Quest for Glory Character Building FAQ 1.1
Created by:
BigCow,

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Please note:

This FAQ is created for recreational use only, all trademarks belong to the 
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Explanation

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The Quest for Glory series covers five games, which are unique in their 
continuity they allow because you can save your character at the end of one 
game and import it to the next. For some of the games your spells or skills 
will be carried over, items you have in your inventory, or spells may be 
created or combined. In addition Hybrid Characters which combine skills from 
multiple classes have access to more quests and events in the game. This FAQ 
will attempt to cover some of the basics of character building across games, as 
well as commenting on what is possible for each game.

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Table of Contents

0. Introduction to Hybrid Characters
I. Quest for Glory I
  A. Building Skills
  B. Quests unique to each class
  C. Saving your character for the next game
II. Quest for Glory II
  A. Building Skills
  B. Quests unique to each class
  C. Saving your character for the next game
III. Quest for Glory III
  A. Building Skills
  B. Quests unique to each class
  C. Saving your character for the next game
IV. Quest for Glory IV
  A. Building Skills
  B. Quests unique to each class
  C. Saving your character for the next game
V. Quest for Glory V
  A. Building Skills
  B. Quests unique to each class
  C. Saving your character for the next game
VI. Final notes

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0. Introduction to Hybrid Characters

Playing through the Quest for Glory games normally, you'll probably go through 
three (or four) times per game, and find a different way to solve the puzzles 
each time, experiencing some different quests with each class. Playing through 
with the normal character classes you're more limited in your options in 
solving puzzles, which keeps things in character, but it's also possible to add 
skills to your character to allow them to play more roles in the story.

Some of the quests you can do depend upon the skills you possess, and some just 
depend upon your class. For example, any character with a magic skill can buy a 
magical spell, but only wizards can create a magical staff. This guide is 
intended to cover the skills particular to each game and how the quests you can 
do depend on them, how to build those skills, and how your character is 
affected being imported from one game to the next.

In general, there are two skills which most strongly affect what quests you 
will be able to participate in. Magic, and the Pick Locks ability. Having the 
magic skill will allow you to learn and buy magic spells from the characters in 
the game, and Pick Locks will enable you to behave as a thief and do virtually 
all of the thief related quests until the fifth game. You can create a skill by 
spending a certain number of points to add it at the start of a game, or wish 
for it in the second game from the genie to add that skill for your character.

If you want a character with a full complement of skills, there are a few ways 
to go about it. The simplest thing to do is to start with a Thief in the first 
game and add the Magic and Parry abilities to have every kind of skill 
available, although Parry isn't terribly useful and disappears in the fifth 
game. Fighters will need to add Magic, Climbing, Pick Locks, and Stealth to get 
a full complement of skills, although they learn climbing automatically in the 
fourth game. Magic Users would need to add Climbing, Throwing, Pick Locks, 
Parry, and Stealth so it would probably be better starting with a non-magic 
user to make a hybrid character. Acrobatics is added for Thieves in the fourth 
game but isn't terribly useful.

Some other interesting combinations occur when you convert one character type 
to another, either manually or allowing them to earn Paladin status. They'll 
inherit the skills of the old class they belonged to, along with the expected 
skills of that class. If a magic user becomes a Paladin they'll retain all 
their magical ability but will also know Throwing and Parry. Paladins will also 
receive basic magic ability in the third or fourth game when they learn 
healing.

To have access to the most quests you can start with a Thief and add Magic in 
Quest for Glory I, and adding Magic and Pick Locks to any class allows you to 
do the Thief and Magic related quests. Thieving can be fatal to a Paladin's 
honor of course, but magic comes in handy for any class. If you simply add Pick 
Locks as a skill for a non-thief they'll be able to perform the thief sign and 
break into places, but you may find it hard to do some thieving without having 
the climbing and stealth skills as well, so you may want to start with a thief 
to be more versatile, use magic to make up for your deficit, or add more skills 
as you progress.

If you start with magic from the first game and never become a magic user, you 
won't be able to learn Zap in the first game although you'll gain it in the 
second. You won't be able to get Juggling Lights in the third game or 
Resistance in the fourth game, although you buy both in the fifth game to make 
up for it. You also won't be able to learn the thermonuclear blast spell in the 
last game which is a little less than practical. In addition, you'll never be 
able to create or summon a magical staff in the third, fourth, and fifth games.

Finally, some general advice on combat that applies to all the classes in all 
the games is that you can do a lot of damage before the fight starts and even 
kill a monster by attacking it with spells or throwing weapons at it from a 
distance. You can even kill monsters without ever taking damage by attacking 
them from a distance, running away, and repeating the attack. Magic Users have 
it even easier because they can just dazzle an opponent to stun them, attack, 
dazzle, and repeat.

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I. Quest for Glory I

The first quest for glory game takes place in the village of Spielburg. There 
are some slight difference between the EGA and VGA versions, but the essentials 
are the same in both cases. Thieves will begin the game with a lockpick, 
dagger, and leather armor, magic users start with the zap spell and leather 
armor, and fighters get leather armor, a sword, and a shield.

You will receive 50 points to assign to any attributes and can create a skill 
for a cost of 15 points. In choosing your starting class and skills there are a 
few things to keep in mind:

Thieves will have the easiest time earning money and have the most starting 
skills. Players with the Pick Locks skill will be able to do all the thief 
quests, including visiting the Thieves guild, fencing stolen goods, and robbing 
two houses in town.

Only magic users can get the Zap spell. Players with the magic skill will be 
able to learn all other spells.

Only fighters will have the sword and shield, making combat most effective for 
them. Players with the parry skill can challenge the sword master with loaned 
equipment.

If you want the most flexible character possible, my advice would be to start 
with a Thief and teach him magic for 15 skill points. Use your other 35 points 
to buff up the magic and strength/vitality skills since magic is the hardest to 
build and strength/vitality will do the most to ensure your survival early on.

Thieves are the most flexible class because they have access to all but two 
skills, Magic and Parry. Fighters have access to all the skills except Stealth, 
Pick Locks, Magic, and Climbing. Magic Users have access to all skills except 
Stealth, Pick Locks, Magic, Climbing, Throwing, and Parry. Simply as a matter 
of convenience if you want to have as many skills as possible you'll need to 
start with a Thief. The parry skill is not useful for anything other than 
challenging the sword master, so I would advise against learning it.

If you choose a fighter or thief, I'd highly advise teaching yourself magic. It 
will only cost 15 of your 50 point pool, and you'll be able to get all the 
spells in the series from this point on, except summon staff, although you'll 
also have to delay learning Zap, Juggling Lights, and Resistance. Pick Locks 
gives you a large extra source of income as a fighter or magic user, although 
you may want to cut back on the stealing in the next game if you're going the 
Paladin route.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. Quest for Glory I: Building Skills

General Attributes:

General Attributes are hard to build up directly, since they don't depend upon 
performing a particular skill or action, but upon more complicated things like 
solving puzzles or dealing damage. Fighting monsters in general is a good way 
to build these stats, and solving all the puzzles.

Strength: Seems to be increased by any activity that involves using up stamina, 
or hiring yourself out for a job at the castle stables. Attacking in combat 
seems to help the most, so you'll probably find it closely tied to weapon use.

Intelligence: Casting magic spells, solving as many puzzles as possible, and 
dodging and attacking at the right time in combat seem to help this skill. 
Other than that, there's no easy way to raise it as fast as you might like, 
although wizards will probably have it easiest from casting spells regularly. 
Playing the knife throwing game with the chief thief also seems to boost 
intelligence.

Agility: Agility helps determine stamina and is most useful for Thieves. 
Dodging, climbing, sneaking, and picking locks all seem to help this thief-
related attribute.

Vitality: Vitality seems to be increased slowly like strength when you perform 
any action, but is increased more quickly when you take damage. It's vital in 
the first game because it determines your stamina, which is your most precious 
attribute at first. If you go to the brigand's fortress, run the gauntlet of 
soldiers, fight the ones behind the bridge, and run back, you'll probably 
increase your vitality a good deal, assuming you can survive. 

Luck: Possibly the most mysterious of all attributes. It appears to affect 
things like random encounters and the odds of a skill succeeding. It seems to 
go up with most any action you would perform, although thief related actions 
seem to help the most. Playing the knife throwing game with the chief thief 
also seems to boost luck.

Skills:

Skills are generally easier to increase because they involve some specific 
action your character can perform. And simply by performing it over and over 
again if you have the patience you can max it out pretty easily.

Weapon Use: To build this one, you'll need to fight and use your weapon as much 
as possible. You should be able to beat monsters pretty easily if you keep 
attacking non-stop before they can change their animation. As for the best 
place to fight:

The Goblin Training Ground. Near the top left of the map and two screens south 
of Baba Yaga's hut, the Goblin Training Ground is the best place to practice 
fighting for all beginning classes. The first time you go there you'll fight 
one goblin hiding in the bush, then 2, then 3, all the way up to 8 of them, and 
you can loot their corpses for a good deal of money. Assuming you attack non-
stop before they can get any hits in, the hardest part of your task will be not 
running out of stamina, or else you'll die instantly in battle. Make sure 
you're fully rested before you attempt it and save beforehand anyway.

Dodge: Given the way combat works in a lot of these games you may just find it 
simpler to keep attacking non-stop and not worrying about avoiding your 
opponent's blows. But it does help intelligence and is useful if you don't have 
much HP left. Simply using the dodge command in combat increases it and it can 
be done repeatedly without too much trouble.

Magic: Only magic users start with magic, although I'd recommend it for 
everyone. It's one of the toughest skills to increase since bringing it up by a 
few points involves casting a lot of spells. Furthermore, each spell has a 
skill level associated with it which has to be increased by casting it 
repeatedly. My advice for building up your magic is to use up all your mana 
before you rest or go to sleep. As for building up specific spells, flame dart 
and zap are arguably the only ones which really need it. Fetch is needed for 
one quest, but after the first game the skill levels of your spells don't seem 
to matter much, except for the offensive spells.

Climbing: Native only to thieves. To increase it, as you might imagine, you can 
just climb any surface in the game repeatedly. The town walls, brigand camp, 
and the tree by the healer are all possibilities, and the healer's tree seems 
to be the easiest one to level up on by repeatedly climbing up and down on it.

Throwing: Native to fighters and thieves. The easiest way to build this up is 
to pick up as many rocks as you can from the ground, and keep throwing them 
until they're all gone.

Stealth: Native to thieves. It helps you sneak around people's houses if you're 
stealing, slip by enemies, or avoid random encounters altogether. Simply turn 
on stealth wherever you go, and you'll get into fewer battles but it'll max out 
eventually.

Pick Locks: Native to thieves. One easy place to practice this skill is on the 
door to the healer's hut outside town, since the Sheriff definitely won't be 
there to catch you. Once you have your skill level high enough you can make it 
even easier on yourself by picking your nose and increasing your skill without 
any risk. (assuming it's high enough that you don't cause a nosebleed and kill 
yourself)

Parry: A fighter skill which measures how well you can block a blow. Useful for 
fighting the sword master, but not recommended for other classes and doesn't 
seem as useful combat-wise as just all out attacking.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

B. Quest for Glory I: Quests unique to each class:

Thief: Thieves have the easiest time making money by far. Only classes with 
thief skills can learn the password to the guild, fence stolen items, challenge 
the boss to a game of dagger throwing, or break into the two houses in town.

Also, the thief will find it easier than other classes to sneak past Toro the 
Minotaur, the Kobold, or to rob the houses in town. In the EGA version, any 
class with the Pick Locks skill gets a free lock pick and can make the thief 
sign. In the VGA version you don't get the lock pick but you can make the thief 
sign by clicking the hand icon on someone. You'll need to learn the password 
from the goons in the alley in either case, so wait until night, make the thief 
sign, and use the password to get into the guild. So essentially, if you have 
the pick locks skill the whole world of thieving is opened up to you. Thieves 
are by far the most versatile class to start with.

Magic User: Magic Users are the only class which can learn the Zap spell, 
although any class with magic receives it automatically in the next game.

All classes with a magic skill can buy the spells from the shop in town, learn 
the trigger spell from Henry, learn the calm spell from Erana's peace, learn 
the detect magic spell from the meeps, and learn the dazzle spell from Erasmus. 
Magic is a very useful skill to have, although the trouble of leveling up each 
spell may seem daunting, but only a few spells are necessary to keep at a high 
skill level, flame dart or zap practically speaking.

Fighter: Only Fighters start with the sword and shield as equipment and 
naturally have the parry ability. However, all classes can teach themselves 
parry and borrow equipment from the sword master if they want to challenge him. 
The only real advantage the Fighter has is in making combat a lot easier.

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C. Quest for Glory I: Saving your character for the next game

Your character from this game will hold over all their skills at their current 
levels, and all the spells at their skill level. However, if you know magic and 
haven't learned an essential magical spell, which apparently includes Open, 
Zap, Flame Dart, Calm, or Fetch, it will be added to your character when you 
import with a skill level related to your magic stat. Thus, if you added magic 
as a non-wizard you'll gain the Zap spell in the next game.

All characters will save the number of daggers they had from the previous game 
or given be one if they lost all of theirs, so investing in daggers is one way 
to carry over your cash. You'll also receive all the money you had at the end 
of the game, measured in Gold Coins, plus 140 gold coins as a reward. 30 of 
those coins are for finding the Warlock, 50 for finding Elsa, and 60 for 
finding the Brigand Leader. So essentially, the only equipment you carry over 
is daggers, and you'll bring over as much cash as you had at the end of the 
game with a bonus.

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II. Quest for Glory II

The second game takes place in the land of Shapier and Rasier. There is a VGA 
remake coming out from AGD Interactive (www.agdinteractive.com), but for now 
the EGA version is the only one available. You can import a hero from the first 
game and carry over all the money, stats, and daggers they had, or you can 
create a hero and have a pool of 50 points to buff out your stats.

Importing a hero will help you financially if you had anything more than 1 
dagger and 10 gold coins in your purse at the end of the first game, although 
if you didn't put much effort into building up your skills you may find your 
stats a bit low, since you can't assign points to an imported character. You'll 
find a genie to enhance your stats however later on in the game.

As before, if you're creating a character I'd highly recommend adding magic as 
a useful skill for everyone, and if you're importing a character I'd recommend 
going the magical route as well to flesh out your skills.

A few things to keep in mind when choosing your skills/character:

Anyone can do the W.I.T. quest if they have the magic skill. You can buy 
Detect/Trigger/Dazzle in the game, and you'll start with Zap/Open/Flame 
Dart/Fetch/Calm no matter what if you add a magic skill or import a character 
with magic. So essentially, you can get all the spells in the game and do the 
wizard related quests as a non-magic-user.

Only Fighters can compete to be in the E.O.F. regardless of skill.

Anyone can fence goods or do Thief related quests if they have the Pick Locks 
skill, and this is quite handy for earning a bit of extra cash. Without the 
Pick Locks skill you might still be able to break into the house the 
moneychanger would send you to and rob the weapon's dealer, but you can't fence 
the goods or do the blackbird quest.

If you want to become a Paladin for the next game, Fighters have the best 
chance although Wizards can get by as well if you want a Paladin decked out 
with magic. Fighters can gain honor from the EOF related quest, Wizards may 
have to do more generous actions. Thieves won't have a chance if they do any 
dishonorable thieving, and if you're not going to steal stuff, what's the point 
of choosing the thief class anyway? Fighters should definitely try to become 
Paladins since it's basically an extension of the Fighter class.

All three classes have a significantly different ending sequence and some 
puzzles unique to them. Gaining the magic skill will let you do all of the 
magic user related quests outside of the ending, and giving yourself the pick 
locks skill will open up the world of thieving in this game. If you don't add 
on the magic skill in this game as a non-magic user you won't be able to access 
all the spells in the series.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. Quest for Glory II: Building Skills

General Attributes:

General Attributes are hard to build up directly, since they don't depend upon 
performing a particular skill or action, but upon more complicated things like 
solving puzzles or dealing damage. Fighting monsters in general is a good way 
to build these stats, and solving all the puzzles.

Strength: Seems to be increased by any activity that involves using up stamina. 
Attacking in combat seems to help the most, so you'll probably find it closely 
tied to weapon use.

Intelligence: Casting magic spells, solving as many puzzles as possible, and 
dodging and attacking at the right time in combat seem to help this skill. 
Other than that, there's no easy way to raise it as fast as you might like, 
although wizards will probably have it easiest from casting spells regularly.

Agility: Agility helps determine stamina and is most useful for Thieves. 
Dodging, climbing, sneaking, and picking locks all seem to help this thief-
related attribute.

Vitality: Vitality seems to be increased slowly like strength when you perform 
any action, but is increased more quickly when you take damage. It determines 
your stamina and health and helps your combat abilities a lot. Taking damage 
and engaging in combat seems to be the best way to increase this.

Luck: Possibly the most mysterious of all attributes. It appears to affect 
things like random encounters and the odds of a skill succeeding. It seems to 
go up with most any action you would perform, although thief related actions 
seem to help the most.

Honor: Honor goes up when you perform any honorable action. Tipping the beggar, 
and giving flowers to the ladies are easy ways to rack up honor points, as well 
as returning the purse and most of the quests in a regular walkthrough. High 
honor is essential for converting your character into a Paladin. Stealing, 
harming the griffon or other dishonorable actions lower your honor and can 
disqualify you from being a paladin altogether.

Skills:

Skills are generally easier to increase because they involve some specific 
action your character can perform. And simply by performing it over and over 
again if you have the patience you can max it out pretty easily.

Weapon Use: To build this one, you'll need to fight and use your weapon as much 
as possible. You should be able to beat monsters pretty easily if you keep 
attacking non-stop before they can change their animation. As for where to 
fight, wandering around Shapier without your Saurus is probably the easiest 
thing to do, although there are also some guaranteed fights with the 
elementals. Random combat is probably the most limited in this game because you 
spend most of your time inside the cities.

Dodge: Given the way combat works in a lot of these games you may just find it 
simpler to keep attacking non-stop and not worrying about avoiding your 
opponent's blows. But it does help intelligence and is useful if you don't have 
much HP left. Simply using the dodge command in combat increases it and it can 
be done repeatedly without too much trouble.

Magic: Only magic users start with magic, although I'd recommend it for 
everyone. It's one of the toughest skills to increase since bringing it up by a 
few points involves casting a lot of spells. Furthermore, each spell has a 
skill level associated with it which has to be increased by casting it 
repeatedly. My advice for building up your magic is to use up all your mana 
before you rest or go to sleep. As for building up specific spells, flame dart, 
zap, and force bolt are arguably the only ones which really deserve a higher 
spell skill for helping in combat. Other spells are used for particular quests 
or purposes, and you can cast them repeatedly if you really want to build them.

Climbing: Native only to thieves. To increase it, as you might imagine, you can 
just climb any surface in the game repeatedly. The cliff where the Griffon 
lives is an adequate surface for climbing, and you may be able to get some 
practice on some of the walls as well.

Throwing: Native to fighters and thieves. The easiest way to build this up is 
to pick up as many rocks as you can from the ground, and keep throwing them 
until they're all gone.

Stealth: Native to thieves. It helps you sneak around people's houses if you're 
stealing, slip by enemies, or avoid random encounters altogether. Simply turn 
on stealth wherever you go, people may give you funny looks, but it'll max out 
eventually.

Pick Locks: Native to thieves. Picking the locks on closed doors in Shapier or 
Rasier is risk-free and lets you build it up quickly. Once you have your skill 
level high enough you can make it even easier on yourself by picking your nose 
and increasing your skill without any risk. (assuming it's high enough that you 
don't cause a nosebleed and kill yourself)

Parry: A fighter skill which measures how well you can block a blow. Never 
found it terribly useful.

Communication: A skill for each class which lasts until the fifth game, where 
it's factored into honor. It affects your ability to bargain well with the 
merchants. It can be increased by bargaining and talking to people, and 
asking/telling them about every subject you can think of.

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B. Quest for Glory II: Quests unique to each class:

Thief: All classes get a Lock Pick if they add a pick locks skill. If you have 
the pick locks skill you can behave as a thief in this game and do the 
blackbird quest, rob the weapon dealer, and rob the house for the moneychanger. 
Without that skill you can still rob the house the moneychanger would have 
pointed the thief to or break into the weapon's dealer, but you won't be able 
to fence the goods. Thieves are also the only class to challenge the tight-rope 
walker to test and build their agility.

Thief skills are useful for sneaking past enemies and climbing around places, 
but these mostly show up in the end game which is unique to each class anyway.

Magic User: Any class can add magic as a skill or import with it, and buy the 
necessary spells from Keapon to round out their set. Furthermore, any class can 
do the initiation course at W.I.T. and learn the reversal spell. The one quest 
that's unique to magic users is essentially how the ending works out for them, 
other classes can duplicate their skills.

Fighter: Only Fighters start with the sword and shield as equipment and 
naturally have the parry ability. They're the best for engaging in combat, and 
the only ones that can participate in the challenge to join the eternal order 
of fighters. They have a unique ending like the other classes, and may find it 
easiest to become a Paladin.

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C. Quest for Glory II: Saving your character for the next game

Your character from this game will hold over all their skills at their current 
levels, and all the spells at their skill level. If you had magic previously 
you'll also gain the offensive magic spells, flame dart, force bolt, zap, and 
detect magic for some reason if you didn't have them before. You'll also hold 
over all the daggers you had from the previous game, and all the mana and 
healing pills you owned. If you were granted the honor of becoming a Paladin at 
the end of the game, you'll be a Paladin when you start QFGIII, which is a bit 
of a hybrid of the Fighter and Magic User types with some special Paladin 
abilities such as sensing danger.

There's a further advantage to importing since you'll still be able to use the 
50 points pool to assign points to skills, and you can also convert characters 
from one type to another if you want to create a Paladin or switch back to a 
Fighter or something similar.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


III. Quest for Glory III

This Quest for Glory game takes place in the land of Tarna. Random encounters 
with enemies are location based depending upon where you are on the world map, 
like most typical RPGs, rather than being strictly time-sensitive like in the 
first two games. Thus, if you want to fight all the monsters possible you'll 
need to hang out for a while in each "screen" of the world map.

Importing a hero will carry over their daggers, mana and healing pills, and all 
their skill levels, and you'll also get the usual pool of 50 points to round 
out your character's stats. Importing a hero is also the only way you can use 
the Paladin class in this game.

A few things to keep in mind:

Thieves aren't terribly useful in this game since there's no one to rob except 
the Leopard Men, which only they can do of course. They can steal small amounts 
of money from the drummer in Tarna however. Thief skills are virtually useless 
for this reason.

Magic Users are the only ones who can create a magical staff, which gives you 
an unlimited supply of mana while you use it but keeps your spells from 
leveling up. They are also the only ones who can engage in a Wizard's Duel or 
learn Juggling Lights. Other classes with magic can learn lightning ball.

Fighters and Paladins are the only classes which can compete in the challenge 
to become a Simbani warrior. Paladins also gain a complement of special skills 
such as sensing danger, using a flaming sword, healing, and an honor shield 
which all help for engaging in combat. Fighters can also become Paladins after 
completing the Spear of Death/Magic Drum quest if their honor is high enough.

As usual, I'd recommend having magic with any class for its offensive 
capabilities or importing a magical character from the previous game to get all 
the spells so far, you can also learn lightning ball to round out your spells 
in this game. Converting a magic user to a Paladin is another helpful route to 
take. All classes have unique endings as usual.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. Quest for Glory III: Building Skills

General Attributes:

General Attributes are hard to build up directly, since they don't depend upon 
performing a particular skill or action, but upon more complicated things like 
solving puzzles or dealing damage. Fighting monsters in general is a good way 
to build these stats, and solving all the puzzles.

Strength: Seems to be increased by any activity that involves using up stamina. 
Attacking in combat seems to help the most, so you'll probably find it closely 
tied to weapon use.

Intelligence: Casting magic spells, solving as many puzzles as possible, and 
dodging and attacking at the right time in combat seem to help this skill. 
Other than that, there's no easy way to raise it as fast as you might like, 
although wizards will probably have it easiest from casting spells regularly.

Agility: Agility helps determine stamina and is most useful for Thieves. 
Dodging, climbing, sneaking, and picking locks all seem to help this thief-
related attribute. Rope-bridge walking in the Simbani village also appears to 
increase it, and you can practice it with any class, although Fighters and 
Paladins will find it essential.

Vitality: Vitality seems to be increased slowly like strength when you perform 
any action, but is increased more quickly when you take damage. It partially 
determines your stamina and health and is a critical attribute to keep high.

Luck: Possibly the most mysterious of all attributes. It appears to affect 
things like random encounters and the odds of a skill succeeding. It seems to 
go up with most any action you would perform, although thief related actions 
seem to help the most.

Honor: Honor goes up when you perform any honorable action. Tipping the music 
player, offering money or food to the thief, and giving flowers to the ladies 
are easy ways to rack up honor points, as well as most of the quests in a 
regular walkthrough. High honor is essential for the Paladin, helps bargaining, 
and allows you to turn a Fighter into a Paladin. Dishonorable actions such as 
harming innocent characters or stealing from the music player lowers your 
honor.


Skills:

Skills are generally easier to increase because they involve some specific 
action your character can perform. And simply by performing it over and over 
again if you have the patience you can max it out pretty easily.

Weapon Use: To build this one, you'll need to fight and use your weapon as much 
as possible. You should be able to beat monsters pretty easily if you keep 
attacking non-stop before they can change their animation. Getting into fights 
in this game is a matter of wandering around on the world map until you spot a 
monster, remember there are different monsters in each area.

Dodge: Given the way combat works in a lot of these games you may just find it 
simpler to keep attacking non-stop and not worrying about avoiding your 
opponent's blows. But it does help intelligence and is useful if you don't have 
much HP left. Simply using the dodge command in combat increases it and it can 
be done repeatedly without too much trouble.

Magic: Only magic users start with magic, although I'd recommend it for 
everyone. It's one of the toughest skills to increase since bringing it up by a 
few points involves casting a lot of spells. Furthermore, each spell has a 
skill level associated with it which has to be increased by casting it 
repeatedly. My advice for building up your magic is to use up all your mana 
before you rest or go to sleep. As for building up specific spells, I'd 
concentrate on the offensive spells: zap, flame dart, force bolt, and lightning 
ball when you learn it.

Climbing: Native only to thieves. To increase it, as you might imagine, you can 
just climb any surface in the game repeatedly. Some of the trees and walls in 
the game are useful for that purpose, although it's not terribly essential.

Throwing: Native to fighters and thieves. The cheapest way to build this up is 
to pick up as many rocks as you can from the ground, and keep throwing them 
until they're all gone. However, if you have a large number of daggers, you can 
increase this skill by throwing them all at the target in the Simbani village 
and them picking them all up at once, which saves you the trouble of having to 
pick up some extra rocks. Throwing spears is slower but also helps to increase 
your strength, and Fighters/Paladins will find building this skill essential.

Stealth: Native to thieves. It helps you sneak around people's houses if you're 
stealing, slip by enemies, or avoid random encounters altogether. Sneaking 
around the villages helps build up stealth, although it's not too useful in 
this game.

Pick Locks: Native to thieves. Unless I'm missing something, most people in 
this game live in pretty basic houses, so aside from a few chests you'll find, 
you won't have much cause to practice. Get ready for QFGIV if you plan on using 
this.

Parry: A fighter skill which measures how well you can block a blow. 

Communication: A skill for each class which lasts until the fifth game, where 
it's factored into honor. It affects your ability to bargain well with the 
merchants. It can be increased by bargaining and talking to people, and 
asking/telling them about every subject you can think of. This is the last game 
in which it is useful or seems to affect gameplay significantly.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

B. Quest for Glory III: Quests unique to each class:

Thief: The other thief who gets arrested will recognize you as a fellow thief, 
but this only affects some of his dialogue with you. The thief is also the only 
one who can steal the Spear of Death, and he has a unique ending.

Thief skills aren't very useful in this game, but if you have the pick locks 
skill you can rob the drummer or have the other thief recognize you.

Magic User: Magic users are the only class which can learn the juggling lights 
spell, or create a magical staff to summon. They are also the only class which 
can challenge the Leopard Men in a Wizard's Duel, and have a unique ending.

Magic is a useful skill for other classes for offense if nothing else, although 
only imported heroes will be able to have many spells. Other classes can learn 
Lightning Ball by talking to the Leopard Lady enough times. Be careful though, 
because if you tell her about the spear of death right away you may miss the 
later conversation where she gives you the spell.

Fighters/Paladins: Fighters are the best at combat as usual, and Paladins take 
it to the next level by having a flaming sword, healing, and an honor shield 
once they get enough honor. Fighters and Paladins are the only class which can 
participate in the Simbani initiation challenge, and have a unique ending.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

C. Quest for Glory III: Saving your character for the next game

You don't have to worry too much about what items or money your character has 
at the end of this game, since you'll lose everything except for your skills 
and spells when you're transported away at the end. All your skills will remain 
where they are, the Thief will get an extra "acrobatics" skill, and 
Fighters/Paladins will be able to learn climbing in the next game if they don't 
know it already.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


IV. Quest for Glory IV

This Quest for Glory game takes place in the land of Mordavia. The game's 
system is very similar to the first game, you have a town and a garden of Erana 
where you're safe from monsters, and battles are all time-sensitive rather than 
location-sensitive.

Importing a hero won't give you much of an advantage other than raising your 
stats, you carry no items or equipment over from the previous game. Importing 
is also the only way you can use a Paladin.

A few things to keep in mind when picking your character/attributes:

Only a Thief or someone with the pick locks skill will be able to act as a 
thief and explore the thief's guild in Mordavia. This gives you a regular 
supply of daggers to throw, a bunch of cash, and an optional quest in saving 
the former Chief Thief. You can break into Nikolai's or the Burgomeister's with 
Pick Locks or the open spell.

Only Magic Users can confront the faeries or summon Erana's Staff, but anyone 
with any magical ability can learn all the spells in the game, except for 
Resistance and Ritual of Release.

Fighters and Paladins are the only classes which can use a sword or break into 
the castle by forcing open the main gate. Paladins are also the only class 
which can save the Rusalka. Paladins also gain a complement of special skills 
such as sensing danger, using a flaming sword, healing, and an honor shield 
which all help for engaging in combat. 

Having magic is quite useful as always, and it will let you "glide" over the 
swamp to save you some trouble. Having the pick locks skill also opens up the 
world of the thieves guild to you if you choose to go that route, and even 
without that skill the other classes can rob a couple houses. A Paladin with 
the pick locks skill can do almost all of the quests in the game, but he'd have 
to worry about keeping his honor high.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. Quest for Glory IV: Building Skills

General Attributes:

General Attributes are hard to build up directly, since they don't depend upon 
performing a particular skill or action, but upon more complicated things like 
solving puzzles or dealing damage. Fighting monsters in general is a good way 
to build these stats, and solving all the puzzles.

Strength: Seems to be increased by any activity that involves using up stamina. 
Attacking in combat seems to help the most, so you'll probably find it closely 
tied to weapon use. Exercising every day as much possible on the stair-stepper 
is recommended for building strength.

Intelligence: Casting magic spells, solving as many puzzles as possible, and 
dodging and attacking at the right time in combat seem to help this skill. 
Other than that, there's no easy way to raise it as fast as you might like, 
although wizards will probably have it easiest from casting spells regularly.

Agility: Agility helps determine stamina and is most useful for Thieves. 
Dodging, climbing, sneaking, and picking locks all seem to help this thief-
related attribute. Doing Acrobatics also seems to build it up.

Vitality: Vitality seems to be increased slowly like strength when you perform 
any action, but is increased more quickly when you take damage. It partially 
determines your stamina and health and is a critical attribute to keep high.

Luck: Possibly the most mysterious of all attributes. It appears to affect 
things like random encounters and the odds of a skill succeeding. It seems to 
go up with most any action you would perform, although thief related actions 
seem to help the most.

Honor: Honor goes up when you perform any honorable action. Giving flowers to 
the ladies is an easy way to rack up honor points, as well as most of the 
quests in a regular walkthrough. High honor is essential for the Paladin, but 
doesn't affect the other classes much in this game. A few actions such as 
murdering the Chief Thief can irrevocably set your honor to zero in this game.


Skills:

Skills are generally easier to increase because they involve some specific 
action your character can perform. And simply by performing it over and over 
again if you have the patience you can max it out pretty easily.

Weapon Use: To build this one, you'll need to fight and use your weapon as much 
as possible. You can either swing manually or let the strategy component take 
over for this game. Getting into fights in this game is a matter of wandering 
around in Mordavia until a monster runs up near you, or invading a Wraith's 
nest in some cases. You can also blunt your sword on the castle gates if you 
have one to increase this skill.

Dodge: Dodge is more useful in this game since it's easier to avoid enemy 
attacks, but it's more useful for the strategy mode, if you're fighting 
manually you want just be doing persistent attacks. It can be increased by 
fighting in manual mode and jumping repeatedly. It gets combined into the 
defense stat in the next game.

Magic: A difficult stat to increase as usual, casting repeated spells like the 
offensive magic spells seems to be the easiest way to do it. Non-magic users 
who add this skill for this game will only start with Detect Magic, Zap, Flame 
Dart, and Force Bolt.

Climbing: Fighters/Paladins get a chance to learn this skill in the 
adventurer's guild. The trees in the forest are the easiest way to practice 
this repeatedly without taking up much time, and using the rope and grapnel at 
the guild is a good way for beginners to get acquainted.

Throwing: Native to fighters and thieves. The cheapest way to build this up is 
to pick up as many rocks as you can from the ground, and keep throwing them 
until they're all gone. 

Stealth: Native to thieves. It helps you sneak around people's houses if you're 
stealing, slip by enemies, or avoid random encounters altogether. Sneaking 
around the villages helps build up stealth, although it's not too useful in 
this game.

Pick Locks: Native to thieves. You can practice on the barred doors repeatedly 
to build up your skills, solving all the quests in the Thieves Guild, and the 
window and cell in the Burgomeister's office are useful targets.

Parry: A fighter skill which measures how well you can block a blow. Practice 
just by blocking in combat with a sword.

Communication: A skill for each class which lasts until the fifth game, where 
it's factored into honor. It's increased by talking to people, but I haven't 
noticed it to affect any gameplay elements whatsoever of this game, unless I'm 
mistaken.

Acrobatics: Thief specific, it allows you to jump to a certain spot or attack 
an enemy with this skill. You can practice this anywhere just by clicking the 
icon on some spot.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

B. Quest for Glory IV: Quests unique to each class:

Thief: Thieves can explore the Thief's Guild, gain a lot of loot, and rescue 
the Chief Thief from a curse. They can also break into and rob Old Man Nikolai 
and the Burgomeister's, as well as break the gypsy out of jail. They also have 
a unique ending as usual, and can throw daggers or use acrobatics in combat.

Other classes can break into the Burgomeister's or Nikolai's simply by casting 
Open in the right spots or climbing up, and adding the pick locks skill gives 
you access to all the Thieves Guild quests.

Magic User: Magic Users are the only class which can learn the Ritual of 
Release spell, the Resistance Spell, or summon Erana's Staff. Erana's staff 
gives you unlimited mana but keeps you from building up your spell skills, the 
ritual of release spell is a one time spell that frees Erana's staff, and the 
Resistance spell protects you from elemental forces. They are also the only 
class which can confront the faeries and have a unique ending. 

Any class with magic can learn the Glide, Protection, Frost Bite, Aura, and 
Hide spells from the right places. Ritual of Release and Glide disappear from 
the next game, and Resistance can be bought in the next game.

Fighters/Paladins: Fighters are the best at combat as usual, and Paladins take 
it to the next level by having a flaming sword, healing, and an honor shield 
once they get enough honor. Paladins are the only class which can restore the 
Rusalka from an undead existence and restore the Burgomeister's honor. They 
have a unique ending as usual.

Other classes can do Paladin related quests such as burning down the Monastery 
or re-uniting Boris and Olga.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

C. Quest for Glory IV: Saving your character for the next game

You'll keep all your skills from the previous game, although Parry and Dodge 
will be combined into your "defense" skill, and communication will be combined 
into honor which will affect bargaining. Weapon Use will also become Offense. 
The Ritual of Release and Glide spells will disappear if you had them. Thieves 
will start with a blackbird they were able to find in the game, and importing 
the Hide spell is the only way to have it in the final game.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


V. Quest for Glory V

The final Quest for Glory game takes place in the land of Silmaria. It's 
similar to the third game in that it uses a world map and is based more upon 
the usual RPG style of random encounters. In addition, the game is much more 
heavily combat-based than the other titles.

Importing a hero will give you access to a spell you can't get otherwise, a few 
extra items, the paladin class, and of course the usual advantages of raising 
your stats. Parry and Dodge are combined into Defense for this game, Weapon Use 
becomes Offense, and Communication is combined into Honor.

A few things to keep in mind when picking your character/attributes:

Only a Thief will be able to enter the Chief Thief contest or complete the 
quest for the blackbird, only thieves can rob the bank twice, and only a thief 
will be able to learn pickpocketing. Other classes with the Lockpicking skill 
will be able to rob the house near Ferrari, and should be able to rob the bank, 
but only the first time.

Only Magic Users may create and use a magical staff by getting wood from the 
Dryads or learn thermonuclear blast from the famous adventurer. In addition, 
Shakra's shop where you may buy spells and mana pills or potions stays open 
longer for magic users.

Fighters/Paladins are the best at close-range combat as usual, and Paladins 
have a bunch of specialized spells which use stamina at their disposal. 
Paladins are also the only class which can create the King's Ring and use it to 
uncover the plot against Silmaria.

In addition to the basic restrictions upon quests, only Magic Users and 
Paladins can arrest Andre for robbing the bank, and only Paladins can help fix 
his arm. In addition, only Paladins or Magic Users can marry Erana, and only 
Fighters or Magic Users can marry Katrina. 

Having magic is a definite plus in this game since it gives you an extra source 
of attacks for combat situations, while thief skills aren't as useful as they 
could be outside their main class.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. Quest for Glory V: Building Skills

General Attributes:

General Attributes are hard to build up directly, since they don't depend upon 
performing a particular skill or action, but upon more complicated things like 
solving puzzles or dealing damage. Fighting monsters in general is a good way 
to build these stats, and solving all the puzzles.

Strength: Seems to be increased by any activity that involves using up stamina. 
Attacking in combat seems to help the most, so you'll probably find it closely 
tied to weapon use. The best way to increase it for this game seems to be 
running on the treadmill in the Adventurer's Guild, although you should click 
it twice to run as fast as possible on it.

Intelligence: Casting magic spells, solving as many puzzles as possible, and 
dodging and attacking at the right time in combat seem to help this skill. 
Other than that, there's no easy way to raise it as fast as you might like, 
although wizards will probably have it easiest from casting spells regularly.

Agility: Agility helps determine stamina and is most useful for Thieves. 
Dodging, climbing, sneaking, and picking locks all seem to help this thief-
related attribute. Doing Acrobatics by attacking when unarmed also seems to 
help.

Vitality: Vitality seems to be increased slowly like strength when you perform 
any action, but is increased more quickly when you take damage. It partially 
determines your stamina and health and is a critical attribute to keep high. If 
you choose to revive Erana or Katrina your Vitality will be cut in half, so 
you'll probably have to rebuild it later in the game. Running on the treadmill 
in the adventurer's guild by double clicking it is the fastest way to build it 
up.

Luck: Possibly the most mysterious of all attributes. It appears to affect 
things like random encounters and the odds of a skill succeeding. It seems to 
go up with most any action you would perform, although thief related actions 
seem to help the most.

Honor: Honor goes up when you perform any honorable action, and determines what 
Paladin abilities you can use as well as how well you can bargain. High honor 
is essential for the Paladin, but doesn't affect the other classes much in this 
game. Thief related actions can drop your honor as low as 100.


Skills:

Skills are generally easier to increase because they involve some specific 
action your character can perform. And simply by performing it over and over 
again if you have the patience you can max it out pretty easily.

Offense: Previously known as weapon use. To build this one, you'll need to 
fight and use your weapon as much as possible. You can also attack repeatedly 
when unarmed to build this up.

Defense: Previously known as Dodge and Parry. Taking damage and successfully 
blocking moves seems to work well.

Magic: A difficult stat to increase as usual, casting repeated spells like the 
offensive magic spells seems to be the easiest way to do it. Non-magic users 
who add this skill for this game will only get Detect Magic, Zap, Flame Dart, 
Force Bolt, Lightning Ball, Protection, Aura, Frost Bite, and Calm.

Climbing: Doesn't come in handy that often in this game, but the best way to 
increase it is to repeatedly climb the tree to the left of the dead parrot inn.

Throwing: Native to fighters and thieves. There are a few piles of rocks on the 
ground in certain areas, you can throw them or stock up on knives and throw 
them at the target at the west gate of town.

Stealth: Native to thieves. It helps you sneak around people's houses if you're 
stealing, slip by enemies, or avoid random encounters altogether. Sneaking 
around everywhere helps build stealth.

LockPicking: Native to thieves. The best place to practice is the doors in the 
Gnome Ann Inn.

Swimming: New skill to this game. Learn it by reading the book at the Famous 
Adventurer's House, and the best way to increase it is by swimming around the 
docks in front of the dead parrot inn. A high swimming skill just helps you 
move faster though, and isn't terribly essential. 

Acrobatics: Thief specific, it affects some of your agility related moves. 
Attack repeatedly without a weapon to do some fancy spinning kicks with this 
skill.

PickPocketing: Only thieves can gain it, the best place to practice at first is 
by going in and out of the Thieves Guild until you can pickpocket the dummy 
perfectly. After that you'll be able to practice on ordinary citizens if you're 
good enough to not get caught.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

B. Quest for Glory V: Quests unique to each class:

Thief: Only thieves can do the blackbird quest, enter the Thieves Guild, learn 
pickpocketing or use the blackjack, or rob the bank twice.

Non Thieves with Lockpicking can rob Ferrari's neighbor, and rob the bank once.

Magic User: Only Magic Users can create a staff by visiting the dryads and 
summon the staff to get a reverse worth 50% of their mana, and only magic users 
can learn thermonuclear blast, although it's hardly practical offensively. 

Other classes with magic can learn all the magic spells in the game except 
thermonuclear blast, although you will have to choose between Erana's or 
Katrina's.

Fighters/Paladins: Paladins have plenty of unique skills of their own, and 
Paladins are the only class which can do the King's Ring quest.

As mentioned above, Erana will only marry Magic Users or Paladins, and Katrina 
will only marry Magic Users or Fighters. Only non-thieves can do the quest with 
Andre, and only Paladins can restore his arm.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

C. Quest for Glory V: Saving your character for the next game

Aside from an unofficial "hero6" game, (www.hero6.org) there are no plans for 
another quest for glory title despite your fondest wishes to save your 
character for more adventuring. So unless Sierra fans or Sierra themselves 
develop more titles, this may be the end of the quest for glory.

--------------------------------------------

VI. Final Notes

First of all, any questions or corrections you might have feel free to e-mail 
me at BigCow@gmail.com. I'm learning new things about the series most every 
time I pick up a game, and even more info on how some of the general attributes 
affect quests: such as how having a low communication skill affects your 
dealings with Rajah or Manu, how having a high luck skill will help you evade 
an assassin attack, and whether or not intelligence affects any quest related 
activities.

Acknowledgements/I'd like to thank the academy:

Finally, special thanks to CyricZ for his excellent walkthroughs for 
each game in the series. Thanks to Lori and Cori Cole, makers of Quest 
for Glory, the GameFAQs community, and CJayC for hosting all of 
GameFAQs and this FAQ in particular.