust into the Mushroom Kingdom, where he befriended 
Princess Peach Toadstool and became the Kingdom's greatest hero with 
his repeated victories over the evil King Bowser Koopa.  Using magical 
items he finds on his adventures to augment his own abilities, 
including his legendary jumping prowess, Mario will always be on call 
to save the Mushroom Kingdom and surrounding lands.

Roles:

1981 -- Donkey Kong (Arcade)
1982 -- Donkey Kong (Atari 2600)
1982 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong (NES) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (NES) 
1983 -- Mario Bros. (Arcade)  
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)  
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. 2  (Famicom Disk System)  
1987 -- Super Mario Bros. 2  (NES) 
1988 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)  
1988 -- Super Mario Land (GB)  
1990 -- Super Mario World (SNES)  
1990 -- Mario Open Golf  (NES)  
1992 -- Mario Paint (SNES) 
1992 -- Mario Teaches Typing (PC)
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1992 -- Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins (GB)
1993 -- Super Mario All-Stars (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Time Machine (NES)
1993 -- Mario's Time Machine (SNES)
1993 -- Mario & Wario (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (NES)  
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Preschool Fun (SNES)
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Numbers (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Letters (SNES)  
1994 -- Donkey Kong (GB)  
1995 -- Mario's Picross (GB) 
1995 -- Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) 
1995 -- Mario Clash (Virtual Boy) 
1995 -- Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (SNES) (as Baby Mario)  
1996 -- Super Mario RPG (SNES)  
1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Mario Teaches Typing 2 (PC)
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
1999 -- Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (GBC)  
1999 -- Mario Artist: Paint Studio (N64) Japan Only 
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Artist: Talent Studio (N64) Japan Only 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2000 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2001 -- Paper Mario (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Luigi's Mansion (GCN) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) 
2002 -- Super Mario World (GBA) 
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)   
2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)   

---

Donkey Kong

There's been some debate about which Donkey Kong is the REAL Donkey 
Kong.  The first game to have the name starred the titanic ape Donkey 
Kong, who terrorized "the city", kidnapped Mario's girlfriend, Pauline, 
and rained down barrels on Mario as he tried to save her.  The next 
game involved Donkey Kong being the captured one, and his son trying to 
save him.  Several years later, Donkey Kong returned to his home in the 
jungle and found a new nemesis in the reptilian species, the Kremlings, 
who he's locked barrels with several times.

Now, who's the real DK?  Well, Cranky Kong has often claimed to be the 
star of the old games, and has called Donkey Kong (the one with the tie) 
as his son.  So, it looks like the current DK used to be Donkey Kong 
Jr., while his dad, Cranky, had the honor of going up against Mario.

Roles:

1981 -- Donkey Kong (Arcade) 
1982 -- Donkey Kong (Atari 2600)
1982 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong (NES) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (NES) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong 3 (Arcade) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong Jr. Math (NES) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong Classics (NES) 
1984 -- Donkey Kong 3 (NES) 
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES) (assuming you count DK Jr.)
1994 -- Donkey Kong (GB)  
1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)  
1995 -- Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (SNES)  
1995 -- Donkey Kong Land (GB)  
1995 -- Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble (SNES)  
1996 -- Donkey Kong Land 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (GB)
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)
1997 -- Donkey Kong Land 3 (GB)
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64) 
1999 -- Donkey Kong 64 (N64) 
2000 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2000 -- Donkey Kong Country (GBC)
2000 -- Donkey Kong Land 3 (GBC)
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Animal Forest (N64) 
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2001 -- Animal Crossing (GCN) 
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)   

Note: There are MANY re-releases of the original Donkey Kong on MANY 
 different formats.  To avoid clutter, I'm just including the earliest and 
 Nintendo-related releases.

---

Link

One of the greatest heroes Hyrule has ever seen, Link carries the blood 
of the Knights of Hyrule in his veins.  His long, pointed ears mark him 
as a member of the Hylian species.  It's actually assumed that the name 
of Link has been passed along several generations.  It seems that 
whenever evil rises in Hyrule, a young warrior of humble beginnings 
named Link takes up his destiny.  Things that remain constant through 
all Links are their trademark green tunic and floppy cap, as well as 
their skills with the blade and use of many varied tools to thwart 
evil.

Roles:

1987 -- Legend of Zelda (NES) 
1988 -- Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES) 
1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) 
1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (GB) 
1993 -- Link: The Faces of Evil (CD-i) 
1993 -- Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon (CD-i) 
1994 -- Zelda's Adventure (CD-i) 
1998 -- Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time (N64) 
1998 -- Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (GBC) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
2000 -- Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64) (Young Link Only) 
2001 -- Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) 
2001 -- Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  

---

Samus Aran

One of the few heroines of the early days of video gaming (and it was 
not even known that she WAS a heroine until you beat her first game), 
Samus was born on an Earth colony K-2L.  Her parents were killed in an 
attack by the Space Pirates.  She was discovered by the Chozo race as they 
surveyed the damage.  They infused her with Chozo blood, trained her in 
the arts of the warrior, and crafted for her a suit that was designed 
to work with her like a second skin.  She took her new-found abilities 
towards earning a living as a bounty hunter.  Her skills were required 
several times to eliminate the Metroid menace.

Roles:

1986 -- Metroid (NES) 
1991 -- Metroid II: Return of Samus (GB) 
1994 -- Super Metroid (SNES) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2002 -- Metroid Fusion (GBA) 
2002 -- Metroid Prime (GCN) 

---

Yoshi

Coming in several colors, although the favored color is green, these 
dinosaurs were discovered on the island of the same name by Mario and 
Luigi.  They're very intelligent, even fresh out of their eggs.  They 
are obedient enough as steeds, but can be quite effective if left on 
their own.  They have long prehensile tongues and will chow down on 
pretty much anything they can fit in their stomachs.  Normally peaceful, 
they will rally to beat back a common foe.  Yoshi was Mario's ride in 
Super Mario World.  Later, he came into his own in Super Mario World 
2 and Yoshi Story.  The Yoshi in SSBM is based largely on the Yoshi 
Story representation as far as voice and demeanor goes.

Roles:

1990 -- Super Mario World (SNES)
1991 -- Yoshi (NES, GB)  
1992 -- Yoshi's Cookie (NES)  
1992 -- Yoshi's Cookie (GB)  
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (SNES) 
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Preschool Fun (SNES)
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Numbers (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Letters (SNES)  
1993 -- Yoshi's Safari (SNES)  
1995 -- Yoshi's Island (Super Mario World 2)  (SNES) 
1995 -- Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) 
1996 -- Yoshi's Cookie  (SNES) 
1996 -- Super Mario RPG (SNES)  
1996 -- Tetris Attack [Yoshi's Panepon] (GB)  
1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1998 -- Yoshi's Story (N64)  
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2001 -- Paper Mario (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) 
2002 -- Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (GBA) 
2002 -- Super Mario Advance 3: Yoshi's Island (GBA)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)

---

Kirby

This plucky little puffball hails from the planet Popstar.  He's best 
known for his incredible appetite.  He has a rather unnerving ability 
to inhale, and once in his mouth, he can spit or swallow the enemy.  
Later on in his hero career, he perfected the ability to copy an enemy's 
primary ability.  He's made many animal friends, like Rick the hamster 
and Kine the fish, and several enemies, from the goofy King Dedede to 
the imposing O2.

Roles:

1992 -- Kirby's Dreamland (GB)  
1993 -- Kirby's Pinball Land (GB)  
1993 -- Kirby's Adventure (NES)  
1993 -- Kirby's Dreamland 2 (GB)  
1995 -- Kirby's Dream Course (SNES)  
1995 -- Kirby's Avalanche (SNES)  
1995 -- Kirby's Blockball (GB)  
1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES)  
1996 -- Kirby's Dreamland 3 (SNES)  
1997 -- Kirby's Star Stacker (GB)  
1997 -- Kirby's Super Star Stacker (Super Famicom)  
1998 -- Kirby Baseball (Super Famicom)  
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
2000 -- Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards (N64)  
2001 -- Kirby's Tilt 'n' Tumble (GBC)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2002 -- Kirby: Nightmare in Dream Land (GBA) 

---

Fox McCloud

The Lylat System is home to many animal-type humanoid species.  Most 
of the beings in the system live together in peace, and they've built 
an advanced space-faring civilization.  Fox is the son of James 
McCloud, the former leader of the Star Fox mercenary team.  On a mission 
against the evil Andross, James was betrayed by one of his own wingmen.  
Fox then assumed the leadership of the team and led the charge against 
Andross with his friends, Falco Lombardi, Peppy Hare, and Slippy Toad.

Roles:

1993 -- Star Fox (SNES)  
1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)  
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2002 -- Star Fox Adventures: Dinosaur Planet (GCN)

---

Pikachu

Pokémon #25 is one of the most popular.  It stores electricity in its 
cheeks and uses its tail as a grounding device.  It can be found 
randomly in some early forests in the world of Pokémon.  In Pokémon 
Yellow, you start with Pikachu and it follows you around.  There's not 
much story behind it, though.  With a Thunder Stone, it can evolve 
into a Raichu.

Roles:

1996 -- Pokemon Red/Green (GB) Japan 
1996 -- Pokemon Blue (GB) Japan 
1998 -- Pokemon Stadium (N64) Japan Only  
1998 -- Pokemon Pikachu (GB) Japan  
1998 -- Pokemon Red/Blue (GB)  
1998 -- Pokemon Pikachu (LCD Unit)  
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
1999 -- Pokemon Pinball (GB)  
1999 -- Pokemon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition (GBC)  
1999 -- Pokemon Snap (N64)  
2000 -- Pokemon Stadium (N64)  
2000 -- Pokemon Trading Card Game (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokemon Puzzle League (N64)  
2000 -- Pokemon Gold/Silver (GBC)  
2000 -- Hey You, Pikachu! (N64)  
2000 -- Pokemon Puzzle Challenge (GBC)  
2001 -- Pokemon Stadium 2 (N64)  
2001 -- Pokemon Crystal (GBC)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)

---

Ness

This young boy lives in Onett, a small town in Eagleland.  When a 
meteorite crashes in his town, his life is changed forever.  He embarks 
on a quest to destroy the evil alien, Giygas.  Joining him in his 
quest are Paula from Twoson, Jeff Andonuts, the inventor's son, and 
Poo, Crown Prince of Dalaam.  Ness's weapon of choice is the bat, and 
throughout his journey, he learns some serious psychic powers.  This all 
occurs in the game Earthbound.

It is of note that Ness does not appear in the original Mother (known in the 
US by its "fan name", Earthbound Zero).  The main character in that game was 
named Ninten.

Roles:

1994 -- Mother 2/Earthbound (SNES)  
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  

---

Captain Falcon

One of the favorites in the F-Zero Grand Prix Circuit, Captain Douglas 
Jay Falcon has a successful career as a bounty hunter, but his true 
passion is in racing in Racer #7, the Blue Falcon.  Not much is known 
about his story, except that he has a history with fellow racers 
Samurai Goroh and Blood Falcon.

Roles:

1990 -- F-Zero (SNES)  
1998 -- F-Zero X (N64)  
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
2001 -- F-Zero: Maximum Velocity (GBA)
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  

---

Bowser

King Bowser Koopa leads his forces of evil against the Mushroom 
Kingdom.  He generally appears as a giant dragon turtle with fiery red 
hair, a spiked shell, and studded bracelets.  It's still unknown 
whether Bowser captures Princess Peach in order to take control of the 
Mushroom Kingdom, or if he has romantic designs for her.

Roles:

1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)  
1986 -- Mario is Missing! (NES)  
1988 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)  
1990 -- Super Mario World (SNES)  
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Preschool Fun (SNES)
1993 -- Super Mario All-Stars (SNES)  
1995 -- Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (SNES)  
1996 -- Super Mario RPG (SNES)  
1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
1999 -- Super Mario Deluxe (GBC)  
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2001 -- Paper Mario (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Luigi's Mansion (GCN)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2002 -- Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (GBA)
2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
2002 -- Super Mario Advance 3: Yoshi's Island (GBA)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)

---

Peach

The ruler of the Mushroom Kingdom likes to think of herself as a well-
liked and proper princess.  Princess Peach Toadstool is not the first 
into the fray when the call to action is sounded, but she's quite 
capable of holding her own in certain situations.  Although she likes 
Mario as a friend, it's unknown if their relationship will ever go 
past platonic.

Roles:

1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)  
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. 2  (Famicom Disk System)  
1987 -- Super Mario Bros. 2  (NES) 
1988 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)  
1990 -- Super Mario World (SNES)  
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1993 -- Super Mario All-Stars (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Preschool Fun (SNES)
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Numbers (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Letters (SNES)  
1995 -- Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) 
1996 -- Super Mario RPG (SNES)  
1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2001 -- Paper Mario (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Super Mario Advance (GBA) 
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) 
2002 -- Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (GBA)
2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)

---

Ice Climbers

This duo spends their days climbing mountains, and that's about it.  
The only story they have behind them is that they climb ledges and 
rescue vegetables from the clutches of an evil condor while avoiding 
seals and polar bears.  Popo's the one in the blue and Nana's the one 
in the pink.

Roles:

1984 -- Ice Climber (Arcade)  
1985 -- Ice Climber (NES)  
2001 -- Animal Forest (N64)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2001 -- Animal Crossing (GCN)

---

Zelda/Sheik

The crown princess of Hyrule.  Much as there have been reported to be 
several Links throughout the ages, there are also several Zeldas.  
Often, Link had to save Zelda at one point in his adventures.  While 
she does seem to be the "damsel in distress" oftentimes, she has a 
decent amount of magical power of ancient Hylia, mostly involved with 
the gift of the gods, the Triforce.  In the adventure with the Ocarina 
of Time, Zelda disguised herself as a Sheikah and took the name as 
Sheik in order to aid Link in his crusade against Ganondorf.

Roles:

1987 -- Legend of Zelda (NES) 
1988 -- Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES) 
1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) 
1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (GB) 
1993 -- Link: The Faces of Evil (CD-i) 
1993 -- Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon (CD-i) 
1994 -- Zelda's Adventure (CD-i) 
1998 -- Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time (N64) 
1998 -- Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (GBC) 
2000 -- Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64) 
2001 -- Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) 
2001 -- Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  

==============================
3B. Unique Secret Characters =
==============================

Luigi

Mario's younger brother Luigi is recognized by his green hat and shirt, 
as opposed to Mario's reds.  He first teamed up with his bro in Mario 
Bros., and later in Super Mario Bros.  He first came into his own in 
Super Mario Bros. 2, where he actually acted quite different than his 
brother.  Solo roles for Luigi include Mario is Missing and Luigi's 
Mansion.

Roles:

1983 -- Mario Bros. (Arcade)  
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)  
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. 2  (Famicom Disk System)  
1986 -- Wrecking Crew (NES)  
1986 -- Mario is Missing! (NES)  
1987 -- Super Mario Bros. 2  (NES) 
1988 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)  
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Numbers (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Letters (SNES)  
1993 -- Super Mario All-Stars (SNES) 
1995 -- Mario Tennis (Virtual Boy)  
1995 -- Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (SNES) (as Baby Luigi)  
1996 -- Super Mario RPG (SNES)  
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
1999 -- Super Mario Deluxe (GBC)  
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2001 -- Paper Mario (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Luigi's Mansion (GCN) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) 
2002 -- Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World (GBA) 
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)

---

Jigglypuff

Pokémon #39 is the second most popular Pokémon after Pikachu, at least 
in Japan.  Jigglypuff's specialty is its voice, which can drop its 
enemies to sleep in nothing flat.  There isn't much story behind the 
puffball, but it can evolve into a Wigglybuff with exposure to a Moon 
Stone.  Also, in the Gold/Silver/Crystal series, Jigglypuff can be 
evolved from Igglybuff.

Roles:

1996 -- Pokemon Red/Green (GB) Japan 
1996 -- Pokemon Blue (GB) Japan 
1998 -- Pokemon Pikachu (GB) Japan  
1998 -- Pokemon Red/Blue (GB)  
1999 -- Pokemon Pinball (GB)  
1999 -- Pokemon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition (GBC)  
1999 -- Super Smash Bros.  (N64)  
1999 -- Pokemon Snap (N64)  
2000 -- Pokemon Stadium (N64)  
2000 -- Pokemon Trading Card Game (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokemon Puzzle League (N64)  
2000 -- Pokemon Gold/Silver (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokemon Puzzle Challenge (GBC)  
2001 -- Pokemon Stadium 2 (N64)  
2001 -- Pokemon Crystal (GBC)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)

---

Mewtwo

Pokémon #150 was genetically engineered to be the ultimate weapon.  It 
was created by cloning cells of the original Mew and programmed to obey 
its masters.  This fell through, though, and Mewtwo escaped to the 
Unknown Dungeon, where it awaits talented trainers for its inevitable 
capture.  It has great psychic abilities, but those still pale in 
comparison to its "parent", Mew.

Roles:

1996 -- Pokemon Red/Green (GB) Japan 
1996 -- Pokemon Blue (GB) Japan 
1998 -- Pokemon Pikachu (GB) Japan  
1998 -- Pokemon Red/Blue (GB)  
1999 -- Pokemon Pinball (GB)  
1999 -- Pokemon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokemon Stadium (N64)  
2000 -- Pokemon Trading Card Game (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokemon Puzzle League (N64)  
2000 -- Pokemon Gold/Silver (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokemon Puzzle Challenge (GBC)  
2001 -- Pokemon Stadium 2 (N64)  
2001 -- Pokemon Crystal (GBC)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)

---

Marth

Marth is the betrayed prince of the Kingdom of Altea.  He was sent into 
exile after his lands were taken over by the Kingdom of Dolua.  He 
rallied armies and used his sword, the Falchion, to take back what was 
his.  This is Marth's first and only appearance outside of Japan.

Roles:

1990 -- Fire Emblem (Famicom)  
1994 -- Fire Emblem: The Mystery of the Crest (Super Famicom)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)

---

Mr. Game and Watch

The very first Nintendo character, this odd black fellow has starred in 
the Game & Watch Series; portable games that ran off LCD screens.  His 
enemies all had one frame of animation.  His soundtracks had naught but 
bleeps and bloops.  His tasks were so simple they'd pale in comparison 
to the quests modern day heroes undertake.  But he did his job well.  It 
could be juggling balls, catching oil drops, or saving people from a 
burning building, Mr. G&W got the job done.  

Roles:

1980 -- Game & Watch Silver Series 
1981 -- Game & Watch Gold Series 
1981 -- Game & Watch Widescreen Series 
1982 -- Game & Watch Multi Screen Series 
1983 -- Game & Watch New Widescreen Series 
1997 -- Game & Watch Gallery (GB)  
1998 -- Game & Watch Gallery 2 (GB)  
1999 -- Game & Watch Gallery 3 (GBC)
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)

===============================
3C. Related Secret Characters =
===============================

Dr. Mario

Considered by many to be one of the most addicting puzzle video games 
ever, and the only true match against Tetris, Dr. Mario went up against 
the evil red, yellow, and blue viruses armed with nothing but his 
Megavitamins.  Of course, it's still just Mario in a lab coat.

Roles:

1990 -- Dr. Mario (NES)  
1990 -- Dr. Mario (GB)
1994 -- Tetris and Dr. Mario (SNES)
2001 -- Dr. Mario 64 (N64) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) 

---

Ganondorf Dragmire

The greatest villain Hyrule has ever known.  While there have been 
several different Links and Zeldas, there has been and will always be 
only one Ganondorf Dragmire, aka Mandrag Ganon.  The only male born to 
the Gerudo Thieves every hundred years, Ganondorf desired the awesome 
power of the Triforce more than anything, and he got it.  What he didn't 
count on was a meddling princess and a boy with a sword that would 
thwart him time and again.  

Note: With the exception of Ocarina of Time, all Ganondorf's roles were as 
 Ganon.

Roles:

1987 -- Legend of Zelda (NES) 
1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) 
1998 -- Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time (N64) 
2001 -- Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) 
2001 -- Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)

---

Falco Lombardi

One of Fox McCloud's wingmen and definitely one of the most reckless of 
the Star Fox team.  Falco Lombardi has followed Fox on all his 
adventures.  It is rumored he joined Star Fox after giving up a life as 
a street punk in a rowdy gang.  Not much else is known about him.

Roles:

1993 - Star Fox (SNES)  
1997 - Star Fox 64 (N64)  
2001 - Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2002 - Star Fox Adventures: Dinosaur Planet (GCN)

---

Young Link

Some theorists claim that this is how Link has always been; a young boy 
hero, and not the tall, buff young adult first introduced in Ocarina 
of Time.  Records of past exploits are hazy, so it can never be certain 
whether all Links fought as young boys or as young men.  Most historians 
agree that it matters not.  Whether one is eight or eighteen, does his 
age truly matter?  Does not saving an entire kingdom already prove one's 
maturity?

Roles (specifically designated as Young):

1998 - Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time (N64) 
2000 - Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64) 
2001 - Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  

---

Pichu

Pokémon #172.  Pichu is the baby form of the popular Pikachu.  It has 
not yet learned to control its awesome electrical capabilities, and may 
release a shock if excited or startled.

Roles:

2000 - Pokemon Gold/Silver (GBC)  
2001 - Pokemon Stadium 2 (N64)  
2001 - Pokemon Crystal (GBC)  
2001 - Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) 

---

Roy

Roy stars in the sixth Fire Emblem game, still before the series had a 
proper release in the West.  He is the game's "Lord", the son of Eliwood 
(star of Fire Emblem 7, the first Fire Emblem to be released in the West).  
He was called away from his studies to lead the Pheraen army in battle 
after his father takes ill.

Roles:

2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2002 -- Fire Emblem: The Sealed Sword (GBA)


***********************************************************************
4A. CHARACTER MOVES
***********************************************************************

This section detais moves on each character.  Any special moves will be 
analyzed as to their origins, as well as any normal moves that related 
to moves of games past.

Note: I won't touch on moves that also appeared in Super Smash Bros, 
but didn't appear in any other game.

=========================
4A. Starting Characters =
=========================

Mario

Generic: Mario wears the classic red shirt, red cap, and blue overalls.  
 All his voice tracks are from Super Mario 64.  One of his alternate 
 costumes has yellow and purple, which was based off the costume of his 
 childhood nemesis, Wario.

Fireball: Originated in Super Mario Bros., and also exists in Super 
 Mario Bros. 3, Super Mario World, Super Mario Land, and Super Mario 
 Land 2.  Mario had the ability to throw fireballs whenever he grabbed 
 a Fire Flower.  The sound of shooting the fireball has been reproduced 
 from Super Mario Bros.

Cape: In Super Mario World, Mario got himself a cape when he grabbed a 
 Feather.  He had the ability to spin with the cape, but he couldn't 
 simply swing it.

Super Jump Punch: This most probably refers to Mario's standard jump 
 from Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 3 (etc.)  It has the same 
 *boing* sound, and involves Mario punching the air as he goes up.  The 
 coins that pop up are the same that Mario collects in the same games.

Mario Tornado: Although this move doesn't exist proper, it may be 
 based on one of a few things.  It could be based on Super Mario 
 World's spin jump, or in Super Mario 64 when Mario launches spinning 
 off certain enemies.

A, A, A: Originates from Mario's punch-punch-kick combo in Super Mario 
 64.

Down + Smash + A: This is Mario's crouching swing kick from Super Mario 
 64.

Dash + A: This is similar to Mario's sliding kick in Super Mario 64.

Dash + A (with swinging item): With an item in his hand, Mario mimics 
 his dive attack from Super Mario 64.

Grab and Back Throw: This may originate from Super Mario 64, when Mario 
 flings Bowser around by the tail.

Wall Jump: In Super Mario 64, Mario could bounce off walls to extend 
 his jumping.  He can also do so in SSBM.

Taunt: Mario grows whenever he snags a Super Mushroom.  Granted, the 
 taunt is spontaneous, but that's where it comes from.

---

Donkey Kong

Generic: DK's first appearance with his necktie was in Donkey Kong for 
 the GB, but Donkey Kong Country was the first game to have the 
 current appearance.

Hand Slap: From Donkey Kong Country.  DK used this move to unearth 
 things underground.

Air + Forward + A: DK slams both hands forward like he does in the air 
 in DK64.

Grab + Forward: DK carries enemies much like he carries barrels in 
 Donkey Kong Country.

---

Link

Generic: Link's appearance in SSBM is derived from Ocarina of Time, with 
 his green tunic and hat, white body suit, and red gauntlets.  He's 
 armed with the Master Sword and Hylian Shield.  His alternate costumes 
 are the red Goron Tunic, and the blue Zora Tunic, both from Ocarina of 
 Time.

Bow: Link had bows in Legend of Zelda, Link to the Past, Link's 
 Awakening, Ocarina of Time, and Majora's Mask.  He never had to hold 
 the button to make the arrow go farther, though.  The arrow always 
 flew straight and never succumbed to gravity.

Boomerang: Link used boomerangs in Legend of Zelda, Link to the Past, 
 Link's Awakening, Ocarina of Time, and the Oracle games.

Whirling Blade: Link knew this technique in Link to the Past, Link's 
 Awakening, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and the Oracle games.

Bomb: Link had Bombs in all the Zelda games but Adventure of Link.

Air + Up + A: Link uses his Upward Thrust technique from Adventure of Link.

Air + Down + A: Link uses his Downward Thrust technique from Adventure of 
 Link.

Grab: Link uses the Hookshot to grab, which exists in Link to the Past, 
 Link's Awakening, Ocarina of Time, and Majora's Mask.

---

Samus Aran

Generic: Samus wears the Varia variation of her power suit.  An 
 alternate costume is purple, with represents the Gravity Suit from 
 Super Metroid.

Charge Shot: Samus had a Charge Beam in Super Metroid.  She could hold 
 down the fire button and release a charged up blast.

Missile: Samus didn't have homing missiles, but all Metroid games had 
 missiles for the purpose of taking down Metroids and other baddies.

Screw Attack: In all three games, Samus used the Screw Attack to turn 
 her body into a weapon that destroyed enemies.

Bomb: In all three games, Samus curled herself into a ball and could 
 drop bombs in that form after she got the item.

Double Jump: Samus' second jump is a remake of the Space Jump, from 
 Metroid II and Super Metroid, where Samus could jump while spinning in 
 the air.

Grab: Samus uses her Grappling Beam to grab enemies, which she got in 
 Super Metroid, which was used to grab onto special blocks.

Ground Dodge: Samus rolls up into her Rolling Ball form to dodge while 
 on the ground.

Wall Jump: In Super Metroid, Samus could kick off walls and jump 
 indefinitely up shafts.  She can do the same in SSBM.

---

Yoshi

Generic: Yoshi's different costumes in this game are all his different 
 colors from Yoshi's Story, save the secret black and white Yoshis.

Swallow: Yoshi's been able to swallow enemies in Super Mario World, 
 Super Mario World 2, and Yoshi's Story.  In the latter two games, he 
 was able to turn enemies into eggs.

Egg Roll: In Yoshi's Story, when Yoshi ate a Turbo Tulip, he could 
 encase himself in an egg and launch himself.  In this game, he can 
 just roll.

Egg Throw: In Super Mario World 2 and Yoshi's Story, Yoshi could take 
 the eggs he made and throw them.  In SSBM, he has unlimited eggs at 
 his disposal.

Yoshi Bomb (aka Hip Drop): In Super Mario World 2 and Yoshi's Story, 
 Yoshi could slam to the ground in much the same way as in SSBM.  Yoshi 
 makes the same noises that he made in Yoshi's Story, as well.

Grab + Forward Throw: Yoshi could spit out enemies in all three of the 
 aforementioned games.

Double Jump: Yoshi's double jump is much the same as it was in Yoshi's 
 Story.

Air + Down + A: Yoshi's Pedal Kick is somewhat taken from Super Mario 
 World 2, where his second jump didn't go as high, but it looked like 
 it took more effort.

---

Kirby

Swallow: In all Kirby games, he had the ability to inhale, and then 
 either spit or swallow.  In Kirby Dream Land 2, he gained the ability 
 to copy powers from his enemies.

Bowser Hat: The manner in which Kirby blows the Fire Breath is exactly 
 the way he blows fire or ice in Kirby Super Star.

Zelda Hat: This hat is actually the headdress of young Zelda (from 
 Ocarina of Time).

Hammer: The Hammer was a power in Kirby Adventure.  Kirby could swing 
 the hammer normally by standing still, and spin around with it in the 
 air.

Final Cutter: This is similar to the Cutter power in Kirby Super Star.  
 Getting close to an enemy and repeatedly hitting attack ended with an 
 attack similar to the Final Cutter.

Stone: When Kirby copies the Stone power, he can drop like a rock in 
 various forms.  This ability was in various games.  It started in 
 Kirby's Adventure, and Kirby Super Star was the first game to use 
 different forms.  He drops in the Stone form from Kirby's Adventure, a 
 Thwomp from Super Mario 64, a spiked ball, a garbage block from Tetris 
 Attack, or a 100t weight.

Double Jump: Kirby can float indefinitely in most Kirby games.

A (rapidly): Kirby uses the Fighter Power's Quick Jab from Kirby Super 
 Star.

Dash + A: Kirby uses his Fire power as he did when dashing and attacking 
 in Kirby's Super Star.

Up Throw: Kirby uses his Ninja powr from Kirby Super Star and performs 
 his Air Drop. (thanks to Xkylyr Rauh)

Forward Throw: Kirby uses his Suplex power from Kirby Super Star and 
 performs a Pile Driver.

Back Throw: Kirby uses his Suplex power from Kirby Super Star and 
 performs a German Suplex.

Down Throw: Kirby uses his Suplex power from Kirby Super Star and 
 performs a Quick Stamp.

---

Fox McCloud

Blaster: Although Fox never uses a Blaster in any of his games, he's 
 shown with one in comics.

Reflector: Fox never actually had a power of his own like this, but 
 the shield itself is copied from rings he can fly through in his 
 Arwing.

---

Pikachu

Thunder Jolt: Although it's tough to call what the attacks are 
 compared to the GB game, this probably corresponds best with 
 Thundershock, which is an attack Pikachu starts with.

Skull Bash: This is actually not a power that Pikachu has, but other 
 Pokémon do.  He can possibly use the power through the use of TMs.

Quick Attack: Another one of Pikachu's attacks from Pokémon, which it 
 learns at Level 16.

Thunder: Correlates to Thunder from Pokémon, which Pikachu learns at 
 Level 43.

---

Ness

PK Flash: Ness has this power in Earthbound.  Instead of attacking, 
 this power caused different status effects on enemies, possibly  
 resulting them in being destroyed outright.

PK Fire: This power actually belonged to Paula from Earthbound.  She 
 used the power to attack a row of enemies.

PK Thunder: This power actually belonged to Paula and Poo from 
 Earthbound, but not Ness.  This interesting power had more of a chance 
 to strike with more enemies, and it struck more times at higher power 
 levels.

PSI Magnet: This power belonged to Paula and Poo in Earthbound, but not 
 Ness.  This power stole Psychic Points from the enemy and gives them 
 to the party.

Forward + Smash + A: Ness uses his bat as a main weapon in Earthbound.

Down or Up + Smash + A: Ness can also use yo-yos as weapons in 
 Earthbound.

---

Captain Falcon

Since Captain Falcon never appeared out of a racer in any other games, 
all his moves are brand new for the Smash Bros. series.  His costume, 
however is representative of his F-Zero X suit.  One of his alternate 
costumes makes him look like his "evil twin" from F-Zero X, Blood 
Falcon.

---

Bowser

Fire Breath: Bowser has used his Fire Breath (as it appears here) in 
 both Super Mario 64 and Luigi's Mansion when the respective brother 
 fought against him.  Bowser's been breathing fire, however, since the 
 days of Super Mario Bros.

Koopa Klaw: This probably connects best to Super Mario RPG, when Bowser 
 attacked unarmed.

Bowser Bomb: In Super Mario Bros. 3, this was one of Bowser's attacks 
 used against you.

---

Peach

Generic: Peach wears her famous pink gown, with blue brooch and 
 earrings, and small crown.  One of her alternate costumes looks like 
 Daisy, princess of Sarasa Land.

Toad: Although Peach never uses Toad this way, her faithful retainer 
 is often at her side to attend to matters of state.

Parasol: In Super Mario RPG, this was one of Peach's weapons against 
 the forces of Smithy.

Vegetable: This relates to Super Mario Bros. 2 (USA), where you plucked 
 vegetables from the ground and used them as weapons.

Float: Peach uses this ability in Super Mario Bros. 2 (USA), where she 
 can float to hold herself in the air.

A: Peach's standard attack is a slap, similar to her unarmed attack in 
 Super Mario RPG (or when armed with the Slap Glove or Super Slap).

Forward + Smash + A: Each of the items pulled out has a history:
 Frying Pan: Weapon for Peach from Super Mario RPG
 Golf Club: Peach was a character in Mario Golf
 Tennis Racket: Peach was a character in Mario Tennis

---

Ice Climbers

Ice Shot: The ice blocks used are a homage to those the Topi pushed 
 around to fill the gaps in the floors.

Jump: This is identical to the standard jump of the Ice Climbers in 
 their original game.

Forward + Smash + A: This is a strong version of the standard Ice 
 Climber hammer smash.

Losing Pose: When the Ice Climbers lose, they cry like they do in the 
 original game if they miss a bonus.

---

Zelda/Sheik

Generic: Both Zelda and Sheik appear in this game as they did in 
 Ocarina of Time.

Nayru's Love: This spell was available to Link in Ocarina of Time.  It 
 surrounded him with a protective shield.

Din's Fire: This spell was available to Link in Ocarina of Time. It 
 casts a sphere of fire around him.

Farore's Wind: This spell was available to Link in Ocarina of Time. It 
 allowed him to teleport to the entrance of a dungeon.

Transform: The sound generated when transforming is the little jingle 
 that plays when you discover something in most Zelda games.

Teleport: When Zelda wants to make a dramatic exit in Sheik costume, 
 she throws down a Deku Nut to stun her enemies.  This is somewhat 
 translated to SSBM.

==============================
4B. Unique Secret Characters =
==============================

Luigi

Generic: Luigi wears his signature green shirt and hat, and his blue 
 overalls.  Much like in Super Mario 2, and the Super Mario Advances, 
 Luigi can jump higher and has work traction than Mario.  One of his 
 alternate costumes (white and green) is what he changes to when he 
 grabs a Fire Flower.

Fireball: Originated in Super Mario Bros., and also exists in Super 
 Mario Bros. 3, Super Mario World.  Luigi had the ability to throw 
 fireballs whenever he grabbed a Fire Flower.  The sound of shooting 
 the fireball has been reproduced from Super Mario Bros.

Super Jump Punch: This most probably refers to Luigi's standard jump 
 from Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 3 (etc.)  It has the same 
 *boing* sound, and involves Luigi punching the air as he goes up.  The 
 coins that pop up are the same that Mario collects in the same games.

---

Jigglypuff

Rollout: This is a representation of Jigglypuff's Rollout attack from 
 Pokémon, which is learned at Level 19.

Pound: This is a representation of Jigglypuff's Pound attack from 
 Pokémon, which is learned at Level 9.

Sing: This is a representation of Jigglypuff's Sing attack from 
 Pokémon, which Jigglypuff starts with.

Rest: This is a representation of Jigglypuff's Rest attack from 
 Pokémon, which is learned at Level 29.

---

Mewtwo

Shadow Ball: Shadow Ball is a Dark/Ghost type attack, which isn't on 
 Mewtwo's normal list, but he can learn it through TMs.

Confusion: This is one of Mewtwo's starting attacks in Pokémon.

Disable: This is one of Mewtwo's starting attacks in Pokémon.

Teleport: This is a power that exists in Pokémon, but Mewtwo can't learn 
 it unless through TMs.

---

Marth

I've been told by some pretty reliable sources that nothing Marth uses 
can translate well enough to this game, so I'm going to leave it at 
that.

---

Mr. Game and Watch

Chef: From the game of the same name, you needed to catch the sausages 
 in the game, as opposed to throwing them.

Judgement: From the game Judge, where players were two GWs on the 
screen.  You would press a button, and you'd see a number appear above 
your head.  If your number was higher then the other GWs number, you'd 
press a button to hit him on the head with a hammer. If it was lower, 
you'd press a button to move back, because the other GW was going to 
hit you on the head.  Thanks to Mega for this info.

Fire: Designed after the game of the same name, where you had to bounce 
 falling people to a waiting ambulance.

Oil Panic: In the game of this name, you had to catch oil dripping in 
 your bucket, then deposit it in another G&W's bucket, who'll then give 
 it to a customer.

A: The sprayer is from the game Greenhouse, where you sprayed worms and 
 spiders that tried to eat your flowers.

Up + A: The flag G&W swings is from the game Flag.  In this game, G&W 
 copies the flag movements of another G&W.

Forward + A: The chair is from the game Lion, where you controls two 
 G&Ws that try to keep two lions in cages.

Up + Smash + A: The diving helmet is the one G&W wears from the game 
 Octopus.  In this game, G&W had to make his way to treasure while 
 avoiding the tentacles of the octopus.

Forward + Smash + A: The torch used is from the game Fire Attack, where 
 you had to defend the fort from attacking Native Americans (gotta be 
 PC, eh?)

Down + Smash + A: The hammers are from the game Vermin, where G&W 
 smacked moles with hammers.

Air + A: The parachute is from the game of the same name, where you 
 had to catch parachuting guys.

Air + Up + A: From the game Spitball Sparky.  In this game, G&W had to 
 blow a ball up to hit blocks.

Air + Back + A: Taken from the game Turtle Bridge.  G&W had to cross a 
 bridge of turtles carrying packages.  Fish swam under and the turtles 
 dove to eat them, which G&W had to watch out for.

Dash + A: Relates to the game Helmet, since G&W has his hardhat on.

Grab and Throw: All of G&W's throws are based on the game Ball, where 
 G&W juggles balls (like he juggles enemies here).

Grab and Hit: G&W uses the bell to be mentioned shortly.

Taunt: G&W's bell represents the alarm function that existed in some 
 Game and Watch games.

Ledge Recover: G&W uses the aforementioned bell.

Floor Recover: G&W uses the hammer from Vermin.

===============================
4C. Related Secret Characters =
===============================

Dr. Mario

Megavitamin: Although the Doc's throws ended up in the bottle, where 
 they could be further manipulated, this is a standard throw.  The 
 sound of the throw is the sound made when clearing vitamins, and the 
 connecting sound is the sound made when a color of virus is eliminated.

---

Ganondorf Dragmire

Ganondorf's attacks were all made special for this game (and to match 
Falcon's).  No attacks used in the game are from past games, although his 
cackle and voices were derived from sounds in Ocarina of Time.

---

Falco Lombardi

Blaster: Although Falco never uses a Blaster in any of his games, he's 
 shown with one in comics.

Reflector: Falco never actually had a power of his own like this, but 
 the shield itself is copied from rings he can fly through in his 
 Arwing.

---

Young Link

Fire Bow: Link had bows in Legend of Zelda, Link to the Past, Link's 
 Awakening, Ocarina of Time, and Majora's Mask.  He never had to hold 
 the button to make the arrow go farther, though.  The arrow always 
 flew straight and never succumbed to gravity.  Fire arrows were in 
 Ocarina of Time, and Majora's Mask.

Boomerang: Link used boomerangs in Legend of Zelda, Link to the Past, 
 Link's Awakening, Ocarina of Time, and the Oracle games.

Whirling Blade: Link knew this technique in Link to the Past, Link's 
 Awakening, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and the Oracle games.

Bomb: Link had Bombs in all the Zelda games but Adventure of Link.

Air + Up + A: Link uses his Upward Thrust technique from Adventure of Link.

Air + Down + A: Link uses his Downward Thrust technique from Adventure of 
 Link.

Grab: Link uses the Hookshot to grab, which exists in Link to the Past, 
 Link's Awakening, Ocarina of Time, and Majora's Mask.

Taunt: Link drinks Lon Lon Milk, which was a restorative item in Ocarina 
 of Time.

---

Pichu

Thunder Jolt: Although it's tough to call what the attacks are 
 compared to the GB game, this probably corresponds best with 
 Thundershock, which is an attack Pichu starts with.

Skull Bash: This is actually not a power that Pichu has, but other 
 Pokémon do.  Pichu can learn it through TMs, however.

Agility: Another one of Pikachu's attacks from Pokémon, which it 
 learns at Level 33.  Pichu can't learn this though.

Thunder: Correlates to Thunder from Pokémon, which Pikachu learns at 
 Level 41.  Pichu can't learn this, though.

---

Roy

Since Roy's a brand new character, and his moves are based off Marth's, 
his moves probably don't exist in his game.

***********************************************************************
5. STAGES
***********************************************************************

Most stages of SSBM are taken from classic Nintendo places.  This 
section describes where they're taken from and aspects from the games 
put into them.  By the way, I won't need to mention Battlefield or 
Final Destination, as they are unique to this game.  I also won't bring 
up the Past Stages, since they already appear in the original game, and 
most elements are reused for levels in this game.

==================
5A. Melee Stages =
==================

Mushroom Kingdom: Princess Peach's Castle

Peach's humble abode first appears in Super Mario 64, and is the main 
hub of the game.  The castle also shows up in Mario Kart 64 and Paper 
Mario.  The Bullet Bills that slam into the castle originated from Super 
Mario Bros, where they fired steadily from cannons.  The switches that 
make blocks appear come from Super Mario World, where you activated 
Switch Palaces to make colored blocks appear.

---

Mushroom Kingdom: Rainbow Cruise

Most of this level is based of the area in Super Mario 64 called Rainbow 
Ride.  The boat is the Rainbow Cruiser, and swinging lifts, flying 
carpets, and donut drops are featured prominently in that area.

---

DK Isle: Kongo Jungle

The waterfall area doesn't figure very prominently in any Donkey Kong 
game, but parts of it are based on DKC games.  The Barrel Cannon at the 
bottom is from DKC games, and Klap Traps fall down the waterfall 
periodically.

---

DK Isle: Jungle Japes

The building in the background is Cranky Kong's Cabin from Donkey Kong 
Country (which you'll see him wandering around in), and sometimes you'll 
have Klap Traps swimming in the river below you, but there's not much 
else to connect this to DK games.

---

Termina: Great Bay

This area is a near-perfect representation of the Great Bay area in 
Majora's Mask.  The area where you fight is the underwater exploration 
lab, where you can hatch Zora Eggs, and the turtle off to the right 
carries you to the Great Bay Temple in the game.  In the background, 
you'll notice the rest of the Great Bay area.  Further back, you'll see 
the Moon as it descends towards Clock Town.  As it gets close, the Four 
Giants who end up stopping the Moon in the game will show up to push it 
back.  Also noticable is an Owl Statue (which could save your progress), 
and Tingle's in the air, a little guy who sold maps.

---

Hyrule: Temple

Although the area has no literal translation, it's based on the temples 
in Zelda II: Adventure of Link that were side-scrolling, much like this 
situation.

---

Yoshi's Island: Yoshi's Story

Based, naturally, on the game Yoshi's Story.  The land is storybook 
colored like the game was.  In Yoshi's Story, you'd find smiley clouds 
that followed on rails (like the one at the bottom).  Also, there were 
Shy Guys that carried fruit, much like the ones in this game that 
carry Food.  Also, marching around in the back is Pak E. Derm, who 
existed in the game with the sole purpose of blocking Yoshi.

---

Yoshi's Island: Yoshi's Island

This area has its roots in Super Mario World.  The yellow rotating 
blocks were present in that game, as well things like the diagonal 
pipe.  In the background are two enemies that appeared in Super Mario 
World: Lakitu (with a 1-up Mushroom) and Banzai Bill.  Yoshi's Island 
was the first area to conquer in Super Mario World.

---

Dream Land: Fountain of Dreams

Kirby's Adventure ended at this peaceful spot.  The Fountain is one of 
the main sources of all the good feelings in Popstar.  Similar 
fountains exist on other planets.

---

Dream Land: Green Greens

The very first area Kirby ever ventured into, way back in Kirby's 
Dream Land, and it's been reproduced several times in other games.  
Since it's always the first area in those games, it's the most simple.  
The Star Blocks were commonly used as obstacles in many Kirby games, 
and the Bomb Blocks were introduced in Kirby's Adventure to act as 
a demolition device, mostly for good, but sometimes for ill.  That tree 
in the back is Whispy Woods, a nasty tree that shakes apples and spikes 
from its branches and spits out gusts of wind.

---

Lylat System: Corneria

Taken from the Star Fox 64 version of Corneria.  Corneria is the fourth 
planet of the Lylat System, and where most of its beings reside, 
particularly the sentient ones.  In both Star Fox games, this was always 
the first mission, and you could branch out from there.  The skyscrapers 
were always a constant obstacle to be avoided.  Also, there are two 
types of ships buzzing around the Great Fox.  The Arwing is the ship of 
choice for Star Fox, and the other ship is the Wolfen, the choice of 
the rival mercenary team, Star Wolf (introduced in Star Fox 64).

---

Lylat System: Venom

Taken from the Star Fox 64 version of Venom.  Venom is the first planet 
in the Lylat System and the most noxious and uninhabitable.  The evil 
Andross has his base of operations here, and this was always the final 
level in any Star Fox game, regardless of the path you took to get 
there.  There are two types of ships buzzing around the Great Fox.  The 
Arwing is the ship of choice for Star Fox, and the other ship is the 
Wolfen, the choice of the rival mercenary team, Star Wolf (introduced 
in Star Fox 64).

---

Planet Zebes: Brinstar

In both Metroid and Super Metroid, Samus' adventures were on the home 
of the Space Pirates, Planet Zebes.  Brinstar is one of the cavernous 
areas of Zebes.  In Metroid, it was Samus' first area, and the largest.  
In Super Metroid, part was an homage to the original Metroid, and part 
was a lush jungle of subterranean plants and wildlife.  None of that's 
very evident here.  Some elements of Metroid are the rising and falling 
lava/acid, which (I believe) refers to Metroid II and the rising and 
falling acid that changed as you destroyed Metroids.  In the background 
you may see a Chozo Statue walking around, which were the carriers of 
items for Samus' arsenal.

---

Planet Zebes: Brinstar Depths

In Metroid, this area was separated from normal Brinstar by an elevator, 
and was the abode of the alien Kraid.  Although there wasn't a specific 
Brinstar Depths in Super Metroid, it is the Kraid used from that game 
that you'll see in the background, knocking your fighting platform 
around.  While he was no taller than you in Metroid, in Super Metroid, 
he became a titanic three-eyed behemoth that could spit rocks and shoot 
claws from his chest.

---

Eagleland: Onett

Onett was Ness's hometown in EarthBound.  This quiet little town had 
quite a few houses and several places of business, including a Drug 
Store, a Hamburger Shop, a Pizza Parlor, a Library, a Hospital, and an 
Arcade.  Traffic did exist, but in EarthBound, the cars never ran you 
down.  The black vehicle that you can sometimes see in the traffic is 
the Runaway Five tour bus.  The Runaway Five was a musical group that 
you ran into several times throughout your adventure.

---

Eagleland: Fourside

Fourside was the big city in EarthBound.  There was a grand hotel, a 
huge shopping mall, a shady café, plenty of skyscrapers, and a sewer 
with a giant rat.  The UFOs that pop up never actually appeared in the 
game proper, but were on the title screen.

---

F-Zero Grand Prix: Mute City

Mute City is an old standby of the F-Zero Grand Prix, even harkening 
back to its original days.  The Mute City you fly through in this game 
is the F-Zero X representation.

---

F-Zero Grand Prix: Big Blue

Big Blue is also one of the original tracks from F-Zero, and you'll be 
fighting over the one from F-Zero X.

---

Kanto: Pokémon Stadium

This is meant to be a representation of the Pokémon Stadium of the game 
with the same name.  The terrains can change to give certain types 
advantages, just like in this game.

---

Kanto Skies: Poké Floats

Although this doesn't specifically appear in any Pokémon game, these are
following Pokémon that appear as balloons, in the order they appear:

Squirtle, Onyx, Psyduck, Chikorita, Weezing, Slowpoke, Porygon, Wooper, 
Sudowoodo, Snorlax, Venusaur, Seel, Wobbuffet, Unown, Goldeen, 
Lickitung, Chansey, Geodude

---

Mushroom Kingdom

Directly based from Super Mario Bros., the level's foreground consists 
of the same bricks, question mark blocks, elevators, and floor of the 
original Super Mario Bros.  The background contains pipes, tall 
mushrooms, the castle, flagpole, and several enemies, all ripped 
directly from Super Mario Bros.

---

Mushroom Kingdom II

This is taken from Super Mario Bros. 2 (USA), specifically the Mario 
All-Stars version, in the dream world, Subcon.  The foreground has 
ground and logs floating down the waterfall.  Also, Pidgit will swoop 
down on his carpet, and Birdo will pop up, sometimes firing eggs and/or 
pushing items.  The background has several elements of Subcon, such as 
the hills and jars.

---

Infinite Glacier: Icicle Mountain

This level is somewhat related to the standard Ice Climbers stage.  It 
all goes straight up.  No horizontal movement.  In the Ice Climber game, 
it was far less detailed, and you broke your way through, as opposed to 
just jumping through platforms here.

---

Superflat World: Flat Zone

This level is a Game & Watch game.  The screen is a reversal of the 
Helmet game as far as the background is concerned.  The plaforms and 
the guy who periodically appears to hold them up is from Manhole.  The 
falling tools are also from Helmet.  The guy who runs in and spills 
oil is from Oil Panic.

======================
5B. Adventure Stages =
======================

The following four stages are unique to the 1-P Adventure Mode.

---

Mushroom Kingdom

This stage is based on a standard overworld level for Super Mario Bros.  
The little guys are Goombas, which could be destroyed with simple 
jumps, and the turtles are Koopa Troopas, which can't easily be 
destroyed, but will retreat into their shells if jumped on.  The flying 
ones are Koopa Paratroopas, which will lose their wings if jumped on.  
The end of the level is a flagpole, as it was in Super Mario Bros.  In 
the background are golf course holes, an homage to Mario Golf.

---

Underground Dungeon

This is based off one of the many dungeons of the Zelda series.  The 
item that triggers a fight against Link is the Master Sword, while your 
objective item is the Triforce.  Enemies you'll find in the Dungeon are 
Octoroks, which have been in most Zelda games, Like Likes, which steal 
your shields in many Zelda games, and the Redeads, which first appeared 
in Ocarina of Time, and which shuffle around and bite you.

---

Zebes Escape

At the end of both Metroid and Super Metroid, Samus needed to escape 
from the exploding planet Zebes quickly, with much climbing up 
platforms.  The experience is recreated here.

---

F-Zero Grand Prix

This is set on the Big Blue track, as opposed to the same Melee stage.  
Not much else to say here that wasn't said in the Big Blue section.

---

Icicle Mountain

Although the same stage is used as normal Melee, scattered around the 
area are Topis, which existed in Ice Climber to push ice blocks around, 
and Polar Bears, which scrolled up the screen in Ice Climber.

============
5C. Others =
============

There's only one, but this is the spot for any other stages that have 
some degree of nostalgia.

---

Ice Climbers Target Test

This is based directly off of a classic Ice Climber stage, complete 
with horizontally-travelling clouds, and destructible blocks.  The 
final target is clutched in a condor's claws.

***********************************************************************
6. ITEMS
***********************************************************************

This section details the origins of the items.  I'll cover all items 
here and whether or not they had origins in another game.

---

Food

Many of the food items are traditional Japanese fare.  Some of them 
are fruits that you'll find in Yoshi's Story.

---

Maxim Tomato

In Kirby games, picking up a Maxim Tomato fully restored your health.

---

Heart Container

In all Zelda games, snagging a Heart Container restored your health 
and added another heart to your meter.

---

Warp Star

In Kirby games, Kirby jumped onto Warp Stars and rode them off whenever 
he needed to access another area.

---

Ray Gun

This weapon only existed in Smash Bros., and wasn't based off any 
specific game.

---

Super Scope

This was an actual accessory for the Super NES, much like the Light 
Gun for the NES.  Games for this included Super Scope 6 and Battleclash.

---

Fire Flower

Originating in Super Mario Bros., grabbing one of these will give Mario 
or Luigi the power to fling fireballs.

---

Lip's Stick

This originated from the game Panel de Pon, which was released in 
America as Tetris Attack, starring Yoshi.  The character Lip had a wand 
of the same name.  Thanks to Paper Ace Chase for this info.

---

Star Rod

Taken from the Kirby games, this item was a source of great power in 
Dream Land.

---

Beam Sword

No, folks.  This is NOT a lightsaber from Star Wars.  It's not a sword 
from Kirby, either.  This is a unique item taken from Super Smash Bros.

---

Home-Run Bat

This could be related to the Ken Griffey baseball series, or based off 
one of Ness's bats from EarthBound.  It could even be a unique item 
altogether just for Smash Bros.  The trophy list says as such.

---

Fan

This item is unique to Super Smash Bros.  Contrary to popular belief, 
this isn't Peach's War Fan from Super Mario RPG.  This is based off 
Japanese paper folded fans.

---

Hammer

In the original Donkey Kong, picking up a hammer would send you into a 
pounding frenzy.  Such is also the case here.

---

Green Shell

As old as Super Mario Bros., Koopa Troopas resided in shells and would 
duck into them when hit.  They could then be kicked.

---

Red Shell

The Red Shell is also from Super Mario Bros, but the concept of homing 
in on people was started in Super Mario Kart, where firing a Red Shell 
would cause to home in on an enemy.

---

Flipper

Flippers act as obstacles in later Balloon Fight stages.  They spin 
around and toss both the Balloon Fighter and his enemies around.

---

Freezie

This is an enemy from Mario Bros. (the arcade game).  When it falls on 
platforms, it melts and coats the platform in ice.

---

Mr. Saturn

This character from EarthBound is a member of the Saturn species.  They 
speak in an odd language, but they're very friendly and have a positive 
outlook on life.  Ness and his friends have to rescue some of them 
from the factories of Master Belch.

---

Bob-omb

This is an enemy from Mario's world, originating in Super Mario Bros. 2.  
When they appear they walk around for a bit before exploding.  Not a 
very fulfilling life, but who are we to criticize...

---

Motion Sensor Bomb

The American version is the Proximity Mine from Goldeneye 007, while the 
Japanese game has the Proximity Mine from Perfect Dark.  Both acted the 
same way.  When thrown, it stuck to any surface, and anyone who got 
near, it exploded.

---

Super Mushroom

One of the most important items from Super Mario Bros., the Super 
Mushroom not only increased Mario's size, it gave him an extra "hit", 
to avoid biting the big one.

---

Poison Mushroom

A rather nasty item in Super Mario Bros. 2 in Japan (known as The Lost 
Levels in the States).  This caused Mario to take a "hit" if he 
grabbed it.  In that game, it appeared blue to distinguish it from Super 
Mushrooms.  In this game, the Poison Mushroom looks much like the Super 
Mushroom to mess you up, with the exception of mad eyes and a slight 
color change.

---

Starman

A Super Mario Bros. item.  Snagging the bouncing star granted Mario 
temporary invincibility.  This item appears in most every other Mario 
game as well.

---

Parasol

This item first was made to use for Kirby in Kirby's Dream Land 2 when 
he copied the Parasol ability from an enemy wielding it.  It was a 
decent weapon, and it slowed Kirby's falling.

---

Screw Attack

In all three Metroid games, Samus used the Screw Attack item to turn 
her body into a weapon that destroyed enemies.

---

Metal Box

In Super Mario 64, once Mario slammed on the green switch, he could 
hit green blocks and collect Metal Caps that came from them, turning 
him into Metal Mario, which made him invincible, and allowed him to 
sink underwater.

---

Bunny Hood

This was a mask in both Zelda: Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask.  In 
the latter game, the hood gave Link enhanced speed and jumping 
distance.

---

Cloaking Device

In Perfect Dark, the Skedar developed this device and gave it to the
DataDyne corporation, who equipped it to their soldiers.  It works by 
bending rays of light around the target.

---

Barrel Cannon

In the Donkey Kong Country games, DK and his pals used these barrels 
as an impromptu mode of transporation to get them ahead.  The design on 
the barrel originated from Donkey Kong Country 2.

---

Poké Ball

These balls are used to keep and pacify Pokémon, and remained in them 
until a trainer wanted to use his or her Pokémon.

Here is some info on the attacks that the Pokémon use:

Togepi: Metronome (which result in Night Shade, Leech Seed, Flash, 
 or Powder Snow)
Clefairy: Metronome (which result in Self-destruct, Ember, Whirlwind, 
 or Razor Wind)
Blastoise: Hydro Pump
Charizard: Flamethrower
Venusaur: Earthquake
Raikou: Spark 
Entei: Fire Spin
Suicune: Icy Wind
Lugia: Aeroblast
Ho-oh: Sacred Fire
Articuno: Blizzard
Zapdos: Thunder Bolt
Moltres: Sky Attack
Porygon 2: Tackle
Snorlax: Body Slam
Chansey: Softboiled
Staryu: Swift
Marill: Take Down
Electrode: Explosion
Weezing: Smog
Scizor: Fury Cutter
Wobbuffet: Counter
Bellossom: Sleep Powder
Goldeen: Splash
Unown: Hidden Power 
Cyndaquil: Flamethrower
Chikorita: Razor Leaf

Mew and Celebi also appear, but they don't do anything.

---

Egg

This Egg is the one that Chansey carries in its pouch in Pokémon.

---

Capsule

This capsule is unique to Smash Bros.

---

Barrel

Possibly based off barrels from Donkey Kong Country, except this one 
has the Smash Bros. logo on its face.

---

Crate

A unique item to Smash Bros., with its logo on the side.

---

Party Ball

Yes, these were in Super Monkey Ball, but it wasn't based off that one.  
Party Balls of that exact type have existed in Japan for some time.

***********************************************************************
7. MUSIC ANALYSIS
***********************************************************************

This section will analyze each track in the Sound Test.  The style, 
origin, and relations to other music will be observed here.  I'm going 
to analyze all tracks, not just the ones that have a history in 
Nintendo.

NOTE: This was originally my plan, just to have a music guide, but it 
kinda grew out from there... ~_^

=============
7A. Opening =
=============

Track 0: Opening
Heard: During opening movie.

What I consider the Melee Theme.  This opens with a brass fanfare and a
chorus.  Originally, there was no grand pause in the movie.  They 
added it to throw in the "Nintendo All-Stars in" which is part of the 
Japanese title.  After the fanfare, a light melody that gradually picks 
up in intensity, which transforms into a string feature, then going 
back to the intense melody, ending with a full fanfare chorus at the 
title.

======================
7B. Character Stages =
======================

These are music pieces that play in each of the characters' own stages.

---

Track 1: Princess Peach's Castle
Heard: Princess Peach's Castle, Mushroom Kingdom Adventure Level

This is a combination of two tunes.  The more prominently featured one 
is the Super Mario Bros. Overworld Theme.  The one that features as a 
bass backup is the Super Mario Bros. Underworld Theme.  Neither are 
reproduced in the same form as they were originally heard in this 
track.  The track starts with the opening of the Underworld theme to 
set the pace, followed shortly by the opening of the Overworld theme, 
then some more underworld, then the first verse of the overworld 
theme on steel drum, synthesized keyboard, and xylophone.  After the 
theme loops back to the beginning, some more of the underworld theme is 
played, followed by the second verse of the overworld theme on trumpets.
The track is all synthesized instruments.

---

Track 2: Rainbow Cruise
Heard: Rainbow Cruise, Princess Peach's Castle (Adventure)

Another combination of two tunes.  The first part of the tune is a 
recreation of the Rainbow Ride/Bonus Level theme from Super Mario 64.  
This is recreated with strings, whistle, and banjo.  At the end of said 
theme, the music switches to the Super Mario Bros. Underwater theme.  
The track is synthesized instruments.

---

Track 3: Kongo Jungle
Heard: Kongo Jungle

The infamous DK Rap is taken from the game Donkey Kong 64.  The lyrics 
are almost exactly the same ("hell" was changed to "heck" in the last 
verse).  The voices change with the verses in SSBM, to match the style 
of music or the character they describe.

Lyrics:

H-h-here we go...

So they're finally here, performin' for you
If you know the words you can join in, too
Put your hands together, if you want to clap
As we take you through this monkey rap

HUH!

D-K...  Donkey Kong...

He's the leader of the bunch, you know him well
He's finally back to kick some tail
His coconut gun can fire in spurts
If he shoots ya, it's gonna hurt
He's bigger, faster, and stronger, too
He's the first member of the DK Crew

HUH!

D-K...  Donkey Kong...
D-K...  Donkey Kong is here!

This Kong's got style so listen up dudes
She can shrink in size to suit her mood
She's quick and nimble when she needs to be
She can float through the air and climb up trees
If you choose her, you won't choose wrong
With a skip and a hop she's one cool Kong

HUH!

D-K...  Donkey Kong...

He has no style; he has no grace
This Kong has a funny face
He can handstand, when he needs to
And stretch his arms out just for you
Can inflate himself just like a balloon
This crazy Kong just digs this tune

HUH!

D-K...  Donkey Kong...
D-K...  Donkey Kong is here!

He's back again and about time too
And this time he's in the mood
He can fly real high with his jetpack on
With his pistols out, he's one cool Kong
He'll make you smile when he plays his tune
But Kremlings beware, 'cause he,m's after you

HUH!

D-K...  Donkey Kong...

Finally, he's here for you
It's the last member of the DK Crew
This Kong's so strong it isn't funny
Can make a Kremling cry out for his mummy
He can pick up a boulder with relative ease
Make crushing rocks seem such a breeze
He may move slow, he can't jump high
But this Kong's one heck of a guy

HUH!

Come on Cranky!  Take it to the fridge!

Walnuts, peanuts, pineapple smells
Grapes, melons, oranges, and coconut shells  (repeat)

NOTE: In DK64, Chunky's stanza calls him one "hell" of a guy.  Yeah, it 
was changed.

---

Track 4: Jungle Japes
Heard: Jungle Japes

The origin of this track is in Donkey Kong Country.  The track isn't a 
carbon copy, but has its roots in the tune that plays during Jungle 
levels.  The main focus in this tune is the percussion, with accents 
on saxophone, piano, and panflute.  The tune is synthesized.

---

Track 5: Great Bay
Heard: Great Bay, Temple in Adventure mode

This is a fully orchestrated version of the Hyrule Overworld theme, 
which orignates in the Legend of Zelda, and is heard at least in small 
forms in all other Zelda games.  Being a fanfare-type tune, the featured 
instruments are brass.

---

Track 6: Temple
Heard: Temple, Underground Dungeon in Adventure mode

This synthesized track is a more modernized representation of the 
Dungeon theme from Zelda II: Adventure of Link.  The dominant 
instruments are guitar and strings.

---

Track 7: Brinstar
Heard: Brinstar

This synthesized track is a rock version, with guitars and keyboards, 
of main Brinstar theme in Metroid.  After the verse, it cuts to a 
strings version of the Metroid "Samus materializing after saving".  
Then, it switches to a bleepy version of the Metroid/Super Metroid 
title screens.

---

Track 8: Brinstar Depths
Heard: Brinstar Depths

This is a synthesized version of the aptly named Brinstar Depths in 
Metroid, also known as Kraid's Lair.  After about a minute of the tune, 
it switches to the "item area" music in Metroid.

---

Track 9: Yoshi's Story
Heard: Yoshi's Story

This is a remix of the Super Smash Bros. N64 Yoshi's Island tune.  It's 
originally mixed off Yoshi's Story on the N64.  While no track such as 
this actually existed in the original game, its tune was based off the 
first level and the title screen, and it uses the same instruments.

---

Track 10: Yoshi's Island
Heard: Yoshi's Island

This track is from Super Mario World.  It's almost the same, except for 
the main theme is banjo instead of piano.  The track plays on any level 
that seems to be an obstacle course as opposed to normal plains.

---

Track 11: Fountain of Dreams
Heard: Fountain of Dreams (sometimes on Green Greens in Adventure mode)

Here's something vastly different.  The tune itself, I believe, 
originates from Kirby Super Star, specifically the Gourmet Race, where 
it was picked up for mini-games in Kirby 64.  It was also used in Super 
Smash Bros.  What makes this orchestrated tune different is that the 
song was originally light and bouncy, but was made into an overture 
style piece featuring the full range of the SSBM orchestra, featuring 
mainly woodwinds, but also very professionally incorporating the brass, 
percussion and strings.  One of my favorites.  Apparently, this is very 
similar to the piece called "Gourmet Race" performed in an Orchestrated 
Game Music Concert.

---

Track 12: Green Greens
Heard: Green Greens

This is based off the tune in Kirby's Dream Land for the Green Greens 
area.  The slower, brassy, orchestral arrangment was first seen in Kirby 
Super Star, which is used here in SSBM.  Brass is the main force here, 
with strings as the backup.

---

Track 13: Corneria
Heard: Corneria

This orchestral tune is based off two themes in the original Star Fox.  
The first is the approach on the planet Venom, featuring rhythm from the 
strings and accents from the trumpets.  The second theme is the main 
Star Fox theme, Battle Cry of the Arwing Fighters, featuring french horn 
and strings.

---

Track 14: Venom
Heard: Venom, Corneria in Adventure mode

This is an orchestral remake of the Super Smash Bros. Sector Z theme, 
specifically.  It's based off Star Fox 64, and the fanfare-like tune 
that plays when you enter a new area.  The style is actually very 
similar to its counterpart in SSB.

---

Track 15: Pokémon Stadium
Heard: Pokémon Stadium

This tune originally is the title theme to Pokémon Red/Blue/Yellow, but 
GB tunes don't translate well to this game, so the SSBM Orchestra 
decided to use the arrangment from the TV series, which is reproduced 
quite faithfully in SSBM, with some added chorus at certain points.

---

Track 16: Poké Floats
Heard: Poké Floats, Battlefield in Classic/All-Star

This is a compliation of battle tunes from Pokémon, and it is refined 
for its debut on the GB.  Most of the tune is Pokémon Red/Blue/
Yellow music when you battled trainers, with some of the music from 
Gym Leader battling music from the same games.  Thanks to The Eternal 
Veggie for that info.

---

Track 17: Mute City
Heard: Mute City

Yes, your guess is correct.  This is the very tune played in both 
F-Zero and F-Zero X in the Mute City races.  More similar to the N64 
version than the other, played in the hard rock format, with full 
guitar support.

---

Track 18: Big Blue
Heard: Big Blue, F-Zero Grand Prix in Adventure mode

This is also taken from F-Zero and F-Zero X, from the Big Blue track, 
natch.  Like Mute City, it's more similar to its N64 incarnation.

---

Track 19: Mother
Heard: Onett

This track is taken from the game of the same name, which was never 
released in America, but was the precursor to Earthbound.  The first 
part of this tune is the overworld theme that plays after you get the 
character Loid, called "Bein' Friends", which plays for about a minute 
before switching gears to the theme called "Maria's Theme", which you 
construct after collecting the eight melodies, and ending on the quick 
riff that plays as you enter battles.  Thanks to llamamaster for this 
info.

---

Track 20: EarthBound
Heard: Fourside

This is an arrangement of the theme that plays when Ness and his friends 
explore the city of Fourside.  The theme has a lot of space-like 
bloops and a guitar melody in SSBM.  After the Fourside theme (thanks 
for pointing this out YoYo Kirby), you can hear the creepy cave theme 
when the party explores caves, followed by a very soft rendition of the 
Sound Stone melody, which Ness constructed after visiting the eight 
spots of power.

---

Track 21: Mushroom Kingdom
Heard: Mushroom Kingdom

This is a carbon copy reproduction of the Super Mario Bros. Overworld 
theme, right down to the classic NES bleeps and bloops.  Not much else 
to say there.

---

Track 22: Mushroom Kingdom (Finale)
Heard: Mushroom Kingdom (with thirty seconds left)

Once time starts to run down in an Overworld level in Super Mario Bros, 
the music picks up the pace.

---

Track 23: Mushroom Kingdom II
Heard: Mushroom Kingdom II

This is a carbon copy reproduction of the Super Mario Bros. 2 World 1-1 
music in Subcon.  Music improved a bit in the two years since Super 
Mario Bros., eh?

---

Track 24: Mushroom Kingdom II (Finale)
Heard: Mushroom Kingdom II

There is no time limit in Super Mario Bros. 2, but they needed a tense 
tune to wind down the clock, so they used the "boss theme", when you 
face off against the likes of Birdo, Mouser, or Triclyde.

---

Track 25: Icicle Mountain
Heard: Icicle Mountain

This tune is split into two parts.  The first is the title/bonus theme 
for Ice Climber, turned into a swingin' jazz with keyboards and bass.  
The second part is a icy jingle bells rendition of the main level theme.

---

Track 26: Flat Zone
Heard: Flat Zone

This is an original tune for this game, in a sense.  It was created 
using the bleeps, bloops, and buzzes from Game & Watch games and their 
limited soundtracks.  Quite innovative if you ask me.

---

Track 27: Kongo Jungle N64
Heard: Kongo Jungle N64

The exact song in Kongo Jungle in Super Smash Bros., this tune is also 
based on the jungle theme in Donkey Kong Country, but it's more of a 
direct translation of that theme.

---

Track 28: Yoshi's Island N64
Heard: Yoshi's Island N64

This tune is originally mixed off Yoshi's Story on the N64.  While no 
track such as this actually existed in the original game, its tune was 
based off the first level and the title screen, and it uses the same 
instruments.

---

Track 29: Dream Land N64
Heard: Dream Land N64

This originates from Kirby Super Star, specifically the Gourmet Race, 
where it was picked up for mini-games in Kirby 64.

===========================
7C. Alternate Stage Music =
===========================

There are several "alternate" tracks to certain stages.  They may pop 
up under certain circumstances, such as holding L and R before entering 
the areas described in the Heard section.

---

Track 30: Super Mario Bros. 3
Heard: Yoshi's Island, Mushroom Kingdom in Adventure mode

As the title of the track says, this synthesized piece was derived from 
two tunes in Super Mario Bros. 3.  An opening guitar riff leads into 
the first theme, which is the theme for the first action level in the 
game, which then proceeds to the second theme, which is the tune heard 
on the map screen.

---

Track 31: Saria's Theme
Heard: Great Bay, Temple, Jungle Japes in All-Star mode

Taken from Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, this simple tune is the 
theme heard in the Lost Woods.  It features the flute and double-reeded 
woodwinds, with plucking strings and percussion.

---

Track 32: Battle Theme
Heard: Battlefield, Poké Floats, Fourside in All-Star mode

Another Pokémon tune, taken from multiple points in the games.  The tune 
begins with the normal battle theme for Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal, 
followed by a bit of the gym leader theme from the same games, and a 
little bit of the Red/Blue/Yellow title theme thrown in at the end.  
Thanks to The Eternal Veggie for this info.

---

Track 33: Fire Emblem
Heard: Temple, Underground Dungeon in Adventure, Fountain of Dreams in 
All-Star mode, Final Destination in All-Star mode.

BTX has given me the best description of this music.  The first part is 
the music that plays when you're about to recruit a character into your 
army, and it soon switches into the title screen of the original Fire 
Emblem.

---

Track 34: Mach Rider
Heard: Big Blue, F-Zero Grand Prix in Adventure mode

Taken from the old NES game of the same name.  This synthesized organ 
and guitar track starts with the game's title screen theme, then quickly 
jumps into the battle mode theme.  Soon afterwards, it switches to the 
stage select, and stage intro music, and ends with the game over theme.

---

Track 35: Mother 2
Heard: Onett

While the tune of this track has an arrangement in Earthbound, the tune 
as its heard is actually from the original Mother; a tune called 
Polyanna's Theme.  The main theme is bounced around from synthesized 
guitar, to horn, keyboard in this adaptation.

---

Track 36: Dr. Mario
Heard: Mushroom Kingdom, Mushroom Kingdom II

Dr. Mario has a couple of timeless tunes, and bless HAL for including 
one in SSBM for Dr. Mario.  This is the famous Fever tune that you can 
choose for gameplay.

---

Track 37: Balloon Fight
Heard: Icicle Mountain

This tune from Balloon Fight is reproduced in classic NES music style.  
This is the tune you hear when on a bonus stage in the normal game or 
when playing the Balloon Trip mode.

=====================
7D. Victory Jingles =
=====================

These are the quick little ditties you hear when someone wins a Vs. 
Battle.  I list "Victory for" when the tune refers to multiple 
characters.

---

Track 38: Mario's Victory
Victory for: Mario, Dr. Mario, Luigi, Peach, and Bowser

From Super Mario Bros., this fanfare played once you grabbed the 
flagpole at the end of every level, signifying your victory over the 
minions of Bowser.

---

Track 39: DK's Victory

From Donkey Kong Country, originally.  This tune played when DK or 
Diddy won a bonus level or beat a major enemy.

---

Track 40: Zelda Team Victory
Victory for: Link, Zelda/Sheik, Ganondorf, Young Link

This short fanfare is unique and was created in Super Smash Bros., but 
it's based on the classic Zelda theme.

---

Track 41: Samus's Victory

This slow tune is from all the Metroid games and plays whenever Samus 
picks up a new item.

---

Track 42: Yoshi's Victory

Identical in arrangement to Yoshi's Victory from Super Smash Bros., this 
tune is based on the title screen of Yoshi's Story with the "area 
complete" jingle thrown in at the end.

---

Track 43: Kirby's Victory

While it was a bit more bouncy originally, this is the tune played in 
just about all Kirby games when he finished an area or beat a boss.

---

Track 44: Fox's Victory
Victory for: Fox, Falco

This tune is the first few notes played when you complete a mission in 
Star Fox 64.

---

Track 45: Pokémon Victory
Victory for: Pikachu, Pichu, Jigglypuff, Mewtwo

This tune originated in Super Smash Bros. for Pikachu's victory theme, 
and was adapted from the main Pokémon theme.

---

Track 46: Capt. Falcon's Victory

This is almost the exact tune that plays when any racer finishes with a
good place in F-Zero X.

---

Track 47: Ness's Victory

This tune is the end of the Sound Stone melody.  Part of Ness's quest 
in Earthbound was to collect melody portions from eight spots of power 
in the world to amplify his latent power.

---

Track 48: Fire Emblem Team Victory
Victory for: Marth, Roy

The tune is new, but it's based off when you finish an area in the Fire 
Emblem series.

---

Track 49: Mr. Game and Watch's Victory

This unique track features accents and classic Game & Watch buzzes and 
beeps.

---

Track 50: Ice Climbers' Victory

This track plays in Ice Climber when you successfully complete a bonus 
stage by grabbing onto the condor at the top of the mountain.

=====================
7E. 1-P Stage Music =
=====================

These are some stage musics that are specific to 1-P mode.

---

Track 51: Metal Battle
Heard: 1-P Classic/Adventure when fighting metal enemies.

"Metal" does describe this tune well, from the percussion to the metal-
sounding guitars.  Also, like cold, featureless metal, this tune is 
very repetitive with little altering, except for the key.

---

Track 52: Battlefield
Heard: Battlefield, Race to the Finish bonus level in Classic

This is a quick and tense variation on the secondary Melee theme (see 
Menu 1 for more info).  It's synthesized and features a lot of fast-
moving percussion and accents.

---

Track 53: Final Destination

Much like Battlefield in its tension and focusing on accents, only this 
tune harkens back to the original Super Smash Bros. theme.

===========
7F. Menus =
===========

These are menu tunes.

---

Track 54: Menu 1

I refer to this as the secondary Melee Theme.  It features dueling 
strings and brass in a quick but not as overtly tense feeling as some 
of the battle tunes.

---

Track 55: Menu 2

A variation on the first Melee theme (Opening).  It's lighter than Menu 
1, with synthesized strings and keyboards, and wind in the background.

=======================
7G. Other Stage Music =
=======================

These are all the rest of the tunes that have to do with some action.

---

Track 56: How to Play

Played during the movie of the same name, this tune is similar to a 
battle preparation march, with highly accented percussion and only 
orchestra hits as opposed to any real melody.

---

Track 57: Targets!

This is a jazzy synth keyboard tune.  It moves quick, but it flows 
easily, not leading to too much tension, but more towards relaxing, good 
for preparing yourself for the relatively harmless (to your character) 
act of taking out targets.

---

Track 58: Multi-Man Melee 1

A variation on the Melee Theme accents this fast moving rock tune.  It 
opens with pipe organ, then moves quickly, with synth keys and guitar 
adding small parts of the Melee theme.

---

Track 59: Multi-Man Melee 2

This MMM theme follows the Melee Theme quite concurrently in a more 
synthesized and steady rock format than the fanfare of the Opening.

=================================
7H. All Other Music and Jingles =
=================================

And THE REST...

---

Track 60: All-Star Intro

This track, heard between battles in All-Star mode, is taken from 
Kirby Super Star specifically in this arrangement and style with soft 
piano and strings.  In Kirby Super Star, this tune played in Save Points 
in The Great Cave Offensive.  The actual tune is the Float Islands 
theme from Kirby's Dream Land.

---

Track 61: Tournament 1

This slow, repetitive accented tune plays as the Tournament gets under 
way, accenting the anticipation leading up to the match play.

---

Track 62: Tournament 2

This tune, actually quite similar to the first, plays in between 
battles, adding to the tension.

---

Track 63: Trophy

This easygoing variation on the secondary Melee Theme (Menu 1) plays 
during the Grab the Trophies bonus level in Classic and when you 
access Lottery.

---

Track 64: Classic Intro

A simple double accent, followed by a bass hit is your lead-in to 
fights in Classic mode.  Simple and to the point, much like your 
fights.

---

Track 65: Adventure Intro

This small anticipatory piece of strings and horns gives you a moment's 
rest as you survey your coming task in Adventure mode, the tasks of 
which are generally more complicated than those of Classic.

---

Track 66: Stage Clear 1

A very simple and general victory fanfare featuring a group of trumpets 
and other brass.

---

Track 67: Stage Clear 2

Another simple fanfare, starting with a solo trumpet, then adding the 
rest of the brass and percussion.

---

Track 68: Continue

A light piccolo solo with accompanying strings is your cue to select 
your fate after your defeat; to return to the fight or to bow out.

---

Track 69: Game Over

A brief low brass and low strings fade marks your retiring from the 
battle.

---

Track 70: New Trophy!

A quick one-note of synthesized keyboards.

---

Track 71: Rare Trophy!

A climbing strings and chimes accent, held for a couple of beats, mark 
your finding of something special.

---

Track 72: Challenger!

Quick-beating percussion and a warning claxon herald the arrival of 
your challenger; a secret character.

---

Track 73: New Feature 1

A quick high synth note with chimes.

---

Track 74: New Feature 2

A two-note brass accent with rolling cymbal.

---

Track 75: New Feature 3

Similar to Rare Trophy!, but it starts softer and drops off a lot 
quicker.

---

Track 76: Hammer

Using NES bleeps, this simple charging tune from Donkey Kong played as 
you picked up the Hammer and went into your rampage upon Donkey Kong 
barrels.

---

Track 77: Starman

Begun in Super Mario Bros. and used in almost every game with Stars 
thereafter, this familiar repetitive jingle heralded your temporary 
invinicibility.

---

Track 78: Warning Siren

Heard in the Zebes Escape portion of the Adventure mode, this tense and 
low-stringed tune with its sustained notes, adding percussion as the 
tension mounted follows you as you attempt to make your escape from the 
doomed planet.

---

Track 79: Ending

This short fanfare-type tune, starts with a short melody based on the 
secondary Melee Theme (Menu 1) and ends on a high sustained note as 
your character performs some of his/her/its moves and you celebrate your 
victory in the 1-P mode.

***********************************************************************
8. STANDARD GUIDE STUFF
***********************************************************************
===========
8A. Legal =
===========

This FAQ was made 100% by me, and is Copyright 2002 Scott "CyricZ" 
Zdankiewicz.  You may not take it in whole or in part and claim it as 
your own. 

Currently, the following sites have permission to post my FAQ:

www.gamefaqs.com
www.gamewinners.com

These will be the only sites permitted to carry this FAQ, as it's a 
very specific In-Depth guide.

=======================
8B. E-mail Guidelines =
=======================

If you wish to e-mail me, be sure to follow these guidelines...

- Make ABSOLUTELY sure I haven't already answered your question in the 
guide.
- Make sure it has something to do with the nostalgia factor of SSBM.  
I refuse to answer any in-game questions, such as getting characters and 
whatnot.
- Spell correctly and use proper grammar, please.  If I can't understand 
your e-mail, it'll go to the junk pile...

=============
8C. Credits =
=============

CJayC and Al Amaloo for having this on their sites.

The Eternal Veggie for some info on Pokémon music.

llamamaster for info on music from Mother.

Paper Ace Chase for a lot of little tidbits.

Mega for a lot of Game and Watch info, among other things.

Xkylyr Rauh for info on Kirby.

Caspar Hansen, philamike, tamano nube, Terrence Glover, Orochi Nogitsune 
for some random info.

IGN Guides for compiling the lists of starring roles.

=====================
8D. Version Updates =
=====================

Version 0.8 - 3/26/02 - Almost done, but I need some info on Fire 
Emblem and Panel de Pon.  Got no help on the SSBM board, so I think 
putting this public may help.

Version 0.9 - 4/1/02 - More stuff added, specifically stuff on the 
above, but plenty others, too.

Version 1.0 - 4/13/02 - About as complete as it's gonna get for the 
time being.

Version 1.1 - 6/11/06 - Why hello thar four years ago.  Updated with my 
modern format and a feeew extra games.  Can't wait for Brawl! ^_^

====================
8E. The Final Word =
====================

This is really the heart of SSBM.  Seeing all your favorite Nintendo 
characters get together to beat each other up has this incredible 
nostalgic feel.  I hope my guide has given you a better understanding 
of the origins of the characters.