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    Challenge Cup Guide by NecroBat

    Version: 1.00 | Updated: 06/03/04 | Search Guide | Bookmark Guide

    ***POKéMON STADIUM 2 CHALLENGE CUP GUIDE***
    Version 1.00
    
    by NecroBat
    
    June 03 2004
    
    ********
    CONTENTS
    ********
    
    I.   Introduction
         I.I   Legal and Copyright Information
         I.II  Version History
         I.III Game Information
    
    II.  Challenge Cup Basics
         II.I   Challenge Cup Rules
         II.II  Pokémon
         II.III Items
         II.IV  General Tips
    
    III. Challenge Cup Round 1
         III.I Poké Ball
               III.I.a Specs
               III.I.b Pokémon Available on Poké Ball Challenge Cup
               III.I.c Poké Ball Trainers
    
         III.II Great Ball
                III.II.a Specs
                III.II.b Pokémon Available on Great Ball Challenge Cup
                III.II.c Great Ball Trainers
    
         III.III Ultra Ball
                III.III.a Specs
                III.III.b Pokémon Available on Ultra Ball Challenge Cup
                III.III.c Ultra Ball Trainers
    
         III.IV Master Ball
                III.IV.a Specs
                III.IV.b Pokémon Available on Master Ball Challenge Cup
                III.IV.c Master Ball Trainers
    
    IV. Challenge Cup Round 2
         IV.I Poké Ball
               IV.I.a Specs
               IV.I.b Pokémon Available on Poké Ball Challenge Cup
               IV.I.c Poké Ball Trainers
    
         IV.II Great Ball
                IV.II.a Specs
                IV.II.b Pokémon Available on Great Ball Challenge Cup
                IV.II.c Great Ball Trainers
    
         IV.III Ultra Ball
                IV.III.a Specs
                IV.III.b Pokémon Available on Ultra Ball Challenge Cup
                IV.III.c Ultra Ball Trainers
    
         IV.IV Master Ball
                IV.IV.a Specs
                IV.IV.b Pokémon Available on Master Ball Challenge Cup
                IV.IV.c Master Ball Trainers
    
    V. Credits and Contact Information
    
    ***************
    I. INTRODUCTION
    ***************
    
    Welcome to this Pokémon Stadium 2 Challenge Cup Guide. This is my first ever
    FAQ, so I hope you all enjoy it and you find it useful. This guide shall help
    you to conquer this -as defined by many- very difficult mode in Pokémon
    Stadium 2.
    
    I.I  LEGAL AND COPYRIGHT INFORMATION
    
    This guide was written by NecroBat (me) and is Copyright by NecroBat, 2004.
    This guide may be not be reproduced under any circumstances except for
    personal, private use. It may not be placed on any web site or otherwise
    distributed publicly without advance written permission. Use of this guide
    on any other website or as a part of any public display is strictly
    prohibited, and a violation of copyright.
    
    Only these websites have permission to use this guide:
    
    - http://www.gamefaqs.com
    
    Pokémon and all related characters © 1995-2001 Nintendo/Creatures inc.
    /GAME FREAK inc.
    
    You have been warned.
    
    I.II VERSION HISTORY
    
    Version 1.0. The guide was completed on May 2004, and transcripted on June
    3rd, 2004.
    
    I.III GAME INFORMATION
    
    Pokémon Stadium 2 is a Strategy/Simulation game released by Nintendo of
    America on March 2001 in North America. This game is the american version of
    Pocket Monsters Stadium Kingin Crystal, released by Nintendo of Japan on
    December 2000 in Japan.
    In Pokémon Stadium 2, you can fight the CPU or 3 other friends using Pokémon
    from your Pokémon Red, Blue, Yellow, Gold, Silver and Crystal cartridges using
    a Transfer Pak.
    There are many modes you can play in Pokémon Stadium 2. One of them is the
    infamous Challenge Cup, where you battle with six Pokémon provided randomly by
    the CPU. The Pokémon you get, the attacks of each Pokémon and the items
    attached to the Pokémon are completely random (within the limits of Challenge
    Cup, which will be discussed in the next section), and that is where the FUN
    of Challenge Cup lays in.
    To access Challenge Cup, enter White City and go to the Stadium. Then you can
    select four different Cups. To the left of the screen, you will find Challenge
    Cup.
    After clearing all modes (Little Cup, Poké Cup, Prime Cup, Challenge Cup, Gym
    Leader Castle, Pokémon Academy and VS Rival), you'll unlock Round 2, which is a
    harder version of Pokémon Stadium 2, where battles are tougher.
    
    *************************
    II.  CHALLENGE CUP BASICS
    *************************
    
    Well, to business, gentlemen.
    As stated before, in Challenge Cup your Pokémon, their attacks and attached
    items are chosen randomly by the CPU. The Challenge Cup comprises of four level
    classes. In order from easiest to hardest, these are:
    
    - Poké Ball
    - Great Ball
    - Ultra Ball
    - Master Ball
    
    Each class contains eight trainers, whom you have to defeat in order to clear
    that specific class. Once you have cleared all four classes, you will be done
    with Challenge Cup. Sounds easy, huh? =P
    
    II.I   CHALLENGE CUP RULES
    
    The Challenge Cup rules are the same for every other Cup in Pokémon Stadium.
    Let's take a look at them.
    
    (Taken from the Pokémon Stadium 2 Instruction Booklet)
    
    - One trainer will battle a computer-controlled trainer.
    - Choose six Pokémon before going into battle. In the case of Challenge Cup,
    Pokémon are chosen by the CPU.
    - You may not choose more than one of a certain kind of Pokémon.
    - The items held by Pokémon must be all different.
    - Out of the six Pokémon chosen, choose three that will be used to battle.
    - The first trainer to make all of his of her opponent's Pokémon faint will win.
    - The trainer must win all battles in the Cup to win the Cup.
    - If one Pokémon falls asleep, none of the remaining Pokémon on the party can
    be put to sleep by the opponent. Same goes for freezing. A Pokémon can be
    asleep and another one frozen at the same time, though.
    - If your last remaining Pokémon uses Selfdestruct or Explosion, you lose, even
    if the opponent's last Pokémon faints. Likewise, Perish Song or Destiny Bond
    will always fail.
    
    II.II  POKéMON
    
    With that set, let's take a look at how the Pokémon are choosen on Challenge
    Cup.
    
    Pokémon on your team are choosen randomly by the CPU. Depending on the class,
    you will get certain level Pokémon:
    
    - Poké Ball: Level 30 Pokémon
    - Great Ball: Level 45 Pokémon
    - Ultra Ball: Level 60 Pokémon
    - Master Ball: Level 75 Pokémon
    
    Also, not every Pokémon can be choosen on any class. For example, you can't
    get a Gyarados on Poké Ball. This will be explained with further details in
    Section III.
    
    No matter what class are you playing in, or what Pokémon you got, your Pokémon
    movesets will look something like this:
    - A STABed move (if available. For example, Gyarados can't learn a Flying type
    move)
    - A stat modifier move (such as Defense Curl, Screech, etc.)
    - An non-STABed move (if the Pokémon is a dual type, such as Normal/Flying
    or Water/Ice, most of the times you'll get another STABed move for the
    secondary type)
    - An annoying move (such as Attract, Stun Spore, etc.)
    
    Of course, these moves are limited to those moves that a certain Pokémon can
    learn.
    
    *NOTE*
    Just what is STAB?
    STAB stands for Same Type Attack Bonus. When a Pokémon uses an attack of its
    same type, it gets a special bonus, thus inflicting more damage. For example,
    let's say Wartortle uses Bubblebeam. Wartortle is a Water-type Pokémon, and
    Bubblebeam is a Water-type attack. Bubblebeam base damage is 65. Applying the
    Same Type Attack Bonus, the final damage is 97.5. This is calculated with the
    next formula:
    
    Attack's Base Damage x 1.5 = Final Damage
    
    Bubblebeam's BP = 65 x 1.5 = 97.5
    
    This applies to all offensive attacks of all Pokémon types, including Normal
    types. Let's continue then.
    ******
    
    These moves can be TMs from the RBY and/or GSC games, Egg Moves or Level
    Moves. Sometimes, some of the movesets assigned to a Pokémon might be
    impossible to get in real life. For example, I once got a Mirror Coat/Hazing
    Blastoise on Master Ball; but sometimes these details are so small it
    doesn't really matter.
    
    Also, there are some moves you will never get, these are:
    
    - Self-Recovery moves (Leech Seed, Milk Drink, Moonlight, Morning Sun,
    Recover, Rest, Synthesis)
    - Rest-based moves (Snore, Sleep Talk)
    - One hit KO moves (Guillotine, Fissure, Horn Drill)
    - 'Hidden' Stats-based moves (Hidden Power, Frustration, Return)
    - Some exclusive moves (Aeroblast, Sacred Fire, Sketch)
    
    Cool, but what Pokémon do I get? Well, most of them. Some
    Pokémon are banned (or so to speak) from Challenge Cup. No matter what class
    you are on, you will never get any these Pokémon:
    
    - Caterpie
    - Metapod
    - Weedle
    - Kakuna
    - Magikarp
    - Articuno
    - Zapdos
    - Moltres
    - Dragonite
    - Mewtwo
    - Mew
    - Unown
    - Entei
    - Raikou
    - Suicune
    - Tyranitar
    - Lugia
    - Ho-oh
    - Celebi
    
    The stats of the Pokémon are also assigned randomly. You can even get shiny
    Pokémon, but it is EXTREMELY rare.
    
    II.III ITEMS
    
    Items are also randomly attached to your Pokémon. Items that can be obtained
    on Challenge Cup are:
    
    - Boosting Items (Black Belt, Black Glasses, Charcoal, Dragon Fang, Hard
    Stone, Magnet, Metal Coat, Miracle Seed, Mystic Water, Nevermelt Ice, Pink
    Bow, Poison Barb, Sharp Beak, Silver Powder, Soft Sand, Spell Tag,
    Twistedspoon)
    - Berries (Berry, Bitter Berry, Burnt Berry, Gold Berry, Ice Berry, Mint
    Berry, Miracleberry, MysteryBerry, PrzCureBerry, PsnCureBerry)
    - Helping Items (Berry Juice, Brightpowder, King's Rock, Quick Claw,
    Scope Lens)
    
    Also, no matter what, you will never get any of these items:
    - Berserk Gene
    - Focus Band
    - Leftovers
    - Light Ball
    - Lucky Punch
    - Metal Powder
    - Thick Club
    - Stick
    
    II.IV  GENERAL TIPS
    
    - The main rule in Challenge Cup is: work with what you've got.
    
    - On low level classes (Poké and Great Ball), moves like Bubblebeam, Psybeam,
    Sludge, etc. work absolutely great when STABed. Don't discard a team because
    your Pokémon has these "weak" attacks. However, if you're stuck with Ember,
    Thief, Water Gun, and the likes, reset.
    
    - Usually, a dual type Pokémon will work more effectively as one of its types.
    For example, if you got an Omanyte and a Kabuto in a team, check out their
    movesets. Usually, one will have Surf and Rollout, and another one will have
    Ancientpower and Water Gun, so one would rather be more efficient as a
    Water-type Pokémon, and the other will be more efficient as a Rock-type
    Pokémon. Of course, if we got both with Water Gun AND Rollout, reset.
    
    - Moves like Attract, Spite, Protect, Substitute and the likes
    are a LUXURY in Challenge Cup. If a Pokémon from your party got one of these,
    use them, and use them often.
    
    - Don't discard Rollout so quickly. Your Pokémon might have also Rollout.
    Most of the times, you are likely to set up and use Rollout 5 times in a row.
    - Double Team and Sand Attack are great additions too. Your opponent won't
    Haze or Roar you away if you DT, they won't try to switch either when you use
    Sand Attack (well, at least like in 95% of the times).
    
    - Don't discard a whole team just because you got a "weak" Pokémon. Most of
    the times, you will find yourself using only 3 or 4 Pokémon throughout the
    whole class.
    
    - Two-turn moves aren't necessarily bad. 95% of the times, your opponent
    won't switch Pokémon nor use Protect/Detect to avoid the attack.
    
    **************************
    III. CHALLENGE CUP ROUND 1
    **************************
    
    Well, now the backbone of this guide. How to deal with every trainer on
    Challenge Cup. Without further adieu, I give you
    
    ***************
    III.I POKé BALL
    ***************
    
    III.I.a SPECS
    
    Level 30 Pokémon only. Only low-stage evolutions, with the exception of
    Smeargle.
    
    III.I.b POKÉMON AVAILABLE ON POKé BALL CHALLENGE CUP
    
    This is a list of Pokémon that can be obtained on Poké Ball:
    
    Bellsprout, Bulbasaur, Charmander, Chikorita, Cleffa, Cyndaquil, Diglett,
    Ditto, Dratini, Drowzee, Ekans, Exeggcute, Geodude, Goldeen, Grimer,
    Hoothoot, Hoppip, Horsea, Igglybuff, Jigglypuff, Krabby, Larvitar, Ledyba,
    Machop, Magnemite, Mareep, Marill, Nidoran(Female), Nidoran(Male), Oddish,
    Paras, Pichu, Pidgey, Pineco, Poliwag, Rattata, Remoraid, Sandshrew,
    Seel, Sentret, Shellder, Slowpoke, Slugma, Smeargle, Snubbull, Spearow,
    Spinarak, Squirtle, Sunkern, Swinub, Togepi, Totodile, Tyrogue, Venonat,
    Vulpix, Wooper, Zubat
    
    III.I.c POKé BALL TRAINERS
    
    #1 Camper Marcus
    STRATEGY: This trainer always uses Pokémon that are weak against Water-type
    moves, specifically: Ground, Rock and Fire type Pokémon. Lead with a
    Water-type Pokémon (If you got one), or a Pokémon that knows a Water-type
    move; you'll get a perfect if you lead with a Water-type Pokémon that knows a
    Water-type move. Back up with a Grass-type Pokémon (remember he carries
    Fire-type Pokémon too), and bring a Rock/Ground type or any other
    strong Pokémon that knows Earthquake and/or Ancientpower or Rock Slide.
    If you don't have any of those Pokémon in your party, Psychic-type and
    Normal-type Pokémon with strong attacks can work also.
    
    #2 Rocket Grunt
    STRATEGY: This trainer always uses Poison-type Pokémon. If you happen
    to have a Magnemite (the only Steel-type Pokémon available on this class) or
    a Poison-type, lead with it because his main strategy is to poison you,
    specially with a nasty Sludge Bomb. Also, if you happen to carry a fast
    Pokémon with Safeguard, you might wanna lead with it. Also bring a
    Psychic-type Pokémon, or any other Pokémon that knows a Psychic-type Attack
    and that can actually use it. Back up with a Fire-type Pokémon,
    Flying-type Pokémon or Ground-type Pokémon.
    
    #3 Picnicker Melissa
    STRATEGY: Unlike previous battles, this one has a little more brain to it.
    Melissa likes Pokémon that are weak to Rock-type and Electric-types moves.
    Since there is no specific type that is both super-effective to Melissa's
    Pokémon, you must organize your party very well. Lead off with a Pokémon
    that knows Ice-type moves, back up with a Pokémon that knows
    Electric-type moves and another Pokémon that knows Rock-type moves.
    Again, this trainer does not have annoying tactis, other than switching
    Pokémon once in a while and just pounding away with STABed attacks.
    
    #4 Guitarrist Daren
    STRATEGY: Daren brings with him three Grass-type Pokémon and three
    Electric-type Pokémon, and LOVES to paralyze you.
    Lead off with a Fire-type Pokémon or at least something that knows
    a Fire-type move, since 4 of his Pokémon are weak to Fire.
    A Ground type is a must too; back up with it. Finally, bring a neutral-type
    Pokémon, such a Psychic-type or a Normal-type. When the battle starts, if he
    happens to lead with a Grass-type Pokémon or Magnemite, fry them with your
    Fire-type move. If he leads with another Pokémon, switch to your Ground-type
    Pokémon, since he will always use an Electric-type move. He will always try
    to paralyze your Pokémon with Thunder Wave and Stun Spore. Rarely, he will
    have Body Slam on some of his Pokémon. If you happen to have a Pokémon with
    Safeguard, bring it to prevent paralysis. Switch between your active Pokémon
    and your Ground-type Pokémon to avoid being paralyzed by Thunder Wave;
    remember Grass-type Pokémon use Stun Spore, though.
    
    #5 Fisherman Curtis
    STRATEGY: This trainer always has Water-type Pokémon. You should lead with a
    Water-type Pokémon, and back it up with an Electric-type Pokémon and a
    Grass-type Pokémon. "Why not lead with super-effective types?" you ask?
    Because: A) he ALWAYS has that annoying Wooper (though, like, 90% of the time
    will actually bring it to battle), which is part Ground-type, making your
    Electric type pokémon useless, B) some of his Pokémon know Ice-type moves,
    so you can kiss your Grass-type goodbye, and C) he always uses Rain Dance,
    which boosts both Pokémon's (yours and his) Water-type attacks. If you lead
    with a Water-type Pokémon, you'll be resistant to his attacks.
    Now, when the fight begins, first turn is always Rain Dance,
    so you can use this turn to up your stats, lower his stats or set up. Attract,
    Double Team, Sand Attack and the likes are perfect. Then, pound away
    with your Water-type Attack, or if you have another type attack, use it.
    Use this Pokémon until it faints. Then switch to your Electric-type Pokémon,
    and Thunder away under the Rain Dance effects, or just attack with your
    STABed move. If he switches to Wooper, switch to your Grass-type.
    Remember, it's important to keep your Grass-type Pokémon until the end,
    because if you're only left with, let's say Pichu, and he has Wooper,
    you'll be creamed.
    
    #6 Medium Peggy
    STRATEGY: She uses some Psychic Pokémon, and some weak-to-Ground Pokémon.
    Peggy likes to confuse you a lot, so if you have that Pokémon with Safeguard
    or Bitter Berry, you should lead with it, and bring Pokémon with strong Attack
    moves; Normal types and Ground types work wonders. If she uses Swagger, take
    advantage of your Attack boost, and pound them with physical attacks.
    
    #7 Rocket Grunt
    STRATEGY: This (hot) chick always uses Normal-type Pokémon, so if you happen
    to have a Pokémon with Fighting-type moves, bring it. She also brings some
    Normal/Flying-types, so a Rock Pokémon is an obvious second choice.
    You should also bring Pokémon that can pack quite a punch (for example, a
    Drowzee with Psychic, or a Sandshrew with Earthquake). There's not much
    strategy here. She just pounds away, just like you should. Reflect or Charm
    are also a plus here.
    
    #8 Juggler Dwight
    STRATEGY: Since this is the final battle, there's no theme on this team.
    Just as your party is somewhat balanced, Dwight's party has a little bit of
    everything too. Not all is lost, though. Try to find common weaknesses on his
    team. For example, one time, he had a team that included Ditto, Ekans, Pichu,
    Cyndaquil, Paras and Sandshrew, so I could easily bring out a
    Ground-type Pokémon to take care of half of his team. Try to find a pattern
    and exploit it. If his team has somewhat more variety, just bring your
    strongest Pokémon and let the games begin. By this time of the class, you
    should know who are the most reliable Pokémon in your party ;)
    
    *****************
    III.II GREAT BALL
    *****************
    
    III.II.a SPECS
    
    Level 45 Pokémon only. Some low-and-mid-level evolutions, final evolutions of
    "weaker" Pokémon such as Butterfree and Magcargo, some no-evolution Pokémon,
    such as Aipom and Wobbuffett.
    
    III.II.b POKÉMON AVAILABLE ON GREAT BALL CHALLENGE CUP
    
    This is a list of Pokémon that can be obtained on Great Ball:
    
    Abra, Aipom, Ariados, Azumarill, Bayleef, Beedrill, Butterfree, Chinchou,
    Clefairy, Corsola, Croconaw, Cubone, Delibird, Doduo, Dunsparce, Eevee,
    Elekid, Farfetch'd, Flaaffy, Gastly, Gloom, Graveler, Growlithe, Houndour,
    Ivysaur, Kabuto, Koffing, Ledian, Lickitung, Machoke, Magby, Magcargo, Mankey,
    Meowth, Natu, Nidorina, Nidorino, Omanyte, Onyx, Parasect, Phanpy, Pidgeotto,
    Pikachu, Poliwhirl, Porygon, Psyduck, Rhyhorn, Skiploom, Smoochum, Staryu,
    Teddiursa, Tentacool, Togetic, Voltorb, Wartortle, Weepinbell, Wobbuffett,
    Yanma
    
    III.II.c GREAT BALL TRAINERS
    
    #1 Twins Jan&Jane
    STRATEGY: The twins like Bug-type Pokémon, and like to mix it with Pokémon
    that can counter Bug-type weaknesses. Rock-types, Flying-types, Water-types
    and Fire-types Pokémon are your best bet in this battle. The twins don't have
    a strategy other than attack and attack again, so there's no need to worry.
    
    #2 Schoolboy Oliver
    STRATEGY: Oliver loves Ground and Rock type Pokémon, so you should lead with
    a Water-type Pokémon, back it up with a Grass-type Pokémon, and bring either
    a Ground-type Pokémon or a Fighting-type Pokémon. Also, Oliver loves to use
    Sandstorm, so keep your eye on your HP, unless you can mess up with the
    weather too, specially with Rain Dance and your Water-type Pokémon.
    
    #3 Sailor Curt
    STRATEGY: This fella likes Pokémon with Electric weakness -mostly Water-types-
    and one or two Pokémon of any other type. Lead with a neutral type, such as a
    Normal-type Pokémon, and back up with a Electric-type and a Grass-type
    Pokémon. Not much startegy here, the Sailor sometimes switches Pokémon to
    prevent serious damage, but nothing your Pokémon can't handle ;)
    
    #4 Swimmer(Female) Darcy
    STRATEGY: Swimmer Darcy has mostly Normal-type Pokémon, and some other types
    just to add some flavor to the mix, but that's not the problem. She loves
    using Attract, so before choosing your Pokémon, check out her Pokémon. If she
    has more Female Pokémon, bring your two Females and a Male, and viceversa for
    Males. If she has 3 Females, and 3 Males, just bring your most reliable
    Pokémon and begin. Fighting types is a good Pokémon type to bring, but
    it's not THAT necessary. When the battle starts, if your Pokémon is the
    opposite sex of Darcy's, jsut switch out to a Pokémon of the same sex.
    Don't worry about damage. She will use Attract and will fail, letting you
    start fresh on the next turn. Keep switching to avoid being attracted.
    Once she attracts your Pokémon, she will just pound away.
    
    #5 Officer Gerald
    STRATEGY: Jerry here uses 3 Grass-type Pokémon, 3 Fire-types and Sunny Day.
    You should lead with a Fyre-type. That way, you can take advantage of
    Sunny Day, plus fry a possible-leading Grass-type. If you don't have a
    Fire-type Pokémon, just lead with a neutral type with Strong attacks.
    Back up with a Flying-type, and a Water-type, preferably with an Ice-type
    move. Ground and Rock-types can be included in the mix. There might be some
    switching on his behalf, although a Sunny Day-ed, STABed Fire Blast will
    leave a mark on almost anything.
    
    #6 Kimono Girl Emiko
    STRATEGY: Another balanced trainer. Emiko has spiced up her team with
    plenty of types. But we know better and you can always find a common
    weakness in her team. Again, one time she had these Pokémon: Aipom, Flaaffy,
    Parasect, Onyx, Growlithe and Delibird, so leading with a Rock/Ground-type
    with nice attacks (A Phanpy with Ancientpower and Earthquake, for example)
    might be a good idea. If you can't find any pattern, just stick with
    your good old trusty Pokémon and let go. She likes switching out when there's
    type disadvantage to your favor, so time your attacks too and hit her
    on the switch ;)
    
    #7 Scientist Roberto
    STRATEGY: As long as types go, Roberto loves Psychic, Dark and Ghost Pokémon.
    Problem is Roberto also loves confusing your Pokémon and increase his
    evasiveness while you get dizzy and hit yourself. You might want to
    bring a Pokémon with Safeguard, a Bitter Berry, a Pokémon with
    Roar or Haze. If this scenario is impossible, then bring your
    hardest-hitting Pokémon, and get ready for one of the most annoying
    battles up until now.
    
    #8 Gentleman Travis
    STRATEGY: Yep. You guessed it. It's one of those balanced teams again, so you
    should know by now what to do in these kind of situations, huh?
    Look for a pattern on his team and lead with the Pokémon most supper-effective
    against his Pokémon, or just belt out your powerhouses. No annoying
    strategies here, other than the occasional switching, so you can battle
    at ease.
    
    ******************
    III.III ULTRA BALL
    ******************
    
    III.III.a SPECS
    
    Level 60 Pokémon. Mostly fully evolved forms, mid-level evolutions such as
    Quilava, no-evolution Pokémon such as Mr. Mime or Gligar, low-level evolutions
    of 'strong' Pokémon such as Ponyta. Challengers on this class are the same as
    Poké Ball; they have stronger Pokémon (according to the Ultra Ball specs), but
    most of the strategies don't change.
    
    III.III.b POKÉMON AVAILABLE ON ULTRA BALL CHALLENGE CUP
    
    This is a list of Pokémon that can be obtained on Ultra Ball:
    
    Arbok, Bellossom, Chansey, Charmeleon, Clefable, Dragonair, Dewgong, Dugtrio,
    Fearow, Forretress, Furret, Girafarig, Gligar, Golbat, Granbull, Haunter,
    Hitmonchan, Hitmonlee, Hitmontop, Hypno, Jumpluff, Kadabra, Kingler, Lanturn,
    Magneton, Mantine, Marowak, Misdreavus, Mr. Mime, Muk, Murkrow, Noctowl,
    Octillery, Persian, Pidgeot, Piloswine, Ponyta, Pupitar, Quagsire, Quilava,
    Qwilfish, Raichu, Raticate, Sandslash, Seadra, Seaking, Shuckle, Skarmory,
    Slowbro, Slowking, Sneasel, Stantler, Sudowoodo, Sunflora, Tangela, Venomoth,
    Vileplume, Weezing, Wigglytuff.
    
    III.III.c ULTRA BALL TRAINERS
    
    #1 Camper Marcus
    STRATEGY: Still keeps using Pokémon that are weak against Water-type attacks
    so you should lead with one. Other Pokémon he has are weak to Ground-type
    attacks (most of the times), so you should back up with one. Bring a
    Psychic-type Pokémon to back up. Ice-type attacks are also welcome. Not much
    of strategy here either. Just pound away until the badge is yours.
    
    #2 Rocket Grunt
    STRATEGY: Still has the Toxic strategy. Still has some Poison Pokémon. But
    now he adds Protect and some other types to the mix. Again, a Steel-type
    Pokémon or a Poison-type Pokémon should lead to avoid the nasty Toxic effects.
    Safeguard helps too. Psychic, Ground and Fire-type Pokémon are what you
    should bring for this battle. If you get poisoned, he will use Protect to make
    Toxic eat your HP away; change Pokémon when this happen, and when he uses
    Toxic again, switch back your poisoned Pokémon.
    
    #3 Picnicker Melissa
    STRATEGY: Melissa just loves Flying-types. She keeps them from Poké Ball,
    along with another type just to make things a little more even. Lead with
    a Pokémon that knows Ice-type moves (or an Ice-type, if you're lucky), and
    back up with Electric-type and Rock-type Pokémon. Not much action here, just
    an occasional switch and that's it.
    
    #4 Guitarrist Daren
    STRATEGY: Unlike the previous Poké Ball, Daren now adds some variety to his
    team. He keeps a couple of Grass-type Pokémon, a couple of dual
    Electric-types, and a couple of diverse types just to annoy you. He keeps
    his paralysis strategy, though, so Safeguard and PRZCureBerry are your best
    friends. Lead with a neutral type (or a Pokémon with Safeguard or
    PRZCureBerry), just to avoid any surprises. Back up with a Ground-type and
    a Fire-type Pokémon.
    
    #5 Fisherman Curtis 
    STRATEGY: Same strategy as the Poké Ball battle: Rain Dancing Water Pokémon.
    You might wanna lead again with a Water-type Pokémon adn take advantage of
    Rain Dance, or lead with a neutral-type, such as a Psychic-type or a
    Normal-type Pokémon. Back up with a Grass-type and an Electric-type Pokémon.
    Same disclaimer applies here. Save Grass-type Pokémon for annoying Quagsire.
    
    #6 Medium Peggy
    STRATEGY: She has Ghost-type and Psychic-type Pokémon, plus a Normal-type
    Pokémon just to throw you out of balance. Dark-type and Ghost-type Pokémon are
    highly recommended, although not a must. She keeps using Swagger to confuse
    you, so Bitter Berry and Safeguard are great tools in this battle. If you
    don't have any Dark-type or Ghost-type Pokémon (or at least a Pokémon with
    those type of attacks and that can actually use them), try focusing on the
    secondary types weaknesses.
    
    #7 Rocket Grunt
    STRATEGY: Again, she has Normal-type Pokémon, and the occasional
    Normal/Flying-type Pokémon. Just belt out your Fighting-type Pokémon
    (if available), or bring in the powerhouses. This is a contest of who hits the
    hardest, so be prepared.
    
    #8 Juggler Dwight
    STRATEGY: A balanced team. All final battles in all Challenge Cup classes have
    balanced teams. You should know that by now. All disclaimers about balanced
    teams apply here. Search for a pattern or bring out powerhouses.
    
    ******************
    III.IV MASTER BALL
    ******************
    
    III.IV.a SPECS
    
    Level 75 Pokémon only. Fully evolved forms and no-evolution Pokémon
    such as Snorlax. Challengers on this class are the same as Great Ball; they
    have stronger Pokémon (according to the Master Ball specs), but most of the
    strategies don't change.
    
    III.IV.b POKÉMON AVAILABLE ON MASTER BALL CHALLENGE CUP
    
    This is a list of Pokémon that can be obtained on Master Ball:
    
    Aerodactyl, Alakazam, Ampharos, Arcanine, Blastoise, Blissey, Charizard,
    Cloyster, Crobat, Dodrio, Donphan, Electabuzz, Electrode, Espeon, Exeggutor,
    Feraligatr, Flareon, Gengar, Golduck, Golem, Gyarados, Heracross, Houndoom,
    Jolteon, Jynx, Kangashkhan, Kabutops, Kingdra, Lapras, Machamp, Magmar,
    Meganium, Miltank, Nidoking, Nidoqueen, Ninetales, Omastar, Pinsir, Politoed,
    Poliwrath, Porygon2, Primeape, Rapidash, Rhydon, Scizor, Scyther, Snorlax,
    Starmie, Steelix, Tauros, Tentacruel, Typhlosion, Umbreon, Ursaring, Vaporeon,
    Venusaur, Victreebel, Xatu
    
    III.IV.c MASTER BALL TRAINERS
    
    #1 Twins Jan&Jane
    STRATEGY: The twins are back, this time with Pokémon that are weak to
    Fire-type and Rock-type attacks. If you got an Aerodactyl, lead with it
    (you'll find Aero to be a nice addition to any team on Challenge Cup Master
    Ball); try an Electric-type if not. Back up with a Fire-type and a
    Rock-type Pokémon. Expect a switch or two, but nothing too complicated.
    
    #2 Schoolboy Oliver
    STRATEGY: Nothing has changed for Oliver since Great Ball. He still uses
    Ground-type and Rock-type Pokémon, and just to spice it up, he knows bring
    Steel-type Pokémon into the mix. Water-type, Ground-type, Grass-type and
    Fighting-type Pokémon are your best bet on this battle. If your Water-type
    Pokémon has a weak attack (such as Water Gun), try leading with a Pokémon that
    knows Rain Dance to set it up. Oliver loves using Sandstorm too, so Rain
    Dance helps A LOT.
    
    #3 Sailor Curt
    STRATEGY: He still uses mostly Water-type Pokémon, and throws in a random
    type just to annoy you. He doesn't have a solid strategy; he just attacks
    and attacks. Might switch once in a while when in type disadvantage. Lead off
    with an Electric-type, back up with a Grass-type, and bring a strong neutral
    type to balance things.
    
    #4 Swimmer(Female) Darcy
    STRATEGY: The Love Bug is back! She sticks with Normal-type Pokémon, and a
    couple of other types, but again, the basic attack is Attract. Same strategy
    as Great Ball works here; check out what gender are her Pokémon, and select
    your team accordingly. You can also lead with a genderless Pokémon to avoid
    infatuation. Back up with a Fighting-type, and any other heavy hitter.
    
    #5 Officer Gerald
    STRATEGY: Still has 3 Grass-type Pokémon, 3 Fire-types and that quirky Sunny
    Day. If you got an Aerodactyl, lead with it. If not, a Fire-type Pokémon
    should do. Back up with a Water-type or a Ground-type Pokémon, and a
    Flying-type or Poison-type. Try taking advantage of his Sunny Day, and if
    you can't attack Fire-type and Grass-type Pokémon, aim for the secondary
    type. ALWAYS!
    
    #6 Kimono Girl Emiko
    STRATEGY: Just like before, Emiko knows how to choose Pokémon and belts out
    a balanced team. Check out for Pokémon on her team with common weaknesses,
    or just bring out your most reliable Pokémon. She will switch Pokémon when in
    type disadvantage too, so be careful.
    
    #7 Scientist Roberto
    STRATEGY: Evasiveness is Roberto's game. Psychic, Dark and Ghost-type Pokémon
    are this Scientist's cup of tea, so you might wanna bring a Pokémon with
    Ghost-type and Dark-type attacks. Again, it is not hard to block Roberto's
    strategy, specially if you have Haze or Roar. Swift and specially Faint
    Attack are your best friends in this battle.
    
    #8 Gentleman Travis
    STRATEGY: Another balanced team. I think you should have an idea how
    to deal with those by now, huh? ;)
    
    *************************
    IV. CHALLENGE CUP ROUND 2
    *************************
    
    Once you have cleared all other Cups in Pokémon Stadium 2 (Prime Cup, Poké
    Cup, Petit Cup, Gym Leader Castle, Pokémon Academy and VS Rival), you'll
    unlock this game's hard mode, Round 2. You'll find that trainers have improved
    their strategies and have stronger Pokémon and movesets. This applies for
    all Cups, including the lovely Challenge Cup.
    
    **************
    IV.I POKÉ BALL
    **************
    
    IV.I.a SPECS
    
    Same as Round 1: Level 30 Pokémon only. Only low-stage evolutions, with the
    exception of Smeargle.
    
    IV.I.b POKÉMON AVAILABLE ON POKÉ BALL CHALLENGE CUP
    
    Same as Round 1:
    Bellsprout, Bulbasaur, Charmander, Chikorita, Cleffa, Cyndaquil, Diglett,
    Ditto, Dratini, Drowzee, Ekans, Exeggcute, Geodude, Goldeen, Grimer,
    Hoothoot, Hoppip, Horsea, Igglybuff, Jigglypuff, Krabby, Larvitar, Ledyba,
    Machop, Magnemite, Mareep, Marill, Nidoran(Female), Nidoran(Male), Oddish,
    Paras, Pichu, Pidgey, Pineco, Poliwag, Rattata, Remoraid, Sandshrew,
    Seel, Sentret, Shellder, Slowpoke, Slugma, Smeargle, Snubbull, Spearow,
    Spinarak, Squirtle, Sunkern, Swinub, Togepi, Totodile, Tyrogue, Venonat,
    Vulpix, Wooper, Zubat
    
    IV.I.c POKÉ BALL TRAINERS
    
    #1 Camper Marcus
    STRATEGY: Not much has changed since Round 1. Still has Ground, Rock and
    Fire-type Pokémon. Lead with a Water-type Pokémon with a decent Water-type
    attack to ease things up. Back up with a Grass-type (look out for Fire-types)
    and a Ground-type Pokémon.
    
    #2 Rocket Executive
    STRATEGY: A new face! But with old Pokémon, though. This guy carries the same
    Poison-type Pokémon the Grunt used to have, but now he uses Toxic to poison
    your Pokémon. Lead with a Poison or Steel-type Pokémon to avoid being
    poisoned and render most of his attacks useless. Safeguard and Substitute
    are great add-ons on this battle. Back up with a Psychic-type and
    a Ground-type Pokémon.
    
    #3 Picnicker Melissa
    STRATEGY: She still carries on with Pokémon that are weak mostly to
    Ice-type attacks. Namely, she brings Flying-type, Grass-type, Ground-type
    and sometimes a Water-type Pokémon. Lead with a Pokémon that knows a
    decent Ice-type attack, back up with a Pokémon that knows a Rock-type attack,
    and bring a powerhouse if you must. An Electric-type is a welcomed addition
    too.
    
    #4 Guitarist Daren
    STRATEGY: Still packs 3 Grass-type and 3 Electric-type Pokémon. His strategy
    is the same: Paralyze you with either Thunder Wave or Stun Spore (don't trust
    though, they sometimes have Body Slam). As before, leading with a Fire-type
    Pokémon guarantees you an easy start, as you can nail down 4 of his 6 Pokémon
    with a nice placed Fire-type attack. Back up with a Ground-type to block those
    annoying Electric-type attacks and bring a powerhouse to the blend. If Daren
    leads with a Pokémon that is not weak to Fire-type attacks, switch immediatly
    to your Ground-type Pokémon to block the incoming Electric-type attack. Switch
    between the Fire-type and Ground-type to avoid being paralyzed, and soon
    you'll get the FogBadge.
    
    #5 Fisherman Curtis
    STRATEGY: Does it surprise you that this guy keeps bringing Water-type
    Pokémon? He still has that ANNOYING Wooper, and still uses Rain Dance to stir
    things up. Take advantage of this by leading with a Water-type Pokémon (yeah,
    I know attacking a Water-type Pokémon with a Water-type move isn't effective,
    but when a STABed, Rain Dance influenced Hydro Pump connects, taking down at
    least 1/3 of your opponent's HP, who cares?), it helps if it has Attacks other
    than Water-type moves. Back up with an Electric-type or at least a Pokémon
    that knows an Electric-type move (this battle is Thunder users' playground),
    and bring a Grass-type Pokémon or at least a Pokémon that knows a Grass-type
    move. Remember to save the Grass-type Pokémon for the final Pokémon. You'll
    never know when that Woopers' gonna come out, and you don't wanna get caught
    with a Pichu as your last Pokémon. Other nice substitutes are Psychic-types
    with Psychic (duh!).
    
    #6 Medium Peggy
    STRATEGY: Psychic-type and Normal-type Pokémon roam Peggy's party. And they
    all use Swagger. Take advantage of this and whip out the powerhouses. Since
    there is not much to fight against Psychic-type Pokémon, try focusing on
    their secondary type instead (if available).
    
    #7 Rocket Executive
    STRATEGY: The Grunt has give way to this luscious Executive. She keeps the
    theme from past events, though: she has Normal-type Pokémon. If you got a
    Tyrogue, you should bring it out here. Watch out for some Flyers, though.
    Powerhouses like Psychic-type and Ground-type Pokémon are good too, just as
    long as they pack quite a punch.
    
    #8 Juggler Dwight
    STRATEGY: As in the previous round, Dwight brings a balanced team to deal with
    you in the final battle of Poké Ball Challenge Cup. Try to stablish a pattern
    on his Pokémon and bring out Pokémon that can cover most of his team types, or
    if you can't find any, just bring your most powerful Pokémon.
    
    ****************
    IV.II GREAT BALL
    ****************
    
    IV.II.a SPECS
    
    Same as Round 1: Level 45 Pokémon only. Some low-and-mid-level evolutions,
    final evolutions of "weaker" Pokémon such as Butterfree and Magcargo, some
    no-evolution Pokémon, such as Aipom and Wobbuffett.
    
    IV.II.b POKÉMON AVAILABLE ON GREAT BALL CHALLENGE CUP
    
    Same as Round 1:
    Abra, Aipom, Ariados, Azumarill, Bayleef, Beedrill, Butterfree, Chinchou,
    Clefairy, Corsola, Croconaw, Cubone, Delibird, Doduo, Dunsparce, Eevee,
    Elekid, Farfetch'd, Flaaffy, Gastly, Gloom, Graveler, Growlithe, Houndour,
    Ivysaur, Kabuto, Koffing, Ledian, Lickitung, Machoke, Magby, Magcargo,
    Mankey, Meowth, Natu, Nidorina, Nidorino, Omanyte, Onyx, Parasect, Phanpy,
    Pidgeotto, Pikachu, Poliwhirl, Porygon, Psyduck, Rhyhorn, Skiploom,
    Smoochum, Staryu, Teddiursa, Tentacool, Togetic, Voltorb, Wartortle,
    Weepinbell, Wobbuffett, Yanma
    
    IV.II.c GREAT BALL TRAINERS
    
    #1 Twins Jan&Jane
    STRATEGY: They still love Bug-type Pokémon, but they also bring along a few
    other types just to disbalance you. Electric-type, Rock-type and
    Psychic-type Pokémon are your best bet here. watch out if you pit a
    Rock-type against one of those bugs. Some of them might know Giga Drain or
    some other Grass-type move.
    
    #2 Schoolboy Oliver
    STRATEGY: Nothing new here. He keeps his Rock-type and Ground-type Pokémon
    plus Sandstorm with him. Just lead with a Water-type Pokémon, back up with
    a Grass-type, and any other heavy hitter (preferably of the Special kind).
    Just watch out for the occasional Magcargo.
    
    #3 Sailor Curt
    STRATEGY: Again, mostly Water-type Pokémon, plus a Flying-type Pokémon and
    the occasional Ice-type. Bring an Electric-type Pokémon, a Grass-type,
    and maybe another Water-type, preferably with an offensive, not
    Water-type move.
    
    #4 Swimmer(Female) Darcy
    STRATEGY: She mostly brings Normal-type Pokémon, but it's the fact that she
    uses Attract what you should be worried about. As in previous classes, see
    what gender are her Pokémon, and bring your Pokémon so that you have as much
    Pokémon as she has of the same gender, to avoid being Attracted. No gender
    Pokémon that can pack quite a punch (Staryu, for example) are great to lead
    with.
    
    #5 Officer Gerald
    STRATEGY: Not much has changed since Round 1. 3 Fire-type and 3 Grass-type
    Pokémon are what Jerry has to offer. Water-type Pokémon with Ice-type
    attacks are precious for this battle. Ground-type Pokémon and Fire-type
    Pokémon are great back-ups too. Just watch out for advantage switching,
    try to predict his switches and nail them right where it hurts. Also, keep
    an eye for Sunny Day. He likes to use it a lot.
    
    #6 Kimono Girl Emiko
    STRATEGY: Another balanced team. Same disclaimer as any other balanced team
    apply here.
    
    #7 Scientist Roberto
    STRATEGY: Dark-type, Psychic-type and Ghost-type Pokémon you will encounter
    here (again), and a Shadow Balling Pokémon isn't a bad idea to bring to the
    battle. Other suggestions include heavy-hitters, such as Ground-types or
    Water-types. Double Team is also a constant on Robbie's Pokémon, so a
    Pseudohazer (or the real thing) might be needed, but you can also strike
    fast and avoid the trouble.
    
    #8 Gentleman Travis
    STRATEGY: As you could possible have guessed from the two previous battles
    with this fella on Round 1, he has a balanced team, so the usual strategies
    against these kind of team are applicable here.
    
    *****************
    IV.III ULTRA BALL
    *****************
    
    IV.III.a SPECS
    
    Same as Round 1: Level 60 Pokémon. Mostly fully evolved forms, mid-level
    evolutions such as Quilava, no-evolution Pokémon such as Mr. Mime or Gligar,
    low-level evolutions of 'strong' Pokémon such as Ponyta. Challengers on this
    class are the same as Poké Ball; they have stronger Pokémon (according to
    the Ultra Ball specs), but most of the strategies don't change.
    
    IV.III.b POKÉMON AVAILABLE ON ULTRA BALL CHALLENGE CUP
    
    Same as Round 1:
    Arbok, Bellossom, Chansey, Charmeleon, Clefable, Dragonair, Dewgong, Dugtrio,
    Fearow, Forretress, Furret, Girafarig, Gligar, Golbat, Granbull, Haunter,
    Hitmonchan, Hitmonlee, Hitmontop, Hypno, Jumpluff, Kadabra, Kingler, Lanturn,
    Magneton, Mantine, Marowak, Misdreavus, Mr. Mime, Muk, Murkrow, Noctowl,
    Octillery, Persian, Pidgeot, Piloswine, Ponyta, Pupitar, Quagsire, Quilava,
    Qwilfish, Raichu, Raticate, Sandslash, Seadra, Seaking, Shuckle, Skarmory,
    Slowbro, Slowking, Sneasel, Stantler, Sudowoodo, Sunflora, Tangela, Venomoth,
    Vileplume, Weezing, Wigglytuff.
    
    IV.III.c ULTRA BALL TRAINERS
    
    #1 Camper Marcus
    STRATEGY: Ground-type and Fire-type Pokémon accompany this guy. Lead on with a
    Water-type, back up with a Ground-type and bring any other Pokémon that can
    cause some damage.
    
    #2 Rocket Executive
    STRATEGY: Not much has changed since the day of Poké Ball. Poison-type Pokémon
    still roam the team, but this time, he adds a couple of different types just
    to annoy you. Toxic remains as the main attack form from the Executive, and
    this time, he adds Protect to the mix :S Leading with a Poison-type or
    Steel-type Pokémon is great to avoid the nasty Toxic effects. You might want
    to back that up with a Psychic-type and a Ground-type Pokémon. Heavy hitters
    and Safeguarders are welcome too.
    
    #3 Picnicker Melissa
    STRATEGY: Most of Melissa's Pokémon this time are weak to Ice-type and
    Electric-type attacks, so you might wanna lead with a Pokémon that knows one
    of those kinds of attacks and that can actually use them. A
    Rock-Sliding/Ancientpower Pokémon is a nice back-up.
    
    #4 Guitarist Daren
    STRATEGY: Somewhat different from Poké Ball. He still has some Grass-type
    Pokémon, a few Electric-type Pokémon and some other types just to annoy you.
    The available Pokémon in Ultra Ball, plus the team theme make it for
    VERY ANNOYING dual types, such as Lanturn. Pokémon with Ground-type moves,
    Electric-types and Fire-type are needed in this battle, and swithcing is
    essential to avoid the most damage. He still has Thunder Wave and Stun Spore,
    so keep an eye for those.
    
    #5 Fisherman Curtis
    STRATEGY: Rain Dancing Water-type Pokémon. That's Curtis' line-up. And yes.
    He STILL has a Water/Ground type (namely Quagsire), so don't rely too much on
    your Electric-type. Bring a Grass-type Pokémon too, and try to save it for
    last (that damn Quagsire!), but be aware that some of Curtis' Pokémon have an
    Ice-type move.
    
    #6 Medium Peggy
    STRATEGY: Peggy still loves those Psychic-type and Ghost-type Pokémon, plus
    she brings one different type jsut to balance you out. A Pokémon with
    Ghost-type or Dark-type attacks works wonders here. Plus, she uses Swagger
    a lot. Try using this to your advantage (Safeguard, Miracle/Bitter Berry on
    a physical attacker, for example).
    
    #7 Rocket Executive
    STRATEGY: Same as R1, this gal has a handful of Normal-type Pokémon. A
    Fighting-type Pokémon is an obvious choice here, you might want to lead with
    that, but be careful, as she might bring a Flyer or two. Strong Pokémon such
    as Psychic-type and Rock-type Pokémon are welcome here too, as well as any
    heavy hitter.
    
    #8 Juggler Dwight.
    STRATEGY: You know the drill already. Do I have to type it again? =P
    
    *****************
    IV.IV MASTER BALL
    *****************
    
    IV.IV.a SPECS
    
    Same as Round 1: Level 75 Pokémon only. Fully evolved forms and no-evolution
    Pokémon such as Snorlax. Challengers on this class are the same as Great Ball;
    they have stronger Pokémon (according to the Master Ball specs), but most of
    the strategies don't change.
    
    IV.IV.b POKÉMON AVAILABLE ON MASTER BALL CHALLENGE CUP
    
    Same as Round 1:
    Aerodactyl, Alakazam, Ampharos, Arcanine, Blastoise, Blissey, Charizard,
    Cloyster, Crobat, Dodrio, Donphan, Electabuzz, Electrode, Espeon, Exeggutor,
    Feraligatr, Flareon, Gengar, Golduck, Golem, Gyarados, Heracross, Houndoom,
    Jolteon, Jynx, Kangashkhan, Kabutops, Kingdra, Lapras, Machamp, Magmar,
    Meganium, Miltank, Nidoking, Nidoqueen, Ninetales, Omastar, Pinsir, Politoed,
    Poliwrath, Porygon2, Primeape, Rapidash, Rhydon, Scizor, Scyther, Snorlax,
    Starmie, Steelix, Tauros, Tentacruel, Typhlosion, Umbreon, Ursaring, Vaporeon,
    Venusaur, Victreebel, Xatu
    
    IV.IV.c MASTER BALL TRAINERS
    
    #1 Twins Jan&Jane
    STRATEGY: They bring Pokémon that are weak to Rock-type and Fire-type attacks,
    as usual. An Aerodactyl with Wing Attack and Ancientpower works wonders here,
    but if you don't have one, a Ground/Rock-type with the same characteristics
    can do the job. Just be careful for the occasional Water-type they might
    bring, so back up with an Electric-type (that also works against Bug/Flying
    types). A Psychic-type Pokémon might come in handy too.
    
    #2 Schoolboy Oliver
    STRATEGY: Same as other encounters. He uses mostly Rock-type and Ground-type
    Pokémon, so lead with a Water-type Pokémoin, back up with a Ground-type
    Pokémon, Ice-type, Fighting-type and/or Grass-type Pokémon. Be careful,
    though; he brings the Nidos and Scizor sometimes, so watch out if you're
    carrying a Grass-type Pokémon.
    
    #3 Sailor Curt
    STRATEGY: He uses mostly Water-type and Ice-type Pokémon, and throws in a
    random type just to annoy you. Lead off with an Electric-type, back up with
    a Grass-type, and bring a strong neutral type to balance things. He might
    switch when in type disadvantage.
    
    #4 Swimmer(Female) Darcy
    STRATEGY: She keeps her Normal-type Pokémon, and a couple of other types,
    and that ever annoying Attract. Check out what gender are her Pokémon, and
    select your team accordingly. Genderless Pokémon are great to lead with,
    and you might wanna bring your most powerful Pokémon.
    
    #5 Officer Gerald
    STRATEGY: As you might have guessed it, Jerry STILL has 3 Grass-type Pokémon,
    3 Fire-types and Sunny Day. Aerodactyl, is the master choice to lead with,
    but a Fire-type does the trick too. Back up with a Water-type (preferably with
    an Ice-type attack, which will also be perfect for leading) or a Ground-type
    Pokémon, and a Flying-type or Poison-type Pokémon.
    
    #6 Kimono Girl Emiko
    STRATEGY: She has a balanced team. Just like before, check out for Pokémon on
    her team with common weaknesses, or just bring out your most reliable Pokémon.
    
    #7 Scientist Roberto
    STRATEGY:Roberto brings again Psychic, Dark and Ghost-type Pokémon, and they
    all LOVE to increase their evasiveness. You might wanna bring a Pokémon with
    Shadow Ball, or a nice Dark-type attack. Again, it is not hard to block
    Roberto's strategy, specially if you have Haze or Roar, or you also might
    wanna hit first and hit hard before any set up.
    
    #8 Gentleman Travis
    STRATEGY: Balanced team. You know the drill.
    
    There. All done.
    
    **********************************
    V. CREDITS AND CONTACT INFORMATION
    **********************************
    
    Very Special Thanks for the following people:
    
    - YOU, for taking the time to read all the way down here. I hope this guide
    helps you a lot.
    
    - GameFAQs, for hosting this guide.
    
    - Nintendo, Game Freak and Creatures, Inc., for making these absolutely
    fabulous series that is Pokémon.
    
    - All the guys at the GameFAQs' Pokémon Gold and Pokémon Stadium 2 Message
    Boards, for providing every day with new and amazing information on the
    Pokémon games. They know who they are; the vets, such as Donald (cmsnrub25),
    thepeoplesgamer, TheMightyMollusk and many, many more who have contributed
    to the Pokémon Gaming Community with their knowledge and experience.
    
    - Everyone reading this who think should be on this list ;P
    
    Well, I think that's it. If you have any question regarding this guide, or
    about Pokémon Stadium, I'd be glad to help you. You can contact me via email
    on the following address:
    
    jerryspc@yahoo.com

    FAQ Display Options: Printable Version