Animal Crossing	
Museum FAQ
Written by Caio Galiango
Version 1.55
Contact: csgaliango@gmail.com
GameFAQs username: JDthecat
	



Version History:
1.0: (7/26/2008) First version. FAQ is pretty much done unless I create a 
question section or add more tips. I’m thinking of adding some of Blathers’ 
quotes when you donate him something.

1.1: (7/29/2008) Fixed some minor mistakes. Added the Blathers’ quotes 
section. Added more people to the Acknowledgments section. Added Neoseeker to 
the list of sites allowed to use this FAQ.

1.11: (7/31/2008) Small update. Added one more fossil quote and changed the 
notes a bit. Next update should be big.

1.25: (8/1/2008) Finished the fossil quotes (the ones I know anyway). Started 
the fish quotes. Two more acknowledgments. Added a “In need of” section.

1.27: (11/15/2008) Added more fish quotes as well as the ammonite, which got 
sent to me by mail. 

1.28: (1/4/2009) Happy new year to everyone. Added more fish quotes.

1.30: (1/23/2009) Finished the fish quotes (the ones I know anyway). Started 
the bug quotes.

1.31: (5/30/2009) Added a fossil quote sent to me by mail. Added a few more 
bug quotes too.

1.35: (8/7/2009) Finished the bug quotes (the ones I know anyway). Started the 
painting quotes.

1.4: (8/20/2009) Finished the painting quotes (the ones I know anyway). FAQ is 
pretty much done, right now it’s only missing some quotes.

1.5 (8/31/2009) Added a lot of painting quotes sent to me by mail. Currently 
missing one.

1.55 (10/28/2010) Added ten more quotes sent to me by mail.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1) Introduction
2) The Museum
3) Fossils
4) Fishes
5) Bugs
6) Paintings
7) Rewards (SPOILERS)
8) Blathers’ Quotes
9) In Need Of...
10) Contact
11) Acknowledgments
12) Legal Information
13) Conclusion




************************************************************************
1) Introduction
************************************************************************

Welcome to my very first FAQ. As you may have already noticed, Animal Crossing 
has a lot of FAQs, so why am I writing another one? Well, there’s no museum 
specific FAQ and I see some confusion on the boards from time to time about 
fishes, bugs and the fossils in the mail, so I decided to write this. Now, 
onto the guide.

************************************************************************
2) The Museum
************************************************************************

The Museum is a place where you can donate items that can be seen by everyone. 
There are 4 sections in all: bugs, art, fossils and fishes. The goal, of 
course, is to complete your town’s museum. The next few sections will go in 
deeper detail of each category.  

************************************************************************
3) Fossils
************************************************************************

This is probably the first section you will complete as the items are easy to 
find and they are around town the whole year. To get a fossil, you will need a 
shovel, which can be bought from Nook for 500 bells on your very first day of 
Animal Crossing. 

To locate a fossil, just go around town looking for “cracks” in the ground 
(they look like a brown X), then just dig it up to get a fossil. 

(Note: Any buried item forms that same crack so you might find other things, 
like gyroids, buried.)

You probably want to take it to the museum, right? Wrong! You need to have 
them identified by the Farway Museum. Now as you can tell, its probably really 
far (so far its not even in the game :p) and the only way  to get your fossils 
there is by mail. You will get a letter from them on your second day, which 
will allow you to send them fossils. Now just get some stationary and write a 
letter to them (you don’t have to write anything at all, if you don’t want 
to). Next grab the fossil from your inventory and place in the letter so that 
it is attached as a gift. Now just drop it off at the post office. You can 
send as many fossils per day as you want, HOWEVER you’ll only get 3 of them 
back the next day. So no matter what you do you can only get back 3 fossils 
per day per character. The others will keep coming the next couple of days. 

Now, some of these can fetch over 5,000 bells while other will get just above 
1,000. You can donate them or sell them. I recommend only selling the 1,000 
ones since they are more common (I once sold one of the 5,000 ones and it took 
me weeks to get another, but hey, its your choice and the only thing that will 
happen is that it will take you a bit longer to finish this part of the 
museum).

Now just take them to Blathers the owl, who will praise you for each fossil 
you donate. There are a total of 25 pieces of fossil in the game and all of 
them are listed below, along with their prices.


Tricera Skull--5,500 
Tricera Torso--5,000
Tricera Tail--4,500
T-Rex Skull--6,000
T-Rex Torso--5,500
T-Rex Tail--5,000
Apato Skull--5,000
Apato Torso--4,500
Apato Tail--4,000
Stego Skull--5,000
Stego Torso--4,500
Stego Tail--4,000
Ptera Skull--4,000
Ptera Left Wing--4,500
Ptera Right Wing--4,500
Plesio Skull--4,000
Plesio Neck--4,500
Plesio Torso--4,500
Mammoth Skull--3,000
Mammoth Torso--2,500
Amber--1,200
Dinosaur Track--1,000
Ammonite--1,100
Dinosaur Egg--1,400
Trilobite--1,300


Tips on getting them:
All fossils are gotten by digging, they appear every day, so there aren’t 
really any tips except to be patient.

************************************************************************
4) Fishes
************************************************************************

This section will take roughly a year to complete, due to certain fishes 
appearing only for a couple of months. First of all, you’ll need a fishing 
rod, which can be gotten from Nook for 500 bells. 

To catch a fish, go to the river, ocean or pond and look for a shadow in the 
water. Then just throw in the rod near their faces (not on top of them or 
they’ll move away) and wait for a bite. When they start biting it, get ready, 
as you have to press A when the bobber goes underwater. If done correctly, the 
fish will circle the bobber a few times and you’ll pull it out of the water. 

(Note: Sometimes, instead of  a fish coming out, you might get junk like a tin 
can. You can just leave it on the dump or sell it to Nook to free up some 
space in the inventory.).

After catching a new fish, you can donate it without waiting by mail.
Here is the complete list with all 40 fishes, their prices, where and when you 
can get them and the size of the shadow you see on the water.

Note: There are four possible places for them to be: river, big pond (where 
there’s some lily pads), small pond (just a small circle of water) and the 
ocean.


River or Big Pond Fish:

Angelfish -- 3,000 -- May-Oct –- 4PM-9AM -- Small
Arapaima -- 10,000 –- Jul—Sep –- 4PM-9AM –- Huge (as big as your character)
Arowana -- 10,000 -- Jun-Sep –- 4AM-9AM and 4PM-9PM -- Medium
Barbel Steed -- 200 -- All year -- All day -- Large
Bass -- 300 --All year -- All day -- Medium
Bitterling -- 1,300 -- Dec-Feb -- All day –- Very small
Bluegill -- 120 -- All year –- 9AM-4PM -- Small
Carp -- 300 -- All year -- All day -- Large
Catfish -- 200 -- May-Oct –- 4PM-9AM -- Large
Cherry Salmon -- 1,300 -- Mar-Jun and Sep—Nov –- 4AM-9AM and 4PM-9PM -- Small
Crucian Carp -- 120 -- All year -- All day -- Small
Dace -- 200 -- All year –- 4PM-9AM -- Medium
Eel -- 2,000 -- Jun-Sep –- 4PM-9AM -- Medium
Freshwater Goby -- 300 -- All year -- All day -- Small
Goldfish -- 1,300 -- All year -- All day –- Very small
Guppy -- 1,300 -- Apr-Nov –- 9AM-4PM –- Very small
Killifish -- 300 -- Apr-Aug -- All day –- Very small
Koi -- 2,000 -- All year -- All day -- Large
Large Bass -- 3,000 -- All year -- All day -- Big
Loach -- 300 -- Mar-May -- All day –- Very small
Pale Chub -- 200 -- All year –- 9AM-4PM -- Small
Piranha -- 6,500 -- Jun-Sep –- 9AM-4PM –- 9PM-4AM -- Small 
Pond Smelt -- 300 -- Dec-Feb -- All day –- Very small
Popeyed Goldfish -- 1,300 -- All year –- 9AM-4PM –- Very small
Rainbow Trout -- 650 -- Mar-Jun and Sep-Nov –- 4AM-9AM and 4PM-9PM -- Medium
Small Bass -- 200 -- All year -- All day -- Small
Stringfish -- 15,000 -- Dec-Feb –- 4PM-9AM –- Very large
Sweetfish -- 1,300 -- Jul-Sep -- All day -- Medium

Big Pond Only Fish:

Brook Trout -- 150 -- All year -- All day -- Medium
Giant Catfish -- 3,000 -- Jun-Aug –- 4PM-9AM –- Very large
Giant Snakehead -- 6,500 -- Jun-Aug –- 9AM-4PM –- Very large

Ocean Fish:

Barred Knifejaw -- 5,000 -- Mar-Nov –- 4AM-9AM and 4PM-9PM -- Large
Coelacanth* -- 15,000 -- All year –- 4PM-9AM –- Very large
Jellyfish -- 100 -- Second half of August -- All day -- Medium
Red Snapper -- 3,000 -- All year –- 4PM-9AM -- Large
Salmon -- 650 –- Sep -- All day -- Medium
Sea Bass -- 120 -- All year -- All day -- Large

Small Pond Fish: 

Crawfish -- 250 -- Apr-Sep -- All day –- Very small
Frog -- 250 -- May-Aug -- All day –- Very small

Waterfall Only: 

Large Char -- 10,000 -- Mar-Jun and Sep-Nov –- 4AM-9AM and 4PM-9PM -- Large


Notes: The coelacanth can only be caught when its raining. The killifish can 
also appear in the small pond. The salmon is most common by the ocean where 
the lighthouse is.

Tips on getting them:
Again be patient especially for rarer fish. When its raining, better fish 
appear. If they are near a bridge and they go under it, they will disappear, 
so try to lure them away from it. If they fall off the waterfall, they 
disappear. Never run or you’ll scare them. There will always be one fish per 
acre (unless another fish rides the river into the next acre).

************************************************************************
5) Bugs
************************************************************************

Another section that will take a year to complete is the bugs section.
First, get a net from Nook for 500 bells. Insects can be tricky and I will go 
into more detail in some of them.

To catch a bug you’ll have to get the net on top of them (note that the net 
has a long range, so try it first, that way you’ll know where the bug has to 
be). Now, bugs can be appear pretty much anywhere, be it on trees, flowers, 
food, even in the water. 0_o 

Once you manage to capture one, take it to the museum and give him to see 
Blathers nervously accept it. ^_^ 

Here’s the list with all 40 bugs, prices, places and time to catch them.
Each bug with a * by its side will have more detail in the tips below the list.


Flying About:

Banded Dragonfly* -- 4,500 -- Jul-Aug –- 8AM-5PM
Common Butterfly -- 80 -- Mar-Oct -- 8AM-5PM
Common Dragonfly -- 130 -- May-Jul -- 8AM-5PM 
Darner Dragonfly -- 200 -- Jun-Aug –- 8AM-5PM 
Mosquito* -- 130 -- May-Sep -- 8AM-11PM 
Purple Butterfly* -- 2,000 -- Jun-Aug -- 8AM-5PM 
Red Dragonfly -- 80 -- Sep-Oct –- 8AM-7PM 
Tiger Butterfly -- 200 -- Apr-Sept -- 8AM-5PM 
Yellow Butterfly -- 80 -- Mar-Oct -- 8AM-5PM 

On Trees:

Bagworm* -- 250 -- Oct-Mar -- All day 
Bee* -- 4,500 -- All year -- All day 
Brown Cicada -- 200 -- Jul-Aug -- 8AM-5PM 
Drone Beetle -- 80 -- Jul-Aug -- All day 
Dynastid Beetle -- 1,350 -- Jul-Aug -- 7PM-8AM 
Evening Cicada -- 850 -- Jul-Aug –- 4AM-8AM and 4PM-7PM 
Flat Stag Beetle -- 2,000 -- Jun-Aug –- 7PM-8AM 
Giant Beetle -- 10,000 -- Jul-Aug –- 11PM-8AM 
Jewel Beetle -- 3,000 -- Jul-Aug –- 8AM-4PM 
Longhorn Beetle -- 200 -- Jun-Aug –- 8AM-5PM 
Mountain Beetle -- 2,000 -- Jul-Aug –- 7PM-8AM 
Robust Cicada -- 300 -- Jul-Aug –- 8AM-5PM 
Saw Stag Beetle -- 2,000 -- Jul-Aug –- 7PM-8AM 
Spider* -- 300 -- Apr-Sep -- All day 
Walker Cicada -- 400 -- Jul-Sep –- 8AM-5PM 

On Flowers:

Ladybug -- 130 -- Mar-Jul and Oct –- 8AM-5PM 
Mantis -- 430 -- Aug-Sep –- 8AM-5PM 
Snail* -- 250 -- Apr-Sep -- All day 
Spotted Ladybug -- 200 -- Mar-Jul and October –- 8AM-5PM 

Near Water:

Firefly* -- 250 –- Jun –- 7PM-4AM 
Pondskater* -- 130 -- Jun-Sep –- 8AM-7PM 

In Patches Of Grass Or On The Ground:

Bell Cricket -- 430 -- Sep-Oct –- 5PM-8AM 
Cricket -- 130 -- Sep-Nov –- 5PM-8AM 
Grasshopper -- 130 -- Aug-Sep –- 8AM-5PM 
Long Locust -- 200 -- Aug-Nov –- 8AM-5PM 
Migratory Locust -- 1,350 -- Sep-Nov –- 8AM-7PM 
Pine Cricket -- 100 -- Sep-Oct –- 5PM-8AM 

Miscellaneous:

Ant* -- 80 -- All year -- All day 
Cockroach* -- 5 -- Mar-Nov -- All day 
Mole Cricket* -- 200 -- Nov-May -- All day 
Pill Bug* -- 250 -- All year -- All day 


Notes: Some insects can fall on the water like the crickets so try to not 
chase them into a river. Look closely, some of them are really small (mosquito 
comes to mind).

Tips on getting them: Ah, the banded dragonfly... One of the last bugs most 
people usually catch. Drives people insane, wot wot. ^_^ Well, to catch one 
simply go to an acre with lots of open space (no houses, rivers, too many 
trees), WALK into the acre do NOT run (their speed is determined by yours, by 
which I mean, if you come into an acre slowly, they will be slow, if you just 
charge in, they fly really fast). Try to run in a straight line after them 
when you find them (so walk in, if you see one THEN run after it) and remember 
the net distance, try and catch it now. Also they sometimes bump into 
something and rebound to some other direction, so be aware.

The mosquito is hard to see, but you can find easily by two methods. You can 
hear him buzzing around if you stand still a bit, the closer he gets to you, 
the louder it becomes. You can look for his shadow on the ground (it helps 
sometimes). If he bites you when you are fishing you’ll immediately pull out 
your rod out of the water, most likely losing the fish.

The purple butterfly appears more often when its raining.

The bagworm is not visible until you shake a tree and it falls down by a 
string. The only way to know if they are on the tree or not is by... shaking 
them of course. Be prepared to get stung when looking for them. If an animal 
is near a tree which contains a bug, it will stop and stare at the tree. Use 
this to your advantage.

The bee. Another bug that causes trouble to people. Well, this should help you 
out. First off, there are 5 beehives per day in random trees. So you’re going 
to be shaking a lot of them to find bees. Second they don’t appear in fruit 
trees. Third, they fall opposite to where you are (if you shake the tree from 
the left, it will fall to the right). Shake it from the side where you can run 
around (if the tree is at the edge of an acre, shake it so you can run into 
the acre, because you stop in order for the acre change). Now onto the 
catching.
If you find one, get out your net and run a bit. When they start catching up, 
run in a circle and they will fly past you. Now they’ll come back so swing 
your net into the bees and you’ll catch one. Even if they are coming straight 
at you swing the net when they are close (remember net distance).

The spider is the same as the bagworm above.

Snails appear only when its raining. They appear on flowers (except tulips) 
and are a bit tough to see so you might want to just walk around a bit instead 
of rushing through town.

Fireflies come out of the small pond. Look into one and sometimes about 10 of 
them will come out, giving you a chance to capture lots of them.

The pond skater is hard to see, but it can be found at the small pond. Look at 
the water to see if the water is moving (kind of like in real life, when a 
fish comes up for air and the water moves because of its head). Swing your net 
when its close to the side of the pond. They also appear in the big pond, but 
since its bigger, it takes more time for it to get to where you are.

To get an ant, just buy some turnips from Joan (get 10 since that’s the least 
you can buy) and wait a week for them to spoil. Now, drop it on the ground, 
change acres and come back, there should be lots of ants or a cockroach on top 
of it. Catch them both. They can also appear on candy from Halloween.

The cockroach can be anywhere really. On trees, on flowers, on turnips and 
candy. Take your pick.

The mole cricket also causes some trouble to a lot of people, in order to 
catch him, you’ll need a shovel as well. Go around town listening to the noise 
he makes (sounds like a cricket). When it gets really loud, try digging a bit, 
he might come out, now capture him. You have to pay attention to the noise 
though. Sometimes an animal will stare at the ground, dig where they are 
looking to get him out.

The pill bug appears when you hit a rock with your shovel. He’ll jump out and 
walk a bit, capture him. Animals might look at a rock, which means there is a 
pill bug there.

************************************************************************
6) Paintings
************************************************************************

This section can definitely take a while, you don’t need anything except luck 
and patience. There are lots of ways to get paintings, you can: buy them from 
Nook (always 1,960 bells), buy them from Crazy Redd (high price, but only sold 
by him), get one in the dump (only paintings that Nook sells though), as a 
reward for helping an animal (again, only paintings that Nook sells) or 
through trading with someone (for which there is a board here on GameFAQs).

Paintings are under the furniture category and there are 15 of them. Here’s a 
list with all of them along with the animals that sell them. They all cost 
1,960 bells (Redds’ will cost like 7,000, but if you order them from Nook, 
you’ll pay the usual 1,960) and can be ordered from your catalog if you want 
one in your house: 

Amazing Painting (Redd)
Basic Painting
Classic Painting
Common Painting (Redd)
Dainty Painting (Redd)
Famous Painting (Redd)
Fine Painting
Flowery Painting (Redd)
Moving Painting (Redd)
Perfect Painting
Quaint Painting (Redd)
Rare Painting
Scary Painting (Redd)
Strange Painting
Worthy Painting 


Tips on getting them: None really. If you’re desperate for them, you can trade 
them with other people.

************************************************************************
7) Rewards (SPOILERS)
************************************************************************

For completing each category in the museum, you don’t get anything :( 
But if you complete the whole museum, each character that has made at least 
one donation will get a Museum Model in the mail.

************************************************************************
8) Blathers’ Quote
************************************************************************

I decided to add this section for people who want to read up on my favorite 
owls’ quotes (he actually says a lot of interesting stuff). As of right now, 
I’m missing some quotes which I’ll put up as soon as I get them. On with the 
quotes.

Talk:
“Please! Take as much time as you like, and be sure to enjoy your visit! With 
that being said, of course, I must confess there’s not much to see...” (few 
items quote)

“I’m afraid I must tell you, our collection is still a bit... lacking. I do 
hope you enjoy it nevertheless.” (decent amount of items quote) 

“Our collection is coming along rather nicely, eh wot? Indeed, there’s much to 
see, so take your time and enjoy.” (lots of items quote)

Missing this quote. If anyone could write down what Blathers says and then 
send it to me, that’d be awesome. I will write it here and give full credit to 
the person who sends it to me. (all items quote)


Notes:
1) Anytime you give Blathers something he will always end with the following 
words “You have our deepest, most profound gratitude.”.
2) Blathers will always say the “Hoo! Hoo, I say!” line for every fossil you 
give him, which is why I’m not going to write it 25 times.
3) Blathers will always say the “Hoo! Indeed, WOO hoo!” line for every fish 
you give him, which is why I’m not going to write it 40 times.
4) Blathers will always say the “Ah. Hoo. Yes. Indeed. That’s a (bug’s name), 
if I’m not utterly mistaken? No! No! That’s not necessary! Please, I must 
insist we leave it in the container! Protocols, you see, eh wot? I have to say 
that I am not... overly fond of insects. I quite simply do NOT like touching 
them! Blech!” line for every bug (besides the cockroach) you give him, which 
is why I’m not going to write it 40 times. 



Fossil Quotes:

Any incomplete fossil: 
“Hoo! Hoo, I say! A (fossil name)! The day the remaining pieces of our 
prehistoric puzzle are found will be a joyous one indeed. Good luck to you!”


Complete Triceratops:
“Well now, if I’m not mistaken, I do believe this means... triceratops is 
complete! Hoo-WEE! Er, did I just say ‘hoo-wee’? Ugh. How terribly 
embarrassing, I sound like some blithering idiot. Let’s move on, shall we? 
Here now... Where to begin? Triceratops... Yes... A member of the 
ornithischian order, this great beast flourished in the late Cretaceous 
period. It was a huge three-horned plant-eater, and grew up to 30 feet in 
length. That’s 9 meters! Truly remarkable! Triceratops is easily recognized by 
its distinctive trio of horns and, of course, its parrot-like beak. Oh, and 
one mustn’t forget the solid neck frill which provided it with fortification 
against giant predators. Triceratops was quite formidable indeed. In fact, it 
was one of the very last dinosaurs to suffer extinction. Oh, dear! Oh good 
gracious! Please, please forgive me. I tend to get a bit carried away. 
Dinosaurs, you know!”


Complete T-Rex:
“Why, this means... Yes! Tyrannosaurus! It’s complete!!! Oh, such joy! Such 
unfettered delight! Truly... this is splendid. I am quite beside myself. I’m 
practically molting with all this excitement! Now then, where to begin? 
Tyrannosaurus... A magnificent beast... A highly evolved theropod, the ‘tyrant 
lizard’ was one of the largest carnivores of the late Cretaceous period. It 
had a large head , a short, muscular neck, a barrel-like body, and powerful 
hind legs with three-taloned feet. Its skull was enormous, and its vast jaws 
were filled with dagger-like teeth, the largest of which were 6 inches long! T-
rex was 40 feet long from nose to tail. Resistance to its powerful attacks was 
an exercise in futility! Garrrr! Oh my! Oh, terribly sorry! I beg your pardon, 
eh wot? I seem to have been overcome by momentary savagery. Hoo!”


Complete Apatosaurus:
“At long last... Apatosaurus is complete! Tremendous! Striking! Massive in 
every sense of the word! Hoo, I say, hootie hoo! What a truly glorious find! 
My cup runneth over! Now let me see here... Where shall I begin? 
Apatosaurus... Hmmm... It lived in the late Jurassic period, and was a member 
of the diplodocid family of long-necked sauropods. You may be more familiar 
with the name brontosaurus, though that is a separate species of the same 
genus. It grew to some 70 feet in length. It had a small head, a long, thick 
neck, and an amazing whip-like tail, wot! Cra-ack! Whup-pshh! Oh, dear! 
Awfully sorry! I was envisioning myself with a massive tail! Hoo hoo!”


Complete Stegosaurus:
“Finally! The day has come! Our stegosaurus is complete! Dare I believe it? 
Might this not be some cruel dream? Nay, it is true, indeed! I say to you: 
HOOOO! Spectacular! Superb! My whole being thrills! Now then, where to begin? 
Much has been written about the noble stegosaurus... It was the largest of the 
plated dinosaurs, and lived during the late Jurassic period, wot wot. It is 
famous for the two rows of alternating, bony plates surmounting its body and 
its four formidable tail spikes. Ka-smash! Yes, that’s correct. It’s a tail-
spike chop! Oh... Please pardon me! I was overcome with emotion.”


Complete Pterodactyl:
“What's this, now, hm? Why, our pterandon is...complete! Simply marvelous! 
Truly, this is beyond all joy! Hoo! Indeed, woo hoo! Amazing! I'm all 
aflutter. I'm atwitter! Now then, how can I begin to do abit of justice to 
this master of the skies? Pterandon... First things first, this winged 
creature is not a dinosaur, but rather a flying reptile. It did, however, live 
among many of the dinosaurs during the Cretaceous Period. Fascinating, eh wot? 
The structure of it's immense wings suggests that it stayed aloft by gliding 
rather then flapping, you see? Imagine pterandons with wingspans over 23 feet 
swooping down to catch sigh in their pelican-like beaks... 
Screee...SCHWAAAH!!! Oh, I do beg your pardon. Beaks, wings, flying...It's so 
very close to home!”


Complete Plesiosaurus:
“At last! At last! Huzzah! The plesiosaur is... complete! I never thought I 
would live to see this day! It’s fantastic! Brilliant! A wonderful, joyful 
occasion! Delight ripples through my body and soul! But I’m getting carried 
away. Now then, where shall I begin with these leviathans? The great 
plesiosaurs... In actuality, plesiosaurs were not dinosaurs, but aquatic 
reptiles, which ruled the seas during the Mesozoic era. There were two main 
types of plesiosaurs, both of which had broad bodies, four large flippers, and 
short tails. The two groups were distinct in that one had long necks and small 
heads, the other short necks and large heads. The plesiosaurs ranged in size 
from 8 to 46 feet long, and their diets consisted of fish and other marine 
creatures. The first plesiosaur fossil was discovered in 1824, and subsequent 
findings have been made on every continent. Incredible, eh wot? Indeed! What I 
wouldn’t do to dig one up myself! The thrill! Where in blazes is my shovel? 
Hoo hoo hoo! Oh, my! I must beg your pardon. The very idea of field work gets 
my crumpets toasting!”


Complete Mammoth:
“Will wonders never cease? Blathers, your eyes must be failing you... No! It 
IS true! The mammoth! It’s complete! Hoo, I say! Hootie hoo! Phenomenal! 
Sensational! A truly grand occurrence! Welcome to cloud nine! Blathers, 
compose yourself... Now then, where to begin? Mammoths... Yes, mammoths... The 
wooliest of woolies... They are, of course mammals, and ones that lived much, 
much later than the dinosaurs, wot wot. Pleistocene earth was their home, and 
they are firmly established in our minds as creatures of the Ice Age. Mammoths 
ranged in height from 6 feet to 14 feet at the shoulder. The wooly mammoth is 
their most famous species. The last of the mammoths died out some 10,000 years 
ago, which coincides with the ascent of man. It is, perhaps, the first animal 
whose extinction was contributed to by man. Though certainly not the last. 
Humans can truly be the most thoughtless and callous of creatures when they 
think only of themselves! Hoo! I say again: HOO! Oh, dear! I wasn’t referring 
to you personally. No offense intended. Temper, temper!”


Amber:
“Hoo! Again, I say hoo! Just look at this. Amber. Stoutly preserving the pale 
reminders of our past. And this is quite a large, full-bodied specimen, eh 
wot? Smooth. Exquisite. I'm reeling in awe! Amber is a form of tree resin, 
which has hardened and been preserved in the earth's crust for millions of 
years. Resin is produced as a defense against insects and disease. It seals 
wounds, allowing trees time to heal. Sometimes, unlucky insects get caught in 
the resin, too. I wonder what's in your amber? A fly? Perhaps a mosquito? 
Amber, you see, is a preservative of miraculous proficiency. Bits of amber are 
like miniature time capsules.”

Dinosaur Track:
“Hoo, I say! Woo hoo! A fossilized footprint. Looks like some paleontology is 
afoot! Hoo hoo hoo! But truly, this is quite an earth-shaking find! I’ve never 
seen a specimen that can match it in beauty. The distinct three-toed foot 
tells us that this is the print of a theropod from... perhaps the Jurassic 
period, eh wot? It’s impossible to discern anything more specific, but 
speculation is free, and a vital part of paleontology. Imagine a terrible 
carnivore stalking its prey... Its great weight pressing down into the 
earth... and... voila! History! Hoo, aren’t I the blatherer! I beg your 
pardon, please! I do hope I didn’t put you into a comatose state!”


Ammonite:
“Well! Hoo and hoo again! An ammonite! My stars! A very impressive find! Ah 
yes, wonderful. This fossil is of exceedingly superior quality, wot wot. Now 
then, I know a thing or two about these creatures. Yes, indeed. Ammonites... 
Though ammonites lived in shells, they were not shellfish, but rather 
mollusks, like octopi and squid. The closest living relative to the ammonite 
is the chambered nautilus. Fascinating, no? Ammonites existed from the 
Devonian period, some 400 million years ago, to the end of the Cretaceous 
period. Their extinction coincided with that of the dinosaurs. Time and tide 
wait for neither man nor beast, wot! Oh, hoo. Blathers, you ninny! I've gone 
and done it again. Spewing out more information than necessary. So sorry.”


Dinosaur Egg:
“Hoo, I say! Hoo upon hoo! A fossilized egg! Eggcellent! I must apologize for 
that atrocious pun. So sorry. I just got carried away in my eggcitement, eh 
wot? Because this is a grade-A specimen. Hoo hoo hoo! Now, I hate to admit 
this, but I cannot identify the species of dinosaur that produced this 
particular egg. I can envision its hatching, though, and from the shards, a 
new life slowly emerging, a miracle of flesh and bone! Hoo, the wonder of it 
all! The drama. The spectacle! The ebb and flow! The grass and grit! Life, I 
say! Life! Hoo, mercy! Hoomy, indeed! I must apologize profusely. I...I was 
lost in the moment. My beak flaps on its own!”


Trilobite:
“Well then, where to begin? Trilobites... Ah, yes... Trilobites were hard-
shelled segmented arthropods, which populated the Paleozoic seas long before 
dinosaurs existed. There were over 15,000 species of known trilobites and more 
are discovered each year, wot wot! This makes them the single most diverse 
group of extinct organisms ever! Amazing! Truly remarkable, you know! They 
are, however, extinct: no living descendants whatsoever. The constant perils 
of nature are quite formidable indeed. Hoo my! So sorry, old bean! Allow me to 
beg your pardon. I've been running off at the beak again. I tend to do that.”


Fossil Section Complete:
“Hoo! Indeed, WOO HOO! Could it be? Is it possible? Yes! I believe so! The 
fossil collection is now... complete! How simply wonderful! I am absolutely 
staggered! Congratulations on a job well done! Well done indeed!!! Keep up the 
right good work! As you might imagine, we’re quite keen to complete our other 
collections as well!”



Fish Quotes:

Angelfish:
“Gorgeous. Sim-ply gorgeous. Heavenly, even. We will treasure your gift. I 
give you my word as an honest, upstanding owl.”

Arapaima:
“My word! I’ve never seen such a tremendous specimen! A fish such as this is 
found only once in a great while. A true rarity among rarities! Extraordinary! 
Top notch! This, we will treasure, I assure you. Cross my heart and hope to 
molt. Hoo!”

Arowana:
“Another rare fish! You, old bean, are an angler for the ages! The bards will 
sing your praises! Thanks to generous individuals such as yourself, (character 
name), the museum is growing by leaps and bounds. Your dragon fish has now 
found a home away from home. I promise, it will be very happy in its new digs!”

Barbel Steed:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Barred Knifejaw:
“Hoo! Hoo, I say! Just look at this magnificent creature! Truly, a king among 
edible aquatic beasts of the world! Tuna, scallops, oysters, lobsters, salmon, 
halibut, crabs, barnacles... Well, maybe not barnacles... One would have to be 
in dire straits indeed to consume a few of those jagged beasties! Now then, 
what say we set this chap up in his new home, eh wot?”

Bass:
“This is one of those fish that seem to mysteriously disappear from time to 
time. Drive fishermen batty, wot! Have no fear, dear friend! You’re leaving 
this beauty in very good wings, hmmm! Hoo! Owl humor. Hoo hoo!”

Bitterling:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Bluegill:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Brook Trout:
“This is one of those fish that seem to mysteriously disappear from time to 
time. Drive fishermen batty, wot! Have no fear, dear friend! You’re leaving 
this beauty in very good wings, hmmm! Hoo! Owl humor. Hoo hoo!”

Carp:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Catfish:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Cherry Salmon:
“This is one of those fish that seem to mysteriously disappear from time to 
time. Drive fishermen batty, wot! Have no fear, dear friend! You’re leaving 
this beauty in very good wings, hmmm! Hoo! Owl humor. Hoo hoo!”

Coelacanth:
“Hoo, my goodness! Glorious! Seen in this light, of course, it’s quite a 
grotesque beast. And yet, it does have a certain peculiar allure, wot! You may 
rest assured that we shall treat it with much affection and respect, wot! My 
word as a gentleowl.”

Crawfish:
“This diminuative fellow is a relative of the lobster. It's pincers are small, 
but distressingly powerful, wot? Indeed, it delights in a little pinchy-
pinchy, eh wot? We'll take pains to ensure our mutual safety.”

Crucian Carp:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Dace:
“This is one of those fish that seem to mysteriously disappear from time to 
time. Drive fishermen batty, wot! Have no fear, dear friend! You’re leaving 
this beauty in very good wings, hmmm! Hoo! Owl humor. Hoo hoo!”

Eel:
“This is one of those fish that seem to mysteriously disappear from time to 
time. Drive fishermen batty, wot! Have no fear, dear friend! You’re leaving 
this beauty in very good wings, hmmm! Hoo! Owl humor. Hoo hoo!”

Freshwater Goby:
“This is one of those fish that seem to mysteriously disappear from time to 
time. Drive fishermen batty, wot! Have no fear, dear friend! You’re leaving 
this beauty in very good wings, hmmm! Hoo! Owl humor. Hoo hoo!”

Frog:
“Greeeeeee! Gree! Gree! That’s my best Sonoran green toad impression, wot! We 
do keep frogs and toads here. Well then, let’s get our amphibious friend 
settled. All the damp comforts of home. Guaranteed.”

Giant Catfish:
“Hoo my! What a large fish! If I remember correctly, these beasties can only 
be caught in ponds, wot wot! Catfish whiskers don’t actually sting, you know. 
The ‘sting’ comes from stiff pectoral barbs located below the gills. Simply 
ecstatic to have this fine fellow. We’ll take good care of him. Hoo! I promise 
you that!”

Giant Snakehead:
“What a stupendous beast! It must have taken great effort to land this 
fearsome creature, eh wot? I’ve heard that giant snakehead carry parasites. Be 
sure to thoroughly cook them before eating. Blech! Parasites! Of course, we’ll 
take special care of it.”

Goldfish:
“Those adorable little fins! Those huge, googly eyes! Even I am helpless in 
the face of their cuteness! We will take special care of this precious fellow. 
Welcome to your new home, you darling little fishy!”

Guppy:
“Hoo hoo! Hullo, little fishy! Aren’t we a tiny little fellow! Adorable! Why, 
I believe is stuck its tongue out at me! Hoo-rumph! Nevertheless, we’ll take 
care of the little blighter! I’ll keep an eye on this mischief-maker myself!”

Jellyfish:
“Jellyfish and other gelatinous creatures are some of the ocean’s most 
beautiful animal life. Some of them do pack a painful sting, but you’ll be 
fine if you observe them from a respectful distance. Now then, let’s get this 
one squared away in its new home, eh wot?”

Killifish:
““Hoo hoo! Hullo, little fishy! Aren’t we a tiny little fellow! Adorable! Why, 
I believe is stuck its tongue out at me! Hoo-rumph! Nevertheless, we’ll take 
care of the little blighter! I’ll keep an eye on this mischief-maker myself!”

Koi:
“Some fish bring a higher price at the market than koi, but koi are special in 
some indescribable way... For whatever the reason, catching a koi feels 
like... like catching a living fortune, somehow. Interesting, that. Well, 
aren’t I incoherent! All rambling aside, rest easy knowing we will give this 
noble fish the utmost care.”

Large Bass:
“My, isn’t this a kick in the proverbial pants, eh wot? Quite a spectacular 
catch you’ve got here! This might even garner you top honors in one of the 
fishing tourneys. A splendid specimen! I’ll watch over this brute personally. 
Rest easy on that account, wot wot!”

Large Char:
“Oh! What a large and CHAR-ming fish. That was dismal, wasn’t it? Mum warned 
me to avoid comedy. Regardless of my shabby comedic failings, this fish will 
have a safe and comfortable home here.”

Loach:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Pale Chub:
“Oh? Is that a fact? It’s sometimes called a mountain trout? But it’s not a 
trout! What rot! Well, regardless, I’ll see that it gets the proper care. You 
have my word on it!”

Piranha:
“Dear me! My mind boggles! I had no inkling that we had such frightfully 
dangerous fish in these waters! I suppose that would indicate they’re not as 
lethal as they are made out to be... Or are they trying to lull us? Have no 
fear! We’ll look after your sharp-toothed friend. For everyone’s sake!”

Pond Smelt:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Popeyed Goldfish:
“Those adorable little fins! Those huge, googly eyes! Even I am helpless in 
the face of their cuteness! We will take special care of this precious fellow. 
Welcome to your new home, you darling little fishy!”

Rainbow Trout:
“This is one of those fish that seem to mysteriously disappear from time to 
time. Drive fishermen batty, wot! Have no fear, dear friend! You’re leaving 
this beauty in very good wings, hmmm! Hoo! Owl humor. Hoo hoo!”

Red Snapper:
“Snaptacular! Snaptastic! Sna... Er, snap... That is... Oh, brother! It wasn’t 
particularly funny anyway. Please attempt to ignore my sorry lack of humor. 
Despite it, we will treat this fish with much care.”

Salmon:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Sea Bass:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Small Bass:
“Even run-of-the-mill, common fish are valuable resources, you see. All part 
of the grand tapestry, wot! We will take excellent care of this fellow, oh 
yes. You can rest assured. Excellent care, indeed.”

Stringfish:
“Hoo! Indeed, WOO hoo! This is an extremely rare fish, I’ll have you know! I’m 
absolutely agog! If I may hazard a guess, this must have been the most 
difficult fish to catch yet! I almost can’t believe it! To think, you’re 
donating such a rare find to us... Allow me to commend you on your matchless 
generosity. We’ve been saving a place just for this day, wot wot! Have faith, 
this fish will be thoroughly treasured!”

Sweetfish:
“Sweetfish appear when the days grow long, you know. Some say summer can't 
begin until the first one is caught. Of course the poor dear is then eaten! 
Hardly a fit welcome for summer's herald! I, myself, do not eat fish. This one 
will be quite safe with us here. Quite safe, indeed! Hoo, I say!”

Fish Section Complete:
“Hoo, hoo, a thousand hoos! Could this possibly mean...? The fish collection? 
Is it... Complete? Why, yes! It is! Good fishing, old sport! A complete fish 
collection is quite the accomplishment! My sincere Congratulations! Keep up 
the right good work! As you might imagine, we’re quite keen to complete our 
other collections as well!”



Bug Quotes:

Ant:
“I wonder, how do you think that ants manage to search out their food? Because 
the question really confounds me! I mean, really. Come now. If ants were our 
size, the area they traverse in their search for sustenance... would FAR 
exceed the entire size of our fair village. Can you imagine it, wot? Hiking 
that far for a snack? What is going on in their tiny little ant-minds, hm? Do 
they have some specific target in mind? Could it be they’re just wandering 
about aimlessly? Hoo-rrrumph! Ridiculous and revolting!”


Bagworm:	
Missing this quote. If anyone is about to donate it and could write down what 
Blathers says and then send it to me, that’d be awesome. I will write it here 
and give full credit to the person who sends it to me.


Banded Dragonfly:
“I’ve heard that Tom Nook pays quite a fair price for specimens such as this. 
Thank you for your generosity. But all that nonsense aside, this is a colossal 
dragonfly! Of course, that merely makes it colossally repulsive.”


Bee:
“Why, I'd imagine it took more than a bit of skill and daring to catch bees! 
You've got 'moxie', as I believe they say. I'm certain you must have been 
stung numerous times. How terribly painful that must have been, eh wot? 
Incidentally, do you know how some honeybees protect their hives when attacked 
by giant wasps? The giant wasps can't survive heats above 113 degrees, but the 
honeybees can live at heats up to 122 degrees. The canny honeybees use this 
nine-degree difference to their fullest advantage, wot! When the wasps arrive, 
the bees attack them en masse. A single wasp may be swarmed by up to 500 bees! 
Now this is truly amazing. The bees then begin to vibrate, creating a 
veritable cocoon of suffocating heat. Do you see the genius at work here? This 
swarming is but a feverish defence against the giant wasps' weakness. The 
temperature? Hoo hoo! Lo and behold, 120 degrees! Just below the bees own 
threshold of survival! In this incredible fashion, the bees literally lay 
their lives on the line to protect the hive. Stupendous! To be honest, I 
learned that from a wee documentary I saw on the telly! Of course, incredible 
feats go only so far. When all is said and done, they're still insects, and 
still ghastly!”


Bell Cricket:
“I actually find their voices quite soothing. On an autumn evening, when their 
cries fill the air... Delightful! Their appearance however, is not in the 
least bit engaging, and actually borders on repugnant. As for myself, I find 
them no better than cockroaches. Blech! Vile. Vile indeed. Truly, dirtily 
vile, eh wot?”


Brown Cicada:
“Cicadas. What can one say about these odd insects? They are 
certainly...noisy! Noisy enough, I should say! Their horrid caterwauling is 
awfully irritating, you know. About as musical as a train wreck, eh wot? I’m 
sure that the cicadas have quite valid reasons for such boisterous behavior, 
but I daresay there are limits. And they have those membranes on their 
abdomens, which vibrate to create those disturbing tones...Odious!”


Cockroach:
“Hoo...Uh...Huh-hoo? Is that a cockroach?! Oh, how repugnant! How foul! The 
vileness! The putrescence! Hoooo-ecchh! I will NEVER understand why we’re 
required to include cockroaches in our collection. It makes no sense. Well, 
who am I to question management? Hoo, indeed! And in any case, what’s one more 
filthy insect, eh wot? Hoooo, my... I hate this part. I hear it wriggling in 
there...”


Common Butterfly:
“There’s an old saying among some of my contemporaries: “Butterflies are 
beautiful, yet moths are montrous.” Well, if you were to ask me, I’d say 
they’re all the same! By which I mean disgusting! Truly hoo-rrific, wot wot!”


Common Dragonfly:
“(Name), have you ever peered closely into a dragonfly’s eyes? Blech! Ghastly, 
really.”


Cricket:
“I actually find their voices quite soothing. On an autumn evening, when their 
cries fill the air... Delightful! Their appearance however, is not in the 
least bit engaging, and actually borders on repugnant. As for myself, I find 
them no better than cockroaches. Blech! Vile. Vile indeed. Truly, dirtily 
vile, eh wot?”


Darner Dragonfly:
“(Name), have you ever peered closely into a dragonfly’s eyes? Blech! Ghastly, 
really.”


Drone Beetle:
“They're called beetles, wot? The lugs of the insect world. Insects with armor 
plating their backs, you know. Their armor, it...opens up, revealing wings. 
Featherless wings. Which they use to fly! It's really quite unnatural. Then 
there's that thin, membrane-covering where their heads connect to their 
bodies. Most foul!”


Dynastid Beetle:
“They’re called beetles, wot? The bugs of the insect world. Insect with armor 
plating their backs, you know. Their armor, it... opens up, revealing wings. 
Featherless wings. Which they use to fly! It’s really quite unnatural. Then, 
there’s that thin, membrane-like covering where their heads connect to their 
bodies. Most foul!”


Evening Cicada:
“Tanna juponesis, commonly known as the higurashi cicada, is one insect that I 
may be able to abide. Its song is so mournful, so filled with sad longing... 
It’s really quite beautiful. Even so, I have no desire to touch one! Mercy, 
no! How repulsive! I shudder at the very thought of it! “


Firefly:
Missing this quote. If anyone is about to donate it and could write down what 
Blathers says and then send it to me, that’d be awesome. I will write it here 
and give full credit to the person who sends it to me.


Flat Stag Beetle:
“They’re called beetles, wot? The bugs of the insect world. Insect with armor 
plating their backs, you know. Their armor, it... opens up, revealing wings. 
Featherless wings. Which they use to fly! It’s really quite unnatural. Then, 
there’s that thin, membrane-like covering where their heads connect to their 
bodies. Most foul!”


Giant Beetle:
“Your donation of such an obviously valuable insect is really quite generous. 
Thank you so very much! To me, however, it’s just an overpriced cockroach. And 
that awful black buster... Horrendous!”


Grasshopper:
“I actually find their voices quite soothing. On an autumn evening, when their 
cries fill the air... Delightful! Their appearance however, is not in the 
least bit engaging, and actually borders on repugnant. As for myself, I find 
them no better than cockroaches. Blech! Vile. Vile indeed. Truly, dirtily 
vile, eh wot?”


Jewel Beetle:
“The incredible jewel-like iridescence, it's so... So very... It's so 
very...nauseating. Yes, that's it. Hoo... But I digress...”


Ladybug:
“Ladybugs are one insect I thought might appeal to me. Then I made the 
grievous error of touching one. This vile fluid appeared from someplace and... 
Oh, it was everywhere! Blech! Utterly appalling!”


Long Locust:
“I have a rather difficult time dealing with the soft underbellies of 
grasshoppers. They’re... vulgar. And their legs! Why do they come off so 
easily when one merely handles the beasts? Blech! Simply horrid!”


Longhorn Beetle:
“Hoo my! Those sharpish mandibles... Truly frightening. Honestly, what could 
be more off-putting than those? And the antennae! Why on earth are they so 
very thick? Blech! Most objectionable! In a word: bad!”


Mantis:
“Ah yes, the infamous mantis... Tell me, does it seem to you that it’s almost 
TOO aware of us? Like it’s studying us... It’s rather as if it were 
questioning our reason for existence, eh wot? Its eyes... They’re far too 
judgemental. Additionally, the manner in which it uses its scythe-like 
forelegs to kill and feed... So very vivid! So graphic! Blech! Grisly little 
beast!”


Migratory Locust:
“I have a rather difficult time dealing with the soft underbellies of 
grasshoppers. They’re... vulgar. And their legs! Why do they come off so 
easily when one merely handles the beasts? Blech! Simply horrid!”


Mole Cricket:
“My my my! Good gracious! This is a frightfully large mole cricket, eh wot? 
Yes, rather large indeed. Interesting, isn’t it? How its monotonous song drags 
on and on, while the insect itself is nowhere to be seen? That very secret is 
what sets the mole cricket apart from its relatives. You see, it lives 
underground, wot wot! It may be because it’s become a bit scarce, but I 
believe that most folk aren’t even aware the mole cricket exists. To be 
nitpicky, it’s not actually a true cricket, but rather a distant relative of 
crickets and grasshoppers. It has rippingly powerful forelegs adapted for 
digging. In fact, it’s these mole-like limbs that give it its name. Its rear 
legs are shorter than a true cricket as well. Bleeeeeech! All this talk of bug 
legs... Simply dreadful!”


Mosquito:
“I’m rather impressed that you managed both to capture and transport a 
mosquito here without squashing it. I might’ve squashed it just on general 
principles, wot! So, (Name), how’s your mosquito knowledge? Were you, for 
example, aware that male mosquitos can’t suck blood? No, they survive by 
drinking plant nectar. Evidently, the female is the vampiric one, and she only 
ingests blood for the protein she needs to lay eggs. I couldn’t care a fig, 
myself. All I know is the itching that occurs after one is bitten is quite 
disturbing. Not only that, but mosquitos are notorious carriers of all sorts 
of disease, you know! Dirty, filthy little buggers!”


Mountain Beetle:
“They’re called beetles, wot? The bugs of the insect world. Insect with armor 
plating their backs, you know. Their armor, it... opens up, revealing wings. 
Featherless wings. Which they use to fly! It’s really quite unnatural. Then, 
there’s that thin, membrane-like covering where their heads connect to their 
bodies. Most foul!”


Pillbug:
“Tell me, (Name), have you ever turned a pill bug over and examined its 
repellent underside? The legs...so many of 
them...jerking...wiggling...writhing... Blech! Abhorrent! Wretched little 
monster!”


Pine Cricket:
“I actually find their voices quite soothing. On an autumn evening, when their 
cries fill the air... Delightful! Their appearance however, is not in the 
least bit engaging, and actually borders on repugnant. As for myself, I find 
them no better than cockroaches. Blech! Vile. Vile indeed. Truly, dirtily 
vile, eh wot?”


Pondskater:
“I’ve always been curious... Why is it that these water striders choose to 
live their lives on the water? And skating across water without sinking? 
Unnatural! Blech! A grotesque affront to the natural order, wot wot!”


Purple Butterfly:
“There’s an old saying among some of my contemporaries: “Butterflies are 
beautiful, yet moths are montrous.” Well, if you were to ask me, I’d say 
they’re all the same! By which I mean disgusting! Truly hoo-rrific, wot wot!”


Red Dragonfly:
“(Name), have you ever peered closely into a dragonfly’s eyes? Blech! Ghastly, 
really.”


Robust Cicada:
“Cicadas. What can one say about these odd insects? They are 
certainly...noisy! Noisy enough, I should say! Their horrid caterwauling is 
awfully irritating, you know. About as musical as a train wreck, eh wot? I’m 
sure that the cicadas have quite valid reasons for such boisterous behavior, 
but I daresay there are limits. And they have those membranes on their 
abdomens, which vibrate to create those disturbing tones...Odious!”


Saw Stag Beetle:
“They’re called beetles, wot? The bugs of the insect world. Insect with armor 
plating their backs, you know. Their armor, it... opens up, revealing wings. 
Featherless wings. Which they use to fly! It’s really quite unnatural. Then, 
there’s that thin, membrane-like covering where their heads connect to their 
bodies. Most foul!”


Snail:
“Let me make one thing perfectly clear: snails are not insects. Snails are 
members of the mollusk family, wot! They are related to oysters, clams, and 
more obviously to slugs. It’s a well-known fact, you can’t pick your 
relatives. Snails have soft bodies, which are protected by hard shells, and 
their eyes are on the tips of their tentacles. I’ve pondered from time to 
time, if one pulled a snail from its shell, would it then become a slug? 
Blech! The very thought of touching that slimy, mucous-covered body... Most 
foul! Utterly nauseating!”


Spider:
“Hanging a toy spider from a string to frighten someone is a jolly good 
childhood ruse known throughout the world. Now, I may be mistaken, but I 
believe this shows the general loathing civilized folk have for spiders. They 
deserve it! Eight legs, bug diet, and those eyes! They just have too many! 
Blech! Sinister fiends!”


Spotted Ladybug:
“Ladybugs are one insect I thought might appeal to me. Then I made the 
grievous error of touching one. This vile fluid appeared from someplace and... 
Oh, it was everywhere! Blech! Utterly appalling!”


Tiger Butterfly:
“There’s an old saying among some of my contemporaries: “Butterflies are 
beautiful, yet moths are montrous.” Well, if you were to ask me, I’d say 
they’re all the same! By which I mean disgusting! Truly hoo-rrific, wot wot!”


Walker Cicada:
“Cicadas. What can one say about these odd insects? They are 
certainly...noisy! Noisy enough, I should say! Their horrid caterwauling is 
awfully irritating, you know. About as musical as a train wreck, eh wot? I’m 
sure that the cicadas have quite valid reasons for such boisterous behavior, 
but I daresay there are limits. And they have those membranes on their 
abdomens, which vibrate to create those disturbing tones...Odious!”


Yellow Butterfly:
“There’s an old saying among some of my contemporaries: “Butterflies are 
beautiful, yet moths are montrous.” Well, if you were to ask me, I’d say 
they’re all the same! By which I mean disgusting! Truly hoo-rrific, wot wot!”


Bug Section Complete:
“Woo hoo hootie HOO! Pardon that outburst, but I believe this means... Yes! 
The insect collection is complete! I daresay that congratulations are in 
order. I could never bring myself to capture such numbers of grotesqueries! 
Keep up the right good work! As you might imagine, we're quite keen to 
complete our other collections as well!”



Painting Quotes:

Amazing Painting:
“Hoooo my! So, this is an amazing painting! Hmm... Well... It's... There's  a 
certain sort of... I'm sure it's just me, but I don't see why they say it's an 
amazing painting...” 

Basic Painting:
“Hoooo! Hoo, I say! A genuine basic painting! My! Absolutely...breathtaking. A 
basic painting! What a find! Hooo my...”

Classic Painting:
“Hoooo! Hoo, I say! A genuine classic painting! My! Absolutely... 
breathtaking. A classic painting! What a find! Hooo my...”

Common Painting:
“Hoooo! Hoo, I say! A genuine common painting! My! Absolutely...breathtaking. 
A common painting! What a find! Hooo my...”
 
Dainty Painting:
“Hootie hoo! I say! So, this is that dainty painting I've heard so much about! 
We meet at last! The original in all its glory. I've only seen reproductions 
until now, and I must say, it's always stuck in my craw! Words fail me, truly! 
I suppose all one can honestly say is that it's... a dainty painting.”
 
Famous Painting:
“Hootie hoo! I say! So, this is that famous painting I've heard so much about! 
We meet at last! The original in all its glory. I've only seen reproductions 
until now, and I must say, it's always stuck in my craw!  Words fail me, 
truly! I suppose all one can honestly say is that it's... a famous painting.”
 
Fine Painting:
“Hootie hoo! I say! So, this is that fine painting I’ve heard so much about! 
We meet at last! The original in all its glory. I’ve only seen reproductions 
until now, and I must say, it’s always stuck in my craw! Words fail me, truly! 
I suppose all one can honestly say is that it’s... a fine painting.”

Flowery Painting:
“Hoooo my! So, this is a flowery painting! Hmm... Well... It's... There's a 
certain sort of... I'm sure it's just me, but I do'nt see why they say it's a 
flowery painting...”

Moving Painting:
“Hoooo! Hoo, I say! A genuine moving painting! My! Absolutely...breathtaking. 
A moving painting! What a find! Hooo my...”
 
Perfect Painting:
“Hoooo my! So, this is a perfect painting! Hmm... Well... It’s... There’s a 
certain sort of... I’m sure it’s just me, but I don’t see why they say it’s a 
perfect painting...”

Quaint Painting:
“Hooo! Hoo, I say! A genuine quaint painting! My! Absolutely...breathtaking. A 
quaint painting! What a find! Hooo my...”
	
Rare Painting:
Missing this quote. If anyone is about to donate it and could write down what 
Blathers says and then send it to me, that’d be awesome. I will write it here 
and give full credit to the person who sends it to me.

Scary Painting:
“Hoooo my! So, this is a scary painting! Hmm... Well... It's... There's a 
certain sort of... I'm sure it's just me, but I do'nt see why they say it's a 
scary painting...”
 
Strange Painting:
“Hootie hoo! I say! So, this is that strange painting I’ve heard so much 
about! We meet at last! The original in all its glory. I’ve only seen 
reproductions until now, and I must say, it’s always stuck in my craw! Words 
fail me, truly! I suppose all one can honestly say is that it’s... a strange 
painting.”

Worthy Painting: 
“Hoooo my! So, this is a worthy painting! Hmm... Well... It’s... There’s a 
certain sort of... I’m sure it’s just me, but I don’t see why they say it’s a 
worthy painting...”

Painting Section Complete:
“Hoo! WOO hoo, if I may be so bold! Could it be? Our masterpiece series... Is 
it complete at last? Bravo! Jolly good show! The paintings are all here! 
Congratulations are in order! Huzzah! HUZZAH, I say! Keep up the right good 
work! As you might imagine, we're quite keen to complete our other collections 
as well!”


Museum Complete:
Missing this quote. If anyone could write down what Blathers says and then 
send it to me, that’d be awesome. I will write it here and give full credit to 
the person who sends it to me.

************************************************************************
9) In need of...
************************************************************************

This section is a list of things I need to finish this FAQ up. If anyone can 
help me, your name will be put in the Acknowledgments Section. 

Quotes for: bagworm, firefly, rare painting, museum complete quote.  

************************************************************************
10) Contact
************************************************************************

My e-mail is csgaliango@gmail.com. If you have any 
questions/information/comments feel free to mail me with the subject “Museum 
FAQ”. Spam and hate mail will be deleted and the person sending it to me will 
be blocked. 

************************************************************************
11) Acknowledgments
************************************************************************

Me for doing this guide. ^_^
Prima strategy guide for the prices of fishes and bugs as well as their times 
of appearance.
NintendoDad for helping me with some information as well as supporting me to 
make this FAQ.
Nom de Plume for a little help with the fossil prices.
Rikuide_Furame for helping me with the line limit.
Games for clearing up how to submit a FAQ for me.
otaku_luna for also helping me with the line limit which was driving me insane.
celticsfan426 for the jellyfish quote.
Singspike for the ammonite quote.
Zeldagirl for the amber quote.
Yoshi648 for all the painting quotes.
LoveShadeRosa for lots of fossil, fish and bug quotes.
CjayC and SBAllen for running this site.
Nintendo for making the game.

************************************************************************
12) Legal Information
************************************************************************

Copyright 2008-2010 Caio Galiango

This may be not be reproduced under any circumstances except for personal, 
private use. It may not be placed on any web site or otherwise distributed 
publicly without advance written permission. Use of this guide on any other 
web site or as a part of any public display is strictly prohibited, and a 
violation of copyright.

Sites allowed to host this FAQ:

www.gamefaqs.com
www.neoseeker.com


If you see any violation of this copyright notice, please contact me, Caio 
Galiango at csgaliango@gmail.com. 

************************************************************************
13) Conclusion
************************************************************************

Congrats, you now have a complete museum. Now if you didn’t donate everything, 
go after all the fishes, bugs, paintings and fossils you missed for more 
rewards. I hope this guide helped you get some new stuff. See you.