Neverwinter Nights
Character Creation Guide
by asimpkins00@hotmail.com
July 15th, 2003
Version 1.3


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  T A B L E   O F   C O N T E N T S
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0.01 Introduction

1.01 The Fighter
1.02 The Barbarian
1.03 The Ranger
1.04 The Paladin
1.05 The Monk
1.06 The Rogue
1.07 The Bard
1.08 The Cleric
1.09 The Druid
1.10 The Sorcerer
1.11 The Wizard

2.01 Attributes
2.02 Races
2.03 Skills
2.04 Feats
2.05 Combat Styles
2.06 Saving Throws
2.07 Cleric Domains
2.08 Familiars & Companions
2.09 Summoned Creatures
2.10 Shapeshifting
2.11 Weapons

3.01 Manual Corrections
3.02 Thanks


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  T H E   I N T R O D U C T I O N                                        0.01
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This is a general guide for building a character for Neverwinter Nights.  Its 
focus in on making your character as powerful as possible by fully 
understanding the rules and the possibilities of the system.  Power playing 
is not everything in this game though, and I realize that you can derive a lot 
of satisfaction from making a unique character for role-playing purposes.  I 
am not going to hand out creative advice though.  Having a character that is 
too weak to survive is not much fun, and that's what I hope this guide will 
help you to avoid.

This guide isn't an overview of the D&D rule system.  I do not talk about many 
of the complexities of combat and spellcasting.  I don't explain how 
multi-class experience penalties or counterspelling work, nor do I repeat many 
of the valuable charts found in the manual.  I don't take the time to explain 
many of the terms involved either.  When I felt it was helpful, I tried to 
explain things as clearly as possible, but I also expect the reader to have a 
basic knowledge of the game.  For more information on these subjects I'd 
recommend reading through the manual as well as Dan Simpson's guide at:

http://db.gamefaqs.com/computer/misc/file/3rd_edition_dungeons_and_dragons.txt

Spellcasters especially should take a look at my Spell Guide, which provides 
a complete list of detailed information for every spell in the game, as well 
as a few helpful organizational lists.  It can be found at:

http://db.gamefaqs.com/computer/doswin/file/neverwinter_nights_char_create.txt

Since this is a general guide, I could only go into a limited amount of detail 
about each class and the possibilities involved.  I leave more focused 
information to be covered by specific class guides. After you have decided on 
a build it would probably be worthwhile to take a look at them as well.

You'll notice that I started my guide with the classes.  I did this because I 
feel that the choice of a class is the most important choice made.  Your 
decisions on races and attributes will all be in response.  The class will 
largely determine your abilities and what kind of role you play in the game.  
I have started each class section with an introduction and then a discussion 
of general multi-classing possibilities.  After that I offer suggestions on 
race, attributes, skills, and feats that will work for the stereotypical 
build.  You should feel free to break from these suggestions if you are trying 
something much different.  I then offer a quick-look of the class's abilities, 
some more in-depth explanations when required, and I close with a few 
multi-classing suggestions.


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  T H E   F I G H T E R                                                  1.01
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- Introduction -
The Fighter is the most versatile melee class, as well as the most commonly 
useful multi-class option for nearly every other class.  This is due to the 
abundance of bonus combat feats he recieves at levels 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 
14, 16, 18, and 20 in addition to the normal character feats that everyone 
receives.  These feats can be used to become more skilled with a particular 
weapon, become a master archer, dual-wield, learn a variety of combat tactics, 
train in Exotic weapons, or even buff your Saving Throws and Hit Points.  A 
pure Fighter can do all of the above.  Fighters also receive a nearly full set 
of weapon and armor proficiencies -- matched only by the Paladin -- as well as 
a solid BAB, Hit Die, and access to the essential Discipline as a class skill.  
In addition, the Fighter is the only class that has access to the valuable 
Weapon Specialization, which gives him a strong edge in the damage output 
department.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
The Fighter is extremely well suited to multi-classing since he receives no 
special abilities at higher levels (except for more and more feats).  Unless 
you want nearly every feat available, it's a good idea to spend a few levels 
on something else.  Barbarians offer a movement boost, Barbarian Rage and 
Uncanny Dodge.  Two levels of Paladin provide immunities to disease and fear, 
as well as the ability to add your Charisma modifier to saving throws with 
Divine Grace.  Rogues offer a ton of skill points, Sneak Attack at 1st level, 
Evasion at 2nd level, and Uncanny Dodge at 3rd level.  Monks offer the 
Improved Unarmed Strike, Stunning Fist, and Cleave feats, as well as Evasion 
all at 1st level.  Some Fighters may even want to consider sacrificing some 
of their combat abilities to take a few levels of Wizards for various buffing 
spells -- but don't forget about Arcane Spell Failure!


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
The Fighter however, makes an even better minor multi-class.  Nearly every 
class in the game can benefit from taking a few levels of Fighter for extra 
feats, simple and martial weapon proficiencies, shield proficiency, and all 
armor proficiencies.  The Fighter class is also the only way to obtain the 
Weapon Specialization feat for your weapon of choice, and one of the few ways 
to train Discipline as a class skill.  For many classes the Fighter also 
offers extra HPs, an improved BAB, and possible extra attacks.  The Fighter 
is probably the most widely used minor multi-class.


- Race -
Half-Orcs are the only race to offer a boost to Strength, the primary 
attribute of most Fighters, making them immediately standout as an excellent 
choice.  The penalties to Intelligence and Charisma will mean very little to 
many Fighters, although 13 Intelligence is a requirement for a few useful 
feats.  Dwarves offer Fighter as their favored class, a boost to Constitution, 
a bonus to saving throws vs. spells, and some racial combat training against 
Orcs, Goblinoids, and Giants.  Humans are a decent choice for any class, but 
the bonus feat won't be as valuable for the already feat-loaded Fighter.  
Half-Elves and Elves offer some minor immunities but not much else.  Gnomes 
and Halflings are usually poor choices as they have Strength penalties and 
weapon limitations due to their small stature -- although the right build 
could make it work.


- Attributes -
The Fighter has an easy time setting up his attributes because he can usually 
ignore half of them.  Most Fighters will want to concentrate primarily on 
Strength, raising it as high as possible, as it will help them hit hard and 
often.  Constitution is next in priority in order to keep your Fighter alive 
through melee combat.  Dexterity is of minor importance to most Fighters as 
they will wear heavy armor and wield heavy weapons.  Full Plate allows a +1 
Dexterity bonus, so it can worth it to raise your Fighters Dexterity to at 
least 12 by some means.  Fighters more concerned with ranged weapons will want 
to allocate more points for Dexterity, and Fighters interested in 
dual-wielding will want to set their Dexterity to 15 to qualify for 
Ambidexterity.  Set it to at least 13 if you want access to the Dodge, 
Mobility, and Rapid Shot feats.

The mental attributes can be largely ignored.  Wisdom will only slightly 
affect your Will saving throws, and Charisma rarely affects anything at all.  
You may however, want to set your Intelligence to at least 13 to get access 
to the Disarm, Improved Disarm, Improved Knockdown, and Improved Parry feats.  
Otherwise, set it according to how many skills you need to max out.


- Skills -
Fighters do not heavily rely on their skills for survival.  Only Discipline is 
critical, and you should put points into it at every level.  Concentration can 
be useful to resist Taunt, which may or may not be a threat depending on what 
environment you are playing in.  A little bit of Lore skill can be useful early 
on for identifying items, and Heal can also come in handy if you have spare 
skill points.  Avoid Parry altogether unless you are making a character 
specifically built around that skill.


- Feats -
Fighters receive more feats than any other class, and have lots of options on 
how to spend them.  Almost all Fighters will want to get Weapon Focus, Weapon 
Specialization, and Improved Critical for their weapon of choice.  Some 
Fighters may even want to get the same package of feats for a second weapon 
as well.  Nearly every Fighter will also want to obtain Power Attack, Cleave, 
and Knockdown -- and Fighters with 13 Intelligence will definitely want to 
pick up Improved Knockdown, and maybe even Disarm and Improved Disarm.  Weapon 
Proficiency Exotic is an optional choice, as it allows you to use many useful 
weapons, but it's not completely necessary.  Dual-wielders will want to pick 
up Ambidexterity, Two-Weapon Fighting, and Improved Two-Weapon Fighting.  
Dexterity-based Fighters will want to look at Weapon Finesse, Dodge, Mobility, 
Point Blank Shot, and Rapid Shot.  At later levels, after all other essential 
feats have been chosen, feats like Toughness, Lightning Reflexes, Iron Will, 
and Great Fortitude can be valuable.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: d10
Base Attack Bonus: 100%
Armor Proficiencies: All armor and shields
Weapon Proficiencies: All simple and martial weapons.  No Exotic weapons.
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude.
Secondary Saving Throws: Reflex and Will.
Spellcasting: None.
Base Skill Points per Level: 2
Class Skills: Concentration, Discipline, Heal, Lore, Parry.
Special: Only class to offer access to Weapon Specialization.

1st Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
2nd Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
3rd Level -
4th Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
5th Level -
6th Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
7th Level -
8th Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
9th Level -
10th Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
11th Level -
12th Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
13th Level - 
14th Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
15th Level -
16th Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
17th Level -
18th Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.
19th Level -
20th Level - Bonus Fighter Feat.


- Fighter Feats -
The bonus Fighter feats must be chosen from a limited list of combat oriented 
feats which includes the following: Ambidexterity, Called Shot, Cleave, 
Deflect Arrows, Disarm, Dodge, Improved Critical, Improved Disarm, Improved 
Knockdown, Improved Parry, Improved Power Attack, Improved Two-Weapon 
Fighting, Improved Unarmed Strike, Knockdown, Mobility, Point Blank Shot, 
Power Attack, Rapid Shot, Stunning Fist, Two-Weapon Fighting, Weapon Finesse, 
Weapon Focus, and Weapon Specialization.


- Weapon Specialization -
Type: Fighter only 
Prerequisites: Four levels in Fighter, Weapon Focus with chosen weapon.
Required For: Nothing.

Weapon Specialization is only available as a Fighter -- although you don't 
need to use a "Fighter feat" in order to select it.  Many elect to multi-class 
to Fighter for four levels just to pick up this feat for their weapon of 
choice.  Weapon Specialization bestows a +2 damage bonus to any weapon you use 
of the selected weapon type.  Like Weapon Focus it can be selected repeatedly 
but for different weapons.


- 18/2 Fighter/Barbarian -
The basic idea of this build is that after a certain point, many Fighters will 
have accumulated all the feats that they need.  At this time, it's often 
useful to multi-class and pick up various class-based abilities instead of 
selecting feats that are really of no use to the Fighter.  There's no definite 
pattern to this build -- the 18/2 Fighter/Barbarian is just an example.  If 
you run out of feats earlier it could be 16/4 or even 12/8 instead.  For 
Lawful Good characters, a two level Paladin multi-class brings in some 
valuable benefits such as immunity to disease and fear as well as Divine 
Grace.


- 12/8 Fighter/Wizard -
This build suffers some heavy penalties to its melee abilities in order to 
cast a few levels of spells.  It's really not the most efficient build, but it 
can be a lot of fun to have such a wide range of abilities.  Make sure to set 
your Intelligence to 14 so that you can access four levels of Wizard spells.  
A lightly armored, high-Dexterity character is probably the easiest way to go 
in order to avoid arcane spell failure, but don't fully neglect Strength 
either.  This combination is also just enough to get you a 4th attack at 20th 
level.  A 9/11 Fighter/Wizard combination is also worth considering.  You lose 
the 4th attack at 20th level, but gain 6th level spells.  In addition, a few 
levels of Fighter could be swapped out for Barbarian or Paladin levels in 
order to access their class abilities instead of picking up surplus feats.


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  T H E   B A R B A R I A N                                              1.02
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- Introduction -
Where the Fighter is all about training, the Barbarian is all about natural 
abilities.  Barbarians will usually have more Hit Points than any other 
character, and at high levels they develop a natural damage reduction which 
will allow them to live even longer.  They are one of the few classes with 
Discipline and Taunt available as class skills -- and they get more skill 
points than Fighters or Paladins.  Except for Exotic, they receive all of the 
weapon proficiencies and shield proficiency, but they lack the ability to wear 
heavy armor.  As compensation, they share the Uncanny Dodge ability of the 
Rogue, allowing them to keep their Dexterity and Dodge AC bonus when surprised 
and also to avoid damage from traps.  Their primary ability though is their 
Barbarian Rage, which they can use one or more times per day to boost their 
Strength, Constitution, and Will saves for a slight loss to their Armor Class.  
However, with the +12 cap to attribute scores, Barbarian Rage can become 
obsolete later in the game when attribute enhancing equipment and spells are 
available.  On top of all this, Barbarians get a slight boost to their natural 
movement speed, making them faster than all other classes but the Monk.  The 
Barbarian is also possibly the simplest class to play, making it an ideal 
choice for a beginner.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
Since Barbarians get additional class abilities all the way up to level 20, 
it's not a bad idea to make a pure Barbarian.  However, it could also be 
useful to only reach 15th level to get the Greater Rage ability or 17th level 
to get the 3/- damage reduction and then take a few levels as another class.  
A few levels of Fighter can bring some extra feats, proficiency in heavy 
armor, and Weapon Specialization.  Rogues offer a ton of skill points, Sneak 
Attack at 1st level and Evasion at 2nd level.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
The Barbarian is a decent choice for a minor multi-class.  One level gives you 
a slightly increased movement speed and Barbarian Rage.  A second level gives 
you access to Uncanny Dodge, a highly valuable ability for Dexterity-based 
characters.  However, many characters will find it more beneficial to obtain 
Uncanny Dodge by taking three levels of Rogue instead.  The Barbarian also 
offers a route to Discipline and Taunt as well as the best means to boost your 
HPs.  You can also obtain many weapon, shield, and armor proficiencies but 
since the Barbarian lacks the Heavy Armor proficiency many players will choose 
to multi-class with the Fighter instead.


- Race -
Half-Orcs get a boost to Strength and have Barbarian as their favored class, 
making them the clear choice for most Barbarians.  Humans bring a bonus feat, 
extra skill points, and the ability to multi-class freely.  Dwarves bring some 
extra Constitution, bonuses to saving throws vs. spells, and some natural 
fighting abilities -- however, you'll be limited to multi-classing with Fighter 
if you want to avoid experience penalties.  Half-Elves and Elves offer some 
minor immunities but little else.  Gnomes and Halflings incur Strength 
penalties and are limited to smaller weapons, making them normally less ideal 
for Barbarians.


- Attributes -
Strength and Constitution are the foundation of most Barbarian characters.  
Strength to hit often and hard and Constitution to even further improve the 
Barbarian's ability to survive massive punishment.  Their Rage ability 
improves these attributes even further.  Dexterity is more of a consideration 
for Barbarians as they don't automatically gain the ability to wear heavy 
armor.  The inclusion of Uncanny Dodge as a class ability seems to indicate 
that most Barbarians are supposed to have a decent amount of Dexterity for an 
AC bonus.  It is probably most effective however to just pick up heavy armor 
proficiency as a feat or multi-class and just set your Dexterity to 12.  
Remember that you'll need a Dexterity score of 13 to access Dodge, Mobility, 
and Rapid Shot.  15 Dexterity is required for Ambidexterity.

Like the Fighter, the mental attributes are of minimal importance.  Wisdom 
slightly affects your Will saves.  Intelligence affects your skill points, and 
13 Intelligence will give you access to Disarm, Improved Disarm, Improved 
Knockdown, and Improved Parry.  Charisma offers very little to the Barbarian.


- Skills -
Barbarians should maximize their Discipline and Taunt skills.  Extra points 
could be spent on Lore to cheaply and easily identify items or on Heal to 
quickly restore HPs and cure other maladies.  Listen probably won't be too 
useful for most Barbarians, and Parry should be completely ignored.


- Feats -
Pure Barbarians only receive seven feats, or eight if they are human, and they 
must be selective in how they spend them.  Weapon Focus and Improved Critical 
for your primary weapon are solid choices.  Knockdown is also effective, and 
if you happen to have 13 Intelligence then get Improved Knockdown as well.  
Power Attack and Cleave are effective choices as well.  Some Barbarians might 
want to spend a feat on proficiencies in order to gain access to Exotic 
Weapons, or to wear Heavy armor if they don't plan on obtaining it through a 
multi-class.  Because of their limited number of feats, dual-wielding is often 
not feasible for the Barbarian, but a determined player can make it work.  
Make sure your Dexterity score is at least 15 and pick up Ambidexterity, 
Two-Weapon Fighting, and Improved Two-Weapon Fighting.  At later levels, a 
Barbarian may want to pick up Toughness to further increase their large number 
of HPs.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: d12
Base Attack Bonus: 100%
Armor Proficiencies: Light and medium armor and shields.  No heavy armor.
weapon Proficiencies: All simple and martial weapons.  No exotic weapons.
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude.
Secondary Saving Throws: Reflex and Will.
Spellcasting: None.
Base Skills Points per Level: 4
Class Skills: Discipline, Heal, Listen, Lore, Parry, Taunt.
Special: Cannot be Lawful in alignment.

1st Level - Fast Movement (10% increase to movement speed).
            Barbarian Rage once per day.
2nd Level - Uncanny Dodge (Retain DEX bonus to AC when flat-footed).
3rd Level -
4th Level - Barbarian Rage twice per day.
5th Level - Uncanny Dodge (+1 to Reflex saves to avoid traps).
6th Level -
7th Level -
8th Level - Barbarian Rage three times per day.
9th Level - 
10th Level - Uncanny Dodge (+2 to Reflex saves to avoid traps).
11th Level - 1/- natural damage reduction.
12th Level - Barbarian Rage four times per day.
13th Level - Uncanny Dodge (+3 to Reflex saves to avoid traps).
14th Level - 2/- natural damage reduction.
15th Level - Barbarian Rage becomes Greater Rage.
16th Level - Greater Rage five times per day.
             Uncanny Dodge (+4 to Reflex saves to avoid traps).
17th Level - 3/- natural damage reduction.
18th Level -
19th Level - Uncanny Dodge (+5 to Reflex saves to avoid traps).
20th Level - Greater Rage six times per day.
             4/- natural damage reduction.


- Rage -
Type: Barbarian only 
Prerequisites: Free at Barbarian 1st level.
Required For: Nothing.

The Barbarian's Rage adds +4 to Strength, +4 to Constitution, +2 to Will 
saving throws, and -2 to AC.  Remember that there is a +10 cap for bonuses to 
attribute scores.  At 15th level Greater Rage becomes available which adds +6 
to Strength, +6 to Constitution, +3 to Will saving throws, and -2 to AC.  Both 
forms of Rage last for three rounds plus the Constitution modifier.  Remember 
that there is a +12 cap to attribute enhancements, meaning that if your 
Strength or Constitution are already being affected by equipment or other 
enchantments, then some of the benefits of Rage may go to waste.


- 16/4 Barbarian/Fighter -
This is a very useful multi-class for Barbarians.  You still get most of the 
Barbarian abilities while making up for the Barbarian's major weaknesses -- a 
lack of feats and no Heavy armor proficiency.  Wearing heavy armor will let 
you set your Dexterity much lower, leaving more attribute points for Strength 
and Constitution.  The extra feats can be used to gather up many of the 
essential feats, or if your Dexterity is 15, you can use it to acquire all 
the necessary dual-wield feats.


- 17/2/1 Barbarian/Rogue/Fighter -
This multi-class allows you to pick up Evasion, a slight Sneak Attack, some 
extra skill points, Heavy armor proficiency and an extra feat.  By reaching 
Barbarian level 17 you'll still get the 3/- damage reduction.  There are 
actually a few variations you can do on this.  16/3/1 loses the improved 
damage reduction but improves your Sneak Attack and gives you more skills -- 
this build is prone to multi-classing experience penalties.  16/2/2 also 
sacrifices the improved damage reduction but gives you an additional feat 
instead.


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  T H E   R A N G E R                                                    1.03
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- Introduction -
The Ranger is a natural dual-wielder, obtaining all of the necessary feats for 
free.  Because their natural dual-wielding abilities limit them to light 
armor, Rangers are usually Dexterity-based which in turn makes them competent 
archers.  Rangers come with the widest assortment of class skills of the melee 
classes -- they share unique access to the Animal Empathy skill with the Druid 
and they have class skill access to the Rogue-like Search and Set Trap.  They 
receive bonuses to Hide and Move Silently skills in outdoor areas, and they 
can choose up to five racial groups as Favored Enemies in which they gain 
bonuses to Listen, Spot, Taunt, and damage.  They also receive four levels of 
healing and protection spells, an animal companion at 6th level, and a good 
Hit Die, BAB, and a relatively full set of proficiencies.  They do however, 
lack Heavy armor proficiency and access to Discipline as a class skill.  
Ultimately a well designed multi-class build can outperform the Ranger in 
pretty much every aspect, making the Ranger one of the lesser NWN classes.  
They are easy to use however, and have a fun set of abilities that will likely 
appeal to a beginner.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
Rangers receive special abilities all the way to 20th level.  In addition 
their animal companion constantly grows in strength and they receive extra 
spell slots, making a pure Ranger an effective character.  However, it is 
debatable how valuable many of these high level abilities are, making 
multi-classing your Ranger worthy of consideration.  Most Rangers will want 
to hit at least 9th level to complete their dual-wielding abilities, and then 
probably 10th level to get their 3rd favored enemy.  Rangers get very little 
after 15th level, which is another good cutoff point.  Like most classes, 
Rangers can benefit from a few levels of Fighter for the bonus feats, Heavy 
armor proficiency, Weapon Specialization, and a chance at training Discipline 
as a class skill.  Barbarians offer Rage, increased movement speed, Discipline 
and Taunt as class skills, and Uncanny Dodge which can be very valuable for 
the Dexterity-based Ranger.  Two levels of Paladin offer immunities to disease 
and fear, Discipline as a class skill, as well as the ability to add your 
Charisma modifier to saving throws with Divine Grace.  A few levels of Rogue 
also offers Uncanny Dodge, Evasion, a big boost to skills, and the ability to 
sneak attack which can compliment ranged attacks very well.  Monks offer the 
Improved Unarmed Strike, Stunning Fist, and Cleave feats, as well as Evasion 
all at 1st level.  If a Ranger is prepared to go without armor completely, the 
Ranger can also benefit from the Monk's ability to add their Wisdom modifier 
to their Armor Class.  Taking one level of Cleric for the Animal and Healing 
domains will increase the power of the Ranger's summons as well as his healing 
spells.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
Taking just a few levels of Ranger is usually a bad idea.  Trackless Step and 
one Favored Enemy are usually less valuable than what other classes can offer.  
The ability to dual-wield initially seems valuable, but for most classes it's 
not a prudent choice.  This is because the Ranger class doesn't actually offer 
Ambidexterity and Two-Weapon Fighting, but rather a similar feat that 
restricts the abilities to light armor.  In essence, this means that you can't 
use the Ranger abilities to qualify for Improved Two-Weapon Fighting later on 
-- which is crucial to the success of most dual-wielders -- nor can you 
dual-wield while in medium or heavy armor.  If you don't mind not maximizing 
your dual-wielding abilities however, the Ranger can be an excellent choice as 
a minor multi-class.


- Race -
Since most Rangers are Dexterity-based, the Elf stands out as an excellent 
choice with the +2 racial bonus to Dexterity.  The Elven bonuses to skills and 
keen senses ability are also useful.  However, you'll be severely restricted 
when it comes to multi-classing and lose -2 to your Constitution.  If those 
penalties bother you, a Human or Half-Elf are good choices.  If your Ranger is 
more Rogue-like than combat oriented or you plan to actually multi-class with 
Rogue, a Halfling can be an valuable choice.  A Dwarf or Half-Orc can also 
work as long as you plan on multi-classing with those race's favored classes.  
A Gnome offers very little to the Ranger class.


- Attributes -
Rangers are restricted to light armor to use their dual-wielding abilities, 
which creates a requirement for a high Dexterity score to make up for the 
armor deficiency.  Dexterity will likely be most Ranger's primary attribute.  
Strength can be neglected, but it's still nice to have an average score for 
damage bonuses.  Constitution is important for every character -- particularly 
those who will engage in melee combat.

Rangers have more need of their mental attributes than the other combat 
classes.  Their limited spellcasting is based on their Wisdom.  14 is a good 
Wisdom score, giving them access to all four levels of Ranger spells.  If you 
set it any lower, be prepared to lose out on some spells.  Rangers also have 
more class skills than most classes, making Intelligence a valuable asset.  A 
13 Intelligence is required for Disarm, Improved Disarm, Improved Knockdown, 
and Improved Parry.  Charisma is the least important attribute and should 
normally be ignored.


- Skills -
Rangers have to spend more consideration on their skills than the other 
warrior types.  Animal Empathy is a unique skill, shared only with the Druid, 
and a tempting choice.  However, you need to spend a lot of points in it 
before it becomes useful -- and even then, there may not be many opportunities 
to use it depending on your environment.  Search is a top choice to help 
locate traps, and only the Rogue also offers it as a class skill.  Hide and 
Move Silently can be raised together if you want to use your Ranger as a 
scout.  Listen and Spot can be valuable for similar reasons.  Some players 
will have a lot of fun with Set Trap, but don't waste points on it unless you 
are sure you will use it.  A few spare points could be dropped into Lore or 
Heal, and you should probably ignore Concentration and Parry.


- Feats -
Like most classes, you should try to get Weapon Focus and Improved Critical 
for whatever weapons you use the most.  Because of their dual-wielding and 
ranged abilities, Rangers may also pick up these feats more than once for 
different weapons.  Many Rangers have more Dexterity than Strength, and for 
that reason should consider picking up Weapon Finesse right away and using 
weapons that are light enough to work with it.  Dodge, Mobility, Point Blank 
Shot, and Rapid Shot will all benefit the dexterous archer-type Ranger.  
Useful combat feats like Power Attack, Cleave, and Knockdown make good 
choices, and maybe even perhaps a metamagic feat like Extend Spell, Empower 
Spell, or Maximize Spell to increase the effectiveness of the Ranger's buffing 
spells.


- Spellcasting -
The Ranger possesses Divine spellcasting that is based off of his Wisdom.  
Once he reaches the required level and possess an adequate Wisdom score, he 
automatically receives access to every spell for that level.  He must, 
however, prepare his spells for use.  This entails selecting in advance which 
spells he believes will be most useful for him, as well as how many times he 
will want each of them to available before he rests again.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: d10
Base Attack Bonus: 100%
Armor Proficiencies: Light and medium armor and shields.  No heavy armor.
Weapon Proficiencies: All simple and martial weapons.  No exotic weapons.
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude.
Secondary Saving Throws: Reflex and Will.
Spellcasting: Divine, Wisdom-based.
Base Skill Points per Level: 4
Class Skills: Animal Empathy, Concentration, Heal, Hide, Listen, Lore, Move 
  Silently, Parry, Search, Set Trap, Spot.

1st Level - Dual-Wield (no penalties when wearing light armor.)
            Trackless Step (+4 to Hide and Move Silently in wilderness areas).
            1st Favored Enemy (+1 to Listen, Spot, Taunt, and damage).
2nd Level -
3rd Level -
4th Level - 1st level spells become available.
5th Level - 2nd Favored Enemy (+2 to Listen, Spot, Taunt, and damage).
6th Level - Animal Companion.
7th Level -
8th Level - 2nd level spells become available.
9th Level - Improved Two-Weapon Fighting
10th Level - 3rd Favored Enemy (+3 to Listen, Spot, Taunt, and damage).
11th Level - 3rd level spells become available.
12th Level
13th Level
14th Level - 4th level spells become available.
15th Level - 4th Favored Enemy (+4 to Listen, Spot, Taunt, and damage).
16th Level -
17th Level -
18th Level -
19th Level -
20th Level - 5th Favored Enemy (+5 to Listen, Spot, Taunt, and damage).


- 10/10 Ranger/Rogue -
This build plays off the similar abilities of the Ranger and the Rogue.  They 
both normally wear light armor and have a decent amount of Dexterity, as well 
as sharing a few key skills.  The 10 levels of Ranger are enough to get you all 
the dual-wielding abilities, 2 levels of spells, and a 3rd favored enemy.  The 
Rogue levels bring the valuable Sneak Attack, Uncanny Dodge, and Evasion 
abilities, as well as a major boost to skills.  In addition, at 10th level the 
Rogue can choose a special Rogue bonus feat.  Remember that only taking 10 
levels of Ranger will serious crippled the abilities of your animal companion.

This build should usually focus on lots of Dexterity.  This character will 
make a decent archer, particularly with the Rogue's Sneak Attack damage.  
Wisdom should be limited to 12, since you'll only gain two levels of spells 
anyway.  Weapon Finesse will be a must to take advantage of the high Dexterity, 
and you should consider wielding the same weapon in both hands -- Shortswords, 
Daggers, or Kukris.  Pick up Point Blank Shot, Rapid Shot, Dodge, Mobility, 
Weapon Focus, and Improved Critical for your Longbow to maximize your archer 
abilities.  Weapon Focus and Improved Critical for your melee weapons is not 
a bad idea either.


- 15/3/2 Ranger/Rogue/Fighter -
This build lets you more fully develop your Ranger abilities.  You'll get all 
the way to your 4th Favored Enemy and you'll acquire all four levels of Ranger 
spells.  The two Fighter levels will offer some bonus feats and the 
opportunity to train Discipline as a class skill.  The Rogue levels will get 
you a small Sneak Attack and extra skills, but even more importantly you'll 
get Uncanny Dodge and Evasion.


- 11/5/4 Ranger/Rogue/Fighter -
This build cuts back your Ranger abilities and more fully developes your Rogue 
and Fighter skills.  You'll no longer get your 4th Favored Enemy and your 
spells will be somewhat cut back -- although you'll still reach your level 3 
spells.  In exchange you'll get a better Sneak Attack and many more skill 
points, as well as an additional bonus combat feat from your 4th Fighter 
level which could be used for Weapon Specialization.


- 16/2/2 Ranger/Fighter/Barbarian -
This build also lets you pick up Uncanny Dodge, but without the slight penalty 
to your BAB and HPs.  You'll also get Barbarian Rage and a small improvement 
to your movement speed, but you'll lose the Rogue's Evasion, extra skills, and 
a slight Sneak Attack ability.  If you aren't interested in the Barbarian's 
abilities, this build could be easily modified to a 16/4 Ranger/Fighter to 
pick up an extra combat feat (Weapon Specialization) instead.  Or if you have 
a Lawful Good alignment you could make a 15/3/2 Ranger/Paladin/Fighterand pick 
up immunity to disease and fear, Divine Grace, and the ability to remove 
disease once per day.


|=============================================================================|
  T H E   P A L A D I N                                                  1.04
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
The Paladin comes with a handful of class abilities designed to hunt down all 
that is evil and undead.  This includes natural immunities to disease and 
fear, as well as excellent bonuses to his saving throws.  He can heal and 
remove disease from his companions, unleash devastating attacks against 
evil-aligned creatures, turn undead like the Cleric, and cast a small number 
of protection spells.  The Paladin gains most of his special abilities early, 
yet they increase in power all the way to 20th level.  Like the Barbarian, he 
receives Taunt and Discipline as a class skill.  He gets a near full set of 
proficiencies like the Fighter, as well as a solid HD and excellent BAB 
growth.  The Paladin is a very specialized class, which means that he is very 
powerful when fighting certain types of enemies, but rather weak when fighting 
others.  You should consider this when thinking of choosing a Paladin.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
While the Paladin gains nearly all of his abilities (except spells) by 3rd 
level, most of his abilities are based on Paladin level which makes it 
reasonable to pursue the path of the Paladin all the way to 20th level.  
However, losing a few levels of Paladin won't hurt much -- at least not 
compared to what you can gain.  The Fighter class probably offers the most 
by helping you quickly accumulate your desired feats and gain Weapon 
Specialization in your weapon of choice.  Rogues bring their skills, sneak 
attacks, Uncanny Dodge, and Evasion.  Taking one level of Cleric for the two 
Cleric domains can greatly improve your turning ability.  You can increase 
it's scope to cover elementals, outsiders, constructs, or vermin.  You can 
also choose the Sun domain and increase it's strength.  Monks offer the 
Improved Unarmed Strike, Stunning Fist, and Cleave feats, as well as Evasion 
all at 1st level.  If a Paladin is prepared to go without armor completely, 
the Paladin can also benefit from the Monk's ability to add their Wisdom 
modifier to their AC.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
The Paladin isn't a great choice as a minor multi-class for most characters.  
The immunities to disease and fear can be useful to most any character, but 
there are usually more practical ways to go about obtaining them, as well as 
more lucrative options from other classes (usually taking Fighter levels for 
more bonus feats).  The rest of the Paladin abilities are based on level and 
will be too weak to be of much use.  High Charisma characters (usually 
Sorcerers or Clerics) however, should strongly consider taking just one 
Paladin level to get Divine Grace.  With a high Charisma modifier you will get 
valuable bonuses to all of your saving throws, making your character 
invulnerable to practically everything.  Remember that even a character with 
low or average Charisma can boost it with equipment, potions, or spells.


- Races -
Humans usually make the best Paladins.  The extra feat and skill point can be 
very valuable to any Paladin character.  Half-Elves are a decent second choice.  
Elves offer very little for the -2 to Constitution.  Dwarves and Half-Orcs 
bring a penalty to Charisma, which is one of the primary Paladin attributes.  
Halflings and Gnomes are too small to be the mighty warriors that most 
Paladins must be as they lose -2 to Strength and are limited to smaller 
weapons.


- Attributes -
Paladins are ideally suited for wearing heavy armor and wielding heavy weapons 
with a high Strength score.  Dexterity should be raised no higher than 12, and 
will probably need to be left much lower.  Constitution is important for the 
Paladin, as it is with any character that heavily engages in melee combat.

The Paladin will need a Wisdom score of 14 to access all of his spells, but 
there is little reason to set it any higher.  If you set it lower, be prepared 
to lose some spells.  Charisma is the basis of many of the Paladin class 
abilities -- Divine Grace, Lay On Hands, Smite Evil, and Turn Undead -- and 
should be set relatively high.  Intelligence is of less importance as the 
Paladin doesn't rely heavily on his skills.  However, a score of 13 is 
required if you want to acquire Disarm, Improved Disarm, or Improved Parry 
-- but due to the Paladin's thin point spread this is usually not possible.


- Skills -
Paladins usually don't have many skill points to work with.  Discipline is an 
essential skill and should be selected first.  Taunt can be a very valuable 
combat aid, and Concentration can be taken to protect yourself from Taunt as 
well as spell failure during combat.  If you play in environments that are 
designed for it, Persuade can be very valuable, otherwise it's completely 
useless.  You likely won't have many extra points for Lore or Heal, and you 
definitely shouldn't waste any on Parry.


- Spellcasting -
The Paladin possesses Divine spellcasting that is based off of his Wisdom.  
Once he reaches the required level and possess an adequate Wisdom score, he 
automatically receives access to every spell for that level.  He must, 
however, prepare his spells for use.  This entails selecting in advance which 
spells he believes will be most useful for him, as well as how many times he 
will want each of them to available before he rests again.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: d10
Base Attack Bonus: 100%
Armor Proficiencies: All armor and shields.
Weapon Proficiencies: All simple and martial weapons.  No exotic weapons.
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude.
Secondary Saving Throws: Reflex and Will.
Spellcasting: Divine, Wisdom-based.
Base Skill Points per Level: 2
Class Skills: Concentration, Discipline, Heal, Lore, Parry, Persuade, Taunt.
Special: Paladins must be Lawful Good.

1st Level - Divine Grace (CHA modifier is applied to all saving throws).
            Divine Health (immune to disease).
            Lay On Hands
2nd Level - Aura of Courage (immune to fear).
            Smite Evil
3rd Level - Turn Undead.
            Remove Disease once per day.
4th Level - 1st level spells become available.
5th Level -
6th Level -
7th Level -
8th Level - 2nd level spells become available.
9th Level -
10th Level -
11th Level - 3rd level spells become available.
12th Level -
13th Level -
14th Level - 4th level spells become available.
15th Level -
16th Level -
17th Level -
18th Level -
19th Level -
20th Level -


- Lay On Hands -
Type: Paladin only
Prerequisites: Free at Paladin 1st level.
Required For: Nothing.

Once per day a Paladin can heal [CHA modifier x Paladin class level] HPs for 
himself or others.  Like other healing abilities, Lay On Hands can be used to 
damage the undead.


- Smite Evil -
Type: Paladin only
Prerequisites: Free at Paladin 2nd level.
Required For: Nothing.

Once per day a Paladin can execute a special attack against an evil opponent.  
As long as the target is evil, the Paladin applies his Charisma modifier to 
his attack roll, and if he hits he applies his Paladin level in the form of 
bonus damage.


- Turn Undead -
Paladins use their turning abilities like Clerics, except that their level is 
reduced by two.  So a 3rd level Paladin would turn as a 1st level Cleric.  See 
the Cleric section for more details on Turn Undead.


- Extra Turning -
Type: Cleric and Paladin only
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

If this is chosen as a feat selection, the Paladin will be able to Turn Undead 
an additional six times per day.  The average Paladin will be able to perform 
Turn Undead over three times per day, which is usually enough -- especially 
considering how easy it is to rest in most modules.  If you want to be a 
particularly effective undead hunter or find yourself playing in a module full 
of undead with severe resting restrictions, then this feat is for you.


- 16/4 or 18/2 Paladin/Fighter -
The basic idea behind either of these builds is to slightly weaken a few of 
the Paladin's abilities -- Lay on Hands, Smite Evil, and Turn Undead -- for 
much needed bonus feats.  If you take four levels of Fighter you have the 
opportunity to pick up Weapon Specialization.


- 17/2/1 Paladin/Fighter/Cleric -
This build incorporates a Cleric level in order to gain powers from the Cleric 
Domains.  This build is ideal for a Paladin that heavily relies on his Turn 
Undead ability, or just feels that he will be facing lots of undead and wants 
to be especially prepared.  The Sun Domain is very valuable in providing an 
immediate boost to the Paladin's turning power.  Other Domain choices can be 
used to increase the scope of the Turn Undead ability.  The Healing Domain 
will increase the power of the Paladin's Cure Light Wounds and Cure Serious 
Wounds spells, which can also be used offensively against the undead.  The 
Fighter levels provide a few feats, but don't weaken your Paladin abilities if 
you don't need them.


- 17/2/1 Paladin/Fighter/Monk -
The Monk level gets you Cleave for free which would normally require that you 
spend two feats to obtain Power Attack and Cleave.  That alone makes it as 
valuable as a level in Fighter.  In addition, you'll pick up Evasion, which 
when coupled with Divine Grace can offer serious protection to the Paladin 
from magical attack.  The Fighter levels provide the usual feats, if you have 
a need for them.


- 18/1/1 Paladin/Monk/Cleric -
This is just an obvious hybrid of the two previous builds.  Forget about the 
Fighter levels completely and pick up Cleave, Evasion, and the power of two 
Cleric Domains.


|=============================================================================|
  T H E   M O N K                                                        1.05
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
The Monk is an interesting melee class.  A Monk receives no armor or shield 
proficiencies, but he gains natural AC bonuses as he rises in level.  He can 
also draw on his Wisdom for an additional AC boost, sometimes allowing him to 
reach higher AC scores than any other class.  A Monk receives very few weapon 
proficiencies, but his bare fists will evolve to be the most powerful weapons 
in the game.  A Monk has the lowest Hit Die of all the melee classes, but 
excels in all three types of saving throws, gains immunity to disease, poison, 
and mind-affecting spells, as well as a natural spell resistance and damage 
reduction.  A Monk has a lower Base Attack Bonus than the other melee classes, 
but he gains his extra attacks at a faster rate -- usually ending up with more 
attacks than his contemporaries.  The Monk receives a good number of combat 
feats for free, as well as many Monk-specific abilities.  To top it all off, 
the Monk is the fastest class in the game, eventually acquiring a 50% movement 
speed increase.  The Monk, however, does lack Discipline as a class skill, 
which is probably one of his biggest weaknesses.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
The Monk should usually not be multi-classed.  The Monk gains special 
abilities all the way to 20th level, and many of the Monk abilities don't work 
well with other classes.  For instance, many abilities go away while wearing 
armor or wielding weapons.  The Monk's natural spell resistance and ability to 
heal himself is based on Monk level.  You'll want to take your Monk to at 
least 16th level to get the highest damage rating for your fists.  The best 
multi-classes for a Monk are probably the Fighter and the Rogue.  The Fighter 
allows the Monk to pick up some possibly needed feats or Weapon Specialization 
for their unarmed attack as well as the chance to train Discipline as a class 
skill.  In addition, four levels of Fighter will provide the Monk with an 
extra attack at 20th level.  The Rogue offers some skills, Sneak Attack, and 
Uncanny Dodge -- which could be very valuable to the unarmored Monk.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
Many classes can gain some valuable advantages from taking just one level of 
Monk.  Immediately you receive Cleave, one of the best combat feats in the 
game, which otherwise requires you to spend a feat on the only semi-useful 
Power Attack first.  You also receive Improved Unarmed Strike, Stunning Fist, 
Flurry of Blows, and an improved damage rating for your fists.  Granted, most 
characters will be armed and unable to take advantage of these abilities, but 
they could be useful if you find yourself disarmed.  You also receive the 
highly valuable Evasion allowing you to escape many highly damaging spells, 
but only if you can make your Reflex save first.  Any characters with a decent 
Wisdom score who finds themselves going unarmored can also take advantage of 
the Monk's ability to apply their Wisdom modifier to their Armor Class.

Shape-shifting characters, particularly the Druid, can also benefit from one 
level of Monk.  While in their altered form characters become unarmed and 
unarmored, making them ideally suited for the Monk's set of abilities.


- Races -
Humans offer the Monk class a useful bonus feat, some extra skill points, and 
no real disadvantages.  Half-Orcs and Dwarves both bring some great racial 
attribute bonuses, and the mental attribute penalties will mean little to the 
Monk.  Elves are a great choice for Dexterity-based Monks.  Besides the boost 
in Dexterity, an Elf bring proficiencies in the shortbow and longbow, immunity 
to sleep, and useful keen senses.  The penalty to Constitution is a drawback 
though.  Half-Elves offer rather little besides the immunity to sleep and no 
real penalties.  Gnomes and Halflings usually make poor Monks because their 
small stature greatly reduces the damage of their unarmed attack.


- Attributes -
The crucial decision when designing a Monk is whether to focus on Strength or 
Dexterity.  Monks have a lower BAB than most other melee characters and thus 
need to have their melee attribute as high as possible in order to hit their 
opponents.  A Strength-based Monk will do more damage, carry more, and will 
not need any extra feats to be effective.  A Dexterity-based Monk will need to 
take Weapon Finesse, but will have a higher AC and Reflex save, as well as the 
ability to use ranged weapons accurately.  Because Monks are restricted from 
wearing armor and need an AC boost from wherever they can get it, I think the 
Dexterity build is usually the best option.  Whatever you choose, don't 
neglect the other attribute too much.  Monks have a lower HD than the other 
melee classes, and can therefore benefit from a decent Constitution score.

Monks need to have decent scores in several attributes, and that usually means 
that Intelligence and Charisma must be heavily neglected.  Wisdom requires a 
bit more thought.  The Wisdom modifier is applied to a Monk's Armor Class and 
it is used to make the Stunning Fist and Quivering Palm abilities more 
difficult to resist.  For these reasons, it's useful to have a decent Wisdom 
score, but other attributes are ultimately more useful.  A score of 14 is 
usually sufficient.


- Skills -
None of the Monk skills stand out as completely necessary.  If you are in an 
environment where you'll have the Taunt skill used on you then you should 
definitely spend your points on Concentration.  Persuade should also be 
pursued -- but only if your environment is designed for it.  Raising both Hide 
and Move Silently can add an element of stealth to your Monk, allowing him to 
scout out situation first and sneak into a favorable attack position.  Heal 
can be useful for patching your Monk up during and after combat, and a little 
bit of Lore can help you identify items early in the game.  Listen and Parry 
should probably be avoided.


- Feats -
All Monks should get Weapon Focus and Improved Critical for their unarmed 
attacks, and possibly for the Kama.  Weapon Finesse is essential for the 
Dexterity-based Monk.  Monks receive many of the best combat feats -- Cleave, 
Knockdown, and Improved Knockdown -- for free and therefore have some extra 
feats to spend elsewhere.  Monks that use ranged attacks may want to pick up 
Point Blank Shot and Rapid Shot.  You could also pick up the dual-wielding 
feats -- Ambidexterity, Two-Weapon Fighting, and Improved Two-Weapon Fighting 
-- and use them with twin Kamas.  (Dual-wielding does not work with the 
unarmed fighting style).  Most Monks will benefit from Dodge and Mobility, as 
well as Toughness to boost their relatively lower number of HPs.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: d8
Base Attack Bonus: 75%
Armor Proficiencies: None.
Weapon Proficiencies: Club, Dagger, Handaxe, Light Crossbow, Heavy Crossbow, 
  Quarterstaff, Shuriken, Kama, and Sling.
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude, Reflex, and Will.
Secondary Saving Throws: None.
Spellcasting: None.
Base Skill Points per Level: 4
Class Skills: Concentration, Heal, Hide, Listen, Lore, Move Silently, Parry, 
  Persuade.
Special: Must be Lawful in alignment.

1st Level - Improved Unarmed Strike, Stunning Fist, and Cleave.
            Specialty Weapon.
            Flurry Of Blows.
            Evasion.
            Monk AC bonus (WIS modifier applied to AC).
            Unarmed Damage (1d6/1d4).
2nd Level - Deflect Arrows.  
3rd Level - 10% increase to movement speed.
            Still Mind (+2 to save vs. mind-affecting spells).
4th Level - Unarmed Damage (1d8/1d6).
5th Level - Purity of Body (immune to disease).
            +1 bonus to Armor Class.
6th Level - Knockdown & Improved Knockdown.
            20% increase to movement speed.
7th Level - Wholeness of Body.
8th Level - Unarmed Damage (1d10/1d8)
9th Level - Improved Evasion.
            30% increase to movement speed.
10th Level - Ki Strike (fists act with a +1 enhancement bonus).
             +2 bonus to Armor Class.
11th Level - Diamond Body (immunity to poison).
12th Level - Diamond Soul (spell resistance = class level + 10).
             Unarmed Damage (1d12/1d10).
             40% increase to movement speed.
13th Level - Ki Strike (fists act with a +2 enhancement bonus).
14th Level - 
15th Level - Quivering Palm.
             +3 bonus to Armor Class.
             45% increase to movement speed.
16th Level - Unarmed Damage (1d20/2d6).
             Ki Strike (fists act with a +3 enhancement bonus).
17th Level - 
18th Level - Empty Body (50% concealment twice per day).
             50% increase to movement speed.
19th Level - 
20th Level - Perfect Self (immune to mind-affecting spells; 20/+1).
             +4 bonus to Armor Class.


- Specialty Weapon -
Type: Monk only
Prerequisites: Free at Monk 1st level.
Required For: Nothing.

This ability allows the Monk to use his special unarmed attack bonus when 
fighting with a Kama.  This can be useful in the beginning of the game, 
however your fists will soon become more powerful than any Kama you can find.  
Another thing to consider is that you can dual-wield Kamas and gain extra 
attacks, but you cannot dual-wield unarmed.


- Flurry of Blows -
Type: Monk only
Prerequisites: Free at Monk 1st level.
Required For: Nothing.

When the Monk activates Flurry of Blows he gains an extra attack when fighting 
unarmed or with a Kama, yet he suffers -2 to all of his attacks.  This is 
usually worth it, but if you find yourself having a hard time hitting a 
heavily defended opponent then you should switch it off.


- Evasion -
Type: Monk and Rogue only
Prerequisites: Free at Monk 1st level or Rogue 2nd level.
Required For: Nothing.

This ability allows Monks to avoid all damage when they make a successful 
Reflex saving throw against a spell that would normally only allow half damage 
for a Reflex save.  Since Monks usually have high Reflex saves, this is a 
primary ability in the Monk arsenal.


- Wholeness of Body -
Type: Monk only
Prerequisites: Free at Monk 1st level.
Required For: Nothing.

This allows the Monk to restore a number of HP equal to twice class level once 
per day.


- Improved Evasion -
Type: Rogue and Monk only
Prerequisites: Available at Rogue levels 10, 13, 16, 19; free at Monk 9th level.
Required For: Nothing.

This excellent feat allows you to take no damage when a successful Reflex save 
would have causes you to take half damage, and half damage even if you fail.


- Quivering Palm -
Type: Monk only
Prerequisites: Free at Monk 15th level.
Required For: Nothing.

The Monk can use this ability once per day to attempt to instantly kill an 
opponent.  If the attack connects and does damage, the target must make a 
Fortitude save against [10 + 1/2 Monk level + Wisdom modifier] or die.  Due 
to the Fortitude save, this ability works best against Arcane spellcasters 
like Wizards and Sorcerers, as well as Rogues and Bards.


- 16/4 Monk/Fighter -
Most Monks will be happy taking all 20 levels as a Monk, however there are a 
few things that multi-classing can offer.  If you are will to give up a slight 
boost to movement speed, an extra +1 to AC, immunity to mind-affecting spells, 
20/+1 damage reduction, 50% concealment twice per day, and an increase to your 
natural spell resistance and healing abilities then you have a few things you 
can gain from the Fighter class.  Four levels as Fighter will get you three 
bonus feats, a chance for Weapon Specialization for your unarmed attacks, and 
a chance to train the valuable Discipline as a class skill.  In addition, 
you'll receive a 6th attack at 20th level due to the Fighter's improved BAB 
growth.  As an alternate build, you could drop two levels of Fighter for two 
levels of Paladin and pick up Divine Grace and immunity to fear.


- 18/2 Monk/Fighter -
This is a variation on the previous build.  You get the 50% concealment and 
movement speed increase back, as well as better spell resistance and 
self-healing.  But you lose the 6th attack and only receive two bonus feats 
instead of three.  You also lose the change to pick up Weapon Specialization.


- 17/3 Monk/Rogue -
This build sacrifices the later Monk abilities in order to receive a small 
Sneak Attack, Uncanny Dodge, and a boost to skills.  Since Monks cannot rely 
on armor for their AC, Uncanny Dodge is a valuable way to retain a large 
portion of their AC when caught flat-footed.  One level of Fighter can also 
chosen to be taken instead of a 17th Monk level in order to pick up Weapon 
Specialization and to train in Discipline, however, it can cause problems with 
multi-classing experience penalties.


|=============================================================================|
  T H E   R O G U E                                                      1.06
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
The emphasis of the Rogue is on skills -- skills which are necessary for 
nearly every expedition.  They'll have at least twice as many skill points as 
any other class (often 4x as many).  To go with the large number of skill 
points they have the longest list of class skills, many of which are only 
available as class skills for the Rogue.  No other class has access to Open 
Lock and Disable Traps as a class skill.  Only the Ranger shares Spot, Set 
Trap, and Search as a class skill, and only the Bard share Pick Pocket and Use 
Magic Device as a class skill.  The Rogue is only a mediocre warrior, but if 
played right he can use his sneak attack to devastating effect, particularly 
with ranged weapons.  He can't cast spells, but Use Magic Device will allow 
him to use nearly any scroll or wand he finds -- as well as 
race/alignment/class restricted equipment.  The Rogue also receives special 
Rogue feats to be chosen at levels 10, 13, 16, and 19.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
Unlike many other classes, there's no clear direction when it comes to 
multi-classing a Rogue.  Rogues get fairly decent gains all the way up to 20th 
level -- or at least 19th level.  However, none of these gains are so 
overwhelming that multi-classing would be a disastrous idea.  It's really up 
to you and what role your character plays in the party.  If you find your 
skills are currently adequate, feel free to develop in another class.  You can 
always come back and take more Rogue levels later.  The best cut-off points 
for Rogues are at levels 10, 13, 16, and 19, as that's where they receive 
their special Rogue feats.

Fighters provide extra combat feats, medium/heavy armor and shield 
proficiencies, Discipline as a class skill, and Weapon Specialization.  
Barbarians provide Rage, medium armor and shield proficiencies, Discipline 
and Taunt as class skills, and faster movement speeds.  Two levels of Paladin 
offers medium/heavy armor and shield proficiencies, Taunt as a class skill, 
immunities to disease and fear, as well as the ability to add your Charisma 
modifier to saving throws via Divine Grace.  It can be a valuable to take at 
least four levels as a Fighter, Barbarian, Paladin, or Ranger.  Their higher 
BAB growth will allow the Rogue to reach 4 attacks per round at 20th level.  
Monks provide Cleave and basic unarmed fighting ability.  Wizard is another 
interesting choice, as Rogues commonly have decent Intelligence scores and 
avoid combat and armor anyway.  You won't reach the highest level of spells, 
but you can become fairly competent with the lower levels.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
Like the Fighter, nearly every class can benefit from taking a few levels of 
Rogue.  For just three Rogue levels you pick up extra skills, the ability to 
sneak attack, Evasion, and Uncanny Dodge, which are useful to nearly every 
character.  This doesn't mean that everyone should do it.  If someone else is 
already covering Rogue abilities in your party, it will often be more useful 
to be a pure warrior or a pure spellcaster.  In addition, many characters 
receive powerful abilities at 20th level.  But a minor multi-class is Rogue is 
always an option worth consideration.  It's valuable to take a Rogue level 
first though, regardless of what you eventually plan to emphasize, as you get 
4x as many skill points at first level.


- Races -
Rogues are almost always Dexterity-based characters.  For that reason, both 
the Elf and the Halfling stand out as immediate choices.  Almost all of the 
Elf abilities will be useful to a Rogue.  They bring skill bonuses to Listen, 
Search, and Spot, and they are able to use their Search ability at maximum 
ability without slowing down.  If you don't plan to multi-class with a melee 
class, the racial weapon proficiencies (longsword, rapier, shortbow, longbow) 
of the Elf can be very valuable.  The Elf also offers immunity to sleep, a 
racial resistance to all mind affecting spells, and low-light vision.  The 
Elf is also perfect for a Wizard multi-class.

A Halfling is more ideal for less combat oriented Rogues due to their loss in 
Strength and limited weapon selection.  However, they have much more freedom 
to multi-class because Rogue is their favored class.  They also get skill 
bonuses to Hide, Move Silently, and Listen, as well as resistance to Fear and 
bonuses to all of their saving throws.  Their small stature also gives a 
slight improvement to AC and accuracy.

Humans and Half-Elves offer multi-classing freedom, and are probably the next 
best choices.  Dwarves offer little, but might work with a heavy Fighter 
multi-class in mind.  There's not much reason to pick a Gnome, and Half-Orcs 
take a penalty to Intelligence which is important to a Rogue.


- Attributes -
Dexterity is almost always the primary attribute for a Rogue.  It provides an 
AC boost to the lightly armored Rogue, and it is the basis of many of the 
Rogue's skills.  You'll want to set it high and continually raise it as the 
character progresses.  You can usually skimp on Strength as you'll likely pick 
up Weapon Finesse, but a decent score is still useful.  Constitution is always 
important and should be set as high as possible after the other attributes are 
taken care of.

Intelligence is also useful for a Rogue, as it is the basis for many of his 
skills as well.  It also helps to have as many extra skill points as possible.  
Wisdom can help make up for the Rogues weakness to Will saves, but it usually 
needs to be neglected.  Charisma can be valuable for interacting with other 
characters, but like Wisdom, usually needs to be ignored.


- Skills -
Skills are the primary ability of the Rogue, and he receives far and away the 
most skill points to assist this function.  Open Lock and Disable Trap should 
never be neglected, particularly since the Rogue is the only class to offer 
them as class skills.  Close behind that is the Search skill, which is 
necessary to spot traps in the first place.  Hide and Move Silently are 
essential for the stealth nearly every Rogue requires.  Many Rogues also need 
to act as party scouts and will also want to train in Listen and Spot.  Set 
Trap can be very effective, but only pursue it if you know you will use it.  
Pick Pocket is a fun skill but is usually not very useful.  Use Magic Device, 
on the other hand, is very useful and should not be passed up.  If you have 
any points left Heal and Lore are always useful, but you should probably 
ignore Parry.


- Feats -
Weapon Focus and Improved Critical are essential for you primary weapon.  
Weapon Finesse is almost always essential as Rogues normally have much more 
Dexterity than Strength.  Rogues are good candidates for dual-wielding, and 
should consider picking up Ambidexterity, Two-Weapon Fighting, and Improved 
Two-Weapon Fighting.  Rogues also make great archers and should pick up Point 
Blank Shot and Rapid Shot, and maybe Weapon Focus and Improved Critical for 
their ranged weapon.  Dodge and Mobility will help most Rogues as well.  
Weapon Proficiency Exotic will provide Rogues with access to the high critical 
range Kukri.  Toughness will boost their relatively low HPs.  If any feats are 
left, or if you Rogue is meant for lots of melee combat, you should try to 
pick up the helpful Power Attack, Cleave, Knockdown, and Improved Knockdown.  
Disarm and Improved Disarm might make an interesting substitute for the 
knockdown feats.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: d6
Base Attack Bonus: 75%
Armor Proficiencies: Light armor.  No medium or heavy armor.  No shield.
Weapon Proficiencies: Club, Dagger, Dart, Handaxe, Light Crossbow, Heavy 
  Crossbow, Quarterstaff, Mace, Short Sword, Rapier, Shortbow, Morningstar, 
  and Sling.
Primary Saving Throws: Reflex.
Secondary Saving Throws: Fortitude and Will.
Spellcasting: None.
Base Skill Points per Level: 8
Class Skills: Disable Trap, Heal, Hide, Listen, Lore, Move Silently, 
  Open Lock, Parry, Persuade, Pick Pocket, Search, Set Trap, Spot, 
  Use Magic Device.

1st Level - Sneak Attack (1d6).
2nd Level - Evasion.
3rd Level - Uncanny Dodge (Retain DEX bonus to AC when flat-footed).
            Sneak Attack (2d6).
4th Level - 
5th Level - Sneak Attack (3d6).
6th Level - Uncanny Dodge (+1 to Reflex saves vs. traps).
7th Level - Sneak Attack (4d6).
8th Level -
9th Level - Sneak Attack (5d6).
10th Level - 1st Rogue feat.
11th Level - Uncanny Dodge (+2 to Reflex saves vs. traps).
             Sneak Attack (6d6).
12th Level - 
13th Level - 2nd Rogue feat.
             Sneak Attack (7d6).
14th Level - Uncanny Dodge (+3 to Reflex saves vs. traps).
15th Level - Sneak Attack (8d6).
16th Level - 3rd Rogue feat.
17th Level - Uncanny Dodge (+4 to Reflex saves vs. traps).
             Sneak Attack (9d6).
18th Level - 
19th Level - 4th Rogue feat.
             Sneak Attack (10d6).
20th Level - Uncanny Dodge (+5 to Reflex saves vs. traps).


- Sneak Attack -
Type: Rogue only
Prerequisites: Free at Rogue 1st level.
Required For: Nothing.

When the Rogue attacks a character that is unable to defend himself, either 
with a melee attack or a ranged attack within a certain distance, the Rogue 
adds extra damage to his hit in the form of a sneak attack.  A character is 
unable to defend himself if he is flat-footed, has not detected the Rogue, or 
is occupied in combat with another foe.  Sneak Attack damage begins at +1d6 
and adds an additional +1d6 at every odd Rogue level.  This damage is not 
multiplied in the case of a critical hit, and many creatures (such as undead 
or constructs) are naturally immune to Sneak Attacks.


- Uncanny Dodge -
Type: Barbarian and Rogue only
Prerequisites: Free at Barbarian 2nd level or Rogue 3rd level.
Required For: Nothing.

This ability immediately allows the Rogue to retain his Dexterity bonus to AC 
even when caught flat-footed.  Since most Rogues rely heavily on Dexterity 
while in light armor, this ability is essential to Rogue survival.  At later 
levels, it provides the Rogues with bonus to avoid traps -- something nearly 
every Rogue will spend a lot of time around.


- Evasion -
Type: Monk and Rogue only
Prerequisites: Free at Monk 1st level or Rogue 2nd level.
Required For: Nothing.

This ability allows Rogues to avoid all damage when they make a successful 
Reflex saving throw against a spell that would normally only allow half 
damage for a Reflex save.  Since Rogues usually have high Reflex saves, this 
is a primary ability in the Rogue arsenal.


- Rogue Feats -
At levels 10, 13, 16, and 19 the Rogue is allowed to choose a unique feat from 
a list completely restricted to the Rogue class.


- Crippling Strike -
Type: Rogue only
Prerequisites: Available at Rogue levels 10, 13, 16, or 19.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat causes the Rogue to deal two points of Strength ability damage 
whenever he lands a successful Sneak Attack.  This damage will stack and last
for quite some time.  It's a good Rogue feat.


- Opportunist -
Type: Rogue only
Prerequisites: Available at Rogue levels 10, 13, 16, or 19.
Required For: Nothing.

The Rogue automatically gains a +4 bonus to all attack rolls when making an 
attack of opportunity.  This is pretty mediocre compared to the other feats 
available, and is therefore one of the worst Rogue feats.


- Skill Mastery -
Type: Rogue only
Prerequisites: Available at Rogue levels 10, 13, 16, or 19.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat allows the Rogue to take 20 on Disable Trap, Open Lock, and Set 
Traps in the midst of combat.  Since there is rarely a reason you can just 
wait to perform Disable Trap or Open Lock until after combat, this is one of 
the least valuable Rogue feats.  Serious trap setters might find it useful 
though.


- Slippery Mind -
Type: Rogue only
Prerequisites: Available at Rogue levels 10, 13, 16, or 19.
Required For: Nothing.

If you fail a Will save against a mind-affecting spell, you make an 
automatic reroll.  Rogues are normally pretty bad when it comes to Will 
saves, so this can be useful.  However, some would argue that since their 
Will saves are so weak, if you failed it once, you'll likely just fail it 
again -- you should be seeking equipment and enchantments to protect your 
from mind-affecting spells.


- Improved Evasion -
Type: Rogue and Monk only
Prerequisites: Available at Rogue levels 10, 13, 16, 19; free at Monk 9th level.
Required For: Nothing.

This excellent feat allows you to take no damage when a successful Reflex save 
would cause you to take half damage, and half damage even if you fail.  This is 
clearly the most valuable Rogue feat and should be taken immediately at 10th 
level -- unless of course you can get the same ability from an item.


- Defensive Roll -
Type: Rogue only
Prerequisites: Available at Rogue levels 10, 13, 16, or 19.
Required For: Nothing.

As long as you haven't been caught flat-footed, if you take a lethal hit you 
are allowed to make a Reflex saving throw in order to take only half damage.  
The DC is determined by the damage dealt.  Keep in mind that half damage may 
still kill you anyway, but as Rogues have notoriously good Reflex saves this 
feat can be very helpful in keeping you alive long enough to make an escape.


- 16/4 Rogue/Fighter -
This build really helps develop the Rogue's combat abilities, while causing 
minimal disruption to his fundamental Rogue skills.  You still receive three 
bonus Rogue feats.  The four levels of Fighter provide three helpful combat 
feats, shield proficiency, and access to Weapon Specialization and Discipline 
as a class skill.  You'll also get a boost to HP, BAB, and a 4th attack at 
20th level.  The bonus feats from the Fighter levels can be used to pick up 
Ambidexterity, Two-Weapon Fighting, and Improved Two-Weapon Fighting -- making 
this one of the best dual-wielding builds available.


- 16/2/2 Rogue/Fighter/Paladin -
This is a slight variation.  Instead of taking two more levels of Fighter just 
to get one feat, you take two levels in Paladin for Divine Grace and immunity 
to disease and fear.


- 17/2/1 Rogue/Fighter/Barbarian -
Another variation.  You lose the Paladin abilities for rage and an increase in 
movement speed instead.  And you get the 17th Rogue level increase to Sneak 
Attack and Uncanny Dodge.


- 13/7 Rogue/Wizard -
This build takes advantage of the shared Intelligence of the Rogue and Wizard 
classes.  Make sure your natural Intelligence score is at least 14 in order to 
access 4th level Wizard spells.  The 7 levels of Wizard won't be enough to 
turn you into an offensive spellcasting powerhouse, but it will provide you 
with valuable utility and buffing spells like Identify, Bull's Strength, Cat's 
Grace, Darkness, Ghostly Visage, Knock, Haste, Magic Circle Against Alignment, 
Protection From Elements, Improved Invisibility, and Stoneskin.


|=============================================================================|
  T H E   B A R D                                                        1.07
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
The Bard can do nearly everything.  He has a skill selection comparable to a 
Rogue.  While he lacks some Rogue essential skills like Open Lock, Disarm Trap, 
and Search as class skills, as well as not getting nearly as many skill points, 
he gains essential combat skills like Discipline, Spellcraft, and Taunt as 
class skills.  He is also the only class besides Rogue to have access to the 
valuable Use Magic Device -- which potentially makes available all scrolls and 
equipment for him to use.  In melee combat he is initially set back by an 
average BAB growth, a relatively small amount of HPs, and a lack of weapon and 
armor proficiencies.  However, he posses a solid list of protection and 
buffing spells that gives him advantages that most warriors won't have -- just 
beware of Arcane spell failure.  In addition, he has his Bardsong ability, 
which not only provides bonuses to his own attacks, damage, saving throws, 
Dodge AC, skills, and HPs, but to his allies as well.  Many of his advantages 
also work well with ranged attacks, making him a good archer class as well.  
Finally, the Bard has the ability to add his class level to his Lore skill.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
Most Bards should multi-class, as it offers a change to fix some major 
weaknesses in the Bard's abilities.  Their last few levels offer very little.  
In fact, high level Bardsongs require Perform skill ranks that are practically 
impossible to reach.  Most Bards will want to advance to at least 16th level 
to get access to 6th level spells and most of the important upgrades in their 
Bardsong ability.  Fighters offer a  boost to HP and BAB, missing weapon and 
armor proficiencies, Weapon Specialization, as well as a the chance to select 
a few more feats.  A couple levels in Barbarian offers Rage, Uncanny Dodge, 
and a slight increase in movement speed.  It can be a valuable to take at 
least four levels as a Fighter, Barbarian, or Ranger as their higher BAB 
growth will allow the Bard to reach 4 attacks per round at level 20.  Rogue 
levels will further improve the Bard's skills, as well as offering Sneak 
Attack, Evasion, and Uncanny dodge -- which are particularly valuable for a 
Dexterity-based Bard.  And a level of Cleric could be useful for the Animal 
and Healing domains, which will provide the Bard with stronger summons and 
healing spells.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
Not many classes will want to take a minor multi-class with Bard because most 
of the Bard's abilities (spells & Bardsong) only become valuable at high 
levels.  If it's skills you want, the Rogue is a much better choice.  However, 
just three levels of Bard will provide some basic bonus through Bardsong 
abilities and a small set of valuable buffing spells.


- Races -
If you don't plan to multi-class your Bard then Elf is probably your best 
choice.  Due to their light armor, most Bards are Dexterity-based, making the 
Elven racial bonus to Dexterity very valuable.  In addition, the Elf offers a 
racial proficiency in the longsword, rapier, shortbow, and longbow -- 
proficiencies that most any Bard could use but initially lacks.  The skill 
boosts, immunities, and keen-senses are all very useful as well.

For a Bard with multi-classing in mind, a Human or Half-Elf will make a better 
choice.  If you plan to multi-class specifically to a Rogue, then a Halfling 
is a great choice.  Gnomes offer little to the Bard, and Dwarves and Half-Orcs 
take a penalty in Charisma, which is too valuable to consider.


- Attributes -
Because armor will interfere with the Bard's Arcane spellcasting, most Bards 
are Dexterity-based to boost their Armor Class.  Dexterity can also be used 
for ranged attacks as well as melee attacks if Weapon Finesse is taken.  
Strength is usually kept low, but avoiding negatives is a good idea.  However, 
it is very possible to make a Strength-based Bard build, wear heavy armor, and 
either accept Arcane spell failure or cast spells before you put your armor on.  
Constitution should be set as high as possible after accounting for other 
attributes.

Since Charisma is the basis of the Bard's spellcasting, it should be set 
relatively high.  However, the Bard only has six levels of spells, so a score 
above 16 is not necessary -- but it can be useful for bonus spells and 
improving spell strength.  A decent Intelligence score can help the Bard keep 
up on all his desired skills.  Wisdom plays a minor role with a Bard and can 
be left fairly low.


- Skills -
Bards get a great selection of class skills and need to take some careful 
consideration when choosing them.  Firstly, all Bards will want to maximize 
their Perform skill, as it is essential to the development of their Bardsong 
ability.  Melee oriented Bards will want to train in Discipline and 
Concentration.  Other Bards will want to focus on Hide and Move Silently to 
emphasize stealth.  Few classes offer Taunt as a class skill, and it is also 
worth a look.  Spellcraft is useful to identify spells and counterspell them, 
and it also provides some bonuses to save vs. spells.  The power of Use Magic 
Device should also not be ignored.  If your environment supports it, Persuade 
can be very valuable.  After all these great options you'll probably not have 
any points left for Heal, Listen, Lore, Parry, and Pick Pocket.


- Feats -
Bards will want to get Weapon Focus and Improved Critical for their primary 
weapon.  Bards that prefer ranged attacks will want Point Blank Shot and Rapid 
Shot, while melee Bards will want to consider Power Attack, Cleave, Knockdown, 
and possibly Improved Knockdown.  A dual-wielding Bard will need Ambidexterity, 
Two-Weapon Fighting, and Improved Two-Weapon Fighting.  Metamagic feats like 
Still Spell, Extend Spell, Empower Spell, and Maximize spell can also be useful 
with the Bard's decent magic selection.  A Bard that doesn't plan a multi-class 
with Fighter or Barbarian may want to pick up Martial weapon proficiencies in 
order to boost his weapon selection.


- Spellcasting -
The Bard possesses Arcane spellcasting that is based off of his Charisma.  He 
is limited to knowing a finite amount of spells for each spell level, and 
these spells are chosen from a complete list when he gains a new level.  He 
also has the option whenever he gains a level to go back and unlearn spells 
and exchange them with another spell of the same level.  Like all spellcasters 
he is limited in the number of spells he can cast for each level, but he does 
not need to prepare his spells in advance.  Rather he can dynamically choose 
and cast his spells from his limited list in any proportion that he sees fit.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: 1d6
Base Attack Bonus: 75%
Armor Proficiencies: Light and medium armor and shields.  No heavy armor.
Weapon Proficiencies: All simple weapons.  No martial or exotic weapons.
Primary Saving Throws: Reflex and Will.
Secondary Saving Throws: Fortitude.
Spellcasting: Arcane, Charisma-based.
Base Skill Points per Level: 4
Class Skills: Concentration, Discipline, Heal, Hide, Listen, Lore, 
  Move Silently, Parry, Perform, Persuade, Pick Pocket, Spellcraft, Taunt, 
  Use Magic Device.
Special: Cannot be Lawful in alignment.

1st Level - Bardic Knowledge (add Bard class level to Lore skill).
            Bardsong.
2nd Level - Bardsong upgrade.
            Level 1 spells become available.
3rd Level - Bardsong upgrade.
4th Level - Level 2 spells become available.
5th Level -
6th Level - Bardsong upgrade.
7th Level - Level 3 spells become available.
8th Level - Bardsong upgrade.
9th Level -
10th Level - Level 4 spells become available.
11th Level - 
12th Level - Bardsong upgrade.
13th Level - Level 5 spells become available.
14th Level - Bardsong upgrade.
15th Level - Bardsong upgrade.
16th Level - Bardsong upgrade.
             Level 6 spells become available.
17th Level - Bardsong upgrade.
18th Level - Bardsong upgrade.
19th Level - Bardsong upgrade.
20th Level - Bardsong upgrade.


- Bardsong -
Type: Bard only
Prerequisites: Free at Bard 1st level.
Required For: Nothing.

The Bardsong may be sung once per day per class level.  It affects all allies 
(including the Bard) within 30 feet and it lasts for 10 rounds.  Deafened 
characters will be unaffected by the Bardsong, and multiple Bardsongs will not 
stack.  The power of the Bardsong is also affected by the Perform skill, so 
remember to constantly raise it.  The various levels of Bardsong are listed 
below:

1st Level & Perform 3 -
            +1 to Attack & Damage.
2nd Level & Perform 6 -
            +1 to Attack, Damage, & Will.
3rd Level & Perform 9 -
            +1 to Attack, Will, & Fortitude. 
            +2 to Damage.
6th Level & Perform 12 -
            +1 to Attack, Will, Fortitude, Reflex, & Skills.  
            +2 to Damage.
8th Level & Perform  15 -
            +1 to Will, Fortitude, Reflex & Skills. 
            +2 to Attack & Dam age. 
            +8 to temporary Hit Points.
12th Level & Perform 18 -
             +1 to Will, Fortitude, & Reflex.
             +2 to Attack, Damage, Skills, & Dodge AC.
             +8 to temporary Hit Points.
14th Level & Perform 21 -
             +1 to Will, Fortitude, & Reflex.
             +2 to Attack & Skills.
             +3 to Damage & Dodge AC.
             +16 temporary Hit Points.
15th Level & Perform 24 -
             +2 to Attack, Will, Fortitude, & Reflex.
             +3 to Damage & Skills.
             +4 to Dodge AC.
             +16 temporary Hit Points.
16th Level & Perform 30 -
             +2 to Attack, Fortitude, & Reflex.
             +3 to Damage & Will.
             +4 to Skills
             +5 to Dodge AC.
             +20 temporary Hit Points.
17th Level & Perform 35 - 
             +2 to Attack, Fortitude, & Reflex.
             +3 to Damage & Will.
             +5 to Dodge AC & Skills.
             +22 temporary Hit Points.
18th Level & Perform 40 - 
             +2 to Attack, Fortitude, & Reflex.
             +3 to Damage & Will.
             +5 to Dodge AC.
             +6 to Skills
             +24 temporary Hit Points.
19th Level & Perform 45 - 
             +2 to Attack, Fortitude, & Reflex.
             +3 to Damage & Will.
             +5 to Dodge AC.
             +7 to Skills.
             +26 temporary Hit Points.
20th Level & Perform 50 - 
             +2 to Attack, Fortitude, & Reflex.
             +3 to Damage & Will.
             +5 to Dodge AC.
             +10 to Skills
             +32 temporary Hit Points.


- 16/4 Bard/Fighter -
This build greatly improves the Bard's combat skills while sacrificing very 
little.  The Fighter levels offer three extra combat feats, martial weapon & 
heavy armor proficiency, access to Weapon Specialization, and an increase in 
HP and BAB.  The improved BAB of the Fighter will give the Bard four attacks 
at 20th level.


- 16/2/2 Bard/Fighter/Barbarian -
This variation sacrifices an extra feat for the Barbarian's Rage, faster 
movement, and Uncanny Dodge.  Since Uncanny Dodge is so useful for the Bard, 
particularly Dexterity-based builds, this is the generally the best Bard 
multi-class, although you will lose the chance to get Weapon Specialization.


- 15/3/2 Bard/Rogue/Fighter -
This build sacrifices 6th level spells for the benefits of both the Rogue and 
the Fighter classes.  The Rogue provides a Sneak Attack, a boost to skills, 
and the highly valuable Uncanny Dodge and Evasion.  The Fighter levels bring 
extra combat feats and weapon and armor proficiencies.  This setup works well 
for a high-Dexterity archer Bard.


|=============================================================================|
  T H E   C L E R I C                                                    1.08
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
The Cleric is a very powerful class.  The Cleric offers a full nine levels of 
magic power, he can use heavy armor and shields without crippling his magic 
abilities, and he has the power to turn undead.  He lacks an animal companion 
or familiar, but can still summon creatures, and with the aid of the Animal 
Domain he can significantly increase the power of these summons.  He has a 
lower HP and BAB than a true warrior and lacks Discipline as a class skill, 
yet he has access to a wide range of protection and buffing spells that a 
true warrior would find unavailable.  He is also the master of healing, 
restoration, and resurrection type spells, while still possessing a 
formidable array of offensive spells.  His ability to spontaneous cast any 
spell has a healing spell allows him to focus on offensive spells yet still 
dominate as a healer.  Ultimately, the Cleric has no clear weaknesses, except 
for perhaps his lack of Discipline as a class skill.  Clerics also allow for 
a wide range of customization by being able to choose two Domains out of a 
list of nineteen at 1st level -- each of which offers different abilities and 
unique spells.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
Clerics keep increasing in their magic and turn undead abilities all the way 
to level 20.  While most will want to make a pure Cleric for that reason, a 
few levels in something else can also be beneficial.  Fighters offer extra 
feats and HPs, an improved BAB, proficiency in martial weapons, Discipline as 
a class skill, and access to Weapon Specialization.  Barbarians also offer a 
boost to HP and BAB, martial weapons, and Discipline as a class skill, in 
addition to Barbarian Rage, improved movement speed, and Uncanny Dodge.  A 
Lawful Good Cleric with a high Charisma score should consider the Paladin for 
Divine Grace, some immunities, martial weapon proficiencies, and an improved 
BAB and HP.  A melee-minded Cleric should consider taking four levels in 
Fighter, Barbarian, Ranger, or Paladin as their improved BAB will allow them 
to reach four attacks at 20th level -- yet this will cause you to lose access 
to 9th level spells.  Monks offer Cleave and a handful of unarmed abilities 
as well as Evasion.  If your Cleric is the rare type that is willing to go 
without armor, you can also benefit from the Monk's ability to add your large 
Wisdom modifier to your Armor Class.  Rogues offer their extra skills, sneak 
attacks, Evasion, and Uncanny Dodge.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
Most characters will not find much point in a minor multi-class with Cleric 
as you need to take many levels to get access to the high powered spells.  
However, taking just one Cleric level for two Cleric domains can be useful for 
a few classes.  A Paladin can expand his turning ability to cover elementals, 
vermin, outsiders, or constructs.  He can also improve the general strength of 
his turning ability through the Sun domain.  Bards, Druids, Rangers, Wizards, 
and Sorcerers can benefit from the Animal domain to increase the strength of 
summoned creatures.  Bards, Druids, Paladins and Rangers can benefit from the 
Healing domain to increase the strength of their healing spells.  Most other 
domains, however, offer bonuses based on Cleric level and are not useful in a 
minor multi-class.


- Races -
No races receive a penalty to Wisdom, the primary Cleric attribute, so there 
are no clearly bad choices.  Characters that want a decent turn undead ability 
however, will want to avoid the Dwarf and Half-Orc due to their penalty to 
Charisma -- although many melee-minded Clerics ignore their turning abilities 
and choose Dwarf for their racial abilities and easy multi-class with Fighter.  
Humans often make the best Clerics because they offer extra feats, skills, and 
multi-classing freedom with no real disadvantages.  Half-Elves can work, 
although their racial abilities are usually less valuable.  Elves bring a 
handful of martial proficiencies that can be useful, but most Clerics either 
won't use them or they'll find alternate ways to obtain them.  A Gnome or 
Halfling suffer a bit in the melee department, but can work if your Cleric is 
not going to be very combat intensive.


- Attributes -
Clerics should usually have high Strength and low Dexterity as they are best 
suited to wearing heavy armor.  However, it will not usually be possible to 
raise Strength as high as you would with a warrior because a Cleric is highly 
dependent on his mental attributes as well.  A 12 Dexterity will give you the 
maximum AC bonus while in Plate Mail -- the choice armor type for most Clerics 
-- and 13 Dexterity is required for the Dodge and Mobility feats.  
Unfortunately, many Clerics will find they simply do not have enough attribute 
points to boost Dexterity.  Balance your spare points between Strength and 
Constitution.

Wisdom is the primary attribute for the Cleric as it is the basis of his 
spellcasting.  Eventually you'll need to reach at least 19 Wisdom to cast 9th 
level spells, and you'll probably want to go higher to make your spellcasting 
even stronger.  You should probably start with a score of 15 or 17 and improve 
it as your character gains levels.  Charisma is also important for turning 
undead and many Cleric Domain abilities, yet many Clerics choose to ignore 
these ability and focus on their physical attributes instead.  Intelligence 
can be largely ignored, but avoiding negatives might be a good idea to avoid 
losing skill points.  A 13 Intelligence score is required for Disarm, Improved 
Disarm, Improved Knockdown, and Improved Parry, but Clerics usually don't have 
the attribute points to spare.


- Skills -
Almost all Clerics should train Concentration and Spellcraft.  If there are 
any points left, Persuade is useful if your environment supports it.  
Otherwise, look to Heal or Lore but ignore Parry.


- Feats -
Clerics will want to select Weapon Focus and Improved Critical for their 
primary weapon, as well as pick up Power Attack, Cleave, and Knockdown to 
improve their melee skills.  Toughness can be taken for a boost to HPs, and 
Exotic Weapon Proficiency can provide access to some valuable weapons.  The 
remaining feats should be spent on metamagic feats like Combat Casting, Spell 
Penetration, Spell Focus, Extend Spell, Empower Spell, or Maximize Spell.


- Spellcasting -
The Cleric possesses Divine spellcasting that is based off of his Wisdom.  
Once he reaches the required level and possess an adequate Wisdom score, he 
automatically receives access to every spell for that level.  He must, 
however, prepare his spells for use.  This entails selecting in advance which 
spells he believes will be most useful for him, as well as how many times he 
will want each of them to available before he rests again.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: 1d8
Base Attack Bonus: 75%
Armor Proficiencies: All armor and shields.
Weapon Proficiencies: All simple weapons.  No martial or exotic weapons.
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude and Will.
Secondary Saving Throws: Reflex.
Spellcasting: Divine, Wisdom-based.
Base Skills Points Per Level: 2
Class Skills: Concentration, Heal, Lore, Parry, Persuade, Spellcraft.

1st Level - Spontaneous Cast.
            Turn Undead.
            Two Cleric domains are chosen.
            Level 1 spells become available.
2nd Level - 
3rd Level - Level 2 spells become available.
4th Level - 
5th Level - Level 3 spells become available.
6th Level -
7th Level - Level 4 spells become available.
8th Level -
9th Level - Level 5 spells become available.
10th Level - 
11th Level - Level 6 spells become available.
12th Level - 
13th Level - Level 7 spells become available.
14th Level - 
15th Level - Level 8 spells become available.
16th Level - 
17th Level - Level 9 spells become available.
18th Level -
19th Level -
20th Level -


- Spontaneous Cast -
Type: Cleric only
Prerequisites: Free at Cleric 1st level.
Required For: Nothing.

This ability allows a Cleric to instantly cast any spell as a healing spell 
instead.  The healing spell cast will be of comparable level with the spell 
sacrificed.  This allows Clerics to memorize offensive spells, but still heal 
when needed.


- Turn Undead -
Type: Cleric and Paladin only
Prerequisites: Free at Cleric 1st level and Paladin 3rd level.
Required For: Nothing.

When Turn Undead is activated, the character first makes a turning check to 
see the maximum Hit Die his turn will be able to affect.  This check is 
determined by [1d20 + CHA modifier] and then compared to Cleric level based 
on the below chart (taken from the 3rd edition Player's Handbook):

Turning Check    Maximum Hit Die
0 or less        Cleric's level - 4
1-3              Cleric's level - 3
4-6              Cleric's level - 2
7-9              Cleric's level - 1
10-12            Cleric's level
13-15            Cleric's level + 1
16-18            Cleric's level + 2
19-21            Cleric's level + 3
22+              Cleric's level + 4

A second roll is then made to determine how many Hit Die of undead the Turn 
will affect.  This is determined by [2d6 + Cleric level + CHA modifier].  
Turned undead will flee from the Cleric for 10 rounds, but if pursued they will 
attack normally.  If the Turned undead's Hit Die is half of the Cleric's level, 
the creature is destroyed.  Clerics may Turn Undead [3 + CHA modifier] times 
per day.


- Extra Turning -
Type: Cleric and Paladin only
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

If this is chosen as a feat selection, the Cleric will be able to Turn Undead 
an additional six times per day.  The average Cleric will be able to perform 
Turn Undead over three times per day, which is usually enough -- especially 
considering how easy it is to rest in most modules.  If you want to be a 
particularly effective undead hunter or find yourself playing in a module full 
of undead with severe resting restrictions, then this feat is for you.


- Domains -
At 1st level a Cleric gets to choose two Domains which provide bonus spells and 
sometimes special abilities.  The Domains worth the most consideration are Air, 
Animal, Healing, Magic, Plant, Sun, and Trickery.  The Domains are discussed in 
more detail in the Domains section below.


- 16/4 Cleric/Fighter -
This build improves the Cleric's melee abilities at the cost of 9th level 
spells.  The four levels of Fighter offer three bonus combat feats, martial 
weapon proficiency, access to Weapon Specialization and Discipline as a class 
skill, and improved HPs and BAB.  The Fighter's BAB gains will allow the 
Cleric to get a fourth attack at 20th level.  If you are willing to give up a 
feat, Weapon Specialization, and the fourth attack you could do a 18/2 
Cleric/Fighter, or even a 19/1 Cleric/Fighter, and gain back your 9th level 
spells.


- 16/2/2 Cleric/Fighter/Paladin -
This variation of the above trades a third bonus feat for Divine Grace, 
immunity to fear and disease, and the opportunity to train Taunt as a class 
skill.


- 16/2/2 Cleric/Fighter/Barbarian -
This variation of the above trades the Paladin abilities for the Barbarian's 
Rage, faster movement speed, and Uncanny Dodge.


- 19/1 Cleric/Monk -
This is a nice build for the rare Dexterity based Cleric that is willing to 
go without armor.  The Monk level lets you apply your large Wisdom modifier 
to your AC.  It also provides Cleave and Evasion.  You could augment this 
build with one or two Fighter levels to pick some helpful feats -- or two 
levels of either Barbarian or Paladin for their special class abilities.  You 
could also spend three levels on Rogue and pick up a Sneak Attack, Uncanny 
Dodge, and a nice boost to your skills.  Be careful though, as the addition of 
three Rogue levels will cause experience penalties.


|=============================================================================|
  T H E   D R U I D                                                      1.09
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
In many ways the Cleric and Druid are very similar.  They both have nine levels 
of Wisdom-based Divine magic and the ability to cast it while wearing armor and 
carrying shields.  The Druid has the same HP and BAB as the Cleric, and he also 
lacks Discipline as a class skill.  However, he is more initially restricted 
with weapon and armor proficiencies and lacks the ability to turn undead.  On 
the other hand, the Druid gets an immediate animal companion in addition to his 
ability to cast summoning spells, and he later gains the ability to shapeshift 
into animals and eventually elementals -- although you lose the bonuses from 
your equipment while shapeshifted, making the value of this ability debatable.  
The Druid also gains immunities to grease, web, entangle, and poison, 
resistance to fear, and bonuses to fighting and skills in wilderness areas.  
The Druid lacks the customization of the Cleric domains, but has a more 
well-rounded spell list to compensate.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
Like any character with heavy spellcasting abilities, the Druid's magical 
abilities get stronger all the way to 20th level.  In addition, the Druid's 
animal companion and unique ability to shape-shift continues to evolve -- 
ultimately allowing the Druid to shift into an Improved Elemental at level 20.  
However, the true effectiveness of shape-shifting is debatable, and it's not a 
bad idea to consider taking a few levels in something else.  Fighters can make 
up for the Druid's lack of weapon and armor proficiencies, offer some extra 
feats (including Weapon Specialization), Discipline as a class skill, and 
improve the Druid's HPs and BAB.  Barbarians offer many of the same 
proficiencies -- minus heavy armor -- and a boost to HP and BAB, Discipline 
and Taunt as class skills, Barbarian Rage, improved movement speed, and 
Uncanny Dodge.  Like the Cleric, a melee-minded Druid should consider taking 
four levels in Fighter, Barbarian, or Ranger for the BAB boost in order to 
get four attacks at 20th level.  Again, these melee abilities come at the 
price of 9th level spells.  Rogues offer their useful set of skills as well 
as Sneak Attack, Evasion, and Uncanny Dodge abilities.  Monks are an essential 
choice for the shapeshifting Druid.  Besides Cleave and Evasion which are 
always useful, the shifted Druid can take advantage of the Monks unarmed 
attack abilities as well as apply their large Wisdom modifier to their AC.  
Finally, one level of Cleric for the Animal and Healing domains will increase 
the strength of your summons and healing spells.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
There aren't very many reasons to minor multi-class with a Druid.  Most of the 
class abilities aren't valuable enough and the Druid's spellcasting and animal 
companion require many Druid levels to be effective.


- Races -
Any race can work well as a Druid.  Half-Orcs work well for Strength-based 
Druid warriors, particularly those thinking of a Barbarian multi-class.  Elves 
work well for Dexterity-based Druids, adding valuable martial weapon 
proficiencies to the Druid's limited weapon selection.  Humans are a great 
choice for their extra feats, skills, and multi-classing freedom.  Halflings, 
Gnomes, Dwarves, and Half-Elves will all work also.


- Attributes -
Druids have some flexibility when determining their physical attributes -- 
they can work as Strength-based or Dexterity-based characters.  Strength-based 
is probably the easiest path to choose though.  Either way, pick one attribute 
and build it up and leave the other at a decent level.  Constitution is 
important too.

The Druid's spellcasting is based on Wisdom and it should therefore be set 
very high (15 or 17) and increased as the character gains in level.  Druids 
have very little use for Charisma and can safely ignore it, and Intelligence 
should be set just high enough to avoid any skill point penalties.  13 
Intelligence is required for Disarm, Improved Disarm, Improved Knockdown, and 
Improved Parry -- but that is probably out of reach for most Druid builds.


- Skills -
Almost all Druids should train in Concentration and Spellcraft.  Animal Empathy 
is a unique skill, shared only with the Ranger, and most Druids will probably 
want to consider pursuing it as well.  Persuade is useful if your environment 
supports it.  Otherwise, spend any surplus points on Heal or Lore but ignore 
Parry.


- Feats -
Like any character that expects to engage in melee combat, a Druid should 
probably get Weapon Focus and Improved Critical for his primary weapon.  He 
may want to obtain Weapon Focus and Improved Critical in unarmed to benefit 
his shapeshifted form.  The standard combat feats -- Power Attack, Cleave, and 
Knockdown -- should also be given consideration.  If you aren't going to 
multi-class to expand your proficiencies, you might want to consider picking 
Heavy Armor Proficiency.  Weapon proficiencies, however, will be unavailable 
to you.  At later levels, Toughness can be useful to add a boost to HPs.  The 
remaining feats should be spent on metamagic feats like Combat Casting, Spell 
Penetration, Spell Focus, Extend Spell, Empower Spell, or Maximize Spell.


- Spellcasting -
The Druid possesses Divine spellcasting that is based off of his Wisdom.  
Once he reaches the required level and possess an adequate Wisdom score, he 
automatically receives access to every spell for that level.  He must, 
however, prepare his spells for use.  This entails selecting in advance which 
spells he believes will be most useful for him, as well as how many times he 
will want each of them to available before he rests again.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: 1d8
Base Attack Bonus: 75%
Armor Proficiencies: Light and medium armor and shields.  No heavy armor.
Weapon Proficiencies: Club, Dagger, Scimitar, Sickle, Spear, Quarterstaff, 
  Dart, and Sling.
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude and Will.
Secondary Saving Throws: Reflex.
Spellcasting: Divine, Wisdom-based.
Base Skill Points per Level: 4
Class Skills: Animal Empathy, Concentration, Heal, Lore, Parry, Persuade, 
  Spellcraft.
Special: Must be somehow Neutral in alignment.  Cannot take other weapon 
  proficiency feats as a Druid, but may gain them from multi-classing.

1st Level - Nature Sense (+2 to attacks in the wilderness).
            Animal Companion.
            Level 1 spells become available.
2nd Level - Woodland Stride (immune to grease, web, and entangle).
3rd Level - Trackless Step (+4 to Hide and Move Silently in the wilderness).
            Level 2 spells become available.
4th Level - Resist Nature's Lure (+2 to save vs. fear).
5th Level - Wild Shape (x1).
            Level 3 spells become available.
6th Level - Wild Shape (x2).
7th Level - Wild Shape (x3).
            Level 4 spells become available.
8th Level -
9th Level - Venom Immunity (immune to poison).
            Level 5 spells become available.
10th Level - Wild Shape (x4).
11th Level - Level 6 spells become available.
12th Level - 
13th Level - Level 7 spells become available.
14th Level - Wild Shape (x5).
15th Level - Level 8 spells become available.
16th Level - Elemental Shape (x1).
17th Level - Elemental Shape (x2).
             Level 9 spells become available.
18th Level - Wild Shape (x6).
19th Level - Elemental Shape (x3).
20th Level - Improved Elemental Shape (x3).


- 19/1 Druid/Fighter -
One of the Druid's main disadvantages is his lack of weapon and armor 
proficiencies.  He is even restricted from choosing Simple, Martial, or Exotic 
proficiencies as a chosen feat.  This makes even a small Fighter multi-class 
very useful.  You'll immediately have access to Simple and Martial weapons, as 
well as the ability to wear Heavy armor, which will allow you to survive with 
a lower Dexterity score.  In addition you'll get another combat feat and a 
chance to put some points into Discipline.  You'll lose the ability to 
shapeshift into an Improved Elemental, but you'll retain most of your 
spellcasting abilities.  You could also choose to take a 2nd level of Fighter 
for another feat and another lost 9th level spell, if you wanted.


- 16/4 Druid/Fighter -
This build further develops the Druid's melee abilities at the cost of his 9th 
level spells.  You still get all of the weapon/armor proficiencies and access 
to Weapon Specialization and Discipline, but in addition you get a total of 
three combat feats and a 4th attack at 20th level.


- 16/2/2 Druid/Fighter/Barbarian -
This build drops the third combat feat for the Barbarian's Rage, faster 
movement, and Uncanny Dodge.


- 18/1/1 Druid/Cleric/Fighter -
This build takes advantage of the Cleric's Domain powers to increase the 
strength of the Druid's summoning spells, as well as his healing spells.  
Choose the Animal and Healing Domains.  The Fighter level is optional, but 
it's usually a good idea to gain more weapon/armor proficiencies and 
Discipline.  You could also take a 2nd Fighter level and still retain your 
9th level spells.


- 18/1/1 Druid/Fighter/Monk -
This build works well for the Dexterity-based Druid that is willing to go 
without armor.  The Monk level lets you apply your large Wisdom modifier to 
AC, as well as providing Cleave and Evasion.  In addition, the Monk's unarmed 
combat abilities work great while shapeshifted.  The Fighter level gives you 
the missing weapon proficiencies and Discipline.  A 2nd Fighter level can be 
taken if needed without completely losing 9th level spells.  Another variation 
would be to drop the Fighter levels completely and take three levels as a 
Rogue to gain Sneak Attack, Uncanny Dodge, and a boost to skills -- just be 
ready for multi-class experience penalties.  Because of the Monk level, all of 
these builds must be Lawful Neutral.


|=============================================================================|
  T H E   S O R C E R E R                                                1.10
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
The Sorcerer is the offensive spellcasting powerhouse.  He goes without armor 
and all but the most basic melee abilities, but he makes up for it with the 
ability to cast the highest quantity and quality of offensive spells available 
-- all based on Charisma.  While his cousin the Wizard has a larger spell 
selection, learns his spells sooner, and much more spellcasting options in 
general, the Sorcerer selects a few favorites and casts them over and over.  
Those players that feel only a fraction of the spell list is truly useful 
should choose the Sorcerer.  The Sorcerer also has a familiar that gains in 
power with each additional level.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
The Sorcerer is all about his spells and should therefore obtain the highest 
level possible with Sorcerer.  There are a few valuable multi-classing options 
though.  Since the Sorcerer is likely to have the highest Charisma score in the 
game, they also have the most to gain from the Paladin's Divine Grace.  Just 
one level of Paladin can add +10 to all of your saving throws.  One level of 
Monk can also be valuable for Evasion, unarmed fighting abilities, and the 
ability to add your positive Wisdom modifier to your Armor Class (if you happen 
to have one).  A few levels of Rogue can be helpful if you are playing solo, 
but you're really better off having someone else do the Rogue work so you can 
master your spellcasting abilities.  Because armor interferes with Arcane 
spellcasting and Sorcerers have an awful Base Attack Bonus, multi-classing with 
warrior types is usually just a waste.  A level of Cleric for the Animal Domain 
can increase the power of the Wizard's summoning spells.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
The Sorcerer's ability to cast spells and summon a familiar are largely 
dependent on class level, making it pretty much worthless to add on a few 
levels of Sorcerer to another character.


- Races -
Sorcerers are all about using their Charisma to cast spells.  For this reason, 
Half-Orcs and Dwarves are obviously poor choices.  Dexterity is important for 
AC making Elves and Halflings good options.  Elves also supply some valuable 
Martial ranged weapon proficiencies.  Human offer a valuable bonus feat, 
skills, and multi-classing freedom.  Gnomes and Half-Elves work well also.


- Attributes -
Since you'll likely never want to engage in melee combat, you can safely ignore 
Strength.  Dexterity will be valuable to boost your Armor Class, Reflex saves, 
and provide you with a decent chance of hitting with a ranged weapon.  
Constitution is important as it boosts Concentration and Hit Points.

Charisma is the foundation of your power and you should set it high and raise 
it whenever possible.  Avoid penalties in Intelligence so you don't lose any 
skill points.  Wisdom isn't too important either -- unless you are thinking of 
a Monk multi-class.


- Skills -
Almost all Sorcerers should train Concentration and Spellcraft.  If any points 
are available, spend them on Lore or Heal.  You can't really go wrong here.


- Feats -
The Sorcerers primary ability is his spellcasting, and his feat selection 
should reflect that.  Dodge and Mobility will provide some defensive 
protection, but the majority of your small number of feats should be spent on 
metamagic feats like Combat Casting, Spell Penetration, Spell Focus, Still 
Spell, Silent Spell, Extend Spell, Empower Spell, Maximize Spell, and even 
Quicken Spell.


- Spellcasting -
The Sorcerer possesses Arcane spellcasting that is based off of his Charisma.  
He is limited to knowing a finite amount of spells for each spell level, and 
these spells are chosen from a complete list when he gains a new level.  He 
also has the option whenever he gains a level to go back and unlearn spells 
and exchange them with another spell of the same level.  Like all spellcasters 
he is limited in the number of spells he can cast for each level, but he does 
not need to prepare his spells in advance.  Rather he can dynamically choose 
and cast his spells from his limited list in any proportion that he sees fit.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: 1d4
Base Attack Bonus: 50%
Armor Proficiencies: None.
Weapon Proficiencies: All simple weapons.  No martial or exotic weapons.
Primary Saving Throws: Will.
Secondary Saving Throws: Fortitude and Reflex.
Spellcasting: Arcane, Charisma-based.
Base Skill Points per Level: 2
Class Skills: Concentration, Heal, Lore, Spellcraft.

1st Level - Summon Familiar
            Level 1 spells become available.
2nd Level -
3rd Level -
4th Level - Level 2 spells become available.
5th Level -
6th Level - Level 3 spells become available.
7th Level -
8th Level - Level 4 spells become available.
9th Level -
10th Level - Level 5 spells become available.
11th Level -
12th Level - Level 6 spells become available.
13th Level -
14th Level - Level 7 spells become available.
15th Level -
16th Level - Level 8 spells become available.
17th Level -
18th Level - Level 9 spells become available.
19th Level -
20th Level -


- 19/1 Sorcerer/Paladin -
This is a highly useful multi-class and most Sorcerers should consider taking 
it.  For the price of one 9th level spell, you gain the Paladin's Divine Grace 
ability which allows you to apply your large Charisma modifier to all three of 
your saving throws.  You also get the Paladin's equipment proficiencies which 
you'll probably never use, the chance to train Discipline as a class skill, 
and immunity to disease.  This build must be Lawful Good in alignment in order 
to access the Paladin class.


- 18/1/1 Sorcerer/Paladin/Monk -
This variation on the above build gives the Sorcerer access to Evasion at the 
price of another 9th level spell.  With his high Reflex saves from the Paladin 
level, Evasion will allow him to avoid taking damage from many of the primary 
offensive spells.  This is very useful, although some people try to get 
Improved Evasion from equipment instead of this multi-class.  You also get 
Cleave and some basic unarmed combat abilities which you'll probably never 
use.  If you have a way to boost your Wisdom you can use the Monk's ability 
to increase your AC.


|=============================================================================|
  T H E   W I Z A R D                                                    1.11
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
Like the Sorcerer, the Wizard lacks the ability to use armor and possess the 
most meager melee abilities.  But like the Sorcerer, he has access to the 
widest range of offensive spells available.  However, where the Sorcerer uses 
his Charisma to cast his favored spells over and over, the Wizard uses his 
Intelligence to learn all spells and customize his abilities for the situation.  
Where the Sorcerer has to select a few, the Wizard has the potential to learn 
them all.  The Wizard also learns higher level spells faster than the Sorcerer.  
He can also specialize in a school of magic and learn more meta-magic feats 
than his counterpart.  Like the Sorcerer, the Wizard can summon a familiar.


- Multi-Classing (major) -
A Wizard derives his power almost completely from his spells, and should not 
choose to multi-class lightly.  Like the Sorcerer, a level of Monk offers 
Evasion, unarmed fighting abilities, and the possibility of adding any positive 
Wisdom modifier to his Armor Class.  The Rogue is another interesting option, 
as the Wizard's high Intelligence can be put to good use with the Rogues wide 
skill selection.  However, it's important to remember that for every level you 
multi-class you are giving up valuable high level spells.  Since the Wizard 
cannot use shields or armor without interfering with their Arcane spell casting 
ability and because their Base Attack Bonus is extremely low, multi-classing 
with a warrior type class is not recommended.  A level of Cleric for the Animal 
Domain can increase the power of the Wizard's summoning spells.


- Multi-Classing (minor) -
A few classes might have sufficient Intelligence to gain some use out of a 
Wizard minor multi-class.  A Fighter, Barbarian, or Monk may want to take a few 
levels as a Wizard to gain some valuable buff spells to augment his combat 
abilities.  The class that has the most to gain from a minor Wizard 
multi-class, however, is usually the Rogue.  The Wizard's low level spells can 
be a great assistance to the roles that Rogues often have to play.


- Races -
Elves offer a valuable boost to Dexterity, somewhat valuable weapon 
proficiencies, and Wizard as the favored class.  Gnomes also offer Wizard as 
their favored class, with a valuable boost to Constitution.  Humans offer 
their usual bonus feat, extra skill points, and multi-classing freedom.  
Halfling could work well for Wizards interested in a Rogue multi-class.  
Dwarves and Half-Elves can work also, although other races probably offer 
more.  Half-Orcs get a penalty to Intelligence and make a poor choice for a 
Wizard.


- Attributes -
A Wizard should not be engaging in much melee fighting and can thus safely 
ignore Strength.  Dexterity will provide a bonus to Armor Class, Reflex saves, 
and offer a decent attack with ranged weapons.  Constitution will help 
Concentration and the Wizard's low amount of Hit Points.

Intelligence is the primary attribute of the Wizard, the source of all his 
magical power.  It should be set high and raised continually.  Charisma and 
Wisdom are of little importance, although a bit of Wisdom could help in the 
case of a Monk multi-class.


- Skills -
Almost all Wizards should train in Concentration and Spellcraft.  Since Wizards 
have a high Intelligence score, there will almost certainly be a surplus of 
skill points.  If you plan to ever multi-class, consider saving your skill 
points for then.  Otherwise, it's worthwhile to pour your points into Heal and 
Lore as well.  After that consider training some non-class skills like 
Persuade, Search, or Discipline.


- Feats -
The Wizards primary ability is his spellcasting, and his feat selection should 
reflect that.  The Wizard gets an advantage over the Sorcerer in that he gets 
to select four bonus metamagic feats.  Some extra planning should be taken to 
ensure that desired metamagic feats are chosen at 5th, 10th, 15th, and 20th 
level and that regular feat selections are left open to choose regular feats.  
It is okay though, to spend these regular feat selections on metamagic feats 
as well.  Dodge, Mobility, and Toughness will be the most valuable normal 
feats.  The rest, however, should be spent on metamagic feats like Combat 
Casting, Spell Penetration, Spell Focus, Still Spell, Silent Spell, Extend 
Spell, Empower Spell, Maximize Spell, and even Quicken Spell.


- Spellcasting -
The Wizard possesses Arcane spellcasting that is based off of his Intelligence.  
He receives all cantrips for free at 1st level, and may initially choose seven 
1st level spells.  After that he may add two new spells at every level-up to 
his spellbook, and he is also able to scribe any spells that he finds on 
scrolls.  He must, however, prepare his spells for use.  This entails 
selecting in advance which spells he believes will be most useful for him, as 
well as how many times he will want each of them to available before he rests 
again.


- Quick-Look -
Hit Die: 1d4
Base Attack Bonus: 50%
Armor Proficiencies: None.
Weapon Proficiencies: Club, Dagger, Light Crossbow, Heavy Crossbow, and 
  Quarterstaff.
Primary Saving Throws: Will.
Secondary Saving Throws: Fortitude and Reflex.
Spellcasting: Arcane, Intelligence-based.
Base Skill Points per Level: 2
Class Skills: Concentration, Heal, Lore, Spellcraft.

1st Level - Summon Familiar.
            Level 1 spells become available.
2nd Level -
3rd Level - Level 2 spells become available.
4th Level -
5th Level - 1st Wizard bonus feat.
            Level 3 spells become available.
6th Level -
7th Level - Level 4 spells become available.
8th Level -
9th Level - Level 5 spells become available.
10th Level - 2nd Wizard bonus feat.
11th Level - Level 6 spells become available.
12th Level -
13th Level - Level 7 spells become available.
14th Level -
15th Level - 3rd Wizard bonus feat.
             Level 8 spells become available.
16th Level -
17th Level - Level 9 spells become available.
18th Level -
19th Level -
20th Level - 4th Wizard bonus feat.


- Wizard Feats -
At levels 5, 10, 15, and 20 the Wizard can choose from the following list of 
feats: Combat Casting, Empower Spell, Extend Spell, Maximize Spell, Quicken 
Spell, Silent Spell, Spell Focus, Spell Penetration, and Still Spell.


- School Specialization -
A Wizard has the option to specialize in a particular school of magic.  This 
oddly doesn't give you many advantages in this chosen school, but rather 
excludes you from using magic from the chosen school's prohibited school.  In 
return you get to cast one extra spell per level (and it doesn't need to be 
used from your specialized school).  You also get a +2 bonus to the Spellcraft 
skill when dealing with spells from your specialized school, and -5 penalty 
when dealing with spells from your prohibited school.  You can also decline to 
specialize and keep access to every school -- which is known as "Universal".  
It's often recommended that beginners stay away from specialization to gain 
familiarity with all the spells first.  I'll discuss some of the 
specialization options below.


- Abjuration, Evocation, and Transmutation -
These three choices prohibit the Conjuration school, which is the source of 
almost all summoning spells.  Most players will avoid them for just that 
reason.  It also contains a few mild offensive spells.  If you are uninterested 
in summoning, than any of these schools would make an excellent choice.  
Evocation is probably the best due to the bonuses to Spellcraft when dealing 
with those spells.

The following spells belong to the Conjuration school and will become 
inaccessible: Acid Splash, Ray of Frost, Grease, Mage Armor, Summon Creature I, 
Melf's Acid Arrow, Summon Creature II, Web, Flame Arrow, Stinking Cloud, Summon 
Creature III, Edvard's Black Tentacles, Summon Creature IV, Cloudkill, Lesser 
Planar Binding, Summon Creature V, Acid Fog, Planar Binding, Summon Creature 
VI, Summon Creature VII, Greater Planar Binding, Summon Creature VIII, Gate, 
and Summon Creature IX.


- Divination and Enchantment -
These two choices prohibit the Illusion school, which provides some excellent 
protection spells and a few powerful offensive spells, including the 9th level 
Weird.  This is an okay choice, but probably not worth giving up.  You should 
choose Enchantment over Divination as the Spellcraft bonus will probably be 
more valuable there.

The following spells belong to the Illusion school and will become 
inaccessible: Color Spray, Ghostly Visage, Invisibility, Invisibility Sphere, 
Improved Invisibility, Phantasmal Killer, Shadow Conjuration, Greater Shadow 
Conjuration, Ethereal Visage, Shades, Shadow Shield, Mass Blindness/Deafness, 
and Weird


- Conjuration -
Conjuration prohibits the Transmutation school, which provides many of your 
buffing spells.  These could be replaced with potions and equipment and such, 
but Transmutation is also the school of the powerful 9th level Time Stop, 
which should not be lightly abandoned.

The following spells belong to the Transmutation school and will become 
inaccessible: Burning Hands, Bull's Strength, Cat's Grace, Eagle's Splendor, 
Endurance, Fox's Cunning, Knock, Owl's Wisdom, Ultravision, Haste, Slow, 
Bestow Curse, Polymorph Self, Greater Stoneskin, Tenser's Transformation, 
Mordenkainen's Sword, Shapechange, and Time Stop


- Illusion -
Illusion prohibits the Enchantment school, which has lots of charm, dominate, 
and hold spells.  These spells usually aren't the best way to deal with 
situations in this combat-oriented game, making their absence not too big of 
a deal.  This is one of the better choices.

The following spells belong to the Enchantment school and will become 
inaccessible: Daze, Charm Person, Sleep, Blindness/Deafness, Hold Person, 
Charm Monster, Confusion, Dominate Person, Hold Monster, Mind Fog, Mass Haste, 
Protection From Spells, Mass Charm, and Dominate Monster


- Necromancy -
Necromancy prohibits the Divination school, which has a small selection of 
relatively weak spells that can be easily replaced by other means.  At high 
levels, however, you receive the valuable defensive spell Premonition.  
Regardless, this is still a popular choice.

The following spells belong to the Divination school and will become 
inaccessible: Identify, See Invisibility, Clairaudience/Clairvoyance, Find 
Traps, Remove Blindness/Deafness, Feeblemind, Legend Lore, True Seeing, Power 
Word- Stun, Premonition, and Power Word- Kill.


- 19/1 Wizard/Monk -
This multi-class can be useful to give the Wizard some mediocre unarmed combat 
skills as well as the useful Evasion.  In addition, the Wizard can boost his 
Armor Class further by boosting his Wisdom score.  However, getting higher 
level spells is almost always a better way to ensure survival, making this 
multi-class a rather sketchy choice.


- 17/3 Wizard/Rogue -
This multi-class can be a useful way to add another dimension to your Wizard 
by filling him out with a nice set of skills.  The Wizard's high Intelligence 
will work well with this approach, allowing him to find and disable traps, 
pick locks, employ stealth, and use just about anything with Use Magic Device.  
You'll also get Uncanny Dodge, Evasion, and small Sneak Attack.  However, for 
every level you take as a Rogue you are giving up a powerful 9th level spell, 
as well as delaying the natural growth of your powers.  This is not something 
to be taken lightly.


|=============================================================================|
  A T T R I B U T E S                                                    2.01
|=============================================================================|

- Distributing Attributes -
Attributes are assigned in a point-buy system in NWN.  This essentially means 
that the higher you want to raise an attribute, the more expensive it becomes, 
and the more it cripples the rest of your attributes.  It's important not to 
get carried away.  It's far more effective to spread the points around and use 
future bonus attribute points, equipment bonuses, and spell bonuses to boost 
your favored attributes to extremely high levels.

For instance, you are making a Paladin and you currently have assigned him 17 
Strength and 11 Wisdom.  You have three points left to spend.  You could use 
all three points to raise his Strength to 18, or you could use all three 
points to raise his Wisdom to 14.  Because the point-buy penalties only apply 
during character creation it is far more effective to raise his Wisdom three 
points now and use your future bonus attribute points to raise Strength 
further.  A good guideline is to assign all your secondary attributes first, 
setting them to the minimum level your character will need, and then spend 
what you have left on your primary attributes.  Then, once you start the game, 
you can ignore those secondary attributes and put everything into raising your 
primary attributes as high as possible.


- Natural or Modified -
A natural attribute score is the attribute's value after points are distributed 
in character creation plus any bonus attribute points you have assigned.  The 
modified score is the total after items and spells and class-abilities have 
provided their bonuses.  Most of the time the game doesn't care how the 
attribute score is derived and uses the modified value.  There are three 
notable exceptions though.  The first is qualifying for feats.  The second is 
when bonus skill points are derived from Intelligence.  And the third is 
qualifying for spell levels.  The highest spell level accessible is determined 
by taking the spellcasting attribute for the class (this varies) and 
subtracting 10.  Thus, a natural attribute score of 11 allows access to 1st 
level spells, and a natural attribute score of 19 allows access to 9th level 
spells.


- Even or Odd -
Attribute scores are rarely used directly, rather it is their modifier that is 
used for the majority of calculations in NWN.  The modifier is the +/- number 
displayed to the right of the attribute.  While the modifier is derived from 
the attribute score, it only changes on even values.  Thus, an attribute score 
of 15 and an attribute score of 14 are virtually the same -- both offering a 
modifier of +2.  Use this to your advantage.  Avoid assigning attribute scores 
that are odd numbers.  Think only in evens.  There are a few exceptions to 
this.  When feats have an attribute prerequisite it's always an odd number.  
The maximum spell level a spellcaster can reach is based on their natural 
attribute score -- you need an odd number to reach an odd spell level.  You 
also might plan to leave an attribute at an odd number with the intention of 
boosting it later to an even number.


- Bonus Attributes -
Every character gets one bonus attribute point to spend at character level 4, 
8, 12, 16, and 20.  It's a good idea to take this into consideration when 
designing your character.  This means you don't have to immediately reach the 
high attribute score to cast your top level spells.  Or you could intentionally 
leave one high attribute at an odd number and plan to boost it up at 4th level, 
which will come pretty quickly.  Because of the way the point-buy system works, 
it's best to spend your bonus attribute points on attributes that have a high 
score.  For instance, a Fighter would do well to start with a Strength score of 
17 and add all five bonus points to this attribute, arriving at a final 
Strength of 22.


- Attribute Maximums -
No matter what methods you employ -- equipment, spells, potions, or 
class-abilities -- you can never raise an attribute more than 12 points above 
its natural score.  The maximum starting attribute score is 20 (if the 
attribute gets a +2 racial bonus).  You can then pour all five bonus attribute 
points into that same attribute.  But from that point you can only raise the 
score ten more points, making 37 the maximum modified attribute score possible.


<-------------->
 The Attributes
<-------------->

- Strength (STR) -
Strength will be the most important attribute for melee warriors, particularly 
those of the heavily armored, two-handed weapon variety.  Your Strength 
modifier is added to your melee attack rolls as well as your melee damage 
rolls.  In some cases, the modifier is also applied to ranged damage.  Strength 
is also used to determine how much weight you can carry and its modifier is 
added to your Discipline skill.

NOTE: The Power Attack, Improved Power Attack, and Cleave feats require a 
natural Strength score of 13.


- Dexterity (DEX) -
Dexterity will be important to ranged warriors and anyone not wearing heavy 
armor.  Your Dexterity modifier is added to your Armor Class, although it will 
be limited by how heavy your armor is.  In addition, your Dexterity modifier 
is added to your ranged attack rolls, and Weapon Finesse will sometimes allow 
you to add it to your melee attack rolls as well.  Finally, your Dexterity 
modifier is added to Reflex saving throws and the Hide, Move Silently, Open 
Lock, Pick Pocket, Parry, and Set Trap skills.

NOTE: The Deflect Arrows, Dodge, Mobility, Stunning Fist, and Rapid Shot feats 
require a natural Dexterity score of 13.  The Ambidexterity feat requires 
natural Dexterity score of 15.


- Constitution (CON) -
Constitution is important to everyone.  Your Constitution modifier is used to 
allocate bonus Hit Points at every level -- even retroactively.  Your 
Constitution modifier is also applied to Fortitude saving throws and the 
Concentration skill.


- Intelligence (INT) -
Intelligence is highly important for Wizards and any class that relies on its 
skills -- such as the Rogue.  Wizards draw their Arcane spellcasting abilities 
from their Intelligence.  Your natural Intelligence modifier is also applied 
to the number of Skill Points you receive every level, and it is added to the 
Disable Trap, Lore, Search, and Spellcraft skills.

NOTE: The Disarm, Improved Disarm, Improved Knockdown, and Improved Parry 
feats require a natural Intelligence score of 13.


- Wisdom (WIS) -
Wisdom is important for the Divine spellcasters (Paladin, Ranger, Cleric, and 
Druid), as they draw their spellcasting powers from it.  The Monk class also 
has a few special abilities that are derived from his Wisdom modifier.  The 
Wisdom modifier is applied to Will saving throws and the Heal, Listen, and 
Spot skills.

NOTE: The Stunning Fist feat requires a natural Wisdom score of 13.


- Charisma (CHA) -
Charisma is the basis of the Arcane spellcasting of the Sorcerer and the Bard.  
Clerics and Paladins also use the modifier to determine the strength of many 
of their class abilities -- including the ability to Turn Undead.  Your 
Charisma modifier is applied to the Animal Empathy, Perform, Persuade, Taunt, 
and Use Magic Device skills.


|=============================================================================|
  R A C E S                                                              2.02
|=============================================================================|

- Human -
Humans have no attribute strengths or weaknesses.  They will always ignore 
their highest level class when determining multi-classing penalties, making 
them the best choice for many multi-class builds.  They get a bonus feat and 
four extra skill points upon creation, as well as one extra skill point at 
each new level.  

Humans really work well with any class, but they are particularly useful when 
doing a unique multi-class or creating a character that quickly needs to pick 
up many foundational feats to become workable.


- Half-Elf -
Like the Human, the Half-Elf has no attribute strengths or weaknesses and they 
can ignore their highest level class when determining multi-classing penalties.  
They trade in the extra feats and skills for Immunity to Sleep, a +2 to saving 
throws against Enchantment spells, and low-light vision.  They also get a +1 
to their Listen, Search, and Spot skills.  

The Half-Elf will work well with any class, and are usually chosen in place of 
a Human when the extra feat and skill points don't seem particularly valuable.  
Ultimately though, this race is seldom used as the racial abilities rarely 
provide more than what a Human would offer.


- Dwarf -
Dwarves get a +2 to Constitution and a -2 to Charisma.  They favor the Fighter 
class and can ignore Fighter levels when determining multi-classing penalties.  
Their natural abilities include +2 to their Search skill in subterranean areas, 
+2 to their Lore skill, +2 to saving throws vs. poison, +2 to saving throws vs. 
all spells, and Darkvision.  They also come with some specialized combat 
training giving them +1 to attack roles vs. Orcs and Goblinoids, and +4 Dodge 
bonus to Armor Class vs. Giants.  

Dwarves work best with any combat oriented class, and they can easily 
multi-class to Fighter , the most popular multi-class, to pick up a few more 
combat feats.  The Charisma penalty makes them less than ideal for Sorcerers, 
Bards, Paladins, and Clerics -- although many Fighter/Clerics opt to ignore 
their turning ability and play as a Dwarf anyway.


- Elf -
Elves get a +2 to Dexterity and a -2 to Constitution.  The favor the Wizard 
class and can ignore Wizard levels when determining multi-classing penalties.  
Their natural abilities include an Immunity to Sleep, a +2 to saving throws 
against Enchantment spells, and low-light vision.  Elves also have keen senses, 
allowing them to search at top efficiency without having to enter Detect Mode 
or reduce their movement speed.  They receive a +2 to their Listen, Search, 
and Spot skills, and they receive Longsword, Rapier, Shortbow, and Longbow 
proficiencies for free.  

Because of their attribute adjustments, Elves make great ranged attackers that 
avoid direct combat as much as possible.  Their racial weapon proficiencies are 
a valuable bonus to many classes that don't offer them for free such as the 
Rogue, Bard, Monk, Druid, Sorcerer and Wizard.  Their keen senses are valuable 
to any class but particularly the Rogue or Ranger.  Elves have problems with 
most multi-classes though because of their favored class, Wizard.  There are 
very few builds built around a Wizard multi-class.


- Gnome -
Gnomes get a +2 to Constitution and a -2 to Strength.  They favor the Wizard 
class and can ignore Wizard levels when determining multi-classing penalties.  
Gnomes are smaller than the other races and thus gain a +1 size bonus to AC 
and attack rolls.  However, they can't wield weapons the same way as 
medium-sized races.  Medium weapons must be used with two hands, and large 
weapons cannot be used at all.  Their unarmed strike is also much weaker.  
Gnomes gain a +2 to saving throws against Illusion spells and a +2 to the DC 
of their Illusion spells.  They have low-light vision and gain a +2 to their 
Listen and Concentration skills.  Like the Dwarf, Gnomes have some racial 
training and gain a +1 to attack rolls vs. Reptilian Humanoids and Goblinoids, 
and a +4 Dodge bonus to Armor Class vs. Giants.

Due to their small size and lack of Strength, Gnomes generally make poor melee 
warriors.  They are most effective as perimeter characters, wielding some form 
of magic, usually as Wizards.


- Halfling -
Halflings gain +2 to Dexterity and -2 to Strength.  They favor the Rogue class 
and can ignore Rogue levels when determining multi-classing penalties.  Like 
the Gnomes, Halflings are smaller than the other races and gain a +1 size bonus 
to AC and attack roles.  They are just as limited when it comes to weapons 
however, and can must wield a medium weapon with two hands while large weapons 
can't be used at all.  Their unarmed strike is also much weaker.  Halflings 
gain a natural +1 to all saving throws and a +2 saving throw vs. fear.  They 
gain a +2 to their Move Silently and Listen skills, and their upbringing gives 
them a +1 to attack rolls with thrown weapons.

The Halfling shares the same Strength and size penalties as the Gnome and is 
likewise generally unfit for a melee class.  Where the Gnome finds his ideal 
place as a perimeter magic-user, the Halfling is usually best suited to the 
life of a stealthy Rogue.


- Half-Orc -
Half-Orcs start with a +2 increase to Strength and a -2 penalty to Intelligence 
and Charisma.  They favor the Barbarian class and can ignore Barbarian levels 
when determining multi-classing penalties.  They have Darkvision.

The Half-Orc abilities are brief and to the point.  Being the only race with a 
Strength bonus, they are ideal for melee combat.  However, their lack of 
Intelligence can prevent them from qualifying for a few valuable combat feats.  
They are a poor choice for any kind of Arcane spellcaster, yet they suffer no 
Wisdom penalties and could work out as a Divine spellcaster -- Paladins and 
Clerics will probably still want to avoid them due to the Charisma penalties.  
Melee combat, ultimately, should always be the focus of a Half-Orc character.


|=============================================================================|
  S K I L L S                                                            2.03
|=============================================================================|

- Class Skills -
Each class has a list of skills that they favor known as class skills.  Class 
skills can be raised quickly and to higher levels than cross-class skills.  
Class skills cost one point to raise one rank, and they can be raised as high 
as [character level + 3].  It's obviously more effectively to concentrate 
primarily on class skills as your points are more efficiently spent and you 
can reach higher levels of competence.


- Cross-Class Skills -
Skills still available but not favored by your class are known as cross-class 
skills.  They cost two skill points per rank and can only be raised to half of 
what a class skill could be raised to [character level + 3 / 2].  Cross-skills 
should be ignored as much as possible as they'll eat up your supply of skill 
points, and you'll never be very competent in them anyway.  The best way around 
this limitation is to multi-class.


- Exclusive Skills -
A few skills -- Animal Empathy, Perform, and Use Magic Device -- are exclusive 
to a few classes.  If it's not a class skill, you can't take any ranks in it 
at all.


- Planning Your Skills -
To keep a skill at it's maximum level, whether it's a class skill or 
cross-class skill, you'll basically need one skill point per level.  Every 
class gets a different number of base skill points per level: Clerics, 
Fighters, Paladins, Sorcerers, and Wizards only get two; Barbarians, Bards, 
Druids, Monks, and Rangers get four; and Rogues get eight.  This number is 
further modified by your natural Intelligence score modifier.  In addition, 
Human characters receive an additional skill point per level as a racial bonus.  
So for example, a Human Fighter with 13 Intelligence would receive four skill 
points per level -- a Half-Orc Barbarian with 8 Intelligence would receive 
three skill points per level.  Decide how many skills you are going to need to 
keep maximized and adjust your Intelligence accordingly.


- Multi-Classing & Skills -
The key to assigning skills to a multi-classed character is to remember that 
any skill points you don't use at level-up are saved and become available at 
the next level.  This means you can save your skill points from one class and 
spend them on the class skills of another class.  For instance, a Rogue is 
overflowing with extra skill points and wants to take the Discipline skill.  
Instead of spending them as a cross-class skill, the Rogue can save the 
surplus points and multi-class to a Fighter, which has Discipline as a class 
skill, and spend the points there.

Also, at first level you receive four times your normal number of skill points.  
Multi-classed characters should take advantage of this and make sure they take 
their first level with whatever class receives the most skill points.  For 
instance, a Rogue/Fighter should make sure to take his first level as Rogue so 
that the large number of Rogue skill points is multiplied by four instead of 
the smaller number of skill points he'd receive as a Fighter.


<---------->
 The Skills
<---------->

- Animal Empathy -
Attribute Basis: Charisma
Armor Check: No
Untrained: No
Use: Selected
Class Skill: (Exclusively) Druid, Ranger.

This skill is available only to the Druid and Ranger.  I'm not quite sure how 
useful it is, but it seems to me that if you are one of the two classes that 
can take it you might as well try it out.  It looks like you have to raise it 
to a fairly high level before it become useful, and if you fail by five or 
more you'll make the creature go hostile.  Animals and Dire Animals have a DC 
of [20 + the creature's Hit Die].  Beasts and Magical Beasts have a DC of [24 
+ the creature's Hit Die].


- Concentration -
Attribute Basis: Constitution
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Automatic
Class Skill: Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Sorcerer, 
  Wizard.

This skill is very important to spellcasters as it allows them to cast their 
spells while taking damage.  Most spellcasters will want to max it out unless 
they are sure they are going to be able to avoid attacks or they don't plan to 
cast spells in combat.  The DC is [10 + damage received].  An additional 
penalty of -4 is incurred if within three meters of an enemy, although the 
Combat Casting feat will eliminate this.  Concentration is also used to resist 
the Taunt skill, which can reduce AC or cause spell failure, but this seems to 
happen rarely unless fighting against other players.


- Disable Trap -
Attribute Basis: Intelligence
Armor Check: No
Untrained: No
Use: Selected
Class Skill: Rogue.

This should be one of your primary skills as a Rogue.  Other classes can 
dabble in it, but only the Rogue will be able to excel in it -- extremely tough 
traps (DC 35 or greater) can only be disabled by a Rogue.  Rogues should max 
this skill out, and eventually they will find themselves able to recover traps 
for future use or profit.  If you don't have access to this ability you can 
always avoid traps or set them off with a spell or summoned creature.  The DC 
of the trap is reduced by -7 when trying to determine its difficulty.  If you 
don't have enough skill to disarm the trap, you can flag it so that you party 
allies will be able to see it and avoid it.  Flagging reduces the DC by -5.  
Rogues that excel at this skill will eventually be able to recover traps to 
reuse or sell for a profit.  Attempting to recover a trap adds +10 to its DC.  
Finally, if you place five ranks into Disable Trap you get +2 ranks in your 
Set Trap skill.


- Discipline -
Attribute Basis: Strength
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Automatic
Class Skill: Barbarian, Bard, Fighter, Paladin.

Discipline is the primary skill of the melee warrior.  It allows them to avoid 
the effects of Disarm, Called Shot, Sap, and Knockdown.  Any warrior who 
doesn't max this out will find themselves in trouble when facing a skilled 
opponent -- and unfortunately a few warrior types don't have this available 
as a class skill.  Rangers, Clerics, Druids, Monks, and Rogues should consider 
a multi-class to make up for this weakness.  The DC is equal to your opponent's 
attack roll.


- Heal -
Attribute Basis: Wisdom
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Selected
Class Skill: All classes.

This skill could be very useful in a module with strict 3rd Edition rules or a 
even a more challenging design.  However, for the official campaign there are 
so many other healing options (potions, unlimited resting, recall stone) that 
this skill is often useless.  One advantage however, is that using a heal kit 
does not provoke an attack of opportunity and can be used quickly in combat.  
Heal kits may be used to heal HPs as well as cure disease or poison -- if the 
disease/poison DC is overcome.  The number of HPs cured is equal to the skill 
roll plus all modifiers.


- Hide -
Attribute Basis: Dexterity
Armor Check: Yes
Untrained: Yes
Use: Selected (Stealth Mode)
Class Skill: Bard, Monk, Ranger, Rogue.

This skill is useful for Rogue and Rogue-type characters to scout ahead, 
perform sneak attacks, escape combat, or sneak by enemies altogether.  Most 
Rogues should try to max this out, but some players won't take advantage of 
the micromanagement that this skill requires and might want to avoid it 
altogether.  Hide is countered by the Spot skill, and works more effectively 
in darkness and when the character stands motionless.


- Listen -
Attribute Basis: Wisdom
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Selected (Detect Mode)
Class Skill: Barbarian, Bard, Monk, Ranger, Rogue.

This skill can be useful to anybody to locate hidden characters.  It works 
against the Move Silently skill.  It's helpful to have at least one person in 
the party with a decent Listen skill, and because of their high amount of skill 
points, this job usually falls to the Rogue.  You gain a +5 boost if you are 
standing still, and the Alertness feat can boost this another +2 points.


- Lore -
Attribute Basis: Intelligence
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Automatic (when examining an object)
Class Skill: All classes.

This skill is fairly useful early in the character's career but drops in 
importance as time goes on.  In the beginning, the 100gp fee to identify 
objects is just too expensive, and this skill will save lots of money.  Later 
on the fee becomes insignificant and Identify spells, scrolls, and potions 
become available.  It's nice to have one character in the party max it out 
through the first few levels, but eventually you should abandon it.


- Move Silently -
Attribute Basis: Dexterity
Armor Check: Yes
Untrained: Yes
Use: Selected (Stealth Mode)
Class Skill: Bard, Monk, Ranger, Rogue.

This skill works with Hide.  Where Hide deals with the visual aspect, Move 
Silently deals with the audio aspect.  This skill is also usually the domain 
of the Rogue or other scout-like characters such as the Ranger or Monk.  Hide 
and Move Silently should usually be raised together, but due to the fact that 
more classes have Listen (the counter for Move Silently) as a class skill than 
Spot, Move Silently is probably more important.


- Open Lock -
Attribute Basis: Dexterity
Armor Check: No
Untrained: No
Use: Selected
Class Skill: Rogue

Like the Disable Trap skill, this should be a primary skill for any Rogue 
character.  At the beginning you will want to max this skill out, but 
eventually you may be able to find thieves tools that will allow you to open 
just about any lock.  At that point, pursuing the skill further is optional.  
If you don't have access to this skill you can always bash chests open with 
weapons or magic, or just use a Knock spell.


- Parry -
Attribute Basis: Dexterity
Armor Check: Yes
Untrained: Yes
Use: Selected
Class Skill: Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue.

This skill will only be useful in extremely unique situations, and even then 
its usefulness is debatable.  It's only effective with high Dexterity 
characters.  You can only parry as many attacks as you have attacks, so it's 
rather useless against multiple opponents or even an opponent that has more 
attacks than you.  It's also only effective with a high skill level, so you 
have to max the skill out and probably spend a feat on Improved Parry and maybe 
even Skill Focus (Parry).  After all of this you gain the ability to fight an 
opponent to a stalemate, unless you perform so well that you best the DC by ten 
points and can then execute a counterattack.  Most players avoid this skill.


- Perform - 
Attribute Basis: Charisma
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Selected
Class Skill: (Exclusively) Bard.

This skill is unique to the Bard.  It affects the power of his Bardsong and 
should be constantly maxed out.  If you neglect this skill, there really isn't 
much reason to be a Bard.


- Persuade -
Attribute Basis: Charisma
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Automatic
Class Skill: Bard, Cleric, Druid, Monk, Paladin, Rogue.

This skill is fairly useful for the official campaign.  It allows you to access 
new side quests and receive greater rewards for completing them.  However, if 
you are playing other modules this skill is only intermittently put to use, so 
it becomes much less valuable.


- Pick Pocket -
Attribute Basis: Dexterity
Armor Check: Yes
Untrained: No
Use: Selected
Class Skill: Bard, Rogue.

This skill isn't usually extraordinarily useful, but it can be a lot of fun.  
Early on it can be used to gather small amounts of gold from city dwellers with 
the danger of setting the town guards on you.  It could be useful in 
multiplayer games to rob characters that have neglected their Spot skill.  Be 
careful though, if you fail your skill checks you will be detected.  It is 
easier to steal from neutral creatures than from hostile creatures who get a 
+10 bonus to their DC.


- Search -
Attribute Basis: Intelligence
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Automatic & Selected (Detect Mode)
Class Skill: Ranger, Rogue.

This skill allows characters to locate traps.  It is valuable for everyone and 
essential for the Rogue.  Particularly tough traps (DC 35 or greater) will only 
be detectable by a Rogue, and they should max this skill out.  Characters 
normally scan five feet ahead of them, but they will scan ten feet ahead of 
them while in Detect Mode.  Elves have keen senses and always scan ten feet 
ahead of them.  Remember, just because you see a trap doesn't mean the rest of 
your party does.  Be sure to let your party know.  The "flag" ability via 
Disable Trap makes the trap visible for the rest of your party.


- Set Trap -
Attribute Basis: Dexterity
Armor Check: Yes
Untrained: No
Use: Selected
Class Skill: Ranger, Rogue.

There are usually more effective ways to defeat your enemies, but setting 
traps can often give you an edge (or just be plain fun).  This skill is purely 
optional, but can be used to deadly effectiveness by a strategic player.  If 
you gain five ranks in Set Trap you get +2 to your Disable Trap skill.  If you 
fail your skill roll by ten or more while in combat, you will trigger the trap 
you are trying to set.


- Spellcraft -
Attribute Basis: Intelligence
Armor Check: No
Untrained: No
Use: Automatic
Class Skill: Bard, Cleric, Druid, Sorcerer, Wizard.

Spellcraft allows you to identify the spells being cast by your opponent.  
This could be purely informational or you could put it to good use and 
counterspell.  In fact, Spellcraft is mandatory when it comes to 
counterspelling, as a spell must be identified before it can be counterspelled.  
In addition, for every five ranks in this skill you gain a +1 bonus to saving 
throws vs. all spells, so even if you don't plan on counterspelling this skill 
can still be a useful place for anybody to spend his extra skill points.  The 
DC of the spell is determined as [15 + the spell's level].  A specialist Wizard 
gains +2 to his skill check when dealing with spells from his chosen school, 
and -5 when dealing with spells from his prohibited school.


- Spot -
Attribute Basis: Wisdom
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Selected (Detect Mode)
Class Skill: Ranger, Rogue.

This skill is similar to Listen except that it works against the Hide skill.  
Like Listen it's usually good to have at least one member in the party with a 
high Spot skill.  Again, this job usually falls to the Rogue.  The Alertness 
feat adds +2 to Spot skill checks.


- Taunt -
Attribute Basis: Charisma
Armor Check: No
Untrained: Yes
Use: Selected
Class Skill: Barbarian, Bard, Paladin.

This skill can be very useful, particularly against characters that ignore 
their Concentration skill.  If successful, it will lower the Armor Class of 
its victim by up to six points for five rounds.  It also inflicts a 30% chance 
of spell failure on spellcasters, but unfortunately, most spellcasters will 
likely have a high Concentration skill.  After Discipline, this can be a useful 
skill for warrior types to place their surplus skill points.


- Use Magic Device -
Attribute Basis: Charisma
Armor Check: No
Untrained: No
Use: Automatic
Class Skill: (Exclusively) Bard, Rogue.

This skill can only be used by the Rogue and Bard and both should probably 
take advantage of it.  They will find themselves able to use a wide assortment 
of scrolls and wands, as well as class, race, or alignment restricted equipment 
that would normally be inaccessible.  A very useful skill.  The DC is 
determined by the value of the item.


|=============================================================================|
  F E A T S                                                              2.04
|=============================================================================|

- Receiving Feats -
Every character receives a feat at character level 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18.  
Humans receive a bonus feat at 1st level.  Fighters, Rogues, and Wizards also 
receive bonus feats that can be selected from a reduced list.  Other classes 
will receive some of these feats for free at certain levels -- and many 
classes receive class-specific feats that aren't listed here.  Taking some 
time to plan out which feats you will take, particularly at the early levels, 
can be helpful.


- Sap -
The Sap feat is listed in the manual, but it was ultimately removed from the 
game as a player option.  Therefore it is not accessible, and is no longer a 
requirement for Stunning Fist nor is Called Shot required for it.


<----------------->
 Proficiency feats
<----------------->

- Armor Proficiency Light -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Armor Proficiency Medium.

This armor proficiency allows you to wear Padded, Leather, Studded Leather, 
and Hide armor types.  Only Wizards, Sorcerers, and Monks lack this 
proficiency.  Since all three of those classes receive severe penalties to 
their core abilities if they wear armor, you'll not likely find yourself ever 
selecting this feat.


- Armor Proficiency Medium -
Type: General
Prerequisites: Armor Proficiency Light.
Required For: Armor Proficiency Heavy.

This armor proficiency allows you to wear Chain Shirt, Scale Mail, Chainmail, 
and Breastplate armor types.  Only Wizards, Sorcerers, Monks, and Rogues lack 
this proficiency.  The first three will definitely avoid this feat for reasons 
mentioned above.  Certain non-stealthy, low-Dexterity Rogues might find it 
useful, although it will probably be more practical to obtain it through 
multi-classing.


- Armor Proficiency Heavy -
Type: General
Prerequisites: Armor Proficiency Medium.
Required For: Nothing.

This armor proficiency allows you to wear Splint Mail, Banded Mail, Half-Plate, 
and Full Plate armor types.  Most characters get proficiency with the armor 
types they should use.  However, a Barbarian, Druid, or Ranger might find this 
feat useful.  A better approach usually is to just multi-class with a class 
that offers this feat for free, such as Fighter.


- Shield -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

Only Wizards, Sorcerers, Monks, and Rogues lack this proficiency.  Wizards and 
Sorcerers will avoid shields because they interfere with their Arcane 
spellcasting, although it is feasible that they could pull a shield out after 
their spells are used to protect themselves.  A shield will also interfere 
with many of the Monk's class abilities.  Rogues can sometimes benefit from 
this feat though.  While they won't want to carry around a shield most of the 
time because it penalizes many of their skills, it can be useful to pull out a 
shield during combat to increase their AC.


- Weapon Proficiency Simple -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

All characters except the Druid, Monk, Rogue, and Wizard are proficient with 
all simple weapons.  These include the club, dagger, mace, sickle, spear, 
morningstar, quarterstaff, light crossbow, dart, sling, and heavy crossbow.  
Weapons are relatively useless to the Monk and the other characters come with 
the proficiencies they need to be effective.  Usually, the most efficient way 
to increase your weapon proficiencies is to multi-class.  Druids cannot choose 
this feat, but the may obtain it when multi-classing.


- Weapon Proficiency Martial -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

Only Barbarians, Fighters, Paladins, and Rangers are proficient with all 
martial weapons which includes the battleaxe, greataxe, greatsword, halberd, 
handaxe, heavy flail, light flail, light hammer, longbow, longsword, rapier, 
scimitar, short sword, shortbow, throwing axe, and warhammer.  Other 
characters may receive a few of these proficiencies -- particularly Elves.  
This feat might be useful for a Bard, Cleric, or Rogue to take in order to 
widen their weapon selection.  Monks, Sorcerers, and Wizards will likely find 
this feat frivolous.  As always, multi-classing is often a better option.  
Druids cannot choose this feat, but the may obtain it when multi-classing.

NOTE: All Elves are proficient with the longsword, rapier, shortbow, and 
longbow.  Choosing an Elf character can be an effective way for a Bard, Cleric, 
Druid, Monk, or Rogue, Sorcerer, or Wizard to gain these useful proficiencies 
without wasting a feat or needlessly multi-classing.


- Weapon Proficiency Exotic -
Type: General
Prerequisites: +1 BAB.
Required For: Nothing.

Exotic weapons include the bastard sword, dire mace, double axe, kama, katana, 
kukuri, scythe, shuriken, and two-bladed sword.  Except for the Monk who 
automatically gains proficiency with the kama and shuriken, these weapons are 
initially inaccessible to all classes.  This feat offers access to many 
effective weapons, and is worth considering for any warrior type.  All of the 
double-weapons -- the dire mace, double axe, and two-bladed sword -- are 
exotic weapons.  The katana and bastard sword are the highest damaging weapon 
a medium sized character can wield in one hand.  The kukuri is a tiny weapon 
with an extremely large (18-20) critical threat range.  And the scythe is the 
only weapon that offers a x4 multiplier for critical hits.  This feat is not 
necessary to be an effective warrior, but it provides you with the opportunity 
to be a bit different with some powerful alternate strategies.  It can also 
allow you complete access to the magical weapons no one else in your party can 
use.  Druids cannot choose this feat, but the may obtain it while 
multi-classing.


<------------------------->
 Skill and attribute feats
<------------------------->

- Alertness -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat gives a +2 bonus to your Spot and Listen skills which really isn't 
that valuable.  It's almost certain you'll be able to find something better to 
choose.  A character maxed out in Spot and Listen will find the bonus 
negligible, and a character with no Spot and Listen skills will find the bonus 
inadequate.  The only time you'd probably want to take this skill is if you 
find yourself in a party playing a very scout-specific role.


- Improved Parry -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Intelligence.
Required For: Nothing.

Improved Parry grants a +4 bonus to your defensive roles while in Parry mode, 
and no Parry skilled character should be without it.


- Skill Focus -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

Like Alertness, Skill Focus seems to be less valuable than most other feats.  
It offers a +3 bonus to the skill of your choice, which won't be a big deal 
when you max out your skills at high level.  It could be used as an early boost 
to a critical skill or a way to make a master of Parry even more masterful.  
Bards may turn to it to boost their crucial Perform skill.  Odds are though 
that unless you have a very specific job, you'll be able to find a more useful 
feat to take.


- Great Fortitude -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat grants a +2 bonus to all Fortitude saving throws.  It's not the most 
useful feat, but it could be a good way to balance out your weaknesses if no 
other feats catch your eye.  Bards, Rogues, Sorcerers, and Wizards typically 
have the weakest Fortitude saving throws.


- Lightning Reflexes -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat grants a +2 bonus to all Reflex saving throws.  It's not the most 
useful feat, but it could be a good way to balance out your weaknesses if no 
other feats catch your eye.  Barbarians, Clerics, Druids, Fighters, Paladins, 
Rangers, Sorcerers, and Wizards typically have the weakest Reflex saving 
throws.


- Iron Will -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat grants a +2 bonus to all Will saving throws.  It's not the most 
useful feat, but it could be a good way to balance out your weaknesses if no 
other feats catch your eye.  Barbarians, Fighters, Paladins, Rangers, and 
Rogues typically have the weakest Will saving throws.


- Toughness -
Type: General
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat will appeal to just about everyone as it gives one bonus hit point 
per level.  For this reason it's best to take at a high level after all other 
essential feats have been taken.


<------------------>
 Combat style feats
<------------------>

- Ambidexterity -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 15+ Dexterity.
Required For: Improved Two-Weapon Fighting.

This feat evens out the penalties on your off-hand while dual-wielding, 
treating your left and right handed attacks the same by reducing the off-hand 
penalty by four points.  It's pretty much essential for dual-wielders, not 
only for the reduced penalties, but also because it allows access to Improved 
Two-Weapon Fighting.  The 15 Dexterity score requirement will often be too 
much for many warrior types to manage though.

NOTE: Rangers don't actually get this feat (and therefore don't qualify for 
Improved Two-Weapon Fighting), but get an equivalent bonus when wearing light 
armor or less.  Rangers also don't need to meet the 15 Dexterity requirement 
to get this bonus, although they'll usually have a fair amount of Dexterity 
anyway to compensate for the low AC of light armor.


- Two-Weapon Fighting -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Improved Two-Weapon Fighting.

Two-Weapon Fighting is another essential feat for dual-wielders.  While 
dual-wielding, it reduces the penalties of your normal and off-hand attacks by 
two points each.  It is also a prerequisite for the highly essential Improved 
Two-Weapon Fighting feat.

NOTE: Rangers don't actually get this feat (and therefore don't qualify for 
Improved Two-Weapon Fighting), but get an equivalent bonus when wearing light 
armor or less.


- Improved Two-Weapon Fighting -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: Ambidexterity, Two-Weapon Fighting, +9 BAB.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat grants you a second off-hand attack at a -5 penalty from that attack 
bonus of your first off-hand attack.  (This is essentially the same as how a 
second attack works with your primary hand).  All dual-wielders should take 
this feat as soon as it becomes available to get the most out of their 
dual-wielding.  

NOTE: Rangers don't actually receive the Ambidexterity and Two-Weapon Fighting 
feats, but they will receive this feat for free at 9th level anyway.  They 
don't need to wear light armor to get the second off-hand attack, but they will 
still need to wear it to retain the penalty reductions provided by 
Ambidexterity and Two-Weapon Fighting.


- Weapon Finesse -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: +1 BAB.
Required For: Nothing.

Weapon Finesse is a lifesaver for some characters, allowing them to use their 
Dexterity modifier as the basis for attacks instead of their Strength modifier 
when using light weapons.  These weapons include the dagger, kukri, light 
hammer, handaxe, kama, mace, sickle, shortsword, rapier, and unarmed attacks.  
If the Strength modifier ever happens to be higher, the character will 
automatically switch to the higher modifier.  High Dexterity characters such 
as Bards, Rogues, Rangers, and some Monks will want to obtain this feat as 
soon as possible.  Characters with high Strength or pure spellcasters can 
safely ignore this feat.

NOTE: The rapier is only finessable for a Medium-sized character as a 
Small-sized character must wield it with two hands.


<------------------->
 Combat tactic feats
<------------------->

- Called Shot -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: +1 BAB.
Required For: Nothing.

This is probably one of the less useful combat tricks.  You must attempt to hit 
with a -4 penalty and then you must overcome the target's Discipline skill.  If 
you strike the legs the opponent's movement rate is decrease by 20% and they 
lose 2 points of Dexterity (which could also decrease their AC) for four 
rounds.  If you strike the arms they lose 2 points to their attack rolls for 
four rounds.  The interesting factor is that the -2 to Dexterity and attack 
roles are cumulative, meaning that repeated use or use by several characters at 
once could quickly add up and seriously disable the opponent.  


- Disarm -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Intelligence.
Required For: Improved Disarm.

A moderately useful combat trick.  You suffer a -6 penalty to hit, the 
combatant with the larger weapon gains a +4 bonus per size category of 
difference, and you must overcome your opponents Discipline skill.  Every 
disarm attempt provokes an attack of opportunity.  If you successfully hit, 
you must then overcome the target's Discipline skill to relieve them of their 
weapon.  At this point the weapon is on the ground and can be picked up by 
anyone, or if you are fighting unarmed you may take the weapon into your own 
hands.  If the opponent doesn't have the Improved Unarmed Strike feat and 
attempts to fight unarmed he will provoke an attack of opportunity with every 
attack.  He could, of course, also choose to pick up his weapon or pull out a 
new one.  This feat is best used by characters with large weapons and high 
attack bonuses against characters with small weapons and a low Discipline 
skill -- and preferably without the Improved Unarmed Strike feat.


- Improved Disarm -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Intelligence, Disarm.
Required For: Nothing.

Improved Disarm works similar to Disarm except that the attack penalty is 
reduced to -4 and you no longer provoke an attack of opportunity.  If you 
take Disarm then you should definitely consider taking Improved Disarm as 
soon as possible.


- Knockdown -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Improved Knockdown.

One of the most useful combat tricks.  You suffer a -4 penalty to hit, and the 
larger combatant gets a +4 bonus per size category of difference.  If you 
successfully hit, you must then overcome the target's Discipline skill to knock 
them to a prone position.  Characters attacking a the knockdown victim receive 
a +4 to attack with melee weapons, but a -4 to attack with ranged weapons.  In 
addition, any spells in progress are interrupted, regardless of Concentration.  
It takes a full round to stand back up again.  This feat is particularly useful 
against spellcasters as they often have a low Discipline skill.  It is also 
more useful if you have several party members around to gang up on the prone 
character and take advantage of the attack bonus.  Monks receive this feat and 
Improved Knockdown for free at 6th level.


- Improved Knockdown -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Intelligence, +7 BAB, Knockdown.
Required For: Nothing.

Improved Knockdown works similar to Knockdown except that you act as one size 
category larger than you really are.  For instance, medium sized characters 
perform the feat as large sized characters.  Monks receive Knockdown and this 
feat for free at 6th level.


- Power Attack -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Strength.
Required For: Cleave, Improved Power Attack.

Perhaps the least useful combat trick.  You suffer a -5 penalty to hit for a 
+5 bonus to damage.  This is mainly a convenience feat, allowing you to quickly 
clear out weak enemies or bash through chests.  It is however, a prerequisite 
for the extremely useful Cleave feat which is reason enough to take it.


- Improved Power Attack -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Strength, Power Attack.
Required For: Nothing.

Improved Power Attack works similar to Power Attack except that you now take a 
-10 penalty to receive a +10 penalty to damage.


- Stunning Fist -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Dexterity, 13+ Wisdom, +8 BAB, Improved Unarmed Strike.
Required For: Nothing.

Monks receive this feet for free at 1st level and are likely going to be the 
only class to put it to use.  Other characters will have a tough time meeting 
all the prerequisites.  They can then execute this attack while unarmed with a 
-4 penalty to hit and damage.  If they hit, the opponent must make a Fortitude 
save or be held for three rounds.  This feat is more effective at higher 
levels and with a high Wisdom modifier, as well as when used on a character 
with a low Fortitude save (Bards, Rogues, Wizards, and Sorcerers).  The attack 
may be used once per day for every four levels of the character.  It does not 
work on creatures that are immune to critical hits.

NOTE: The Monk does not suffer the -4 penalty to hit and damage and may use 
this ability once per day per level.


- Rapid Shot -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Dexterity, Point Blank Shot.
Required For: Nothing.

Rapid Shot is a necessity for archers.  However, it will not work with 
crossbows as they have mandatory loading times.  For this reason, if you're 
serious about being a ranged warrior you should abandon the crossbow as soon 
as possible.  While in Rapid Shot mode you gain an extra attack per round at 
your highest attack bonus, but all attacks within that round suffer a -2 
penalty to hit.  The extra attack is usually worth it, but if you find 
yourself fighting a particularly tough opponent and missing too often, you can 
quickly switch it off for more accuracy.


<------------------------>
 Combat enhancement feats
<------------------------>

- Improved Unarmed Strike -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Stunning Fist, Deflect Arrows.

This feat is mostly useful for Monks and they receive it for free at 1st level.  
Improved Unarmed Strike allows you to attack unarmed and not provoke an attack 
of opportunity.  Non-Monk characters will do too little damage to consider 
unarmed fighting, but it could become useful if you are disarmed.  The 
Discipline skill, however, is a more effective way of countering that tactic.


- Cleave -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Strength, Power Attack.
Required For: Nothing.

Cleave is one of the most useful feats for melee warriors.  Every time you kill 
an opponent in melee combat, you get a free attack against another adjacent 
opponent.  Those free attacks will be extremely useful against multiple 
opponents.  Unfortunately, Cleave can only be used once per round.  Monks get 
it for free at 1st level.


- Point Blank Shot -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: None.
Required For: Rapid Shot.

This is a necessary feat for any archer.  It negates the -4 penalty to hit for 
using ranged weapons within melee attack range, and it provides a +1 to attack 
and damage with ranged weapon when the target is within 15 feet.  It is also 
the prerequisite for Rapid Shot, another necessity for archers.  If you never 
use ranged weapons or quickly switch to melee after firing off a shot or two 
then you can ignore this feat.


<--------------------->
 Weapon training feats
<--------------------->

- Weapon Focus -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: +1 BAB, proficiency with chosen weapon.
Required For: Weapon Specialization.

Weapon Focus is another feat for almost everyone but the pure spellcaster.  
Unless you're one of those characters that likes to keep his weapon options 
open, you can take this feat to get a +1 attack bonus with your weapon of 
choice.  You can even select it multiple times on different weapons if you 
have several weapons of choice.


- Improved Critical -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: +8 BAB, proficiency with chosen weapon.
Required For: Nothing.

This is probably the most useful feat when it comes to specializing with a 
particular weapon.  It doubles the critical threat range of any weapon you 
wield of the selected type.  For instance, 20 would become 19-20 and 19-20 
would become 17-20.  Nearly every character should consider taking this feat.  
The only exceptions would be pure spellcasters or characters that find 
themselves continually switching between weapon types (or that want to be 
ready to use any type of magical weapon that comes along).


<--------------->
 Defensive feats
<--------------->

- Deflect Arrows -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Dexterity, Improved Unarmed Strike.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat grants the character the ability to deflect one missile attack per 
round.  The save is reflex based against a DC of 20.  Monks get it for free at 
2nd level and other characters are not likely going to want to spend the feats 
to obtain it.


- Dodge -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Dexterity.
Required For: Mobility.

This feat  provides a nice +1 Dodge bonus to AC for attacks coming from the 
character's current target.  The AC bonus is small however, and may not stack 
if you are already receiving +10 Dodge AC from equipment and other 
enchantments.


- Mobility -
Type: Fighter
Prerequisites: 13+ Dexterity, Dodge.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat is useful for characters that find themselves provoking attacks of 
opportunity often.  This includes spellcasters casting in combat, ranged 
attackers, or Rogues trying to sneak through combat to set up a sneak attack.  
The feat provides a +4 Dodge bonus to AC against every attack of opportunity 
-- which may not be useful if you have already reached the +10 maximum for 
Dodge AC.


<------------------------------->
 Magic and special ability feats
<------------------------------->

- Combat Casting -
Type: Wizard
Prerequisites: Ability to cast 1st level spells.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat removes the -4 penalty to Concentration checks when engaged in 
melee combat, and is thus a must have for almost all spellcasters.  
Spellcasters that only use their magic outside of combat or do a good job of 
keeping their distance might not need this feat.  At high levels the -4 
penalty becomes less significant with a high Concentration skill, but this 
feat is usually essential to survival through the low levels.


- Spell Penetration -
Type: Wizard
Prerequisites: Ability to cast 1st level spells.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat provides a +2 bonus to caster level checks to beat a creature's spell 
resistance, and most serious spellcasters will find it somewhat useful.


- Spell Focus -
Type: Wizard
Prerequisites: Ability to cast 1st level spells.
Required For: Nothing.

This feat grants a +2 bonus to the DC of any spell cast from the selected 
school of magic.  It may be selected repeatedly for a different school of 
magic each time.  Evocation is usually the first choice for this spell as many 
of the most powerful offensive spells lie in this school.  Necromancy is often 
a close second, and Conjuration, Enchantment, and Illusion also offer many 
spells that would gain from a tougher saving throw.  Schools like Abjuration, 
Divination, and Transmutation usually have little to gain from Spell Focus.


- Silent Spell -
Type: Wizard (Metamagic)
Prerequisites: Ability to cast 1st level spells.
Required For: Nothing.

Silent spells can be cast without the usual verbal component.  This can be 
useful to stealthy characters, allowing them to use their magic and remain 
hidden.  It can also be used to cast spells while being inflicted with Silence.  
Silent spells occupy a spell slot one level higher than normal.


- Still Spell -
Type: Wizard (Metamagic)
Prerequisites: Ability to cast 1st level spells.
Required For: Nothing.


Still spells can be cast without the usual somatic component.  This can be 
useful for Arcane spellcaster that want to use their magic while wearing armor, 
as still spells are not affected by Arcane spell failure due to armor or 
shields.  I can also be used to cast spells while being inflicted by any 
malady that prevents movement.  Still spells occupy a spell slot one level 
higher than normal.


- Extend Spell -
Type: Wizard (Metamagic)
Prerequisites: Ability to cast 1st level spells.
Required For: Nothing.

Extended spells are cast with a 100% increase to duration, which is 
particularly useful for buffing spells.  Extended spells occupy a spell slot 
one level higher than normal.


- Empower Spell -
Type: Wizard (Metamagic)
Prerequisites: Ability to cast 2nd level spells..
Required For: Nothing.

Empowered spells are cast with a 50% increase to variable numeric effects, 
excluding duration.  Empowered spells occupy a spell slot two levels higher 
than normal.


- Maximize Spell -
Type: Wizard (Metamagic)
Prerequisites: Ability to cast 3rd level spells.
Required For: Nothing.

Maximized spells are cast with all variable numeric effects applied at their 
maximum, which is particularly useful for damage inflicting spells.  Maximized 
spells occupy a spell slot three levels higher than normal.


- Quicken Spell -
Type: Wizard (Metamagic)
Prerequisites: Ability to cast 4th level spells.
Required For: Nothing.

Quickened spells are cast instantaneously allowing another action to be taken 
the same round, but only one Quickened spell can be cast per round.  Quickened 
spells are also invulnerable to counterspells or interruption.  This can be 
useful for particular strategies, but most find their price to high as 
Quickened spells occupy a spell slot four levels higher than normal.


|=============================================================================|
  C O M B A T   S T Y L E S                                              2.05
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
When creating a character, it can be helpful to decide ahead of time which 
kind of combat styles the character will engage in.  This is because most 
combat styles require particular feats and attribute scores to be most 
effective.  I have listed the primary styles below along with a brief 
discussion of what is required and what characters will find them most 
effective.  It's important to remember that many characters will find it useful 
to be adept at several different fighting styles, and some characters -- namely 
the pure spellcaster -- might ignore all of them in favor of his spells.


- Strength vs. Dexterity -
One of the first decisions you'll need to make concerning your character is 
whether he will be Strength based or Dexterity based.  By default, the Strength 
modifier is added to your attack roles.  However, if you take the Weapon 
Finesse feat and use light weapons you can use your Dexterity modifier for your 
attack roles.  Ranged attacks are always Dexterity based.  Strength based 
characters usually wear heavy armor, do more damage, and are best suited for 
two-handed weapons or weapon/shield combat styles -- they make the best melee 
characters.  Dexterity based characters usually wear light armor and derive an 
AC bonus from their Dexterity.  They are well suited for ranged attacks, and 
often make good dual-wielders.  Dexterity based characters are usually focused 
on something else (spells, skills, archery) and use Weapon Finesse in order to 
engage in melee combat as a secondary ability.


- Unarmed -
This style is really only suited for the Monk class.  Even with training, most 
characters will find they do too little damage to be effective.  The Monk 
however, gets all the necessary feats for free and has the ability to turn his 
fists into the most damaging weapons in the game, making this his primary 
combat style.  Other characters, however, may want to slightly develop their 
unarmed style as a precaution against being disarmed.  The Improved Unarmed 
Strike feat is a necessity for this style as it allows you to attack unarmed 
without provoking an attack of opportunity.  Stunning Fist can also be a useful 
addition.  Weapon Focus, Weapon Specialization, and Improved Critical can all 
be taken for unarmed fighting, and Weapon Finesse will work for characters that 
have a higher Dexterity than Strength.  A character heavily dependent on 
shapeshifting, such as a Druid, can also benefit from developing his unarmed 
combat abilities.

NOTE: Shields can be used while fighting unarmed, however a Monk will lose most 
of his special class abilities if he attempts to use a shield.


- One-Handed Weapon -
This style is not really ideal for anyone, but you may find yourself using it 
for lack of a better choice.  Most characters should use a shield, but you may 
lack the proficiency.  Stealthy or Parry-minded characters may go without a 
shield in order to avoid skill penalties.  Arcane spellcasters will avoid 
shields to prevent Arcane spell failure.  If possible, carry a shield and use 
it when it won't interfere with your abilities, or take the necessary training 
to effectively dual-wield.


- One-Handed Weapon & Shield -
This is the most defensive combat style available as a quality shield can 
provide a significant boost to your Armor Class.  Melee characters with 
slightly less Hit Points, such as the Druid, Cleric, Bard, or Rogue, will find 
this style ideal for keeping them alive in combat.  It's even a good idea for 
just about every character to carry around a one-handed weapon and shield to 
switch to for increased defense in particularly challenging fights.


- Two-Handed Weapon -
This is the ideal style for characters with a high Strength score and enough 
hit points and armor to survive through battles without shields.  Large weapons 
are already among the most damaging, and when wielded with two hands they 
receive a 50% increase to the Strength modifier damage bonus.  It's a good idea 
to have a one-handed weapon and shield option available for when you find 
yourself taking too much damage though.  Characters wielding large weapons will 
usually excel with the Disarm feat as you receive a bonus for having a larger 
weapon than your opponent.


- Dual Wielding -
This style sacrifices accuracy for one or two extra attacks.  Without training 
and proper weapon selection the attack penalties will be too high to be 
tolerable, but with proper character development these penalties can be reduced 
to a mere -2 to all your attacks.  You'll want to immediately pick up the 
Ambidexterity and Two-Weapon Fighting feats to drastically reduce your 
penalties.  At later levels you'll want to pick up the Improved Two-Weapon 
Fighting feat which grants the ability to make a second off-hand attack.  
Fighting with a double-weapon or a light weapon in the off-hand further reduces 
the penalties by two points, but it's not entirely necessary.  (A light weapon 
is defined as a weapon that is at least one size category smaller than the 
character.)  Your damage bonus from Strength is cut by 50% for your off-hand 
attacks.

Rangers receive the Dual-Wielding feat for free at 1st level, which is the 
equivalent of having Ambidexterity and Two-Weapon Fighting feats while wearing 
light armor.  They do not need a Dexterity score of 15.  You cannot use the 
Dual-Wielding feat to qualify for Improved Two-Weapon Fighting, but a Ranger 
will receive that feat for free at 9th level anyway.

Most dual-wielders are Dexterity based characters -- largely because the 
Ambidexterity feat requires a Dexterity score of 15 or they are playing as a 
Ranger that is restricted to light armor and requires an AC boost from 
Dexterity.  The light weapon restrictions fit well with the Weapon Finesse feat 
which nearly every Dexterity based character will take.  A Rapier works with 
Weapon Finesse and makes an excellent choice for the main hand, although it 
will not work in the off-hand without penalties.

Dual-wielding is not entirely impossible for Strength based characters.  A well 
rounded character might have enough Dexterity to qualify for Ambidexterity.  
You could also choose to ignore Ambidexterity, although this is not recommended 
as you will suffer severe penalties with your off-hand and not be able to take 
Improved Two-Weapon Fighting.  Strength based characters are not limited to 
light weapons like Dexterity based characters, and should consider wielding 
double-weapons or two heavy weapons and accepting the resulting penalties.

No matter what type of dual-wielder you are, it can be an effective strategy 
to wield the same type of weapon in both hands.  This is because you can double 
the advantages of Weapon Focus, Weapon Specialization, and Improved Critical.  
This might mean that you use a lighter weapon than possible in your main hand, 
or it might mean that you use a heavy weapon in your off-hand and accept some 
penalties.  Double-weapons fill this role perfectly.  On the other hand, 
depending on what weapons you have available, you should feel free to break 
away from this principle as you see fit.  Pure Fighters may have enough feats 
to pick up Weapon Focus, Weapon Specialization, and Improved Critical for two 
different weapons.

Finally, sometimes you may find it worthwhile for a character to dual-wield 
purely for the enchantments provided by certain weapons.  For instance, a 
Sorcerer may have no dual-wielding abilities, yet still carry two short swords 
because they provide Haste, Improved Evasion, or extra spells.  Since the 
Sorcerer doesn't plan on engaging in melee combat anyway, this offers no 
disadvantages.


- Ranged -
Nearly every character type can take advantage of this combat style.  Melee 
characters can use it to get a few shots off before switching to their melee 
weapons (although if their Dexterity is low they may not hit very often), and 
spellcasters can use it to avoid battle but still contribute when they don't 
have spells to cast.  Some characters may choose to play the role of a pure 
archer.  Dexterity based characters will make the best ranged attackers as the 
Dexterity modifier is always used for ranged attacks.  Point Blank Shot is 
helpful for all archers, and Rapid Shot is a necessity for all archers not 
wielding some form of crossbow.  The ranged combat style is especially 
effective for Rogues as they can apply their sneak attack damage bonus for 
attacks within 30 feet.


- Arcane Spellcasting -
Arcane spellcasting is not really a combat style, but I'll discuss it here as 
it can affect your choices.  Arcane spellcasting is used by the Bard, Sorcerer, 
and Wizard.  Armor and shields interfere with Arcane spellcasting and for this 
reason these characters usually go without them, making these characters 
particularly vulnerable in melee situations.  Their need to avoid direct combat 
and their normally decent Dexterity scores makes the ranged combat style most 
suited for them -- although Bards have much more flexibility on this point.  
Arcane spellcasters can also usually benefit from taking the Dodge and 
Mobility feats for improved defense.


- Divine Spellcasting -
Divine spellcasting is not really a combat style, but I'll discuss it here as 
it can affect your choices.  Divine spellcasting is used by the Cleric, Druid, 
Paladin, and Ranger.  Unlike Arcane spellcasting, armor and shields provide no 
interference with their magic abilities, allowing them to suit up in the 
heaviest armor and carry tower shields and engage directly in melee combat.  
Clerics and Druids are more spellcaster than warrior and are therefore well 
suited to the weapon/shield style.  Since Divine casters often find themselves 
in the midst of melee combat, the Combat Casting feat can prove especially 
useful.


|=============================================================================|
  S A V I N G   T H R O W S                                              2.06
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
There are three different types of saving throws: Fortitude, Reflex, and Will.  
These three saving throws represent a character's various ability at avoiding 
different types of danger.  Saving throws are largely dependent on class.  
Each class will have saving throws that it considers primary, and gains 
quickly in, as well as saving throws that is considers secondary, and gains 
more slowly in.  In addition, attributes, equipment, and feats can further 
modify a saving throw.  It's important to know your character's weaknesses in 
order to protect against them or avoid dangerous situations.  In addition, 
it's valuable to know the weaknesses of certain classes, so that you can use 
abilities and spells against them that they are most likely to fail avoiding.


- Fortitude -
Fortitude represents the physical body's ability to resist trauma.  Poison, 
disease, stunning, and instant death spells all normally target Fortitude 
saves.  Fortitude is augmented by a character's Constitution modifier, and 
it can be further increased by taking the Greater Fortitude feat.  The 
following classes are usually weak against Fortitude saves: Bards, Rogues, 
Sorcerers, and Wizards.


- Reflex -
Reflect represents a character's ability to react quickly and move out of 
danger.  Many standard damaging spells involving explosions and hurling 
various types of elemental energy test a character's Reflex save -- as the 
only way to avoid damage is to quickly get out of the way.  In addition, 
traps also typically target Reflex saves.  Reflex is augmented by a 
character's Dexterity modifier, and it can be further increased by taking 
the Lighting Reflexes feat.  The following classes are usually weak against 
Reflex saves: Fighters, Barbarians, Rangers, Paladins, Clerics, Druids, 
Sorcerers, and Wizards.


- Will -
Will represents the power of the mind to resist illusions or dominance.  
Many enchantment type affects like charm, confusion, or fear will target 
Will saves.  Will is augmented by a character's Wisdom modifier, and it can 
be further increased by taking the Iron Will feat.  The following classes are 
usually weak against Will saves: Fighters, Barbarians, Ranger, Paladins, and 
Rogues.


- Spells -
The saving throw system is heavily used with spells.  Almost all offensive 
spells offer a saving throw, sometimes more than one, and often with 
conditions and modifications.  The basic formula for determining the DC of a 
spell is [10 + spell level + spellcasting modifier].  The spellcasting 
modifier is taken from the attribute that governs the spellcasting for 
whatever class cast the spell.  For example, a Wizard would use his 
Intelligence modifier.  This formula also shows that higher level spells are 
more difficult to save against than lower level spells.  Spell Focus further 
increases the DC of spells from a chosen school of magic.


- Spell Resistance -
This doesn't really relate directly to saving throws, but it is somewhat 
similar and this was the best place to put it.  Spell resistance represents 
the ability to ignore the affects of spells.  It is sort of like an AC against 
magic.  Monks develop it naturally, and other characters can acquire it 
through spells or equipment.  Many powerful creatures also have a natural 
spell resistance.  To affect a creature with spell resistance your roll of 
[1d20 + class level] must overcome the creature's spell resistance.  The Spell 
Penetration feat adds +2 to this roll.  Even if spell resistance is overcome, 
the creature still gets to make any applicable saving throws.


|=============================================================================|
  C L E R I C   D O M A I N S                                            2.07
|=============================================================================|

- Air Domain -
Special Ability: Turn Undead can be used to affect Elementals.
Bonus Spells: 
  3rd level Call Lightning (Druid 3) 
  6th level Chain Lightning (Wizard/Sorcerer 6)

The Air Domain is fairly useful as it provides two highly effective offensive 
spells.  It's ideal for the Cleric that likes to use offensive spells, and 
expanding the scope of your Turning abilities never hurts.


- Animal Domain -
Special Ability: Summon Creature spells are all increased one level in power.  
  In other words, Summon Creature I performs like Summon Creature II and so on.
Bonus Spells: 
  2nd level Cat's Grace (Bard, Ranger, Wizard/Sorcerer 2)
  3rd level True Seeing (Cleric 5; Druid 7; Wizard/Sorcerer 6)
  5th level Polymorph Self (Ranger, Wizard/Sorcerer 4)

The Animal Domain is to be avoided unless you are really interested in stronger 
summoned creatures.  Most Clerics can get by with normal or no summoned 
creatures, and Cat's Grace is probably better obtained from the War Domain if 
you need it at all.  You'll get True Seeing eventually anyway, and Polymorph 
Self isn't particularly useful.  It could work for an archer Cleric who wants 
to summon powerful creatures to protect himself while increasing his Dexterity 
for ranged accuracy.


- Death Domain -
Special Ability: Summon a negative plane avatar once per day.
Bonus Spells: 
  4th level Phantasmal Killer (Wizard/Sorcerer 4)
  5th level Enervation (Wizard/Sorcerer 4)

This is one of the worst Domains.  The special ability and spells are all 
pretty weak.  Enervation is also available in the Evil Domain, where it's 
equally worthless.  The negative plane avatar is extremely weak, and can only 
be summoned at the exclusion of your normal summon creature spells.  For more 
information on the negative plane avatar, check the Summoned Creatures 
section.


- Destruction Domain -
Special Ability: Turn Undead can be used to damage Constructs.
Bonus Spells:
  3rd level Stinking Cloud (Wizard/Sorcerer 3)
  6th level Acid Fog (Wizard/Sorcerer 6)

This is an average Domain.  Constructs are relatively tough opponents, so the 
ability to use your turning abilities to damage them can be useful.  The two 
provided spells are decent, but nothing spectacular.


- Earth Domain -
Special Ability: Turn Undead can be used to affect Elementals.
Bonus Spells:
  4th level Stoneskin (Druid, Wizard/Sorcerer 4)
  5th level Energy Buffer (Bard, Druid 6; Wizard/Sorcerer 5)

This is a below average Domain.  Stoneskin is very useful, but you'll probably 
be better off getting it from the Magic Domain (it can also be obtained from 
the Good and Strength Domains).  Energy Buffer is okay, but as a Cleric you'll 
already have some weaker forms of elemental protection.  Energy Buffer is also 
available through the Fire and Protection Domains.


- Evil Domain -
Special Ability: Turn Undead can be used to affect Outsiders.
Bonus Spells:
  2nd level Negative Energy Ray (Cleric 2; Wizard/Sorcerer 1)
  3rd level Negative Energy Burst (Wizard/Sorcerer 3)
  5th level Enervation (Wizard/Sorcerer 4)

The Evil Domain is an average choice.  It gives you a nice selection of early 
damaging spells, and the ability to turn Outsiders, but nothing too powerful.  
It's debatable how valuable it is to get Negative Energy Ray just one level 
earlier, and Negative Energy Burst can be better obtained through the Magic 
Domain.  Enervation is also available in the Death Domain.  Ultimately, other 
Domains just have more to offer.


- Fire Domain -
Special Ability: Turn Undead can be used to affect Elementals.
Bonus Spells:
  4th level Wall of Fire (Druid 5; Wizard/Sorcerer 6)
  5th level Energy Buffer (Bard, Druid 6; Wizard/Sorcerer 5)

The Fire Domain is another average choice.  Wall of Fire is mediocre and Energy 
Buffer isn't that necessary.  The ability to turn Elements is better obtained 
through the Air Domain.  Energy Buffer is also available in Earth and 
Protection Domains.


- Good Domain -
Special Ability: Turn Undead can be used to affect Outsiders.
Bonus Spells:
  4th level Stoneskin (Druid, Wizard/Sorcerer 4)
  5th level Lesser Planar Binding (Wizard/Sorcerer 5)

It's probably best to avoid the Good Domain.  Stoneskin is very useful, but 
better obtained through the Magic Domain (it is also available from the Earth 
and Strength Domains).  Lesser Planar Binding and the ability to turn 
Outsiders just doesn't compare to what some of the other Domains offer.


- Healing Domain -
Special Ability: All healing spells are empowered.
Bonus Spells:
  2nd level Cure Serious Wounds (Bard, Cleric 3; Druid, Paladin, Ranger 4)
  5th level Heal (Cleric 6; Druid 7)

This Domain doesn't provide any new spells, but it allows you to cast some 
powerful healing spells sooner.  Being able to cast Heal at 5th level can also 
free up slots for other powerful 6th level spells like Harm.  Having all your 
healing spells automatically cast at full strength is also highly convenient.  
Since the undead are damaged by healing spells, this Domain is also ideal for 
combating the undead and perfect for the undead-hunting Cleric.  This is one 
of the best Domains.


- Knowledge Domain -
Special Ability: None.
Bonus Spells:
  1st level Identify (Bard, Wizard/Sorcerer 1)
  2nd level Knock (Wizard/Sorcerer 2)
  3rd level Clairaudience/Clairvoyance (Bard, Wizard/Sorcerer 3)
  4th level True Seeing (Cleric 5; Druid 7; Wizard/Sorcerer 6)
  6th level Legend Lore (Bard 4, Wizard/Sorcerer 6)

This Domain offers no special ability and lots of bonus spells.  Unfortunately, 
most of the bonus spells are pretty much useless.  There are cheaper ways to 
identify items and open locks, and a Cleric rarely needs to boost his Listen 
and Spot checks.  True Seeing you'll get anyway as a 5th level spell.  Avoid 
this Domain.


- Magic Domain -
Special Ability: None.
Bonus Spells:
  1st level Mage Armor (Bard, Wizard/Sorcerer 1)
  2nd level Melf's Acid Arrow (Wizard/Sorcerer 2)
  3rd level Negative Energy Burst (Wizard/Sorcerer 3)
  4th level Stoneskin (Druid, Wizard/Sorcerer 4)
  5th level Ice Storm (Bard 6; Druid 5; Wizard/Sorcerer 4)

This Domain also offers no special abilities and lots of bonus spells.  
However, most of these spells are very useful.  If you are shopping for the 
valuable Stoneskin, this is the place to pick it up -- as well as a handful of 
offensive spells.  This is one of the better Domain options.


- Plant Domain -
Special Ability: Turn Undead can be used to affect Vermin.
Bonus Spells:
  2nd level Barkskin (Druid 2)
  7th level Creeping Doom (Druid 7)

This Domain allows you to expand your turning abilities to affect certain 
animals and pick up two useful Druid spells in the process.  Barkskin is a 
valuable way to pick up Natural AC besides wearing a magical amulet -- in the 
official campaign this will leave a spot free for Wisdom increasing amulets.  
Creeping Doom is a powerful offensive spell, particularly if used well.  This 
is one of the better Domains.


- Protection Domain -
Special Ability: Divine Protection allows you to cast an improved form of 
  Sanctuary once per day.  The DC is set at [10 + Cleric level + CHA modifier] 
  and the duration is [1 round per Cleric level + CHA modifier].
Bonus Spells:
  4th level Minor Globe of Invulnerability (Wizard/Sorcerer 4)
  5th level Energy Buffer (Bard, Druid 6; Wizard/Sorcerer 5)

This is an average Domain with an appropriate title.  The special ability and 
spells will help protect you from all kinds of threats.  However, Clerics 
aren't usually the most vulnerable classes and could probably get more use out 
of other Domains.


- Strength Domain -
Special Ability: Divine Strength lets you increase your Strength once per day 
  by [2 + 1 per 3 Cleric levels].  This effect lasts [1 round per Cleric level 
  + Charisma modifier].
Bonus Spells:
  3rd level Divine Power (Cleric 4)
  4th level Stoneskin (Druid, Wizard/Sorcerer 4)

This is a below average Domain.  The special ability is rather worthless as you 
can only use it once per day.  In addition, with the +10 attribute cap you'll 
find it becoming obsolete at you gather other equipment.  Really, you could 
just cast Bull's Strength instead.  Divine Power can be useful, but you'll get 
it anyway at 4th level.  And Stoneskin is better obtained through the Magic 
Domain (it is also available in the Earth and Good Domains).


- Sun Domain -
Special Ability: Exception Turning provides a +1d6 bonus to determine the 
  maximum Hit Die that can be turned, and a +1d4 bonus to the total number of 
  Hit Die turned.
Bonus Spells:
  2nd level Searing Light (Cleric 3)
  7th level Sunbeam (Cleric 8)

This is a useful domain for Clerics focused on their turning abilities and 
hunting undead.  The turning boost is very useful.  Both of the bonus spells 
would be received anyway though, making it less useful for Clerics not 
specifically built to fight the undead.


- Travel Domain -
Special Ability: None.
Bonus Spells:
  1st level Entangle (Druid, Ranger 1)
  2nd level Web (Wizard/Sorcerer 2)
  3rd level Freedom of Movement (Cleric, Druid, Paladin, Ranger 4)
  4th level Slow (Bard, Wizard/Sorcerer 3)
  5th level Haste (Bard, Wizard/Sorcerer 3)

This is a very mediocre Domain.  Most of the spells are useful but not very 
powerful -- meaning you'll probably end up casting other stuff.  Haste is very 
nice to have, but it's at 5th level, which is pretty high.  You'll almost 
definitely get more from other Domains.


- Trickery Domain -
Special Ability: Divine Trickery can be used once per day to provide a [1 per 
  2 Cleric level] boost to the Hide, Persuade, Search, Disable Traps, Move 
  Silently, Open Lock, and Pick Pocket skills.  These affects last for [5 
  turns + Charisma modifier].
Bonus Spells:
  2nd level Invisibility (Bard, Wizard/Sorcerer 2)
  3rd level Invisibility Sphere (Bard, Wizard/Sorcerer 3)
  5th level Improved Invisibility (Bard, Wizard/Sorcerer 4)

This is an interesting Domain.  With a slight emphasis on skills, the Cleric 
could use the Domain powers to become nearly as good as a Rogue for a short 
duration.  The first two Invisibility spells are only slightly useful, mainly 
for special occasions.  But Improved Invisibility is very valuable for combat, 
persuading many people to choose this Domain for just that spell.


- War Domain -
Special Ability: Battle Mastery can be used once per day and causes you Cleric 
  to gain [1 + 1 per 5 Cleric levels] to Dexterity, Constitution, attack rolls, 
  damage, and the same number is used to provide damage reduction.  The effects 
  last for [5 rounds + Charisma modifier].
Bonus Spells:
  2nd level Cat's Grace (Bard, Ranger, Wizard/Sorcerer 2)
  7th level Aura of Vitality (Druid 7)

This is an average Domain.  Battle Mastery and the spells offered all have to 
do with increasing attribute scores.  Battle Mastery can only be used once per 
day and will run out in the duration of a single battle.  In addition, the +10 
attribute cap can make some of these abilities useless.  Cat's Grace is also 
available from the Animal Domain.


- Water Domain -
Special Ability: Turn Undead can be used to affect Elementals.
Bonus Spells:
  3rd level Poison (Cleric 4; Druid 3)
  5th level Ice Storm (Bard 6; Druid 5; Wizard/Sorcerer 4)

This is a pretty useless domain.  You'll get the Poison spell anyway as a 5th 
level spell, and it's a very weak spell regardless.  Ice Storm is excellent, 
but you can better acquire it through the Magic Domain.


|=============================================================================|
  F A M I L I A R S   &   C O M P A N I O N S                            2.08
|=============================================================================|

- The Inadequacy Of It All -
I've tried to make this listing as helpful as possible.  However, due to time 
restraints I haven't been able to make a completely satisfactory list.  The 
biggest problem is incorrect damage listings.  For some reason, the game 
engine does not properly list unarmed damage on the character sheet.  I 
decided to record what was offered anyway, but be aware that most creatures do 
much more than 1d3 damage.  In addition, there are level to level differences 
that I did not record, and it is certain that I missed many special abilities 
(particularly spells) that were not easy to access.  For these reasons, this 
listing should be viewed as a general guideline and not the final word.


<--------->
 Familiars
<--------->

- Introduction -
Wizards and Sorcerers get the class ability to summon a Familiar to assist 
them.  The type of creature is chosen at character creation, and may be 
modified every time a new level is gained.  A Familiar's level increases along 
with the Wizard/Sorcerer.  In addition, Familiars have the unique ability of 
allowing their masters to possess them.  When possessed the player will have 
full control of the Familiar, as if it were his own character.  This can be 
useful for scouting or using any of the Familiar's skills or special 
abilities.  If the Familiar is killed, its master will lose 1d6 HPs.  
Familiars may be summoned once per day, and they remain until killed, 
unsummoned, or until you rest.


- The Bat -
Attributes: STR-3, DEX-15, CON-8, INT-3, WIS-14, CHA-5
Natural AC: None
HP Growth: Approximately 5 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Will
Effects: Damage Increased, Damage Reduction, Immunity to Mind Spells, Spell 
  Resistance (10-20)
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, and Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Gaze of Fear


- The Panther -
Attributes: STR-16, DEX-19, CON-12, INT-13, WIS-12, CHA-6
Natural AC: +2
HP Growth: Approximately 5 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Will
Effects: Spell Resistance (10-20)
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Evasion, Sneak Attack, Uncanny Dodge, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: None


- The Hell Hound -
Attributes: STR-13, DEX-15, CON-11, INT-6, WIS-10, CHA-6
Natural AC: +5
HP Growth: Approximately 5 points per level
BAB Growth: 100%
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude, Reflex, & Will
Secondary Saving Throws: None
Effects: Damage Increased, Resistant to Fire, Vulnerable to Cold, Immunity to 
  Mind Spells, Spell Resistance (10-20)
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision
Special Abilities: Hell Hound Fire Breath


- The Imp -
Attributes: STR-10, DEX-17, CON-8, INT-10, WIS-12, CHA-10
Natural AC: +2
HP Growth: Approximately 5 points per level
BAB Growth: 100%
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude, Reflex, & Will
Secondary Saving Throws: None
Effects: Damage Reduction, Resistant to Fire, Immunity to Mind Spells, 
  Immunity to Poison, Regeneration, Spell Resistance (10-20)
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Invisibility, Poison


- The Fire Mephit -
Attributes: STR-10, DEX-13, CON-8, INT-12, WIS-11, CHA-15
Natural AC: +4
HP Growth: Approximately 5 points per level
BAB Growth: 100%
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude, Reflex, & Will
Secondary Saving Throws: None
Effects: Damage Increased, Damage Reduction, Resistant to Fire, Vulnerable to 
  Cold, Immunity to Mind Spells, Regeneration, Spell Resistance (10-20)
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision
Special Abilities: Bolt of Fire


- The Ice Mephit -
Attributes: STR-10, DEX-17, CON-8, INT-12, WIS-11, CHA-15
Natural AC: +4
HP Growth: Approximately 5 points per level
BAB Growth: 100%
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude, Reflex, & Will
Secondary Saving Throws: None
Effects: Damage Increased, Damage Reduction, Resistant to Cold, Vulnerable to 
  Fire, Immunity to Mind Spells, Regeneration, Spell Resistance (10-20)
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision
Special Abilities: Bolt of Cold


- The Pixie -
Attributes: STR-7, DEX-18, CON-11, INT-16, WIS-15, CHA-16
Natural AC: None
HP Growth: Approximately 4 points per level
BAB Growth:75%
Natural Damage: 1d4 (19-20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Will
Effects: Attack Increased, Damage Increased, Damage Reduction, Immunity to 
  Mind Spells, Spell Resistance (10-20)
Exceptional Skills: Disable Trap, Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Open Lock, 
  Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Dodge, Sneak Attack, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Improved Invisibility

NOTE: The Pixie wields an enchanted dagger.  It is +1 at 1st level, and by 
  20th level it is +3.  In addition, her Sneak Attack never evolves past +1d6.


- The Raven -
Attributes: STR-3, DEX-23, CON-8, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-3
Natural AC: None
HP Growth: Approximately 4 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Will
Effects: Damage Reduction, Immunity to Mind Spells, Spell Resistance (10-20)
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Toughness, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Poison


<----------------->
 Animal Companions
<----------------->

- Introduction -
Druids are granted an Animal Companion at 1st level, and Rangers acquire one 
at 6th level.  Like the Familiar, the Animal Companions increase in level 
along with their master, and may be changed everytime the Druid/Ranger gains a 
level.  However, Animal Companions may not be possessed and their masters 
suffer no HP loss if they are killed.  Animal Companions may be summoned once 
per day, and they remain until killed, unsummoned, or until you rest.


- The Badger -
Attributes: STR-8, DEX-17, CON-11, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-7
Natural AC: +3
HP Growth: Approximately 6 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Will
Effects: None
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: Toughness
Special Abilities: Rage (increase to STR and CON)


- The Wolf -
Attributes: STR-13, DEX-31, CON-11, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-6
Natural AC: +2
HP Growth: Approximately 6 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Will
Effects: None
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: None
Special Abilities: None


- The Brown Bear -
Attributes: STR-35, DEX-13, CON-17, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-6
Natural AC: +5
HP Growth: Approximately 7 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Will
Effects: None
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: None
Special Abilities: None


- The Boar -
Attributes: STR-32, DEX-10, CON-13, INT-3, WIS-13, CHA-8
Natural AC: +6
HP Growth: Approximately 6 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Will
Effects: None
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: None
Special Abilities: Ferocious (increase to STR and DEX)


- The Hawk -
Attributes: STR-10, DEX-17, CON-8, INT-3, WIS-14, CHA-6
Natural AC: +6
HP Growth: Approximately 6 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Will
Effects: None
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: Disarm, Dodge, Mobility, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: None


- The Panther -
Attributes: STR-16, DEX-19, CON-11, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-6
Natural AC: +1
HP Growth: Approximately 6 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Will
Effects: None
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: Evasion, Sneak Attack, Uncanny Dodge, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: None


- The Giant Spider -
Attributes: STR-15, DEX-17, CON-10, INT-10, WIS-10, CHA-3
Natural AC: +2
HP Growth: Approximately 5 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude
Secondary Saving Throws: Reflex & Will
Effects: Immunity to Mind Spells, Spell Immunity
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision
Special Abilities: Poison


- The Dire Wolf -
Attributes: STR-18, DEX-34, CON-13, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-10
Natural AC: +3
HP Growth: Approximately 7 points per level
BAB Growth: 75%
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Primary Saving Throws: Fortitude & Reflex
Secondary Saving Throws: Will
Effects: None
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: None
Special Abilities: None


|=============================================================================|
  S U M M O N E D   C R E A T U R E S                                    2.09
|=============================================================================|

- The Inadequacy Of It All -
I've tried to make this listing as helpful as possible.  However, due to time 
restraints I haven't been able to make a completely satisfactory list.  The 
biggest problem is incorrect damage listings.  For some reason, the game 
engine does not properly list unarmed damage on the character sheet.  I 
decided to record what was offered anyway, but be aware that most creatures do 
much more than 1d3 damage.  In addition, there are level to level differences 
that I did not record, and it is certain that I missed many special abilities 
(particularly spells) that were not easy to access.  For these reasons, this 
listing should be viewed as a general guideline and not the final word.


- Introduction -
Summoned Creatures are accessible through spells and Domain powers.  Only one 
creature may be summoned at a time.  If a new creature is summoned the old one 
with be unsummoned.  Familiars and Animal Companions are not considered 
summoned creatures for this purpose and can be used at the same time as a 
summoned creature.  Summoned creatures have varying durations -- some last 
until killed, unsummoned or the player rests, and some last only a short 
amount of time, usually based on the spellcaster's abilities.


- The Dire Badger -
Spell: Summon Creature I
Level: 3
Attributes: STR-10, DEX-17, CON-12, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-4
AC: 16
HP: 25
Attack Bonus: +5
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 4, Reflex- 6, Will- 2
Exceptional Skills: Hide
Noteworthy Feats: Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Rage


- The Dire Boar -
Spell: Summon Creature II
Level: 7
Attributes: STR-17, DEX-10, CON-11, INT-3, WIS-13, CHA-8
AC: 16
HP: 33
Attack Bonus: +8
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 5, Reflex-5, Will- 3
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: None
Special Abilities: Ferocious


- The Dire Wolf -
Spell: Summon Creature III
Level: 6
Attributes: STR-21, DEX-17, CON-17, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-10
AC: 21
HP: 54
Attack Bonus: +9
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 8, Reflex- 8, Will- 3
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Improved Critical (creature), Keen Sense, Knockdown, 
  Power Attack, Toughness, Weapon Focus (creature), Weapon Specialization 
  (creature)
Special Abilities: None


- The Dire Spider -
Spell: Summon Creature IV
Level: 10
Attributes: STR-19, DEX-17, CON-14, INT-3, WIS-10, CHA-3
AC: 21
HP: 54
Attack Bonus: +11/+6
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 9, Reflex- 6, Will- 3
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Toughness, Weapon Focus (creature), Weapon 
  Specialization (creature)
Special Abilities: Immunity to Mind Spells, Spell Immunity


- The Dire Bear -
Spell: Summon Creature V
Level: 12
Attributes: STR-24, DEX-13, CON-19, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-10
AC: 18
HP: 102
Attack Bonus: +16/+11
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 12, Reflex- 9, Will- 5
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: None
Special Abilities: None


- The Dire Tiger -
Spell: Summon Creature VI
Level: 16
Attributes: STR-27, DEX-15, CON-14, INT-3, WIS-12, CHA-10
AC: 18
HP: 120
Attack Bonus: +20/+15/+10
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 12, Reflex- 12, Will- 6
Exceptional Skills: Move Silently
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Power Attack, Toughness
Special Abilities: None


- The Huge Air Elemental -
Spell: Summon Creature VII
Level: 16
Attributes: STR-18, DEX-29, CON-18, INT-6, WIS-11, CHA-11
AC: 23
HP: 136
Attack Bonus: +16/+11/+6
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 9, Reflex- 14, Will- 10
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Pulse Attack, Damage Reduction, Immunity to Disease, 
  Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, 
  Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Huge Fire Elemental -
Spell: Summon Creature VII
Level: 16
Attributes: STR-18, DEX-25, CON-13, INT-6, WIS-11, CHA-11
AC: 21
HP: 88
Attack Bonus: +16/+11/+6
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 6, Reflex- 12, Will- 10
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge, Mobility, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Resistant to Fire, Vulnerable to Cold, 
  Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Mind Spells, 
  Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack, Damage 
  Increased


- The Huge Water Elemental -
Spell: Summon Creature VII
Level: 16
Attributes: STR-20, DEX-18, CON-19, INT-6, WIS-11, CHA-11
AC: 23
HP: 136
Attack Bonus: +17/+12/+7
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 9, Reflex- 9, Will- 10
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Power Attack
Special Abilities: Pulse Attack, Damage Reduction, Resistant to Fire, Immunity 
  to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to 
  Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Greater Air Elemental -
Spell: Summon Creature VIII
Level: 18
Attributes: STR-20, DEX-31, CON-17, INT-6, Wis-11, CHA-11
AC:28
HP:157
Attack Bonus: +18/+13/+8
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 9, Reflex- 16, Will- 11
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge, Mobility, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Pulse Attack, Damage Reduction, Immunity to Disease, 
  Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, 
  Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Greater Fire Elemental -
Spell: Summon Creature VIII
Level: 18
Attributes: STR-20, DEX-27, CON-15, INT-6, WIS-11, CHA-11
AC: 26
HP: 136
Attack Bonus: +18/+13/+8
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 8, Reflex- 14, Will- 11
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Mobility, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Resistant to Fire, Vulnerable to Cold, 
  Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Mind Spells, 
  Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack, Damage 
  Increased


- The Greater Water Elemental -
Spell: Summon Creature VIII
Level: 18
Attributes: STR-26, DEX-20, CON-19, INT-6, WIS-11, CHA-11
AC: 24
HP: 178
Attack Bonus: +21/+16/+11
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 10, Reflex- 11, Will- 11
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Improved Critical (creature), Power 
  Attack
Special Abilities: Pulse Attack, Damage Reduction, Resistant to Fire, Immunity 
  to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to 
  Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Elder Air Elemental -
Spell: Summon Creature IX
Level: 20
Atttributes: STR-22, DEX-33, CON-18, INT-6, WIS-11, CHA-11
AC: 29
HP: 204
Attack Bonus: +19/+14/+9
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 10, Reflex- 17, Will- 12
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge, Mobility, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Pulse Attack, Damage Reduction, Immunity to Disease, 
  Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, 
  Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Elder Fire Elemental -
Spell: Summon Creature IX
Level: 20
Attributes: STR-22, DEX-29, CON-17, INT-6, WIS-11, CHA-11
AC: 27
HP: 180
Attack Bonus: +21/+16/+11
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 9, Reflex- 15, Will- 12
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge, Mobility
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Resistant to Fire, Vulnerable to Cold, 
  Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Mind Spells, 
  Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack, Damage 
  Increased


- The Elder Water Elemental -
Spell: Summon Creature IX
Level: 20
Attributes: STR-28, DEX-22, CON-21, INT-6, WIS-11, CHA-11
AC: 25
HP: 228
Attack Bonus: +24/+19/+14
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 11, Reflex- 12, Will- 12
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Improved Critical (creature), Power 
  Attack
Special Abilities: Pulse Attack, Damage Reduction, Resistant to Fire, Immunity 
  to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to 
  Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Imp -
Spell: Lesser Planar Binding (evil)
Level: 6
Attributes: STR-14, DEX-19, CON-12, INT-10, WIS-12, CHA-10
AC: 17
HP: 19
Attack Bonus: +10/+5
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 6, Reflex- 9, Will- 6
Exceptional Skills: Hide
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge, Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Resistance, Immunity to Poison, 
  Regeneration, Spell Resistance (10)


- The Red Slaad -
Spell: Lesser Planar Binding (neutral)
Level: 7
Attributes: STR-22, DEX-16, CON-20, INT-6, WIS-6, CHA-8
AC: 19
HP: 66
Attack Bonus: +13/+8
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 10, Reflex- 8, Will- 3
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Dodge, Power Attack, Weapon Focus 
  (creature), Weapon Specialization (creature)
Special Abilities: Damage Resistance, Regeneration


- The Lantern Archon -
Spell: Lesser Planar Binding (good)
Level: 6
Attributes: STR-9, DEX-11, CON-14, INT-6, WIS-11, CHA-10
AC: 18
HP: 18
Attack Bonus: +5/+0
Natural Damage: 1d2 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 7, Reflex- 5, Will- 5
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Hasted, Damage Immunity, Immunity to 
  Paralysis


- The Succubus -
Spell: Planar Binding (evil)
Level: 10
Attributes: STR-16, DEX-20, CON-16, INT-16, WIS-14, CHA-20
AC: 24
HP: 57
Attack Bonus: +11/+6
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 8, Reflex- 13, Will- 7
Exceptional Skills: Concentration, Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Dodge, Mobility, Sneak Attack (+3d6)
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Resistance, Damage Immunity, 
  Immunity to Poison, Spell Resistance (12)


- The Green Slaad -
Spell: Planar Binding (neutral)
Level: 9
Attributes: STR-20, DEX-16, CON-18, INT-10, WIS-12, CHA-10
AC: 23
HP: 76
Attack Bonus: +14/+9
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 10, Reflex- 9, Will- 7
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Power Attack, Weapon Focus (creature), 
  Weapon Specialization (creature)
Special Abilities: Damage Resistance, Regeneration, Damage Reduction


- The Hound Archon -
Spell: Planar Binding (good)
Level: 15
Attributes: STR-18, DEX-10, CON-16, INT-10, WIS-13, CHA-12
AC: 24
HP: 109
Attack Bonus: +20/+15/+10
Damage: 2d6 + 8 (19-20/x2) +1d6 Fire vs. Evil + 1 Physical Damage
Saves: Fortitude- 14, Reflex- 8, Will- 9
Exceptional Skills: None
Noteworthy Feats: Knockdown, Toughness, Weapon Specialization (greatsword)
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Immunity, Immunity to Paralysis, 
  Spell Resistance (16)


- The Vrock -
Spell: Greater Planar Binding (evil)
Level: 15
Attributes: STR-20, DEX-15, CON-18, INT-14, WIS-14, CHA-12
AC: 26
HP: 96
Attack Bonus: +20/+15/+10
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 13, Reflex- 11, Will- 11
Exceptional Skills: Concentration, Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, 
  Spellcraft, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Knockdown, Power Attack
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Resistance, Damage Immunity, 
  Immunity to Poison, Spell Resistance (22)


- The Death Slaad -
Spell: Greater Planar Binding (neutral)
Level: 15
Attributes: STR-20, DEX-18, CON-17, INT-18, WIS-18, CHA-18
AC: 26
HP: 112
Attack Bonus: +20/+15/+10
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 12, Reflex- 13, Will- 13
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Power Attack
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Resistance, Regeneration


- The Celestial Avenger -
Spell: Greater Planar Binding (good)
Level: 17
Attributes: STR-20, DEX-17, CON-16, INT-16, WIS-16, CHA-16
AC: 34
HP: 105
Attack Bonus: +28/+21/+16/+11
Damage: 1d8 + 5 (19-20/x2) +1d6 Fire vs. Evil, +4 Physical Damage
Saves: Fortitude- 15, Reflex- 12, Will- 12
Exceptional Skills: Animal Empathy, Concentration, Listen, Spot
Feats: Cleave, Knockdown, Power Attack, Weapon Specialization (greatsword)
Special Abilities: Rage, Damage Reduction, Damage Immunity, Immunity to 
  Paralysis, Spell Resistance (28)


- The Helmed Horror -
Spell: Mordenkainen's Sword
Level: 16
Attributes: STR-19, DEX-15, CON-10, INT-10, WIS-16, CHA-12
AC: 24
HP: 104
Attack Bonus: +19/+14/+9
Damage: 2d6 + 8 (17-20/x2) +5 Fire Damage +2 Physical Damage
Saves: Fortitude- 5, Reflex- 7, Will- 8
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Improved Critical (greatsword), 
  Knockdown, Power Attack, Toughness, Weapon Focus (greatsword), Weapon 
  Specialization (greatsword)
Special Abilities: Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to 
  Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to Ability Decrease, 
  Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity 
  to Sneak Attack, Spell Immunity, True Seeing


- The Balor -
Spell: Gate
Level: 20
Attributes: STR-26, DEX-13, CON-20, INT-20, WIS-20, CHA-16
AC: 35
HP: 158
Attack Bonus: +29/+24/+19/+14
Damage: 2d6 + 8 (17-20/x2) +1 Physical Damage
Saves: Fortitude- 17, Reflex- 13, Will- 17
Exceptional Skills: Concentration, Listen, Search, Spellcraft, Spot
Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Improved Critical (greatsword), Knockdown
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Resistance, Hasted, Damage 
  Immunity, Immunity to Poison, Spell Resistance (28)


- The Shadow Lord -
Spell: Shadow Conjuration, Greater Shadow Conjuration, Shades
Level: 10
Attributes: STR-16, DEX-18, CON-10, INT-16, WIS-14, CHA-12
AC: 22
HP: 65
Attack Bonus: +8
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 1, Reflex- 5, Will- 7
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Improved Critical (creature), Power 
  Attack, Weapon Specialization (creature)
Special Abilities: Damage Immunity, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical 
  Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to 
  Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity 
  to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Tyrantfog Zombie -
Spell: Animate Dead (1st-5th level)
Level: 4
Attributes: STR-13, DEX-10, CON-10, INT-6, WIS-12, CHA-13
AC: 10
HP: 30
Attack Bonus: +3
Damage: 1d8 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 1, Reflex- 1, Will- 5
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Toughness
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical 
  Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to 
  Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity 
  to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack, Movement Speed Decreased


- The Skeletal Warrior -
Spell: Animate Dead (6th-9th level)
Level: 6
Attributes: STR-14, DEX-12, CON-10, INT-10, WIS-10, CHA-11
AC: 13
HP: 39
Attack Bonus: +6
Damage: 2d6 + 3 (19-20/x2)  +1 Physical Damage
Saves: Fortitude- 2, Reflex- 3, Will- 5
Exceptional Skills: Discipline
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Power Attack
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical 
  Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to 
  Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity 
  to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack, Spell Resistance (20)


- The Skeleton Chieftain -
Spell: Animate Dead (10th-20th level)
Level: 7
Attributes: STR-18, DEX-12, CON-10, INT-10, WIS-10, CHA-11
AC: 15
HP: 36
Attack Bonus: +12/+7
Damage: 2d6 + 8 (17-20/x2)  +2 Physical Damage
Saves: Fortitude- 5, Reflex- 3, Will- 4
Exceptional Skills: Discipline
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Improved Critical (greatsword), Power 
  Attack, Weapon Specialization (greatsword)
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Immunity, Immunity to Disease, 
  Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative 
  Level, Immunity to Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to 
  Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack, Spell Resistance 
  (20)


- The Ghoul -
Spell: Create Undead (1st-11th level)
Level: 6
Attributes: STR-17, DEX-17, CON-10, INT-13, WIS-14, CHA-16
AC: 19
HP: 45
Attack Bonus: +6
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 2, Reflex- 5, Will- 7
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Improved Critical (creature), Knockdown, 
  Power Attack, Toughness, Weapon Finesse, 
Special Abilities: Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to 
  Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to Ability Decrease, 
  Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity 
  to Sneak Attack


- The Ghast -
Spell: Create Undead (12th-13th level)
Level: 8
Attributes: STR-17, DEX-17, CON-10, INT-13, WIS-14, CHA-16
AC: 21
HP: 60
Attack Bonus: +7
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 2, Reflex- 5, Will- 8
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Move Silently, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Knockdown, Power Attack, Toughness, 
  Weapon Finesse
Special Abilities: Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to 
  Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to Ability Decrease, 
  Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity 
  to Sneak Attack


- The Wight -
Spell: Create Undead (14th-15th level)
Level: 4
Attributes: STR-12, DEX-12, CON-10, INT-11, WIS-13, CHA-15
AC: 15
HP: 26
Attack Bonus: +3
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 1, Reflex- 2, Will- 5
Exceptional Skills: Move Silently
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision
Special Abilities: Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to 
  Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to Ability Decrease, 
  Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity 
  to Sneak Attack


- The Spectre -
Spell: Create Undead (16th-20th level)
Level: 7
Attributes: STR-10, DEX-18, CON-10, INT-14, WIS-14, CHA-15
AC: 18
HP: 55
Attack Bonus: +3
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 0, Reflex- 4, Will- 5
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge, Improved Critical (creature), 
  Sneak Attack (+1d6), Weapon Finesse, Weapon Specialization (creature)
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical 
  Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to 
  Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity 
  to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Vampire -
Spell: Create Greater Undead (1st-15th level)
Level: 10
Attributes: STR-21, DEX-17, CON-12, INT-12, WIS-14, CHA-14
AC: 17
HP: 94
Attack Bonus: +18/+13
Damage: 1d10 + 7 (17-20/x2) +2 Physical Damage
Saves: Fortitude- 10, Reflex- 8, Will- 5
Exceptional Skills: Discipline, Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Parry, Search, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Dodge, Improved Critical (bastard sword), Point 
  Blank Shot, Power Attack, Toughness, Weapon Focus (bastard sword), Weapon 
  Focus (longbow), Weapon Specialization (bastard sword)
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Resistance, Immunity to Disease, 
  Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative 
  Level, Immunity to Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to 
  Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack, Regeneration


- The Doom Knight -
Spell: Create Greater Undead (16th-17th level)
Level: 9
Attributes: STR-21, DEX-15, CON-19, INT-12, WIS-15, CHA-12
AC: 24
HP: 76
Attack Bonus: +18/+13
Damage: 2d6 + 7 (19-20/x2) +3 Physical Damage
Saves: Fortitude- 10, Reflex- 8, Will- 8
Exceptional Skills: Discipline, Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Weapon Focus (greatsword)
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical 
  Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to 
  Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity 
  to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack, Spell Resistane (12)


- The Lich -
Spell: Create Greater Undead (18th-19th level)
Level: 12
Attributes: STR-12, DEX-14, CON-13, INT-23, WIS-16, CHA-14
AC: 19
HP: 112
Attack Bonus: +10/+5
Damage: 1d6 + 1 (20/x2) +3 Bludgeoning Damage
Saves: Fortitude- 5, Reflex- 6, Will- 11
Exceptional Skills: Concentration, Listen, Lore, Search, Spellcraft
Noteworthy Feats: Combat Casting, Dodge, Spell Focus (evocation), Toughness
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Immunity, Immunity to Disease, 
  Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to Ability 
  Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to 
  Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Greater Mummy -
Spell: Create Greater Undead (20th level)
Level: 16
Attributes: STR-21, DEX-12, CON-10, INT-10, WIS-16, CHA-15
AC: 21
HP: 100
Attack Bonus: +15/+10
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 9, Reflex- 6, Will- 15
Exceptional Skills: Concentration
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Combat Casting, Darkvision, Disarm, Improved 
  Critical (creature), Knockdown, Power Attack, Spell Penetration, Toughness, 
  Turn Undead, Weapon Focus (creature), Weapon Specialization (creature)
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Damage Immunity, Damage Vulnerability, 
  Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, 
  Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind 
  Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Shadow -
Spell: Death Domain, Negative Plane Avatar (1st-7th level)
Level: 3
Attributes: STR-10, DEX-14, CON-10, INT-6, WIS-12, CHA-13
AC: 12
HP: 19
Attack Bonus: +1
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 1, Reflex- 3, Will- 4
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge
Special Abilities: Damage Reduction, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical 
  Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to 
  Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity 
  to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Shadow Mastiff -
Spell: Death Domain, Negative Plane Avatar (8th-10th level)
Level: 6
Attributes: STR-19, DEX-15, CON-19, INT-4, WIS-12, CHA-13
AC: 19
HP: 51
Attack Bonus: +9/+4
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 9, Reflex- 7, Will- 6
Exceptional Skills: Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Darkvision, Dodge, Disarm, Improved Critical (creature), 
  Power Attack
Special Abilities: None


- The Shadow Fiend -
Spell: Death Domain, Negative Plane Avatar (11th-14th level)
Level: 7
Attributes: STR-10, DEX-18, CON-10, INT-12, WIS-12, CHA-13
AC: 20
HP: 55
Attack Bonus: +3
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 2, Reflex- 6, Will- 6
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Dodge, Power Attack
Special Abilities: Damage Immunity, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical 
  Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to 
  Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity 
  to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


- The Shadow Lord -
Spell: Death Domain, Negative Plane Avatar (15th-20th level)
Level: 10
Attributes: STR-16, DEX-18, CON-10, INT-16, WIS-14, CHA-12
AC: 22
HP: 65
Attack Bonus: +8
Natural Damage: 1d3 (20/x2)
Saves: Fortitude- 3, Reflex- 7, Will- 9
Exceptional Skills: Hide, Listen, Spot
Noteworthy Feats: Cleave, Darkvision, Improved Critical (creature), Power 
  Attack, Weapon Specialization (creature)
Special Abilities: Damage Immunity, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Critical 
  Hit, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Negative Level, Immunity to 
  Ability Decrease, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity 
  to Poison, Immunity to Sneak Attack


|=============================================================================|
  S H A P E S H I F T I N G                                              2.10
|=============================================================================|

- Introduction -
Shapeshifting allows a character to take the temporary form of some animal or 
creature.  Wild Shape and Elemental Shape are class abilities of the Druid, 
while Polymorph Self and Shapechange are spells that are available to the 
Ranger, Cleric, Druid, Wizard, or Sorcerer.  While shapeshifted, the three 
physical attributes -- Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution -- change to the 
creature's values, while the mental attributes -- Intelligence, Wisdom, and 
Charisma -- remain the same.  For this reason, shapeshifting is often most 
advantageous to characters with low physical attribute scores.  In addition, 
the immunities of the selected creature are adopted, as well as a bonus to AC 
and a temporary boost to HPs.  

Weapons and other equipment do not remain in use while shifted, and any 
bonuses offered -- immunities, enchantments, and AC -- are temporarily lost.  
Spell enchantments will remain, yet the ability to cast spells is restricted.  
On the other hand, you may use any of the feats you have acquired.  Weapon 
Focus (unarmed), Weapon Specialization (unarmed), and Improved Critical 
(unarmed) will all apply to your shapeshifted attacks.  Improved Unarmed 
Attack will also apply, however it is not needed as shapeshifted forms 
automatically receive proficiency with their natural attacks.  Since 
shapeshifted forms are always unarmed and without armor, many of the Monk's 
class abilities apply, making the Monk a particularly valuable multi-class for 
shapeshifters.


<---------->
 Wild Shape
<---------->

- Introduction -
Two numbers are listed, separated by a slash.  The first number is the normal 
value, and the second number listed is the value of the "Improved" form.


- The Badger -
Strength: 16/16
Dexterity: 16/18
Constitution: 22/22
Natural AC: +5/+10
Temporary HP: +10/+20


- The Boar -
Strength: 20/27
Dexterity: 16/16
Constitution: 22/22
Natural AC: +4/+8
Temporary HP: +10/+20


- The Brown Bear -
Strength: 22/31
Dexterity: 16/16
Constitution: 16/19
Natural AC: +4/+8
Temporary HP: +10/+20


- The Panther -
Strength: 16/25
Dexterity: 22/22
Constitution: 16/17
Natural AC: +4/+8
Temporary HP: +10/+20


- The Wolf -
Strength: 16/25
Dexterity: 22/22
Constitution: 16/17
Natural AC: +4/+8
Temporary HP: +10/+20


<--------------->
 Elemental Shape
<--------------->

- Universal Information -
All Elementals have Damage Reduction, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to 
Critical Hits, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to 
Poison, and Immunity to Sneak Attack.


- The Air Elemental -
Strength: 19/23
Dexterity: 30/34
Constitution: 19/19
Natural AC: +10/+10
Special: None


- The Earth Elemental -
Strength: 30/34
Dexterity: 10/10
Constitution: 22/22
Natural AC: +7/+10
Special: None


- The Fire Elemental -
Strength: 19/23
Dexterity: 19/19
Constitution: 26/30
Natural AC: +5/+6
Special: Resistant to Fire, Vulnerable to Cold


- The Water Elemental -
Strength: 25/29
Dexterity: 22/22
Constitution: 19/23
Natural AC: +10/+10
Special: Resistant to Fire


<-------------->
 Polymorph Self
<-------------->

- The Fey -
Strength: 10
Dexterity: 24
Constitution: 10
Natural AC: +5
Temporary HP: +0
Special: Spell Level Absorption


- The Giant Spider -
Strength: 19
Dexterity: 17
Constitution: 12
Natural AC: +5
Temporary HP: +20
Special: Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Slow, Immunity to Entangle, 
  Immunity Movement Speed Decrease


- The Troll -
Strength: 23
Dexterity: 14
Constitution: 23
Natural AC: +5
Temporary HP: +10
Special: Regeneration


- The Umber Hulk -
Strength: 23
Dexterity: 15
Constitution: 19
Natural AC: +7
Temporary HP: +30
Special: True Seeing


- The Zombie -
Strength: 14
Dexterity: 14
Constitution: 14
Natural AC: +0
Temporary HP: +40
Special: Damage Resistance


<----------->
 Shapechange
<----------->

- The Balor -
Strength: 24
Dexterity: 30
Constitution: 24
Natural AC: +10
Temporary HP: +250
Special: Damage Reduction, Damage Resistance, Damage Immunity Increase, 
  Immunity to Poison, Spell Resistance (28)


- The Death Sladd -
Strength: 24
Dexterity: 36
Constitution: 24
Natural AC: +10
Temporary HP: 225
Special: Damage Reduction, Damage Resistance, Regeneration


- The Fire Giant -
Strength: 30
Dexterity: 30
Constitution: 21
Natural AC: +10
Temporary HP: +200
Special: Resistant to Fire, Vulnerable to Cold


- The Iron Golem -
Strength: 30
Dexterity: 20
Constitution: 20
Natural AC: +10
Temporary HP: +300
Special: Damage Reduction, Damage Immunity Decrease, Immunity to Poison, 
  Immunity to Critical Hits, Immunity to Death Magic, Immunity to Ability 
  Decrease, Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Sneak 
  Attack, Immunity to Disease, Immunity to Negative Level


- The Red Dragon -
Strength: 36
Dexterity: 30
Constitution: 21
Natural AC: +10
Temporary HP: +150
Special: Damage Reduction, Resistant to Fire, Vulnerable to Cold, True Seeing, 
  Immunity to Paralysis, Immunity to Mind Spells, Immunity to Sneak Attack, 
  Spell Resistance (20)


|=============================================================================|
  W E A P O N S                                                          2.11
|=============================================================================|

<-------------------->
 Simple Melee Weapons
<-------------------->

- Dagger -
Size: Tiny
Damage: 1d4
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Piercing

The dagger is a widely used weapon.  It has the largest critical threat range 
of any Simple melee weapon, it works with Weapon Finesse, and it makes an ideal 
off-hand weapon for medium and small characters.


- Mace -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Bludgeoning

This weapon makes a great off-hand bludgeoning weapon for medium-sized, and a 
great primary weapon for small-sized characters.


- Sickle -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Slashing

A relatively unimpressive weapon.  It would most likely be used by a Druid as 
it is the highest damage weapon available to the Druid that qualifies for 
Weapon Finesse.


- Club -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Bludgeoning

Another unimpressive weapon, most likely used by the restricted Druid as it is 
the highest damaging one-handed bludgeoning weapon available to him.  Other 
classes would probably want to use a morningstar instead.


- Morningstar -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d8
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Bludgeoning and Piercing

This is the highest damaging medium weapon in the Simple weapon package, or in 
other words, the most damaging weapon that a medium-sized character restricted 
to Simple weapons can wield in one hand.  It is a chain weapon, and it can 
therefore not be used with other chain weapons for dual-wielding.


- Quarterstaff -
Size: Large
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Bludgeoning

This is the only large melee weapon available to the Monk, Rogue, and Wizard.  
Large weapons are used with two-hands and allow a 50% increase to 
Strength-based damage.


- Spear -
Size: Large
Damage: 1d8
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Piercing

This is the best large melee weapon available to the Bard, Cleric, Druid, and 
Sorcerer.  Large weapons are used with two-hands and allow a 50% increase to 
Strength-based damage.


<--------------------->
 Simple Ranged Weapons
<--------------------->

- Dart -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d4
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Piercing

A very basic ranged weapon.  A positive Strength modifier will not increase 
damage, but a negative Strength modifier will reduce it.  Darts do less damage 
than crossbows, but can be used more than once per round.  In addition, they 
can be used with a shield, allowing for much better defense.  Darts also work 
well with the Halfling's bonus to thrown weapons.


- Sling -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d4
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Bludgeoning

The sling is very similar to darts.  It is affected by a negative Strength 
modifier, but not a positive one.  It can also be used in one hand, allowing 
the use of a shield.  The sling is usually better because it can derive attack 
and damage bonuses from both the sling and the bullets being launched.


- Light Crossbow -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d8
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Piercing

Crossbows are high damaging ranged weapons with the broadest critical threat 
range available for ranged weapons.  They are very mechanical and never 
affected by Strength when determining damage.  All crossbows are two-handed 
weapons, and cannot be used with a shield.  In addition, because of their 
demanding reloading time, they can only be fired once per round.  This also 
limits them from being used with the Rapid Shot feat.


- Heavy Crossbow -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d10
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Piercing

The heavy crossbow is very similar to the light crossbow except that it weighs 
a bit more and does slightly more damage.  Assuming you can afford it, there 
is really no reason to use a light crossbow instead of a heavy crossbow.


<--------------------->
 Martial Melee Weapons
<--------------------->

- Light Hammer -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d4
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Bludgeoning

This weapon serves little purpose.  Use a mace instead.


- Handaxe -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 20/x3
Type: Slashing

With its x3 critical damage multiplier and decent damage rating, the handaxe 
makes a great off-hand weapon for a medium-sized character, or a great primary 
weapon for a small-sized character.  Medium-sized creatures can also choose to 
wield handaxes in both hands, to take full advantage of their specific weapon 
training.


- Shortsword -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Piercing

While the handaxe offers more damage on critical hits, the shortsword offers a 
greater threat range, generally meaning more frequent critical hits.  The 
shortsword can be used in similar situations as the handaxe.


- Battleaxe -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d8
Critical: 20/x3
Type: Slashing

The battleaxe is the medium counterpart to the handaxe.  It can be wielded by 
small characters in two hands, or it can make an excellent primary weapon to 
be matched with a shield for a medium-sized character.  Like all axes, it has 
a high x3 critical damage multiplier.


- Light Flail -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d8
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Bludgeoning

Another useless weapon.  The warhammer is superior in every way.


- Longsword -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d8
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Slashing

The longsword is the medium counterpart to the shortsword.  It can be wielded 
by small characters in two hands, or it can make an excellent primary weapon 
to be matched with a shield for a medium-sized character.  Like most swords, 
it has an extended critical threat range making for more frequent critical 
hits.


- Rapier -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 18-20/x2
Type: Piercing

The rapier has the unusual property of being the only medium weapon that 
medium-sized characters can use with Weapon Finesse.  This allows them to fight 
with their Dexterity instead of their Strength.  With the addition of an 
incredibly wide critical threat range, the rapier is a popular choice among 
Dexterity-based characters.  (See the scimitar entry for further information.)


- Scimitar -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 18-20/x2
Type: Slashing

The scimitar is very similar to the rapier, but without the ability to work 
with Weapon Finesse.  It is also one of the best weapons available to the 
Druid by default.  Like the rapier, it is a good strategy to exploit the 
scimitar's extended critical threat range as much as possible.  If you take 
the Improved Critical feat for the Scimitar then the range is extended from 
18-20 to 15-20.  If you can find a keen scimitar, that range is further 
extended to 12-20.  The scimitar can make a great two-handed weapon for a 
high-Strength Gnome or Halfling.  Two-handed weapons already provide a 50% 
increase to Strength-based damage, and the frequent critical hits will only 
further multiply this damage.


- Warhammer -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d8
Critical: 20/x3
Type: Bludgeoning

The warhammer is almost identical to the battleaxe except that it provides 
bludgeoning damage which can be more useful against certain types of creatures 
than slashing.


- Heavy Flail -
Size: Large
Damage: 1d10
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Bludgeoning

While a bit weaker than the greatsword or greataxe, the heavy flail is the most 
damaging bludgeoning weapon available.  Being able to use it with two hands 
makes it even more dangerous.


- Greataxe -
Size: Large
Damage: 1d12
Critical: 20/x3
Type: Slashing

The large counterpart to the handaxe and battleaxe.  Like all axes, it has a 
x3 multiplier.  The greataxe, however, can be used as a two-handed weapon by 
medium-sized characters, even further increasing its damage.


- Greatsword -
Size: Large
Damage: 2d6
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Slashing

The Greatsword might be the best two-handed weapon.  It gets the wider critical 
threat range of all swords.  It also has a high damage rating, but the 2d6 
means that damage scores will heavily tend to an average, consistent 7 range 
rather than extremely low or high scores.


- Halberd -
Size: Large
Damage: 1d10
Critical: 20/x3
Type: Piercing and Slashing

This weapon is very similar to the Greataxe, yet inferior in it's damage 
rating.  There's really no reason to use this weapon instead of a Greataxe.


<---------------------->
 Martial Ranged Weapons
<---------------------->

- Throwing Axe -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 20/x3
Type: Slashing

Throwing axes have the unique feature of allowing a character to apply their 
full positive Strength modifier to damage.  Of course, negative Strength 
modifiers are also applied.  This make it an ideal ranged weapon for a melee 
warrior with high Strength.  Accuracy, however, is still based on Dexterity.  
Throwing Axes are fairly heavy, which makes it difficult for most characters 
to carry around too many of them.


- Shortbow -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 20/x3
Type: Piercing

A bow is generally superior to a crossbow.  While the crossbow does more damage 
per shot and generally scores critical hits more often, bows do more damage per 
critical and can be fired multiple times per round.  All bows are affected by a 
negative Strength modifier, but certain types of bows with the Mighty 
enhancement will allow you to apply a portion of your positive Strength 
modifier to damage.  The shortbow is weaker than the longbow, and generally 
only used when size or proficiency restriction keep the longbow unavailable.


- Longbow -
Size: Large
Damage: 1d8
Critical: 20/x3
Type: Piercing

The longbow is the best ranged weapon available in almost all situations.  Any 
character serious about archery should attempt to use a longbow.


<-------------------->
 Exotic Melee Weapons
<-------------------->

- Kukri -
Size: Tiny
Damage: 1d4
Critical: 18-20/x2
Type: Slashing

Kukri are essentially daggers with an extended critical threat range.  It makes 
an ideal off-hand weapon for medium and small characters.


- Kama -
Size: Small
Damage: 1d6
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Slashing

The notable feature of the kama is that the Monk can use it while retaining all 
of his unarmed combat abilities.  Other characters will not have much use for 
them.


- Bastard Sword -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d10
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Slashing

Along with the katana, the bastard sword is the highest damaging medium-sized 
weapon.  That means it's the highest damaging two-handed weapon for small 
characters, and the highest damaging weapon that medium characters can wield 
in one hand.


- Katana -
Size: Medium
Damage: 1d10
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Slashing

The katana is statistically identical to the bastard sword.


- Dire Mace -
Size: Large
Damage: 1d8/1d8
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Bludgeoning

The dire mace is a double-weapon, meaning that it is automatically used in 
dual-wield mode, so make sure you have the proper training to avoid penalties.  
Double-weapons are usually the best way to score high damage with your off-hand 
while retaining the bonuses for having a light off-hand weapon.  The dire mace, 
however, is inferior to the two-bladed sword and the double axe in terms of 
critical capacity.  But it does do bludgeoning damage, which is useful against 
certain types of creatures.


- Two-Bladed Sword -
Size: Large
Damage: 1d8/1d8
Critical: 19-20/x2
Type: Slashing

The two-bladed sword is another double weapon.  Along with the usual 
advantages, it has the widest critical threat range of all of the double 
weapons, meaning it will likely score more frequent critical hits.


- Double Axe -
Size: Large
Damage: 1d8/1d8
Critical: 20/x3
Type: Slashing

The double axe is another double weapon.  Along with the usual advantages, it 
has the highest critical damage multiplier of all the double weapons, meaning 
it will do more damage per critical hit.


- Scythe -
Size: Large
Damage: 2d4
Critical: 20/x4
Type: Piercing and Slashing

The scythe's damage is fairly average for a two-handed weapon, but it has the 
highest critical multiplier of all the weapons available -- allowing for the 
most devastating hits possible.


<--------------------->
 Exotic Ranged Weapons
<--------------------->

- Shuriken -
Size: Tiny
Damage: 1d3
Critical: 20/x2
Type: Piercing

Shurikens are not affected by Strength, not even negatively.  Despite their 
low damage rating, this might make them an ideal weapon for low Strength 
characters -- or Halfling's due to their bonus with thrown weapons.  
Proficiency with the shuriken is automatically granted to Monks at 1st level, 
and they may find themselves easily using them.


|=============================================================================|
  M A N U A L   C O R R E C T I O N S                                    3.01
|=============================================================================|

- General Errors -
Omission - pg. 53 - The Rogue weapon list is missing Sling and Handaxe.
Omission - pg. 56 - At 16th level Barbarian Rage is available 5 times a day, 
  and at 20th level it is available 6 times a day.
Error - pg. 57 - Uncanny Dodge becomes available at level 2, not level 1.
Error - pg. 58 - Bardsongs last for 10 rounds, not 6.
Error - pg. 58 - Perform 3 is required for 1st level Bardsong.
Omission - pg. 58 - 6th level Bardsong grants +1 to Skills.
Error - pg. 58 - 11th level Bardsong actually becomes available at 12th level.
Omission - pg. 58 - 12th level Bardsong grants +1 to Skills.
Omission - pg. 58 - 15th level Bardsong grants +1 to Skills.
Error - pg. 58 - 16th level Bardsong requires Perform 30.
Omission - pg. 58 - 16th level Bardsong grants +1 to Skills.
Omission - pg. 58 - In addition to +2 temporary Hit Points, 17th, 18th, and 
  19th level Bardsong also grants +1 to Skills.
Error - pg. 58 - 20th level Bardsong grants +6 temporary Hit Points and +3 
  to Skills.
Omission - pg. 61 - Monks receive Cleave for free at 1st level.
Omission - pg. 61 - Fighters get a bonus feat at 1st level.
Omission - pg. 62 - Monks receive Still Mind (+2 vs. mind-affecting spells) 
  at 3rd level.
Error - pg. 62 - Wholeness of Body is based on class level, not character 
  level.
Error - pg. 63 - Diamond Soul's spell resistance is based on class level, 
  not character level.
Error - pg. 77 - Only Rogues may disarm traps with a DC of 35 or greater, 
  not 25 or greater.
Error - pg. 82 - Only Rogues may detect traps with a DC of 35 or greater, 
  not 25 or greater.
Error - pg. 87 & pg. 98 - Rangers do not actually receive Ambidexterity 
  and Two-Weapon Fighting at 1st level. They receive a Ranger-specific feat 
  called Dual-Wield which simulates those two feats while wearing light 
  armor or less. This also means that you can't take only one level of 
  Ranger and then expect to qualify for Improved Two-Weapon Fighting later 
  on.  In addition, Rangers must wear Light armor in order to retain their 
  dual-wielding abilities.
Error - pg. 88 - Since Sap is removed, Called Shot is no longer a 
  prerequisite for it.
Omission - pg. 91 - Improved Knockdown requires Int 13+.
Omission - pg. 88 - Monks receive Cleave for free at 1st level.
Error - pg. 95 - Sap was removed from the game as a PC feat.
Error - pg. 95 - Rapid Shot does not work for all ranged weapons, as it does 
  not work with any form of crossbow.
Error - pg. 97 - Sap is no longer a prerequisite for Stunning Fist.
Error - pg. 98 - The Weapon Finesse description states that it works with 
  light crossbows, shurikens, slings, and throwing axes. This is confusing 
  as all ranged weapons are always based on Dexterity and therefore 
  unaffected by Weapon Finesse.
Error - pg. 99 - The Bastard Sword is incorrectly listed as a Martial 
  weapon when it is actually an Exotic weapon.
Omission - pg. 100 - Weapon Specialization should list 4 levels of Fighter as 
  a prerequisite and not "Fighter with base attack bonus +4".
Error - pg. 113 - Maximum ability score modifier is +12 not +10.
Error - pg. 114 - Dodge bonuses can stack to +10.
Omission - pg. 152 - It should be mentioned that both Light and Heavy 
  Crossbows are limited to one attack per round due to reloading time.
Error - pg. 152 - Unarmed attack is listed as a Simple Weapon which is very 
  misleading.  Characters without Simple proficiency can still attack 
  unarmed, and characters with Simple proficiency get no special 
  advantages.  It's really a special case.
Error - pg. 152 - The Sling is erroneously placed on the "Simple - Melee" 
  list and not the "Simple - Ranged" list.
Error - pg. 152 - The Bastard Sword is incorrectly listed as a two-handed 
  sword.  It is a medium weapon and therefore one-handed for medium-sized 
  characters, and two-handed for small characters.
Error - pg. 153 - A Rapier cannot be used as a light weapon in the off-hand to 
  avoid dual-wielding penalties.
Error - pg. 99 - The Bastard Sword is incorrectly listed as a Martial 
  weapon when it is actually an Exotic weapon.
Error - pg. 153 - The Katana description incorrectly implies that a Bastard 
  Sword is a two-handed weapon.  In actuality, the Bastard Sword is wielded in 
  one hand for medium-sized characters, and in two hands for small characters, 
  just like the Katana.
Error - pg. 182 - The 2nd level spell in the Knowledge Domain should be Knock, 
  not Ultravision
Error - pg. 183 - Improved Invisibility in the Trickery Domain becomes 
  available at 5th level, not 4th level.
Error - pg. 185 - Remove Sap from the Fighter Bonus feats chart.
Error - pg. 191 - Discipline should be listed as a class skill for a Paladin.
Error - pg. 192 - Remove Sap from the chart.


- Spell List Errors (pages 124-144) -
Bard - Cantrip - Flare (add)
Bard - 1st level - Mage Armor (add)
Bard - 2nd level - Ultravision (add)
Cleric - 1st level - Endure Elements (add)
Cleric - 2nd level - Ultravision (add)
Cleric - 4th level - Flame Strike (move to 5th level)
Cleric - 4th level - Hammer of the Gods (add)
Cleric - 5th level - Summon Shadow (remove)
Cleric - 5th level - Circle of Doom (add)
Cleric - 6th level - Control Undead (add)
Cleric - 7th level - Greater Restoration (add)
Druid - Cantrip - Flare (add)
Druid - 1st level - Endure Elements (add)
Druid - 1st level - Ultravision (add)
Druid - 4th level - Hammer of the Gods (remove)
Druid - 7th level - Greater Restoration (remove)
Druid - 9th level - Storm of Vengeance (add)
Paladin - 1st level - Endure Elements (add)
Paladin - 3rd level - Cure Moderate Wounds (add)
Ranger - 1st level - Ultravision (add)
Ranger - 2nd level - Resist Elements (move to 1st level)
Sor/Wiz - Cantrip - Acid Splash (add)
Sor/Wiz - Cantrip - Electric Jolt (add)
Sor/Wiz - Cantrip - Flare (add)
Sor/Wiz - 1st level - Endure Elements (add)
Sor/Wiz - 2nd level - Ultravision (add)
Sor/Wiz - 3rd level - Animate Dead (move to 5th level)
Sor/Wiz - 5th level - Elemental Shield (move to 4th level)


- Weapon List Errors (pages 173-175) -
Kama - Should be listed as a Small weapon.
Shuriken - Damage should be listed as 1d3.
Kukri - Missing from the Tiny list. It's stats are: 16gp, 1d4, 18-20/x2, 3, 
  and Slashing.
Axe, Throwing - Costs 1gp per axe.
Dart - Weighs 0.1
Mace - Damage should be listed as 1d6.
Spear - Should be listed as a Large weapon.
Sling - Weighs 0.1
Crossbow, heavy - Costs 100gp.
Morningstar - Damage should be listed as 1d8.
Quarterstaff - Should be listed as a Large weapon, and it's improperly 
  listed as a double-weapon.
Bastard Sword - Should be listed as a Medium weapon.
Two-bladed Sword - Weighs 4.4
Longbow - Costs 150gp.


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  T H A N K S                                                            3.02
|=============================================================================|

Coming up with all these ideas and strategies on my own would have been an 
impossible task.  Much of this information was gathered through message 
boards.  In many cases, I've forgotten names and in other situations the idea 
has been around so long that nobody remembers who first thought of it.  
Countless people have contributed to this FAQ.  I would name a few specific 
people but then I'd feel like a jerk for forgetting someone who I clearly 
should have remembered.  So for now I'll take sole credit as archiver, and 
give an abstract thanks to everybody else.