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    Xc (Morita Shogi)
     also known as Morita Kazuo no Shogi (Morita Kazuo's Shogi)
    
    FAQ
    NES 1987
    
    Version: 1.0
    
    
    Introduction (this section is courtesy of Devin Morgan)
    ===============================================================================
    
    Shogi () is a game very similar to what we call Chess. There are many
    similarities, but there are some noticeable differences as well. While chess
    is played on a 8x8 board, Shogi is played on a 9x9 board. In chess, there are
    16 pieces for each player; Shogi gives you 20. Gameplay is on a turn by turn
    basis; that is, after one player makes a move, the other one goes, and so on.
    There are two colors, white and black, with black always going first.
    
    
    Controls:
    ===============================================================================
    Use the A button to select a piece, the D-pad to move it and then A again to
    finalize your move. Pressing B cancels anything in mid-turn. B switches the
    cursor to the defeated pieces table when it is your turn, else it goes to the
    mini-menu on the right. You can still move between these two with the left and
    right button.
    
    Display:
    ===============================================================================
    When you play the game, the main feature to notice is the game board in the
    middle. Getting used to that is another matter, read the board basics section
    for that. What is more important for you to adapt to the game is the rest of
    the layout.
    
    At the top are two timers which display the time used for thinking by each
    player, the left being the white (top) player and the right for the black
    (bottom) player. The number on the top right is the current number of moves and
    the last move description. The small tables in the left and right right corner
    are for defeated pieces. The menu is always present on the right side, the
    board will never disappear but only reset etc.
    
    
    Modes:
    ===============================================================================
    At the main menu you have four choices:
    
    The first mode is to simply play a game of Shogi (΋). The left player's
    color will flash and you have four sub-options. The top is for a human player
    l and the other three are levels for a CPU opponent, 1 being the easier and
    3 being the hardest. You can select the same for the right player which means
    you can mix player vs player, CPU vs player, player vs CPU or CPU vs CPU and of
    course all at different CPU levels.
    During the game you have the option to resign (), interrupt (f) or
    change the players (΋ǎ).
    If you start a game in-progress it will ask if you want to reset the board or
    not. Say yes to do so but say no to continue the game.
    
    The second mode is Č which allows you to go back and forth through the moves
    of the currently in-game Shogi match. Use the arrows to advance or reverse
    moves either slowly or fast. The bottom option returns to the main menu from
    where you can also continue the game with the top choice. You can also use this
    mode to review moves, learn from the CPU or discuss the game with other people.
    
    The third mode is the for setting up your own board (Ֆ). Move around any
    units as you desire and end the move with the bottom option. The top choice
    resets the board to its original state. This mode is useful for learning how to
    play and giving the opponent a handicap by removing some pieces.
    
    The final option is an endgame mode called l. You start with just the
    opponent's king and you have to set up the board for a puzzle. Start it with
    the top option or return to the main menu with the lower one.
    
    
    Gameplay: (this section is courtesy of Devin Morgan)
    ===============================================================================
    
    Board Setup
    -----------
    
    The typical Shogi board is set up as follows, with each side's pieces facing
    towards the opponent to signify which pieces belong to which side:
    
     ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
    | L | KN| SG| GG| K | GG| SG| KN| L |    K = King ()
    |___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|    R = Rook ()
    |   | R |   |   |   |   |   | B |   |    B = Bishop (ps)
    |___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|   GG = Gold General ()
    | P | P | P | P | P | P | P | P | P |   SG = Silver General (⏫)
    |___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|   KN = Knight (jn)
    |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |    L = Lance ()
    |___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|    P = Pawn ()
    |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
    |___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|
    |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
    |___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|
    | P | P | P | P | P | P | P | P | P |
    |___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|
    |   | B |   |   |   |   |   | R |   |
    |___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|
    | L | KN| SG| GG| K | GG| SG| KN| L |
    |___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|___|
    
    
    Game Pieces/Movement
    --------------------
    
    NOTE: The "@" symbol in the diagrams below is meant to signify where the
          piece in question can make a valid movement in a turn. It should also
          be noted that in the diagrams below, "up" means forward, down is "back"
          and so on.
    
    
    King: This piece is the most important one in the game. You must protect it
          since if it gets trapped by enemy pieces, you lose. It can move one
          square in any direction per turn.
           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   | @ | @ | @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   | @ | K | @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   | @ | @ | @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
    
    
    Rook: You only get one of this piece, which is on the right side of the
          second row. It can move as far as it wants in the four directions (up,
          down, left, right).
           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
          |   |   | @ |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | @ |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          | @ | @ | R | @ | @ |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | @ |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | @ |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
    
    
    Bishop: Like the Rook, you only get one of these pieces as well, and it is on
            the left side of the second row. It can move as far as it wants in
            the four diagonal directions.
           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
          | @ |   |   |   | @ |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   | @ |   | @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | B |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   | @ |   | @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          | @ |   |   |   | @ |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
    
    
    Gold General: There are two of these pieces, starting on either side of the
                  King. Its movement is interesting, in that it can move one
                  square in each of the four directions, plus it can move in the
                  two forward diagonal directions, but it can NOT move diagonally
                  backwards.
           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   | @ | @ | @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   | @ | GG| @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | @ |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
    
    
    Silver General: Like the Gold General, you get two of these as well, and they
                    start next to each Gold General. The Silver General has even
                    more limited movement and a unique pattern, in that it can
                    move one square diagonally in four directions or directly
                    forward, but not directly to the sides or backwards.
           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   | @ | @ | @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | SG|   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   | @ |   | @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
    
    
    Knight: This piece is just like the piece of the same name in regular chess.
            You have two of them, starting next to each Silver General. It is the
            only piece that can pass over other pieces without capturing them. As
            for its movement, it can go forward two squares, then one square to
            either the left or right. It cannot move to the sides or backwards.
           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
          |   | @ |   | @ |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | KN|   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
    
    
    Lance: These are the final two pieces, which occupy the corner positions in
           the back row. The Lances are very limited, in that they can only move
           directly forward and that's it.
           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
          |   |   | @ |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | @ |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | L |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
    
    
    Pawn: You will get nine of these bottom-rank pieces, which occupy the entire
          third row. Pawns can only move forward one square per turn, that's it.
          Unlike regular Chess, Pawns can capture enemy pieces by moving forward;
          diagonal movement by this piece is not allowed.
           ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | @ |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   | P |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
          |   |   |   |   |   |
          |___|___|___|___|___|
    
    
    Promoting Pieces
    ----------------
    
    As in Chess, if you move any of your pieces to the opposite end of the board,
    they can be promoted. In Shogi, this does not only apply to Pawns; it can
    apply to every piece (except the King and Gold General). A piece is valid for
    promotion if you move it into the back three rows of the board (the three
    rows that the enemy pieces initially occupy). When you promote a piece, it
    gains more movement options, depending on the piece. Also, when you get to
    the opposing side's three rows and choose to promote the piece, you flip the
    piece over to reveal its new "name". These names will be listed below. Keep
    in mind though, that you don't have to promote a piece because you are in the
    three back rows.
    
    If the promoted piece is a Silver General, Knight, Lance, or Pawn, its
    upgraded movement will be that of a Gold General. If the piece you are
    promoting is a Rook or Bishop, it will retain its original range of movement,
    but it will be able to move like a King would as well.
    
    Original Name     Kanji     Promoted Name     Kanji
    -------------     -----     -------------     -----
    Rook                    Dragon            
    Bishop            ps      Horse             n
    Silver General    ⏫      Promoted Silver   
    Knight            jn      Promoted Knight   j
    Lance                   Promoted Lance    
    Pawn                    Tokin             Ƌ
    
    
    Capturing/Dropping Pieces
    -------------------------
    
    As in Chess, the objective in Shogi is ultimately to 'capture' the opposing
    player's King. Along the way, as you move your own pieces across the board,
    you can capture the opposing player's pieces by making a legal move onto the
    same square that an enemy piece is currently occupying. When you capture the
    enemy's piece, you put it on a side table known as a komadai (܂). You
    can 'drop' a captured piece onto the board, putting it under your control and
    thus increasing your active forces. This kind of gameplay can work in your
    favor (or against you, if the enemy does it) if done at the right times.
    
    
    ===============================================================================
    This guide is available for and to anyone who wishes to use the information on
    their site or in their own guide. Remember this was posted on GameFAQs first if
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