PPPPP RRRR  OOOOO
                       P   P R  R  O   O
                       PPPPP RRRRR O   O
                       P     R   R O   O
                       P     R   R OOOOO

                    RRRR   AAA   CCC  EEEEE
                    R  R  A   A C   C E
                    RRRRR AAAAA C     EEEE
                    R   R A   A C   C E
                    R   R A   A  CCC  EEEEE

              DDDD  RRRR  IIIII V   V EEEEE RRRR
              D   D R  R    I   V   V E     R  R
              D   D RRRRR   I   V   V EEEE  RRRRR
              D   D R   R   I    V V  E     R   R
              DDDD  R   R IIIII   V   EEEEE R   R



PRO RACE DRIVER: DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS GUIDE
by
Jamie Stafford/Wolf Feather
FEATHER7@IX.NETCOM.COM





Initial Version Completed: December 25, 2002
Version 1.0 Completed:     December 25, 2002

==============================================
==============================================
==============================================

MILESTONE
This guide was originally submitted December 25, 2002,
exactly two years after the submission of my first-ever game
guide (Midnight Club: Street Racing - Capture the Flag
Guide).  This marks my 100th guide in these two years of
writing, and when my first guide was submitted, I never
dreamed that I would become such an authority figure on
PlayStation and PlayStation2 racing games.  Due to support
from readers and other guide writers, I have launched my own
Web site with my guides as well as an e-mail list to inform
others of my writing projects.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the hundreds
of readers who have e-mailed me with suggestions, comments,
criticisms, and even simply short notes of thanks.  It is
truly for the readers that I continue to write game guides,
and reader feedback and input is definitely welcome.  I
eagerly look forward to the next two (and hopefully more)
years of writing game guides - which will almost certainly be
concentrated within my specialty of auto racing games.

==============================================

JOIN THE FEATHERGUIDES E-MAIL LIST
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released, join the FeatherGuides E-mail List.  Go to
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information about the list and to subscribe for free.

==============================================
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==============================================

CONTENTS
Spacing and Length
Permissions
Introduction
Driving Instructions: A1 Ring
Driving Instructions: Adelaide
Driving Instructions: Bathurst
Driving Instructions: Brands Hatch Grand Prix
Driving Instructions: Brands Hatch Indy
Driving Instructions: Bristol
Driving Instructions: Canberra
Driving Instructions: Catalunya
Driving Instructions: Charlotte
Driving Instructions: Dijon Prenois
Driving Instructions: Donington Park
Driving Instructions: Eastern Creek
Driving Instructions: Fuji
Driving Instructions: Hockenheim Long
Driving Instructions: Hockenheim Short
Driving Instructions: Knockhill
Driving Instructions: Las Vegas
Driving Instructions: Magny-Cours
Driving Instructions: Mantorp Park
Driving Instructions: Mexico
Driving Instructions: Monza
Driving Instructions: Norisring
Driving Instructions: Nurburgring
Driving Instructions: Oran Park
Driving Instructions: Oschersleben
Driving Instructions: Oulton Park
Driving Instructions: Phillip Island
Driving Instructions: Rockingham Oval
Driving Instructions: Rockingham Road
Driving Instructions: Sandown
Driving Instructions: Sears Point
Driving Instructions: Silverstone
Driving Instructions: T1 Circuit AIDA
Driving Instructions: Vallelunga
Driving Instructions: Vancouver
Driving Instructions: Zandvoort
Driving Instructions: Zolder
Contact Information

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SPACING AND LENGTH
For optimum readability, this driving guide should be
viewed/printed using a monowidth font, such as Courier.
Check for font setting by making sure the numbers and letters
below line up:

12345678901234567890123456
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

This guide is approximately 65 pages in length in the
Macintosh version of Microsoft Word98 using single-spaced
Courier 12-point font.  Therefore, it is probably NOT a good
idea to print this guide in its entirety!!!!!

==============================================

PERMISSIONS
Permission is hereby granted for a user to download and/or
print out a copy of this driving guide for personal use.

This driving guide may only be posted on: FeatherGuides,
GameFAQs.com, f1gamers.com, PSXCodez.com, Cheatcc.com, Games
Domain, gamesover.com, Absolute-PlayStation.com,
RobsGaming.com, InsidePS2Games.com, CheatPlanet.com,
RedCoupe, The Cheat Empire, a2zweblinks.com, Gameguru,
CheatHeaven, IGN, GameReactors.com, cheatingplanet.com,
neoseeker.com, and vgstrategies.com.  Please contact me for
permission to post elsewhere on the Internet.

Plagiarism is NOT tolerated!!!!!

==============================================
==============================================
==============================================

INTRODUCTION
This guide is a list of detailed driving instructions to help
players to quickly yet safely drive each circuit in Pro Race
Driver.  Much of this information comes from my World-famous
Racing Circuits Guide (in which the information is based upon
a variety of racing games featuring the listed circuits), so
there may be a few minor differences between what is printed
here and the rendition of each circuit in Pro Race Driver.

Please note that different games will provide different
variations on the same circuit.  For example, compare Monte
Carlo/Monaco (Temporary Street Circuit) in F1 2001 and Gran
Turismo 3; the circuit in the former is very tight and
narrow, just like the real-world circuit, whereas the latter
presents a generally wider circuit.  Changes also occur
within the same game series; compare the Le Mans circuit in
Test Drive: Le Mans and Le Mans 24 Hours.  Note also that
circuit owners are always considering changes (largely in the
effort to improve safety in the event of crashes) and that it
may take quite some time for games to reflect these changes;
the Monza circuit's initial chicane was changed in 2000 in an
attempt to slow cars somewhat, but it was not until F1 2001
that EA Sports made the real-world circuit's alterations to
its line of F1-based games.

For those fairly new to racing games - especially those games
with a heavy road racing emphasis, such as any F1-based game
and games based on endurance racing - it may be a good idea
to combine the driving details presented in this guide with
information of driving tips presented both in the previous
section of this guide and also in my General Racing/Driving
Guide, also available EXCLUSIVELY on FeatherGuides and
GameFAQs.

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DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: A1 RING
This course may only have seven corners, but it is still a
highly-challenging technical course for the drivers.  The
circuit itself is built on a steep hillside, with the Paddock
area and the Pit Straight located at the lowest elevation of
the course.  The significant elevation changes and poorly-
placed barriers make this a particularly challenging circuit
to safely navigate.  This is also the circuit where Ferrari
made a major public relations blunder in 2002 by ordering
race leader Rubens Barrichello to pull aside in the final few
meters of the Austrian Grand Prix to allow teammate Michael
Schumacher to win a race which Barrichello had completely
dominated all weekend long (Practice, Qualifying, and Race).

Pit Straight: Long and straight; main grandstands to the
left, Pit Lane to the right.  Rather mundane, except that the
entire Pit Straight has a slow uphill climb into the Castrol
Curve.  The beginning of the Pit Straight (coming off
Mobilkom Curve) is also a bit bumpy.

Turn 1 (Castrol Curve): After a rather mundane Pit Straight,
the Castrol Curve is anything but mundane.  This is a right-
hand uphill corner which requires moderate braking.  The Pit
Lane rejoins the main course on the right at the exit of the
corner.  Because of the steep slope of the hill, it is all
too easy to drive off the outside of the corner and into the
massive sand trap.  If you lose your concentration and forget
even to slow down, you will likely find yourself airborne
once you hit the rumble strip; similarly, if you try to take
this corner at top speed, you may find yourself looking up at
the ground.

Straightaway: There are a few fades in the straightaway as
the course continues its uphill climb.  The end of the
straightaway (approaching Remus Curve) has a suddenly steeper
grade and demands total concentration.

Turn 2 (Remus Curve): This is a TIGHT right-hand 'J' turn
requiring heavy or even severe braking, as well as COMPLETE
CONCENTRATION to navigate safely (even when not dealing with
traffic).  The uphill climb of the circuit continues through
most of the turn, plus Remus Curve is even slightly banked
toward the OUTSIDE of the corner, making high or even
moderate speeds absolutely impossible here.  Rolling the
right-side tires up on the thin patch of grass on the inside
of the Remus Curve will almost definitely result in loss of
control of your vehicle.  Even worse, this is a blind corner
due to the barrier.  Aggressive drivers will certainly end up
overrunning the Remus Curve on exit and find themselves
beached in the kitty litter.  If you use the accelerator too
soon on exit, you WILL find yourself off-course.

Straightaway: Located at the highest elevation of the course,
this straightaway has a fade to the right, then another to
the left.  After the second fade, prepare for braking before
arriving at the Gosser Curve.  Make use of the distance-to-
corner markers, or else you risk overrunning Gosser Curve.

Turn 3 (Gosser Curve): Another tight right-hand corner, heavy
braking will be required here to avoid sliding off the course
and into yet another sand trap.  This is also a blind corner,
due to the barrier on the inside of Gosser.  The circuit
begins to slowly descend in elevation here.

Straightaway: This is actually NOT a straightaway at all; the
course map does not list the right-hand turn, but it is
definitely more than just a fade.  If you overrun this, you
will end up in the same sand trap as before - it is simply
extended along the left side of the course from the outside
of Gosser until well beyond this unofficial corner.

Turn 4 (Niki Lauda Curve): This is a wide left-hand corner
which will require moderate or heavy braking, especially
since this is a blind corner due to the slope of the hill on
the inside of the turn; even if you slow greatly before
entering the corner, you will likely be tapping the brakes as
you progress through Niki Lauda.  There is another wide patch
of sand on the outside of the corner, stretching almost all
the way to the entrance of the Gerhard Berger Curve.  A short
straightaway separates Turns 4 and 5.  Note that the circuit
turns to the left here; the patch of pavement which continues
straight forward will lead you into a barrier.

Turn 5 (Gerhard Berger Curve): This is almost identical to
the Niki Lauda Curve, but with an additional sand trap which
begins on the inside of the corner.

Straightaway: Again more than a fade but not listed as an
official corner, there is a 'turn' to the right shortly after
exiting the Gerhard Berger Curve.  About two-thirds of the
way along, the course enters a scenic forested area; this
'transition' section is also rather bumpy.

Turn 6 (Jochen Rindt Curve): This is a blind right-hand
corner which can be taken with light braking, or just a small
lift of the accelerator; the best way to judge this corner is
by using the right-side barrier as a guide.  Another sand
trap awaits those who run off the outside of the corner.  A
short straightaway follows Jochen Rindt.

Turn 7 (Mobilkom Curve): This is a right-hand corner which
will require light or moderate braking.  The Pit Lane begins
on the right just before the entry to Mobilkom, so be careful
not to bump cars slowing before going to the pits.

Pit Entry: Located just before the entrance to the Mobilkom
Curve, the Pit Lane is to the right.  This is a very long pit
lane, so plan to stay out of here as much as possible!!!

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: ADELAIDE
The Adelaide venue is a temporary street circuit which was
one of the true gems of F1 racing.  Unfortunately, the Grand
Prix of Australia is now held instead at Albert Park in
Melbourne (which is itself an excellent race venue), but,
while Albert Park is definitely a beautiful place to hold a
race, it does not have nearly the mystique and the charm that
is found on the challenging streets of Adelaide.
(Fortunately, Australia's excellent V8 SuperCar series still
uses the Adelaide circuit.)

Turns 1 and 2: At the end of the Pit Straight, this very
tricky section begins with a TIGHT left-right chicane which
requires moderate or heavy braking; cars will definitely pile
up here if there is an incident on the opening lap of the
race, as there is virtually nowhere to go should an accident
block the raceway due to the closeness of the barriers
(although they are fortunately NOT nearly as close as at
Monaco).  After a VERY brief straightaway, there is a dogleg
to the left.

Turn 3: Shortly after passing underneath the pedestrian
bridge, drivers need to begin braking for the blind right-
hand Turn 3.  Because the white-painted barriers are so close
to the circuit in this opening segment of the Adelaide street
circuit, it can be VERY difficult to spot exactly where the
circuit bends until one can see the very short escape road
ahead... and by this time, it is really too late to safely
make it through the right-hand right-angle corner.

Turn 4: About one city block beyond Turn 3, this is a
perpendicular left-hand corner requiring moderate braking.

Turn 5: About one city block beyond Turn 4, this is a
perpendicular right-hand corner requiring moderate braking.

Turns 6 and 7: About one city block beyond Turn 5, this is a
fast left-right chicane which can actually be taken at full
throttle with the proper tight racing line.  If taken at full
throttle, beware the barrier on exiting the chicane.  Begin
braking at corner exit for Turn 8.

Turn 8: This is a rough right-hand corner which requires
moderate braking beginning with the exit of Turn 7.

Turn 9: This is a rough right-hand corner which requires
light braking and a wide racing line... but beware the
grandstands on the left on corner exit.

Straightaway: This is the single longest straightaway at
Adelaide.  Powerful acceleration out of Turn 8 is required,
and only the BAREST of tapping on the brakes is needed for
Turn 9 to enable excellent passing opportunities along this
immense straightaway and the entry to Turn 10.

Turn 10: This tight and nasty right-hand J-turn requires
heavy braking, especially given the incredibly-fast speeds
attained along the previous straightaway.  This is an
excellent to pass on braking entering this J-turn.

Turn 11: Immediately following a left-hand dogleg, this is a
J-turn to the left, requiring moderate braking.

Turn 12: This final corner is tricky.  Pit Entry is
immediately on the right on corner entry, whereas the main
circuit uses the outside racing line.  The Pit Lane barrier
is set back at corner exit, which means that passing can
occur by essentially 'shortcutting' the corner... but then
drivers risk ramming the Pit Lane barrier by 'shortcutting'
the corner too much.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: BATHURST
This 'world-famous' counter-clockwise circuit (in Australia
and New Zealand) hosted its first 24-hour race in November
2002.  The circuit map certainly presents a mostly-technical
circuit, but it simply does NOT do justice to just HOW
technical this circuit is... and drivers must certainly have
their hands full and their hearts in their throats while
trying to race here at night in the new 24-hour event!!!!!
What makes this circuit so difficult is that the most
technical section consists of many tight and fast-approaching
twists and turns combined with the continual ascents and
descents in the highly-scenic mountains, so that when drivers
finally exit the mountainous section, their nerves are
extremely frayed.  While speed is obviously important in auto
racing, the trick to Bathurst is to continually maintain a
1,000,000,000% concentration level for the entire race.

Pit Straight: This is nearly the shortest straightaway of the
circuit, and is the farthest point from the highly-technical
mountainous section.

Turn 1 (Hell Corner): This may not seem like much on the
circuit map, but due to the immense speeds attained on Pit
Straight and the near-lack of recovery room for those who
miss the braking zone, this left-hand right-angle corner is
an extremely dangerous place.  It is important to begin
braking rather early, especially on the first lap of a race,
to try to avoid other cars' accidents (and debris) ahead.

Straightaway (Mountain Straight): This straightaway leaves
the vast, flat, open area of the valley and begins the ascent
into the mountains.  More and more trees appear alongside
either side of the straightaway as the elevation rises, and
is in some respect reminiscent of the Spa-Francorchamps
circuit in Belgium.  Mountain Straight has its own crest
about halfway along the straightaway, then a long dip before
renewing its ascent.

Turn 2: This right-hand 105-degree angle seems rather gentle
on the circuit map, but the ascent of the circuit truly gains
momentum here; this fact combined with the inside barrier's
proximity to the raceway itself makes this corner semi-blind
and extremely difficult, so pristine knowledge of this corner
is a necessity to keep from sliding off the pavement.  The
main ascent of the mountains begins at the entry of Turn 2,
so car power will certainly be a necessity... although that
power must be continually tempered with both strong braking
and feather-light throttle control.

Note: From the exit of Turn 2 to the end of the mountainous
section, there pavement is almost always directly bounded by
barriers and/or sheer cliff faces.  This means that there is
literally NOWHERE to go in case of an incident, and thus the
raceway can quite easily become blocked.  This also means
that missing a braking zone will result in the near-instant
destruction of the front of a vehicle.

Turn 3 (Cutting): This is a left-hand decreasing-radius
hairpin corner with NO room for error; missing the braking
zone will destroy the front of the car.  Cutting is a blind
corner, so it is imperative to go VERY slowly here,
especially since this is a prime place for accidents to occur
as cars ram and bounce off the barriers here.

Turn 4: This right-hand corner is rather gentle, but the
circuit has a brief crest here which can potentially play
havoc with light-weight, high-power vehicles.  This caveat
aside, it should be possible to power through Turn 4 at full
acceleration without incident (unless blocked by traffic).

Turns 5-6: Here, minor braking will be needed to keep off the
barriers (still adjacent to the raceway) as the grade of the
ascent increases through the right-hand Turn 5.  Immediately
afterward is the gentle left-hand Turn 6, which leads onto a
brief straightaway.

Turn 7: This long left-hand corner requires at least light
braking at its midpoint, which is a major dip in elevation.
This dip will play havoc with virtually any vehicle, but car
control will be EXTREMELY difficult here if a car is even
slightly loose (i.e., the rear of the car tends to swing
about).

Turn 8: This is a gentle left-hand corner which can be taken
at full acceleration.

Straightaway (Skyline): As the name suggests, this is the
highest elevation of the Bathurst circuit (although the
mountain continues to climb in elevation to the right of the
raceway), and a nice view of the vast plains can be seen both
ahead and to the left of the flow of traffic.  However,
taking the time to admire this scenery will bring death and
destruction in the Esses.

Turns 9-15 (Esses): Simply put, this is a nail-biter.  The
circuit makes a steep downhill descent among the tightest,
twistiest turns; again, there is really nowhere to recover
should a driver miss a braking zone.  This section is where
strong braking is REALLY needed.  Those using manual
transmission can use mountain-driving tactics and gear down
one or two gears lower than usual, allowing for 'engine-
braking' to occur to save the vehicle's true brakes.

Turn 16 (Forest Elbow): This is a sharp left-hand corner on a
steep downhill run which is semi-blind on approach.  There is
STILL no recovery room for those who miss the corner, so it
is imperative that all drivers brake early and HARD for
Forest Elbow.

Turn 17: After a brief straightaway, this is a gentle left-
hand corner coming out of the mountainous area.  No braking
should be required here.

Straightaway (Conrod Straight): This is the single longest
straightaway of the Bathurst circuit.  The descent is very
gradual now as the circuit rejoins the vast desolate valley,
the trees thinning quickly.  The barriers on either side of
the raceway slowly begin to give way as well.  Fortunately,
Chase can be easily seen ahead (in daytime conditions).

Turns 18-20 (Chase): This is a gentle right-hand mini-kink
followed by a sharp left-right.  There is no barrier on the
inside of Chase to prevent cars from simply barreling
straight ahead, but the entire area IS filled with kitty
litter to severely slow those drivers attempting this tactic.
Moderate or hard braking will be required for Turn 19, and
drivers may need to tap the brakes again for Turn 20.

Turn 21: After a short straightaway, this is a left-hand
right-angle corner onto Pit Straight, with Pit Entry just
before the entry of the corner on the left side of the
pavement.  There is some recovery room for Turn 21, but not
much.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: BRANDS HATCH GRAND PRIX
The Brands Hatch Grand Prix circuit is a fun circuit for
racing.  Situated within a natural bowl, it is easy for many
spectators to see the bulk of the racing action from many
points along the circuit.  However, traffic is almost always
a problem for drivers.  Interestingly, along almost the
entire circuit, drivers can easily hear the other cars on
other sections of the circuit, thus testifying to the compact
nature of this venue.

Pit Straight (Brabham Straight): This is the longest single
straightaway of the circuit, so powerful acceleration is
required out of Clark Curve to make passes or pull away from
challengers.

Turn 1 (Paddock Hill Bend): This long sweeping right-hand
corner can be tricky at full acceleration, so a gentle
tapping of brakes before entering Turn 1 is key.  This is
nearly a double-apex corner, so take care with the racing
line, especially since this begins the downhill descent of
the circuit.  Taking this corner at full throttle is likely
to cause the car to spin before achieving corner exit.

Turn 2 (Druid's Bend): This right-hand hairpin is the
tightest corner of the Brands Hatch Grand Prix circuit.
Passing on braking here can be advantageous, but is NOT for
the newcomers - especially on the opening lap of a race!!!
There is plenty of sand to the outside of the hairpin for
those who miss the braking zone.

Turn 3 (Graham Hill Bend): Experts can handle this left-hand
corner at full throttle if unencumbered by traffic, although
slight braking is preferred here.  The course is at its
lowest elevation here.

Straightaway (Cooper Straight): This straightaway has a
slight bend to the left.  While not nearly as long as Brabham
Straight, it is a great place for low-downforce cars to gain
race positions.

Turn 4 (Surtees): This left-hand corner requires light
braking to keep to the pavement, and flows quickly toward
Pilgrim's Drop.

Straightaway: Following Surtees, the circuit has its longest
straightaway.  About halfway along this straightaway begins
Pilgrim's Drop, which - despite the 'misnomer' - is a gentle
descent into Hawthorne Bend.

Turn 5 (Hawthorne Bend): This right-hand right-angle corner
will require light to moderate braking, but really adept
drivers should be able to get away with only a very slight
tapping of the brakes through Hawthorne Bend as necessary.
The entry to Hawthorne Bend marks the beginning of an uphill
climb for the circuit; this makes this corner a bit more
challenging than it would originally appear from the circuit
map.

Straightaway (Derek Minter Straight): This straightaway
continues the gentle uphill climb of the circuit (which
begins with the entry to Hawthorne Bend).

Turn 6 (Westfield Bend): This is a long right-hand corner
which can generally be taken with light or moderate braking;
only TRUE experts can safely navigate Westfield Bend without
ANY braking whatsoever (and this will really only be due to
prime car tuning).  Driver who carry too much speed through
Westfield Bend will likely find themselves beached in one of
the wide sand traps to the outside of the corner.

Turns 7-9 (Dingle Dell Corner): Shortly after Westfield Bend
is a right-left-right chicane complex.  If unencumbered by
traffic, it is possible to essentially shortcut Turn 8 and
make a wide right-hand sweeping arc.  Otherwise, moderate
braking will be required here to keep to the pavement (or
only light braking if the traffic through the chicane is
spread wide enough to allow making ample use of the rumble
strips).

Turn 10 (Stirling's Bend): This is a left-hand right-angle
corner coming very quickly after Dingle Dell Corner (the
right-left-right chicane).  Moderate braking is a requirement
here, especially since there is VERY little grass on the
outside of the pavement before the barrier will stop any
runaway vehicles.  This opens onto Clearways, another long
straightaway, so excellent acceleration out of Stirling's
Bend will pay dividends for gaining race positions.

Turn 11 (Clark Curve): Slight braking may be desired entering
this long right-hand corner, but then it is imperative to
power hard all the way to Turn 1!!!  Pit Entry is on the
right entering Clark Curve.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: BRANDS HATCH INDY
The Brands Hatch Indy circuit is a small but fun circuit for
racing.  Situated within a natural bowl, it is easy for many
spectators to see the bulk of the racing action from many
points along the circuit.  However, traffic is almost always
a problem for drivers.  Interestingly, along almost the
entire circuit, drivers can easily hear the other cars on
other sections of the circuit, thus testifying to the compact
nature of this venue.

Pit Straight (Brabham Straight): This is the longest single
straightaway of the circuit, so powerful acceleration is
required out of Clark Curve to make passes or pull away from
challengers.

Turn 1 (Paddock Hill Bend): This long sweeping right-hand
corner can be tricky at full acceleration, so a gentle
tapping of brakes before entering Turn 1 is key.  This is
nearly a double-apex corner, so take care with the racing
line, especially since this begins the downhill descent of
the circuit.  Taking this corner at full throttle is likely
to cause the car to spin before achieving corner exit.

Turn 2 (Druid's Bend): This right-hand hairpin is the
tightest corner of the Brands Hatch Indy circuit.  Passing on
braking here can be advantageous, but is NOT for the
newcomers - especially on the opening lap of a race!!!  There
is plenty of sand to the outside of the hairpin for those who
miss the braking zone.

Turn 3 (Graham Hill Bend): Experts can handle this left-hand
corner at full throttle if unencumbered by traffic, although
slight braking is preferred here.  The course is at its
lowest elevation here.

Straightaway (Cooper Straight): This straightaway has a
slight bend to the left.  While not nearly as long as Brabham
Straight, it is a great place for low-downforce cars to gain
race positions.

Turn 4 (Surtees): This left-hand corner requires light
braking to keep to the pavement, and flows quickly into
McLaren.

Turn 5 (McLaren): This long sweeping right-hand corner can
generally be taken at full acceleration.

Turn 6 (Clark Curve): Slight braking may be desired entering
this long right-hand corner, but then it is imperative to
power hard all the way to Turn 1!!!  Pit Entry is on the
right entering Clark Curve.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: BRISTOL
First used for NASCAR in 1961, Bristol Motor Speedway is the
shortest track on the current NASCAR calendar at 0.533 miles
(0.853 kilometers) - thus it is known as 'The World's Fastest
Half-mile.'  Formerly asphalt, the  Bristol, Tennessee, USA,
circuit was converted to concrete in 1992, and boasts
attendance easily topping 150,000 for NASCAR events.  The
banking is thirty-six degrees in the corners and sixteen
degrees on the straightaways.  Passing is difficult at
Bristol due to the compact nature of the circuit; the only
easy part about racing at Bristol is the ability to be
involved in accidents.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: CANBERRA
Canberra is a rather difficult street circuit.  This venue is
not nearly as tight and compact as at Vancouver, but the
corners are definitely FAR worse (and also more numerous),
requiring much slower speeds.  It is important to keep to the
left on Pit Straight to ensure avoiding Pit Lane... unless a
pit stop is truly needed or required.

Pit Straight: Pit Entry is on the right half of Pit Straight,
so it is important for cars remaining on the main circuit to
keep to the left to ensure they do not accidentally go into
Pit Lane itself.  Also, the Pit Lane barrier is difficult to
see on approach, so drivers should commit to either the far-
left or the far-right until they have safely passed the
beginning of this barrier.

Turn 1: This is a severe-braking right-hand right-angle
corner which will likely see a lot of bumping and grinding on
the first lap of a race.  During a race, Pit Exit is at the
apex of the corner, so it is important for those coming from
Pit Straight to keep hard to the left, and those coming from
Pit Lane to keep hard to the right.

Turn 2: IMMEDIATELY after exiting Turn 1, this is a long
sweeping left-hand corner on a slightly-wider raceway.  Full
acceleration can be used here, and there is definitely plenty
of room to make a well-timed pass.  However, drivers must be
careful as traffic from Pit Lane merges with the higher-speed
traffic coming off Pit Straight.

Turns 3-6: This is an elongated right-left-left-right bus
stop chicane.  Moderate or severe braking will be required
for Turn 3 and Turn 5; careful throttle management will be
needed for Turn 6 to ensure avoiding the outside barrier.

Turns 7-9: This is a left-right-right complex which in total
acts as nearly a hairpin corner.  Moderate braking will be
needed here, with gentle throttle control throughout.  In
fact, this section is easier if Turns 8 and 9 are treated as
a hairpin corner, making a wide berth to hit both apexes just
right.  Note that there is an access road BETWEEN Turn 8 and
Turn 9, but this is NOT part of the official raceway;
nonetheless, this can be rather confusing until the
intricacies of this circuit have been committed to memory.

Turn 10: This right-hand corner requires moderate braking.

Straightaway: This is not 'straight' at all.  Instead, this
'straightaway' is one long continuous sweeping bend to the
left.  there are three bridges over this 'straightaway;' it
is best to begin braking for Turn 11 once beyond the third
bridge.

Turn 11: This right-hand corner requires moderate braking.

Turns 12 and 13: This is a VERY slow left-right chicane, so
moderate or even severe braking will be required.  Due to the
VERY slow speed required here for safe passage, this is a
prime place for cars to pile up if one driver is too
aggressive.

Turns 14-16: This right-left-right chicane is just as slow as
the previous chicane.  What makes this worse, however, is
that the left-hand corner of this chicane is an actual
hairpin in its own right!!!  Fortunately, once past the apex
of the chicane's own hairpin turn, the right side of the
raceway opens up, so those drivers using too much speed
through the hairpin portion of the chicane will have a nice
expanse of grass to greet them instead of the usual immovable
barrier.

Turns 17 and 18: Immediately after exiting the chicane, the
raceway curves twice to the right.  These are gentle curves,
but the second will still require light braking since the
momentum of the vehicle will try to force it into the left-
side barrier. This leads onto Pit Straight.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: CATALUNYA
The Catalunya circuit is challenging, especially the two
hairpins and the final corners of the race.  This is the same
circuit configuration used in modern F1 racing.

Pit Straight: As usual, incredible speeds can be attained
here.  Watch for cars rejoining the race from the right side
of the straightaway about two-thirds of the way along its
length.

Turn 1 (Elf): This is a right-hand corner which requires
moderate braking.  Be careful not to hug the inside of the
corner too tightly, or you will damage your right-side tires
on the barrier.  Strong acceleration out of Turn 1 creates
great passing opportunities all the way to Repsol.
Attempting to take Turn 1 at top speed will either cause you
to lose control as you run up on the rumble strips, or send
you too far off course to survive Turn 2 intact.

Turn 2 (Elf): Immediately following Turn 1, the left-hand
Turn 2 can usually be taken at top acceleration.  With strong
acceleration out of Turn 1, this is a prime passing zone.

Turn 3 (Seat): A sweeping right-hand increasing-radius corner
which can be taken at full speed with a flawless racing line.
This is also a good place to pass slower cars, especially if
you have the inside line.

Turn 4 (Repsol): This is a semi-blind right-hand hairpin
corner which requires moderate or heavy braking.  The barrier
on the inside of the corner rests almost directly against the
track, and blocks your view around the corner.  This can
actually be a good place to pass on braking, but only with
extreme caution (and usually only if the car you wish to pass
takes the wide line around the corner).  Don't come too hot
into this corner or else you will find yourself in the sand.
After clearing the first 90 degrees, you should be able to
accelerate fairly well if not encumbered by traffic.

Turn 5: After a very short straightaway, this is a semi-blind
left-hand hairpin, a bit tighter than Turn 4.  Moderate or
heavy braking will be needed here, or you will definitely
find yourself in the kitty litter.

Straightaway: This straightaway fades to the left.  Strong
acceleration out of Turn 5 can create passing opportunities,
especially in the braking zone for Wuth.

Turn 6 (Wuth): With a good racing line, you should be able to
brake lightly to clear this semi-blind, slightly-downhill,
left-hand corner.  Beware the barrier on the inside of Wuth.
The exit of Wuth has an immediate fade to the right, so do
not commit too much to turning left here, or the front-left
of the car will be shaking hands with the barrier.

Turn 7 (Campsa): This right-hand corner can be taken at full
speed with a flawless racing line.  Note that the official
circuit is to the right; do not drive directly ahead onto
another patch of pavement, or you will be assigned a Stop-Go
Penalty.

Turn 8 (La Cacsa): Severe braking is required for this left-
hand corner.  While not suggested, you may be able to pass
other cars on braking here.  As with Wuth, stay off the
rumble strips and grass on the inside of the turn, or you
will risk losing control of the car.  This is a 'J' turn, and
the corner seems to go on forever before you reach the exit.

Turn 9 (Banc Sabadeau): Shortly following Turn 8, moderate or
heavy braking will be needed here for the right-hand, upward-
sloping corner.  This is also a 'J' turn which is nearly a
double-apex corner.  If you need a recovery area anywhere on
the course, it will most likely be here.  It is possible to
pass slower cars here by tightly hugging the inside of the
turn, even running the right-side tires on the rumble strips
or just slightly in the grass.

Turn 10: Light braking may be needed for this right-hand
corner.  The key here is to truly hug the inside of the turn
and accelerate strongly through the exit.  Watch for slow
cars here preparing to go to Pit Lane for servicing.

Turn 11: Entering this right-hand corner, the Pit Lane begins
on the right, so be on the lookout for very slow cars here.
If you take this final corner too tightly, or make a VERY
late decision to go to the pits, you will certainly damage
the front of the car on a barrier.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: CHARLOTTE
One of the favorite circuits of NASCAR racing, Charlotte is a
tri-oval, with Pit Straight actually curved slightly along
its entire length.  The corners can accommodate two-wide
racing if necessary, but single-file racing is best through
the turns.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: DIJON PRENOIS
Located in southern France, Circuit Dijon Prenois is a small,
hilly, and FUN circuit.  Pit Straight is 1.1km (0.7 miles) in
length, whereas the rest of the circuit continually twists
and turns in the hills.

Pit Straight: This is really the only true straightaway of
the entire circuit.  At 1.1km (0.7 miles) in length, this
straightaway really should be taken at lower than optimal
speeds, due to the necessity for high downforce on the rest
of the circuit.

Turns 1-2 (Villeroy): This is a double-apex right-hand
corner.  Turn 1 can be taken with light braking, but moderate
braking will be necessary for Turn 2.

Turns 3-5 (Hourglass S'es): Careful, precision steering will
be needed to keep the car on the pavement while still
negotiating traffic at top speed through these right-left-
right S-curves.  Turn 5 is sharper than the other corners.
There is a continual rise in elevation throughout this
section of the circuit.

Turn 6 (Crossover): The shorter configuration of the circuit
has simply a moderate left-hand corner here, but the main
configuration uses a 135-degree left-hand corner heading
toward the Parabolique.  Light to moderate braking will be
required for Crossover, and plenty of sand on the outside of
the corner awaits the not-so-focused drivers.

Turn 7 (Parabolique): This is a right-hand heavy-braking
near-hairpin corner which is made much more difficult due to
the sudden steep climb in elevation beginning at the entry of
the Parabolique.  This means that much of the corner is
unsighted, thus drivers must have PRISTINE knowledge of this
corner in order to truly power through the Parabolique at any
great speed.  There is fortunately a sand trap on the outside
of the Parabolique to collect runaway vehicles, but it is
still possible to clear the kitty litter and severely damage
the car against the barrier.

Turn 8: This left-hand corner is a long moderate-braking
corner at the crest of the circuit.  There is a wide sand
trap on the outside of the turn for those who overshoot the
corner, which is especially important since this is a semi-
blind corner until the car is safely at the top of the rise.

Turn 9 (Combe): This right-hand corner can be easily
negotiated with only slight braking as needed.

Turn 10 (Pouas Corner): This final corner is a long right-
hand sweeping turn leading back onto the immense Pit
Straight.  Slight tapping of the brakes may be necessary for
Pouas Corner, especially in high-powered cars.  Pit Entry is
on the right approximately 1/4 of the way along Pit Straight.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: DONINGTON PARK
This popular British venue is the host of many events, and
has been included in other games.  The outside of almost
every corner has a very small strip of grass between the
pavement and the sand trap.  The Grand Prix configuration
inverts the final chicane of the National configuration and
adds two lengthy straightaways with two hairpin corners
behind the paddock area.

Turn 1: This right-hand J-turn requires moderate braking, and
plenty of patience at the start of a race as traffic really
jams up here.

Turn 2: This is a long, gentle right-hand semi-corner,
sloping downhill along its entire length.

Turn 3: Continuing downhill, this left-hand corner will only
require light braking, if the brakes are needed at all.  Due
to the downhill slope, it may be difficult to see the apex of
the corner as you approach.

Turn 4: Immediately after Turn 3, the course turns uphill to
the right here, with light or moderate braking required.

Turn 5: After passing underneath the pedestrian bridge, the
course turns to the left here.  No braking is required.

Turn 6: This is really just a left-hand fade.

Turn 7: Moderate braking is necessary as the course continues
uphill through this right-hand turn.  The barrier on the left
comes rather close to the pavement, so there is not much
grass and sand to stop you if you miss your braking zone.

Turn 8: This lengthy, sweeping right-hand J-turn will require
light braking to keep out of the grass and sand as the course
continues slowly uphill.  This corner opens out onto the
longest straightaway at Donington.

Turns 9-10: Shortly after passing underneath the big Dunlop
tire, begin braking for the chicane.  This is a tight left-
right combination with NO room for error.  The barrier on the
inside of Turn 9 prevents shortcutting, and the sand trap to
the inside of Turn 10 severely hinders anyone attempting to
shortcut that corner.

Turn 11: After a significant straightaway, this is a tight
right-hand hairpin turn onto another significant straightaway
behind the Paddock Suite.  Essentially, think of this as
changing runways on an airport circuit (such as at Sebring)
and you should do fairly well here.  Moderate braking is
required here.  If you miss your braking zone, there is a
wide patch of kitty litter to the outside of the corner.

Turn 12: The final corner of the circuit is a left-hand tight
hairpin.  Again, think of this as changing runways on an
airport circuit.  Moderate braking will be needed here.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: EASTERN CREEK
This 3.93-kilometer (2.456-mile) circuit hosts V8 Supercars,
many Formula series, a number of sports cars and sports
sedans series, touring cars, production cars, and numerous
national and support motorcycle series.  The pit straight
even incorporates a drag strip, so racecars here can make use
of this wider section to pass large packs of slower traffic.
This is a high-speed technical circuit, and those with
moderately- or extremely-loose cars will likely find
themselves slamming the barriers and/or sliding through the
many patches of kitty litter.

Pit Straight: The longest straightaway at Eastern Creek, Pit
Straight also doubles as a drag strip :-)   Pit Entry is
approximately 1/3 of the way along Pit Straight.

Turn 1: This is a long left-hand corner requiring light
braking after the immense length of Pit Straight and the high
speeds attained there.

Turn 2: This left-hand hairpin corner requires moderate or
even heavy braking on approach, and perhaps slight braking
throughout.  This is a somewhat-tight corner, so it is easy
to misjudge speed and end up slipping off the pavement and
getting stuck in the grass on the outside of the corner.

Turn 3: Almost immediately following Turn 2, this right-hand
corner may require light braking to keep from slipping out
into the kitty litter on corner exit.

Turn 4: This right-hand corner needs moderate braking to keep
to the pavement, although a wide sand-filled recovery area is
available if necessary.

Turn 5: Just after Turn 4, Turn 5 is a left-hand corner
requiring moderate braking.

Turns 6-7: Turn 6 is a quick right-hand flick leading
immediately into the left-hand sweeping Turn 7.  Light
braking can be useful for Turn 6, whereas moderate braking is
required for and throughout Turn 7 to keep the vehicle on the
pavement.

Turn 8: Light or moderate braking is needed for this left-
hand corner.

Turn 9: This right-hand hairpin requires moderate or even
heavy braking.

Turns 10-11: Turn 10 is a quick right-hand flick leading
immediately into the left-hand sweeping Turn 11.  Light
braking can be useful for Turn 10, whereas moderate braking
is required for and throughout Turn 11 to keep the vehicle on
the pavement.  This leads onto Pit Straight.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: FUJI
This Japanese circuit is perhaps most notable to North
American classic video game enthusiasts from its appearance
in Atari's Pole Position series in the stand-up arcades of
the 1980s.  There are a few of these classic Pole Position
and Pole Position II arcade boxes still in existence,
although the best bet for finding these games now is on the
various gaming consoles.  However, those who prefer the
version of the circuit in the Pole Position series will be
rather disappointed at the chicanes added along the faster
sections of the Fuji circuit.

Turns 1-2 (Daiichi Corner) This is a double-apex right-hand
near-hairpin corner.  Due to the immense length of Pit
Straight, HARD braking will be required before even thinking
of entering Daiichi Corner, and moderate braking will be
required throughout this section.  There is a nice patch of
kitty litter on the outside of Daiichi Corner, but drivers
should not expect it to stop a runaway car before the vehicle
slams hard into the wall when overshooting this section of
the circuit.

Turns 3 and 4 (Sumtory Corner): Ahead, a barrier can be seen;
this blocks direct access to the smooth left-hand corner Pole
Position enthusiasts know so well; instead, players are
forced straight ahead into a tight left-right complex around
the barrier, so moderate or hard braking will be needed here
on entry.  It is possible to power out of Turn 3 and through
Turn 4 without braking, unless the car has some severe grip
problems and/or is extremely loose (i.e., the back end of the
car tends to swing about).

Turn 5 (100R): If the driver's car is properly tuned, there
should be no trouble with powering through this wide right-
hand sweeping turn, even when navigating traffic.  However,
cars which are moderately or extremely loose will have plenty
of trouble here, ESPECIALLY if encumbered by traffic.

Turn 6 (Hairpin): This left-hand corner is aptly named.
Unfortunately, Hairpin comes at the dip following 100R, which
can make this corner extremely tricky as the car inherently
loses traction; the proximity of the barrier is definitely
too close for comfort here due to this drop in elevation (the
elevation change is certainly not significant, but it is just
enough to cause grip problems in many cars).

Turn 7 (MC Corner): This long, sweeping, right-hand corner is
another prime place for full-throttle acceleration.

Turns 8-10 (Dunlop Corner): This right-left-right chicane
will also disappoint Pole Position enthusiasts.  Heavy
braking will be needed for Turn 8, with moderate braking
required for Turn 9.  Turn 10 should be easily taken at full
acceleration.  Fortunately, the barrier forcing cars to take
the chicane is easily visible from a distance on approach.

Turn 11 (Last Corner): This aptly-named corner is the final
sweeping long right-hand corner of the Fuji circuit.
Moderately- and extremely-loose cars will have difficulty
here; otherwise, only a slight tapping of the brakes MAY be
necessary for Last Corner.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: HOCKENHEIM LONG
Surrounded by multitudes of trees which make much of the
circuit rather dark in wet or overcast races, this is the
fastest course used for F1 racing in recent years.  If not
for the Jim Clark, Brems, and Ayrton Senna chicanes, cars
would be flying around the course in top gear all the way
from the North Curve (Turn 1) to the entry of the Stadium
(Turn 10).  Except for the right side of the Pit Straight,
there is more than enough room to pull well off the pavement
should a car have a serious problem on any part of the
circuit.  Interestingly, Hockenheim's Stadium segment is very
similar to an unnamed final segment at Silverstone.

Important Note: These driving instructions are for the old
Hockenheim circuit.

Pit Straight: This is an extremely short straightaway
compared to the rest of the course.

Turn 1 (North Curve): This right-hand corner will require
moderate braking to keep out of the expansive kitty litter.
The Pit Lane rejoins the course from the right at the exit of
North Curve.  Acceleration out of North Curve is of key
importance due to the length of the ensuing straightaway.

Straightaway: Immensely lengthy and lined with trees, speed
is of the utmost importance here.  The entire straightaway is
an extremely gentle fade to the right.  Drift to the left
when you reach the grandstands.

Turns 2 and 3 (Jim Clark Chicane): Former games in the series
had a patch of pavement heading straight off Turn 2, allowing
for shortcutting of the chicane; this is no longer possible,
as a nasty barrier blocks any shortcutting attempts.
Moderate or heavy braking will be required for Turn 2 (or
light braking if not in traffic and using a FLAWLESS racing
line which makes judicious use of the rumble strips), but
full acceleration can be taken leading out of the chicane.

Straightaway: Yet another long, sweeping straightaway which
fades calmly to the right, so powerful acceleration out of
the Jim Clark Chicane is imperative to keep from getting
passed.  Drift to the left before entering the Brems Chicane,
and begin braking much earlier than for the Jim Clark
Chicane.

Turns 4 and 5 (Brems Chicane): The original course
configuration (used in older F1 racing games) did not have a
chicane here, and the original pavement remains.  However,
the official course suddenly cuts tightly to the right and
then cuts tightly to the left to rejoin the old pavement.
Moderate braking will be needed for Turn 4, and light braking
for Turn 5.  This right-left chicane has a continual downhill
slope, adding to the difficulty of the chicane.  Even with
the Flags option disabled, the angle of the old pavement to
the official chicane is such that it is impossible to blast
through this segment at top speed without spinning the car
through the kitty litter.

Turn 6 (East Curve): This is a very wide right-hand corner
which can be taken at top speed.  Strong acceleration out of
Brems is key to assist in passing here.

Straightaway: This is yet another long straightaway, but
without any fades.  Drift to the right for the Ayrton Senna
Chicane.

Turns 7-9 (Ayrton Senna Chicane): DO NOT follow the old
course pavement directly ahead unless you really WANT to
collide with the brand-new barrier.  The official course
turns to the left, cuts to the right, and eases left again.
It is actually possible to speed into Turn 7 at top speed,
lift off the throttle through Turn 8, and accelerate quickly
out of the chicane - but this is certainly NOT recommended.

Straightaway: The final long straightaway of the course has
extra pavement on the left - this could potentially be a
place to pass large numbers of cars.  This extra pavement
begins shortly after the exit of the Ayrton Senna Chicane,
and ends at the entry of the Stadium; thus, if you are on
this 'extra' pavement entering the Stadium, you will have a
better racing line for Turn 10, allowing you to navigate the
corner with less.

Turns 10-13 (The Stadium): This is similar to the final
segment of the Silverstone circuit.  However, do not expect
to drive The Stadium the same way you would the final segment
at Silverstone.

   Turn 10 (Entrance to the Stadium: Agip Curve): Light
   braking may be required here, but you should be able to
   pass through the Agip Curve without any braking at all
   (especially if your racing line began with the 'extra'
   pavement on the left before the Stadium).  A short
   straightaway follows.

   Turn 11 (Continuing through the Stadium: Sachscurve): This
   is a left-hand wide hairpin turn, requiring moderate
   braking.  Be careful not to end up in the grass, either
   entering or exiting the corner, and beware the barrier.

   Straightaway (Continuing through the Stadium): This short
   straightaway has a fade to the left, followed by a fade to
   the right.

   Turns 12 and 13 (Exiting the Stadium: Opel): The first
   right-hand corner is somewhat tight, and heavy braking
   will be required here; the old course rejoins the current
   course from the left on exit, so if you run wide in this
   corner, you can likely recover here using the old
   pavement.  The final corner of the circuit is a right-hand
   turn which will require moderate braking.  The Pit Lane
   entry is to the right just before the official Turn 13.

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the right at the entry of
Turn 13 (the final corner of the Stadium).

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: HOCKENHEIM SHORT
In 2002, the long, traditional Hockenheim circuit was
dismantled and replaced by a much shorter version.  F1
traditionalists worldwide were FURIOUS about this change, as
the shorter circuit is no longer scenic and is really too
compact for F1 racing (although still better than A1-Ring in
Austria).  However, the new, severely-shortened version of
Hockenheim still retains its characteristic Stadium section,
so at least some measure of the old circuit's tradition and
history remains.  Interestingly, the new, shorter circuit
supposedly now handles more spectators than the old, longer
circuit.

Pit Straight: This is an extremely short straightaway
compared to the rest of the course.

Turn 1 (North Curve): This right-hand corner will require
moderate braking to keep out of the expansive kitty litter.
The Pit Lane rejoins the course from the right at the exit of
North Curve.  Acceleration out of North Curve is of key
importance due to the length of the ensuing straightaway.

Turn 2: After a nearly-nonexistent straightaway comes the
right-hand 120-degree Turn 2.  This corner requires some
moderate braking, and it is very easy to slide off the
pavement here.  Unfortunately, the barrier on the inside of
the corner is really TOO close to the pavement, so a driver
trying to pass to the inside of a slower car will have
literally nowhere to go should the slower car suddenly cut
inward in the corner.  Just at the exit of Turn 2 is a quick
fade to the left.

Turn 3: After a brief straightaway is the left-hand 45-degree
Turn 3.  It is best to begin braking for Turn 4 at the exit
of Turn 3.

Turn 4: Almost immediately after Turn 3 is the right-hand
135-degree Turn 4, leading back onto the old (longer)
Hockenheim circuit just before entering The Stadium.
Moderate or heavy braking will be required for Turn 4,
although there is a significant amount of paved swing-out
room so that those in need of a quick recovery can briefly
slam on the handbrake to keep off the outside barrier.

Turns 5-8 (The Stadium): This is similar to the final segment
of the Silverstone circuit.  However, do not expect to drive
The Stadium the same way you would the final segment at
Silverstone.

   Turn 5 (Entrance to the Stadium: Agip Curve): Light
   braking may be required here, but you should be able to
   pass through the Agip Curve without any braking at all
   (especially if your racing line began with the 'extra'
   pavement on the left before the Stadium).  A short
   straightaway follows.

   Turn 6 (Continuing through the Stadium: Sachscurve): This
   is a left-hand wide hairpin turn, requiring moderate
   braking.  Be careful not to end up in the grass, either
   entering or exiting the corner, and beware the barrier.

   Straightaway (Continuing through the Stadium): This short
   straightaway has a fade to the left, followed by a fade to
   the right.

   Turns 7 and 8 (Exiting the Stadium: Opel): The first
   right-hand corner is somewhat tight, and heavy braking
   will be required here; the old course rejoins the current
   course from the left on exit, so if you run wide in this
   corner, you can likely recover here using the old
   pavement.  The final corner of the circuit is a right-hand
   turn which will require moderate braking.  The Pit Lane
   entry is to the right just before the official Turn 8.

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the right at the entry of
Turn 8 (the final corner of the Stadium).

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: KNOCKHILL
This circuit is a nightmare for car set-ups, as there are
many tight corners (some with their own significant elevation
changes) connected by significant straightaways.

Pit Straight: Pit Straight is on an uphill slope, which may
make standing starts somewhat tricky.  It is also quite
lengthy.  Pit Entry is on the left, where the slots of the
starting grid are located; this is a very short Pit Lane.

Turn 1: This heavy-braking right-hand corner is made even
more difficult because it heads downhill.  It is very easy to
foul up here and get caught out in the sand on the outside of
Turn 1.

Turn 2: Almost immediately after Turn 1, this left-hand
corner requires at least a slight tapping of the brakes to
keep to the pavement.

Turn 3: Almost immediately after Turn 2, this right-hand
corner requires moderate braking  to keep to the pavement.

Turn 4: Shortly after Turn 3, this gentle right-hand corner
can be taken at full acceleration, but care must be taken on
the approach to Turn 5.

Turns 5-6: This tricky left-right complex requires heavy
braking on entry; slowing enough on entry allows for powerful
acceleration through Turn 6 and onto the ensuing
straightaway.

Turn 7: This difficult right-hand corner is on an uphill
climb; if there is no traffic in front to provide an idea of
where the circuit is, it is virtually impossible to see the
layout of the pavement due to the angle of the hill.  This
opens onto a nice straightaway.

Turn 8: This is another right-hand corner on an uphill climb;
this time, the corner is nearly a hairpin.  Strong
acceleration out of Turn 8 is required, as this opens onto
the lengthy Pit Straight.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: LAS VEGAS
This is a tri-oval which is VERY wide: three-abreast racing
is definitely feasible here; four-wide racing MIGHT be
possible (primarily on the straightaways), but should never
be attempted.  Due to the nice width of the circuit, passing
is relatively easy - the difficult part could be getting
enough of an aerodynamic tow (slipstreaming or drafting) to
actually make a pass.  The gentle, lengthy nature of the
corners means that this is a fast race venue.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: MAGNY-COURS
The Magny-Cours circuit is characterized by long, sweeping
straightaways, and fairly quick corners. The Adelaide hairpin
will almost definitely cause trouble, especially for
aggressive drivers, and is one of the slowest corners in
modern F1 racing.  This is a very fun course to drive
(admittedly a very subjective statement), but its layout can
produce problems from the standpoint of hearing other cars:
Three of its main straightaways are almost exactly parallel
to each other with little distance and no large obstacles
between them, sometimes making it difficult to determine
where other cars are truly located around you as you try to
anticipate where the next group of traffic that you will need
to navigate is located; listen attentively to the team radio
for useful traffic information.  The circuit also has
extremely wide areas along most of the main course for a car
to pull aside should a major malfunction arise.

Pit Straight: Following the tight High School chicane, strong
acceleration through the Pit Straight creates good passing
chances through Great Curve and into Estoril.  However, the
tightness of the High School chicane and the incredibly close
proximity of the Pit Lane barrier requires immense caution
and headache-causing concentration as you come onto the Pit
Straight.  The Start/Finish Line is about halfway down the
Pit Straight; the Pit Lane rejoins the course from the left
at this point.

Turn 1 (Great Curve): In accordance with its name, this is a
sweeping left-hand corner which can be taken flat-out unless
encumbered by a lot of traffic.

Turn 2 (Estoril): Either light or moderate braking will be
needed for entering the VERY long right-hand 180-degree
Estoril; in either case, you will almost certainly be tapping
the brakes repeatedly through Estoril.  It is quite easy to
roll the right-side tires off onto the grass, and it is just
as easy to slip off onto the grass on the outside of Estoril
- both can easily occur, whether navigating traffic or
driving alone.

Straightaway (Golf): The Golf Straight if by far the longest
of the course and includes several fades to the right.

Turn 3 (Adelaide): The right-hand Adelaide hairpin is
EXTREMELY tight.  The key here is to brake EARLY, as you will
be downshifting from your top gear to your lowest gear
rapidly; if you begin braking too late, you will be off in
the grass.  If you accelerate too soon out of Adelaide, you
will be rolling through the kitty litter and losing valuable
track position.  Even 30MPH is likely to be too fast here.

Straightaway: Acceleration out of Adelaide is important for
passing other cars here.  There are a few fades in the course
here.

Turns 4 and 5 (Nurburgring): This is a right-left chicane
which will require light braking.  It is possible to fly
through Nurburgring without braking by making use of the
bright-green extension on the inside of Turn 5; however, this
extension is significantly shorter than it was in F1
Championship Season 2000.

Turn 6 (180 Degrees): This is quite true - the official name
of this corner is '180 Degrees' according to the official Web
site of Magny-Cours.  This is a wide left-hand hairpin
nestled well within the Estoril hairpin.  Running too wide
here will put you out in the sand; running too close to the
apex could put you up on the rumble strips and force you to
lose control.  While this corner is not as slow as the
Adelaide hairpin, you really do not want to try pushing very
much faster here.

Straightaway: The third of the three parallel-running
straightaways, this 'straightaway' has several fades before
the Imola chicane.

Turns 7 and 8 (Imola): This right-left chicane should require
light braking, except for cars with a flawless racing line.
The bright-green extension on the inside of Turn 8 is longer
than in F1 Championship Season 2000, which could well be used
for top-speed navigation of the chicane.  A short
straightaway out of Imola sets up the Water Castle curve.

Turn 9 (Water Castle): Somewhere between a standard 'J' turn
and a hairpin, this is an increasing-radius right-hand corner
leading into the final straightaway of the circuit.

Turns 10 and 11 (High School): There is a false line of
pavement to the right as you near the official chicane; this
false pavement runs directly up to an immovable barrier (I
believe this is the Pit Entry for other forms of racing at
the circuit).  The official chicane requires moderate braking
on entering, and allows for a VERY short burst of
acceleration on exit.  If you completely miss this chicane,
you will blast through the sand trap and break the front end
on a perpendicular barrier blocking any direct access to Pit
Lane.

Turn 12 (High School): On entry, the Pit Lane begins to the
left.  The official corner is a TIGHT right-hand turn which
requires moderate or even heavy braking; wheel lock is very
much a possibility here, especially in wet conditions.  If
you miss the corner, you will blast through the all-too-brief
sand trap and ram directly against a barrier and bounce
backward into any cars behind you.  Speed is an extreme
concern here; it is virtually impossible to go too slow, but
going too fast will definitely result in a crash (with great
possibility of bouncing into follow-up crashes with other
cars, or with another nearby barrier).

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the left at the entry of
Turn 12.  The Pit Lane has its own sharp right-hand turn
almost immediately, so it is best to begin slowing (or
rather, barely accelerating) as you leave the High School
chicane.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: MANTORP PARK
Like Eastern Creek, Mantorp Park uses one of its
straightaways as a drag strip.  This time, however, the width
from standard road course to drag strip is more impressive,
allowing road course racers MUCH more room for passing along
the drag strip portion of the circuit.  This is a high-speed
circuit, although strong braking will be required for many
corners; fortunately, there is plenty of recovery room in
almost all areas of the circuit.

Pit Straight: Unlike Eastern Creek, Mantorp Park's Pit
Straight does not double as a drag strip; instead, the drag
strip is just to the right as cars pass along Pit Straight.
The Pit Straight itself is relatively short, so any passing
here requires INCREDIBLE power out of the final corner and/or
outbraking a competitor into Turn 1.

Turn 1: This is a left-hand corner requiring moderate
braking.

Turn 2: After a too-brief straightaway comes the right-hand
hairpin at Turn 2.  Moderate braking will be needed here, and
light braking may be required throughout, especially if a car
is loose.

Turn 3: Shortly after the hairpin is a gentle right-hand bend
which can generally be handled at full acceleration.

Turns 4-5: This is a double-apex right-hand section leading
onto the drag strip portion of the circuit.  Moderate braking
is needed for Turn 4, while full acceleration can be used in
Turn 5.  However, those who miss the braking zone for Turn 4
can turn in the sand trap and slide sideways onto the staging
area for the drag strip, then power ahead at full
acceleration without having lost too much time.

Straightaway: This is the drag strip portion of the Mantorp
Park road course.  This is a rather wide stretch of pavement,
so there should be no problems with passing slower cars here.
Not surprisingly, this is the longest straightaway of the
road course.

Turn 6: At the end of the drag strip, this right-hand
increasing-radius hairpin corner requires moderate or heavy
braking on approach, and judicious throttle management
throughout to keep from sliding the car off the pavement.

Turn 7: Light braking may be required for this left-hand
bend.

Turns 8-9: This is a double-apex right-hand increasing-radius
section leading back toward Pit Straight.  Moderate or heavy
braking is required for Turn 8, while gentle throttle
management can alleviate the need for braking in Turn 9 IF
the car has slowed enough for Turn 8.  Pit Entry is on the
left side of the pavement at the entry of Turn 9.

Turn 10: This is a left-hand right-angle corner requiring
moderate braking.  This leads onto Pit Straight.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: MEXICO
This circuit reopened for use in a CART race in November
2002, many months after its originally-scheduled grand
opening.  Pit Straight is immensely lengthy, but the rest of
the circuit consists of mainly high-speed twists and turns.
Drivers who prefer slightly-loose cars AND are excellent at
countersteering and/or drift-style racing should perform well
at Mexico.

Turns 1-3: The end of Pit Straight is a moderate braking zone
for the right-left-right chicane that begins the difficult
twisty portion of the circuit.  If not encumbered by traffic,
shortcutting across the chicane (or at least making ample use
of the rumble strips) will save a lot of time and allow the
driver to maintain momentum for the following straightaway.

Turns 4 and 5: This is a left-right complex which can be
rather tricky.  Moderate braking is needed on entering Turn
4, but the car must be slowed even more in order to safely
handle Turn 5 without getting caught in the kitty litter to
the outside of the corner.

Turns 6-13: This is the S-curve section.  Interestingly, the
corners begin with a right-hand tight corner, then the
corners gradually decrease in radius and 'tightness' while
the slight distances between the corners keeps growing
gradually.  After the final corner of this section (the
fourth left-hand corner), the S-curve section empties onto
another long straightaway which runs through a popular Mexico
City baseball stadium.

Turn 14: Essentially the Curva Parabolica of Mexico, this
right-hand wide hairpin corner can be taken at full
acceleration with slight or no braking required.  On corner
entry, however, there is a rather significant bump - if a car
is not tuned correctly, this bump can cause a problem for
drivers.  Pit Entry is on the right immediately before
entering Turn 14.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: MONZA
This historic high-speed track hosts a highly partial pro-
Ferrari crowd - affectionately known as the 'tifosi.'  The
2000 Italian Grand Prix is the race in which a volunteer
corner worker was killed at the Roggia Chicane, due to all
the flying debris from the first-lap multi-car collision
caused by Heinz-Herald Frentzen missing his braking zone.

Pit Straight: Strong acceleration out of the Curva Parabolica
can create prime passing opportunities along the Pit
Straight, the longest straightaway at Monza.  The Pit Lane
begins on the right shortly after exiting the Parabolica.

Turns 1-3 (Rettifilio): The new chicane here is a tight
right-left with a gentle right turn back into line with the
original pavement.  The chicane is blocked by a barrier, but
the inside of Turn 1 has a paved 'extension' which may be of
benefit.  Even with Flags on, shortcutting the chicane TO THE
RIGHT OF THE BARRIER can be done at top speed, thus lowering
lap times; shortcutting to the left of the barrier results in
a Stop-Go Penalty.

Turn 4 (Biassono): This sweeping right-hand corner among the
thick trees can be taken flat-out.  To the left is a long,
wide area of sand, but the corner is so extremely gentle that
the sand should not be needed for any reason unless you blow
an engine or severely puncture a tire.

Turns 5 and 6 (Roggia): Despite the flatness of the Monza
circuit, this chicane is extremely difficult to see on
approach unless traffic is present to mark the pavement for
you, so it is very easy to overrun the chicane.  This is a
very tight left-right chicane, so moderate or heavy braking
is required; shortcutting through here at full throttle is
possible by making use of the new, narrow, bright-green
extensions on the inside of each corner, as the CPU us rather
tolerant of shortcutting here (compared to previous
incarnations of the game).  There is a large sand trap for
those who miss the chicane altogether.

Turn 7 (First Lesmo): This right-hand corner requires
moderate braking.  There is a wide sand trap on the outside
of the corner, just in case.  Beware the barrier on the
inside of the corner.  About 150MPH is the maximum speed
here, or you risk slipping off the course and into the kitty
litter.  If you shortcut the first two chicanes of the game,
this will be the first time you absolutely need to use the
brakes.

Turn 8 (Second Lesmo): This right-hand corner is a little
tighter than First Lesmo, and also has a significant area of
kitty litter on the outside of the corner.  Moderate braking
will be needed here.  Again, beware the barrier on the inside
of the corner.  Generally, about 140MPH is the maximum speed
here to keep from sliding off the pavement.

Straightaway/Turn 9 (Serraglio): This is really just a fade
to the left, but the official course map lists this as a
curve.  Counting this as a fade, this marks about the halfway
point on the longest straightaway of the Monza circuit.
There is sufficient room to pull off the course here on
either side if necessary, except when passing underneath the
first bridge.  The circuit is extremely bumpy between the two
bridges.

Turns 10-12 (Ascari): The Ascari chicane is more difficult
than it seems.  Turn 10 is a left-hand corner requiring at
least light braking.  This is followed immediately by a
right-hand corner requiring moderate braking.  Turn 12 can be
taken at full acceleration if you slowed enough in Turn 11.
Wide areas of grass and sand are available for those
overruninng any part of the chicane.  Still, unless
encumbered by traffic, experts may be able to take Ascari at
full throttle with a flawless racing line which makes use of
the rumble strips as well as the bright-green 'extension' on
the inside of Turn 10.  Unfortunately, F1 2001 does not
provide the real course's paved swing-out area at the exit of
Ascari.

Straightaway (Rettilineo Parabolica): This is the second-
longest straightaway at Monza and a prime passing zone,
especially with powerful acceleration out of Ascari.

Turn 13 (Curva Parabolica): This final corner is a very-wide
increasing-radius right-hand hairpin. Light or moderate
braking is required on entry, but after about one-third of
the way around the hairpin, stand on the accelerator all the
way through to Rettifilio.  The outside of the Curva
Parabolica has an immense expanse of kitty litter, but this
really should not be necessary unless you suddenly need to
take evasive action to avoid someone else's accident.  After
the Lesmo corners, the Curva Parabolica is the third and
final place where braking is a definite MUST.

Pit Entry: Shortly after exiting the Curva Parabolica, the
Pit Lane begins on the right.  This is perhaps the shortest
Pit Lane in all of F1; there is virtually NO room for
deceleration once leaving the main course, so cars going in
for servicing will begin slowing at the exit of the Curva
Parabolica.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: NORISRING
Due to the track layout and the surrounding scenery,
Norisring primarily has the feel of an inner-city street
circuit.  The circuit itself is rather small and thus
extremely easy to learn, yet it is VERY difficult to master.

Pit Straight: The single longest straightaway at Norisring,
Pit Straight is also the widest straightaway, allowing plenty
of room for passing slower traffic.  Pit Entry is on the
right side about 1/4 of the way along Pit Straight; the lane
for Pit Entry actually begins at the exit of the final
corner.

Turn 1: Things start with a BANG at this left-hand SHARP
hairpin corner.  What makes this corner so nasty is that
there is virtually NO recovery room for those who miss the
braking zone or do not brake hard enough - there is
definitely a reason why SEVERE braking is required for this
initial hairpin corner.

Turns 2-3: Essentially an overglorified chicane, this is a
right-left complex which leads the raceway around and behind
the main grandstands.  Both corners here are perpendicular
corners, but the sand on the inside of Turn 2 makes car
control virtually impossible if touched.  The exit of Turn 3
has a brick extension alongside a brick wall; this extension
is more than wide enough to provide an extra lane for passing
slower traffic and/or for making a wide sweeping run out of
Turn 3.

Turns 4-5: Turn 4 is a right-hand kink just before the left-
hand hairpin at Turn 5.  It is important to begin braking
before Turn 4, then slam HARD on the brakes for Turn 5.
Fortunately, the exit of the hairpin is onto an unbelievably-
wide straightaway (the same width as Pit Straight), so the
braking required here is not quite as severe as for the
initial hairpin corner at Turn 1.

Turn 6: Very quickly after the second hairpin is the left-
hand full-throttle kink onto Pit Straight.  Those vehicles
going to Pit Lane will keep hard to the right here coming off
the second hairpin and through Turn 6.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: NURBURGRING
From a driving standpoint, the hilly Nurburgring circuit is
very much characterized by its tight corners, some of which
are semi-blind turns.  Tire wear is a definite issue in long
races here, especially in wet conditions.  Even more
important, however, is braking early for almost every corner;
perhaps only the narrow streets of Monaco require more
braking than does the Nurburgring circuit.

Pit Straight: This straightaway is fairly long, but the
Start/Finish Line is near the exit of the final corner.  The
Pit Lane rejoins the course near the end of the Pit Straight,
just before the Castrol S.

Turns 1 and 2 (Castrol S): Moderate braking is required
before entering this right-left 'S' curve.  It is quite easy
to miss seeing the entry to the Castrol S unless traffic is
present to mark the corner for you.  Until you know the
course really well, expect to find yourself driving straight
ahead into the recovery area.  Turn 2 is actually somewhat of
a double-apex left-hand corner, so do not go too wide
initially on exit.  Also, be careful not to drive too wide
exiting the Castrol S.  Caution must be taken here on the
first lap of a race, as the traffic truly bunches up here.

Turn 3: Light braking or a quick lift of the accelerator will
be necessary for this left-hand corner.  However, hard
braking will be required for the Ford Curve ahead.  Beginning
at the top of Turn 3, the course moves downhill.

Turn 4 (Ford Curve): This is a hard right-hand corner,
practically a 'J' curve.  The course continues its downhill
slope here, which significantly adds to the difficulty of the
turn, especially in wet condditions.  Braking too late here
means a trip through the kitty litter, while riding up on the
inside rumble strips usually means losing control of the car.
This is definitely NOT a place to pass unless absolutely
necessary.

Straightaway: The course fades to the left here.  If you can
accelerate well out of the Ford Curve, you should be able to
pass several cars here as you continue downhill.

Turn 5 (Dunlop Curve): Severe braking for this hairpin is a
must, unless you really want to drive through the sand.
Again, rolling up on the rumble strips on the inside of the
curve may cause you to lose control of the car; however, I
have several times induced slight wheelspin of the right-side
tires on the rumble strip, which helped to swing the car
around the corner just a little faster.  The course continues
gently uphill here toward the Audi S.

Turns 6 and 7 (Audi S): Entering the left-right Audi S, the
uphill slope of the course increases, making it very
difficult to see the course more than a few feet ahead.  The
exit of Turn 6 is the crest of this hill.  Unless traffic
blocks your racing line, the entire Audi S section can be
taken at top speed if you have a good racing line, so good
acceleration out of the Dunlop Curve will be very beneficial
for passing entering Turn 6 and/or exiting Turn 7.

Turn 8 (RTL Curve): With the rise in the course entering the
left-hand RTL Curve, this appears to be identical to Turn 6
on approach.  However, you MUST use moderate braking entering
the RTL Curve, or you will definitely be off in the grass on
the outside of the curve.  After a short straightaway, this
corner is followed by the gentler BIT Curve.

Turn 9 (BIT Curve): This right-hand curve will require light
or moderate braking, depending on how much acceleration was
used in the brief straightaway following the RTL Curve.

Turn 10 (Bilstein-Bogen): This is a gentle right-hand semi-
corner which can be taken at full throttle.  From here to the
Veedal S, the course makes its final and steepest upward
slope.

Turns 11 and 12 (Veedal S): This is an extremely tight left-
right made even worse for the drivers by its placement at the
very crest of the hill.  For those who overshoot the chicane,
there is a newly-added barrier to collect you and your car.

Turn 13 (Coca-Cola Curve): A 'J' turn to the right, moderate
braking is required here to keep from sliding off the course.
The entry of the Coca-Cola Curve is also where the Pit Lane
begins, so cars may be slowing on approach to go to Pit Lane
for servicing.  This is the final corner of the circuit.

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins at the entry of the final
corner.  It is extremely important to slow down before
entering Pit Lane; if you come in too fast, you will
certainly damage the front of the car on the barrier.  Keep
tight to the right for Pit Entry, to allow those continuing
the race to have the prime racing line to the left of the
pavement.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: ORAN PARK
Like Suzuka in Japan, Oran Park includes a bridge where the
raceway crosses over itself.  However, Oran Park is generally
a slower-speed circuit than Suzuka, primarily due to the lack
of long straightaways and the many moderate- and severe-
braking corners.  Fortunately, the circuit is almost entirely
flat; even the ascent to and the descent from the bridge is
so gradual that elevation is really not an issue when working
on car set-ups for Oran Park.

Pit Straight: Pit Entry is about 1/3 of the way along Pit
Straight, although the entry lane for Pit Entry begins at the
exit of the final corner (on the right); this 'extra lane' is
also quite useful as a swing-out area for the final corner,
if necessary, but a barrier directly against the pavement
here still requires some amount of moderate braking for the
final corner.

Turn 1: This is a gentle left-hand kink which itself can be
taken at full acceleration.  However, it is best to begin
braking well before Turn 1, since the nasty Turn 2 follows
IMMEDIATELY.

Turn 2: This tight left-hand corner requires moderate or even
severe braking.  This 135-degree corner leads underneath the
bridge, and because there is precious little recovery room,
missing the braking zone for Turn 2 will obliterate a vehicle
almost instantly.

Turn 3: Shortly after passing underneath the bridge is the
right-hand Turn 3, a nasty and tight 135-degree corner.  With
the lack of a recovery area, moderate or severe braking is a
MUST for Turn 3.

Turn 4: A paved chicane area which is not used for the Grand
Prix configuration appears on the right; immediately
following this is Turn 4 itself.  This is yet another nasty
and tight 135-degree corner leading onto the bridge.  There
is a moderate recovery area to the outside of Turn 4, but
moderate or heavy braking is still required to keep off the
grass.

Turn 5: INSTANTLY beyond the bridge is a junction; the Grand
Prix circuit heads to the right here with yet another nasty
right-hand corner requiring moderate or severe braking.  It
is best to begin braking just as the car comes onto the
bridge itself.

Turns 6-7: Shortly beyond Turn 5, this is an overglorified
right-left chicane.  Light or moderate braking will be needed
here to keep to the pavement.

Turn 8: Beyond the overglorified chicane, this is a left-hand
corner which needs light or possibly moderate braking.

Turns 9-10: Again, this is an overglorified right-left
chicane.  Expert drivers can squeak through here with no
braking whatsoever, but most drivers will likely need light
braking to keep to the pavement here.  There is also a slight
crest on entry here, and a dip exiting Turn 10, and these
features can certainly play havoc with a car's handling
(especially with lightweight cars).

Turn 11: This final corner is on a slight incline as it leads
onto Pit Straight.  Moderate braking is needed for this left-
hand 135-degree corner.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: OSCHERSLEBEN
This is a primarily flat circuit, so ride height need not be
a problem.  However, there are several slow hairpin corners
plus plenty of other corners which require moderate braking.
The recovery areas around the circuit are not very
significant, so it really is best to keep to the pavement at
all times.

Pit Straight: This is the longest straightaway at
Oschersleben.

Turn 1: At the end of Pit Straight, this is a semi-gentle
left-hand corner.  This corner itself does not require
braking, but Turn 2 (which follows immediately after the exit
of Turn 1) DOES require braking, so it is perhaps best to
begin braking just at the entry of Turn 1 at the latest (of
course, braking works best in a straight line).

Turn 2: This right-hand 270-degree corner requires moderate
or even severe braking to keep from sliding off the pavement.
Once in the corner itself, careful throttle management is
required to keep from overspinning the drive wheels and
sending the car sliding off the raceway.

Turn 3: After a short straightaway, this is a left-hand
hairpin corner requiring moderate braking.  The entire turn
is banked slightly, but it is definitely not enough to help
to 'catch' a car which is carrying too much speed into and
through Turn 3.

Turns 4-6: This is a triple-apex left-hand complex with
requires increasing braking with each corner.

Turn 7: IMMEDIATELY following Turn 6, this right-hand hairpin
requires moderate braking (if the vehicle is not already
slowed enough after the triple-apex section) and feather-
light acceleration to remain on the pavement.

Turns 8-10: This right-left-right chicane requires increasing
braking with each corner.  It is possible to completely
bypass Turn 9, but this requires running through the kitty
litter.  Careful acceleration is needed from the apex to the
exit of Turn 10.

Turns 11-12: At the end of the second-longest straightaway at
Oschersleben is an overglorified right-left chicane.  It is
important to use light or even moderate braking for Turn 11
to avoid the sand trap.  By making judicious use of the
rumble strips, drivers can save a few milliseconds of time -
and may also even be able to make a pass.

Turn 13: This is a 30-degree right-hand corner which requires
light braking.

Turn 14: After a VERY brief straightaway, this final turn is
a right-hand 150-degree turn leading back onto Pit Straight.
Pit Entry is to the left just before corner entry.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: OULTON PARK
Overtaking is often difficult at this tight venue.  This
circuit is also somewhat rough on brakes in long races, in
part due to the traffic jams (especially at the first corner
at the beginning of a race).  The two lengthy straightaways
(one with a tight chicane) can be a great place to pass if
gearing and downforce are set correctly.

Pit Straight: The Pit Straight here is rather long compared
to most, so powerful acceleration is absolutely necessary.

Turn 1 (Old Hall Corner): This right-hand corner begins a
slow downhill run along The Avenue and Dentons.  Slight or
moderate braking is required for the corner, put strong
acceleration is needed on corner exit.

Turn 2 (Cascades): This tricky left-hand corner requires
moderate braking as the pavement leaves the Fosters circuit
using this left-hand J-turn.  This opens out onto the longest
straightaway of the circuit, so hard acceleration is needed
here to gain race positions before the next corner.

Straightaway (Lakeside): Named for the lake to the left of
the pavement, strong acceleration is needed here.

Turn 3 (Island Bend): This left-hand corner (more of a fade
than a corner) can itself be taken flat-out, but moderate
braking is really required due to the hairpin which follows
almost immediately.

Turn 4 (Shells Oils Corner): This right-hand hairpin is
rather slow, making this a prime place for passing on braking
on corner entry, and for passing on horsepower on corner
exit.

Turns 5-7 (Foulstons): This tight left-right-left chicane
truly disrupts any sense of speed, but can be good for
passing on braking FOR EXPERTS ONLY due to the signs blocking
a clear run past the chicane.

Straightaway (Hilltop): This long straightaway is a wonderful
place for high-horsepower cars to pass slower traffic,
especially if there are multiple cars all trying to draft off
each other.

Turn 8 (Knickelbrook): This right-hand corner can be taken at
full throttle unless blocked by traffic.  A pristine racing
line is needed (perhaps with the assistance of the rumble
strips) to keep on the pavement.  There is a paved chicane on
the inside of Knickelbrook, but it is not used for TOCA
racing.

Straightaway (Clay Hill): This long straightaway has a left-
hand bend.

Turn 9 (Druids Corner): This right-hand corner will require
light braking to keep to the pavement as the car muscles its
way along a slow uphill climb.

Turn 10 (Lodge Corner): This right-hand J-turn requires
moderate braking on entrance to keep out of the sand and
grass.  Once safely though Lodge Corner, it is imperative to
power hard along Pit Straight to make a few passes.
==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: PHILLIP ISLAND
The Phillip Island Grand Prix Circuit is host of both V8
Supercars and some of the high-profile international
motorcycle series.  The circuit combines high speeds with
VERY slow hairpin corners, making car set-up a bit more of a
compromise than usual in auto racing.

Pit Straight: The final corner is gentle enough that braking
should not be necessary, so Pit Straight is FAST.

Turn 1: This gentle right-hand corner may not require any
braking at all; however, depending on car set-up, moderate
braking may be required.  In any event, there is plenty of
sand to catch those who miss the braking zone.

Turn 2: This is a long left-hand hairpin corner requiring
moderate braking.  The speeds here are definitely slow, but
not quite as slow as for the other hairpin corners of the
circuit.

Turn 3: This is a gentle left-hand corner which should
require light braking at most.  However, toward the end of
the corner, it is imperative to begin braking for Turn 4.

Turn 4: The first of the REALLY slow hairpin corners, this
right-hand corner requires moderate or even severe braking,
depending on if/when braking began in Turn 3 itself.

Turn 5: This is a barely-noticeable kink to the right, but
this is listed as an official corner on the circuit map.

Turn 6: This is another REALLY slow hairpin corner, this time
to the left.  Moderate or severe braking will be required for
Turn 6 as well.

Turn 7: This is a barely-noticeable kink to the left, but
this is listed as an official corner on the circuit map.

Turn 8: Turn 8 is a high-speed sweep to the right, requiring
only a light tapping of the brakes if necessary.

Turn 9: Light or moderate braking is needed to keep to the
pavement in this sweeping left-hand corner.

Turn 10: This is the final hairpin corner of the circuit, and
it is also very SLOW, requiring moderate or (most likely)
severe braking on approach.

Turn 11: Coming out of Turn 10, this left-hand corner may
require light braking, but throttle management is the true
key to remaining on the pavement in Turn 11.

Turn 12: This final corner is a long sweeping left-hand arc
back onto Pit Straight; Pit Entry is to the left just before
corner entry.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: ROCKINGHAM OVAL
'Oval' is really a misnomer in the case of Rockingham Oval.
This circuit is essentially shaped like a square with an
adjacent triangle attached to its side.  If a car is tuned
properly, NO braking will be required unless the driver
cannot get low enough in a corner and drifts toward the wall.
All corners are also banked, although Turn 3 is banked less
than the other corners.  It may actually be beneficial to
simply SLIDE through the corners, depending on car set-up and
driver experience.

Turns 1 and 2: These are left-hand perpendicular corners,
although the corners themselves are long and semi-gentle.
Pit Exit is from the left beyond the exit of Turn 2.

Turn 3: This is a 45-degree corner.

Turn 4: This is a 135-degree corner which is long and semi-
gentle.  Pit Entry is to the left just before corner entry.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: ROCKINGHAM ROAD
This is a 'stadium circuit' (similar to the Indianapolis
Grand Prix circuit used in F1 racing) nestled within the
Rockingham Oval circuit. Turn 4 of the Rockingham Oval venue
is used, as is the Pit Lane and Pit Exit lane; otherwise, the
Rockingham Road circuit makes use of the vast infield area.

Turns 1-3: Just beyond the Start/Finish Line, the Rockingham
Road raceway has a left-right chicane off the oval portion
and onto the oval's Pit Exit lane; a barrier prevents drivers
from simply powering ahead along the oval.  Once on the
oval's Pit Exit lane, the pavement makes a gentle curve to
the left while merging once again with the oval portion of
the venue.  (Note that the chicane itself can be
straightlined, but moderate braking will still definitely be
required.)

Turns 4 and 5: This is a harsh double-apex left-hand hairpin
off the oval and onto the infield portion of the circuit.
This hairpin corner will require moderate or severe braking.

Turns 6 and 7: After a short straightaway, this is a pair of
right-hand perpendicular corners.  Moderate braking will
again be needed here for each of these corners .

Turns 8 and 9: This is a left-right chicane which requires
light or moderate braking, depending on car set-up and
traffic conditions.

Turns 10 and 11: Again, this is a set of left-hand
perpendicular corners.  Moderate braking is required for
both, but this section can be treated as a single left-hand
hairpin turn.

Turn 12: This left-hand 135-degree corner requires moderate
braking to keep on the pavement.

Turn 13: Here is a TRUE hairpin corner to the right,
requiring moderate or severe braking.  This is perhaps the
best place to pass via outbraking an opponent.

Turns 14 and 15: This is a pair of left-hand corners.  The
first of these corners will require moderate braking, but the
second corner can be handled nicely at full acceleration.

Turn 16: This is also a true hairpin corner, this time to the
left and leading back toward the oval portion of the circuit.
Moderate or severe braking will be required here; the
handbrake can be used here effectively if carrying too much
speed into Turn 16.

Turn 17 (Oval Turn 4): This is the final corner of the oval
portion of the circuit.  Note that for the Rockingham Road
circuit, however, Pit Entry is on the left at the APEX of
this corner.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: SANDOWN
This circuit appears easy on the circuit map, but is a very
different beast on the pavement; numerous test drives and
practice sessions are definitely required to truly come to
grips with Sandown.

Turn 1: The initial corner is a left-hand near-perpendicular
corner requiring moderate or severe braking after the lengthy
Pit Straight.  There is fortunately A LOT of recovery room
for those who miss the braking zone.

Turns 2 and 3: This is a right-left chicane which should
really require light braking.  However, it is quite feasible
to straightline this chicane; those with extensive rally
racing experience will already be quite adept at this tactic.

Turn 4: IMMEDIATELY following Turn 3, this is a NASTY left-
hand acute-angle corner which requires moderate or severe
braking.  Most importantly, the 'recovery area' here is
extremely tiny, so missing the braking zone for Turn 4 will
definitely result in severe car damage against the barrier on
the outside of the corner.

Straightaway: This is the longest straightaway of the
circuit, with a slight fade to the right just shortly beyond
Turn 4.  The straightaway also crests at its end.

Turns 5-8: This is a left-right-left-left complex which
requires harder and harder braking with each corner.  The
entire complex makes a left-hand 120-degree bend overall, but
it is comprised of some rather fast-approaching corners with
little recovery room.

Turns 9 and 10: This is a right-left chicane requiring
moderate braking on approach, but powerful acceleration
through Turn 10 and all the way to the end of Pit Straight.

Turn 11: With Pit Entry to the right at corner apex, this is
a gentle left-hand bend onto Pit Straight which can be taken
at full acceleration.

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DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: SEARS POINT
Sears Point Raceway is one of only two road courses used in
NASCAR racing.  This circuit is also notable in NASCAR due to
the need for two Pit Lanes - one on each side of the raceway
near the Start/Finish Line.  Road course and street course
specialists will certainly love Sears Point, even if using a
standard NASCAR-spec vehicle :-)

Pit Straight: There really is NO 'Pit Straight' per se, since
the main Pit Lane curves around the outside of final corner
(a hairpin turn) while the secondary Pit Lane begins to the
inside of this hairpin turn.  There is a semi-significant
bend to the left about halfway between the final corner and
Turn 1.

Turn 1: This is a fast left-hand bend taken at full
acceleration and beginning an uphill climb.

Turn 2: Shortly after the first corner, this is another left-
hand bend which can generally be handled at full
acceleration.  However, due to Turn 3 which closely follows,
it is best to begin braking for the next corner at the apex
of Turn 2.

Turn 3: This is a right-hand blind corner due to the
hillside.  Those who miss the braking zone and/or forget to
turn (the actual corner itself is VERY difficult to spot on
approach) may be able to benefit from the wide paved recovery
area.  Since the recovery area is paved, it is relatively
easy to maintain a moderate level of speed and rejoin the
race.  However, because the recovery area is paved, it is
also quite easy to keep on sliding across the pavement and
slam into the barrier.

Turns 4 and 5: This is a left-right section which dips at the
entry of Turn 4, crests, then begins a gentle downhill run
toward Turn 6.  The elevation changes in this section can
cause handling problems, especially for lightweight cars.

Turn 6: This is a right-hand right-angle corner around a tire
barrier (placed specifically to prevent shortcutting the
corner).  Those with good drift-racing skills can implement
those abilities here (and at Turn 7 as well) to pass one or
two cars through the corner (but beware the barrier at the
apex).  Like Turn 3, Turn 6 has a wide paved recovery area
for those who overshoot the braking zone; this recovery area
is the largest at Sears Point, so a GREAT amount of effort is
required to slide all the way across it and slam into the
distant barrier to damage the vehicle.

Turn 7: This is a right-hand 135-degree corner around a tire
barrier (placed specifically to prevent shortcutting the
corner).  Those with good drift-racing skills can implement
those abilities here (as at Turn 6) to pass one or two cars
through the corner (but beware the barrier at the apex).

Turn 8: Immediately at the exit of Turn 7, this is a quick
left-hand bend which can be taken at full acceleration.

Turns 9-14 (S-curves): The raceway keeps switching from left
to right, all the way back to Pit Entry for the primary Pit
Lane.  The overall trend of the raceway here is a gentle
downhill slope, although some corners will require light
braking to remain on the pavement.

Turn 15: This is a tight right-hand hairpin corner with some
paved swing-out room (but not very much).  Pit Entry for the
primary Pit Lane is to the left well before this hairpin
corner, while Pit Entry for the secondary Pit Lane is to the
right on corner exit.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: SILVERSTONE
The Silverstone International circuit shares much of the same
pavement as the Grand Prix circuit used for the annual F1
Grand Prix of Great Britain; in fact, the pavement for the
two circuits even cross at approximately two-thirds of the
way around the International circuit.  Once the International
circuit leaves the Grand Prix circuit, however, the ensuing
S-curves are incredibly tight and tricky, although
straightlining by making use of the rumble strips will often
help to save time.

Pit Straight: The Start/Finish Line is directly at the
beginning of the Pit Straight.  There is no room for error on
the right side of the track, as the Pit Lane barrier is
directly against the pavement.

Turn 1 (Copse): This is a moderate right-hand corner which
can be taken at full speed with a pristine racing line, but
be careful to not run off the course at the exit of the turn.
The best racing line is to tightly hug the apex, but the Pit
Lane barrier is right there against the pavement, so it is
imperative to keep the right side of the vehicle from rubbing
the barrier.  Copse exits onto a long straightaway.

Straightaway: The Pit Lane rejoins the main course from the
right about 1/3 of the way along the straight.

Turns 2-3 (Maggots): This is a left-right S-curve. Turn 2 can
be taken at full speed or with very quick tapping of the
brakes, but Turn 3 requires moderate braking to keep to the
pavement.

Turn 4: This tight right-hand J-curve can easily surprise
newcomers to this version of Silverstone; fortunately, there
is plenty of sand to the outside of the corner to catch the
unwary.  With the heavy braking required to safely clear this
corner, this is a prime place to pass on braking.

Turn 5-7 (Ireland): This tight set of S-curves can be taken
at full throttle with no traffic by straightlining the
corners using the rumble strips.  Otherwise, expect to be
frustrated by slow traffic in this tight left-right-left
complex.  There is a fade to the left on exiting Ireland.

Turn 8: There is a fade to the left immediately before
entering this tight right-hand hairpin, which makes the
hairpin itself much more difficult.  Fortunately, pavement
from the Silverstone Grand Prix circuit crosses the
International circuit here, so those who go wide on the
hairpin can generally make use of the Grand Prix pavement to
recover and get back onto the International pavement.

Straightaway (Farm Straight): From the right side, the Grand
Prix pavement rejoins the International pavement.  Both
circuits follow the same pavement for the remainder of the
lap.  With good acceleration out of the hairpin, good passing
opportunities can be made here.

Turns 9-13: This final segment of the circuit is very similar
to The Stadium at Hockenheim.  However, these similar
segments cannot be approached in the same manner.

   Turn 9 (Bridge): Immediately after passing underneath the
   pedestrian bridge, you will enter a complex similar to The
   Stadium at Hokkenheim.  This is a right-hand corner which
   can likely be taken at full speed.

   Turn 10 (Priory): This left-hand corner will require
   moderate braking.

   Turn 11 (Brooklands): Another left-hand corner, this one
   requires heavy braking.  There is a small sand trap for
   those who miss the braking zone.

   Turn 12 (Luffield): This set of right-hand corners
   essentially forms a 'U' shape, and requires moderate or
   severe braking to avoid sliding off into the kitty litter.
   The entry to Pit Lane is on the right shortly leaving
   Luffield.

   Turn 13 (Woodcote): Barely a corner but more than a fade,
   the course eases to the right here.  The right-side
   barrier begins abruptly here (be careful not to hit it).

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the right between Luffield
and Woodcote.  The new Pit Lane has a gentle right-hand
swing, so you can come into Pit Lane at top speed and have
plenty of room to slow.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: T1 CIRCUIT AIDA
Aida is a fun and fairly quick circuit.  There are many high-
speed areas, tempered with a few J-turns to slow the cars.
Fortunately, there are NO CHICANES at Aida, which is
absolutely great for aggressive drivers.

Turn 1: After a moderate-length Pit Straight, Turn 1 is a
right-hand J-turn requiring moderate braking and gentle
throttle control throughout.  While passing on the outside
line is indeed possible here, it is not suggested.

Turn 2: Shortly after Turn 1, this is a gentle left-hand
corner which can generally be taken at full acceleration with
a pristine racing line making use of the rumble strips
(especially on corner exit)... unless encumbered by traffic.

Straightaway: This 'straightaway' has three fades - left-
right-left - which can essentially be straightlined; those
with experience in rally racing will already have this
essential time-shaving skill in their arsenal of racing
tactics.

Turn 3: Immediately after the final fade of the preceding
'straightaway,' the circuit makes a right-hand bend here as
the venue makes a slow rise.  This corner requires moderate
braking.  Note that the crest comes after corner exit, so
while speed out of the corner is important, it is quite
possible that there will be an incident jut over the rise -
therefore, drivers must be prepared to quickly take evasive
action coming over the crest.

Turn 4: After a second mini-crest comes the right-hand Turn
4.  Moderate braking is required here as is a tight racing
line along the apex for this J-turn.

Turns 5 and 6: Almost immediately after Turn 4 comes a pair
of left-hand corners.  These are fairly gentle corners
requiring only light braking, but the straightaway connecting
Turn 5 and Turn 6 is simply too long to permit treating this
section like one elongated hairpin corner.  Slow cars tend to
REALLY slow for the Turns 4-5-6 complex, so powering out of
the corners and braking heavily and late entering the corners
will help with passing in this section.

Turns 7 and 8: This section begins just beyond the pedestrian
bridge over the raceway.  This is a set of left-right J-
turns, each requiring moderate braking.  Again, slow cars
tend to be REALLY slow here, so powering out of the corners
and braking heavily and late entering the corners will help
with passing in this section.

Turns 9 and 10: This is a pair of VERY gentle right-hand
corners requiring NO braking whatsoever, so long as the
driver can keep a good racing line.  These corners
essentially form one wide sweeping elongated hairpin turn to
the right.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: VALLELUNGA
This Italian venue is primarily a high-speed circuit with
semi-gentle curves that require only very light braking, if
any braking is required at all.  However, on the back side of
the circuit, there is a set of hairpin corners which requires
moderate or hard braking, thus slowing things down
considerably.  So long as drivers master this 'additional'
section along the back side of the circuit, there should be
no problems attaining success at Vallelunga :-)

Turn 1: At the end of Pit Straight, this is a gentle left-
hand bend.  There is pavement which continues straight ahead,
but this is not used.  Little braking is needed here, if any.

Turn 2: Shortly after Turn 1, the raceway makes a gentle
right-hand bend.  Little braking is needed here, if any.

Turn 3: If any, little braking is needed for this long,
gentle, sweeping right-hand bend.

Turn 4: This is a rather wide hairpin corner to the right,
requiring moderate braking on approach and careful throttle
management throughout.

Turns 5 and 6: This right-left section should not require any
braking whatsoever, except perhaps by the most powerful of
cars.

Turn 7: This begins the tricky section of the circuit.  This
is a right-hand hairpin corner requiring moderate braking.
Note that there is virtually NO recovery room should a driver
miss the braking zone for Turn 7.

Turn 8: After a brief straightaway, this is an even tighter
hairpin corner, this time to the left.  Severe braking will
be needed here, especially since there is NO recovery area to
the outside of the corner until corner exit - and this is
primarily a steep hillside which risks to cause a vehicle to
flip onto its side or roof.

Turns 9 and 10: This left-right section requires light
braking for most cars, or moderate braking by high-power
vehicles.

Turn 11: This final corner is a right-hand hairpin requiring
light braking.  Drivers must avoid shortcutting the corner
even by a few centimeters, as a barrier protrudes all the way
up to the pavement itself at the apex of this hairpin turn.
Note that Pit Entry is to the left (the inside of the corner)
just beyond the apex but before corner exit.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: VANCOUVER
Perhaps most popular for the annual CART race (one of three
in Canada - the others being in Toronto and Montreal), this
is a TIGHT street circuit.  This means that there are AT MOST
two lanes of racing (and passing in most areas is very dicey
at best), and that there is NOWHERE to go in case of a
mistake or an accident.  Due to the barriers, ALL corners are
semi-blind.

Turn 1: This is a wide right-hand hairpin corner, with Pit
Exit at the apex.  This is actually one of the two best
passing zones at Vancouver, but passing here means keeping a
VERY tight line on corner entry and hoping that the brakes do
not lock up and cause the vehicle to slide across the
pavement and into the outside barrier.

Turn 2: Immediately after Turn 1, this is a left-hand right-
angle corner.

Turn 3: After a VERY short straightaway, this is a right-hand
right-angle corner onto the long back straightaway.

Straightaway: This is the longest straightaway at Vancouver.
Passing here is possible, but definitely still tricky due to
the narrow nature of the circuit.  The 'straightaway' has a
semi-significant bend to the right about 1/3 of the way along
its length, but this can be handled at full acceleration
(even with side-by-side racing).

Turn 4: This is the other prime passing area, a right-hand
right-angle corner.  There is some extra room on the inside
of the corner, so crossing over the rumble strips can be
quite useful for passing.

Turn 5: This is a right-hand hairpin corner, requiring
moderate braking.  If there is no traffic here, some good
speeds can be carried through Turn 5.

Turns 6-9: This is a left-left-right-left complex which is
rather tricky, especially since the raceway narrows between
Turns 6 and 7.  Harder and harder braking will be required
while passing through this section.

Turns 10-12: This final section is the trickiest, both to see
and to drive.  There is an overhead highway on the left side
of the raceway approaching Turn 10; at the TINY break in the
wall, the raceway makes a hard left-right-left onto Pit
Straight.  GOING STRAIGHT AHEAD LEADS TO PIT LANE!!!!!
Moderate or even severe braking is required to definitely be
able to keep to the pavement without banging any of the
barriers here at the tiny opening.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: ZANDVOORT
This is one of the trickiest race circuits on the planet.
While not as technical as Monaco, the difficulty level is
still definitely rather high.  There are really only two
high-speed sections along the entire circuit; the rest of the
circuit is filled with twists and turns combined with changes
in elevation; for much of the circuit, there is NO room for
error, as - similar to a street circuit - the barriers come
almost directly up against the raceway itself.

Pit Straight: This is one of only two sustained high-speed
sections at Zandvoort.  Pit Entry is on the right about 1/3
of the way along Pit Straight; the Pit Entry lane begins just
after the exit of Turn 14.

Turn 1: This right-hand hairpin requires moderate or even
severe braking to keep out of the vast area of kitty litter
on the outside of the corner.  Careful throttle management
will also be needed throughout the corner once past the apex.

Turn 2: After a quick fade to the left, Turn 2 is a right-
hand corner requiring moderate braking.  This enters the main
area where there are barriers almost directly against the
pavement on both sides, so making any mistakes in this
section of the circuit can be extremely costly, creating A
LOT of work for the pit crew (and thus longer pit stops).

Turn 3: IMMEDIATELY after Turn 2, this left-hand hairpin
corner requires even more braking.  From the apex of Turn 3,
the circuit begins a noticeable uphill trajectory, which can
make corner exit slightly difficult.

Turns 4-6: The raceway crests at the apex of Turn 4, a gentle
right-hand bend, then dips at the apex of Turn 5, a gentle
left-hand bend; the raceway then crests again at the apex of
Turn 6, another gentle right-hand bend.  This is the second
high-speed section at Vandvoort.  At one point, the right-
side barrier does give way, but generally, the barriers are
almost directly up against the raceway on both sides.

Turn 7: Moderate or severe braking will be needed for this
long right-hand corner.  There is a steeply-banked elongated
sand trap on the outside of the corner to help slow runaway
vehicles, but it is still possible to slam into the barrier
on the other side of the kitty litter; also, should a car
slide sideways into the sand, the sudden deceleration rate
and the angle of the slope here risks to cause the car to
roll onto its side and/or roof.

Turns 8 and 9: The circuit map shows these as two distinct
right-hand corners, but it is best to approach these as one
270-degree decreasing-radius corner.  Moderate braking is
needed entering Turn 8, but the braking pressure must be
slowly increased to safely make it to the exit of Turn 9.
There is a large sand trap to the outside of this section,
but by the exit of Turn 9, the raceway is again bounded VERY
closely by barriers.

Turn 10: Moderate braking is required for this left-hand
hairpin corner.  There is not much recovery room to the
outside of Turn 10, then the barriers again closely protect
the raceway.

Turns 11 and 12: This is the absolute worst section of the
circuit.  This is a NASTY right-left chicane: a right-hand
perpendicular corner instantly followed by a left-hand
hairpin turn around a large sand trap bisected by a barrier.
There is NO shortcutting possible here, and those carrying
too much speed into this chicane will DEFINITELY destroy the
front of the vehicle on the barrier.

Turns 13 and 14: These final two corners again appear as
distinct turns on the race map, but should also be treated as
one massive hairpin corner.  Turn 13 may require light
braking by high-power vehicles, but ALL cars should be able
to power through Turn 14 at full throttle.  This leads onto
Pit Straight.

==============================================

DRIVING INSTRUCTIONS: ZOLDER
This circuit can be fun but tricky, especially in wet racing
conditions.  It is generally a high-speed circuit, but the
chicanes and few tight corners will certainly test a driver's
guts.

Turn 1: This left-hand corner will require light braking to
remain on the raceway.  The outside of the corner begins with
a good recovery area, but by corner exit, the outside barrier
is almost directly against the pavement.  Pit Exit is at
corner exit on the right.

Turn 2: Turn 2 is a right-hand hairpin corner with a
decreasing radius.  There is some good sand-filled recovery
space on the outside of the corner.  Light braking will be
required initially, but the braking pressure must be slowly
increased in order to remain on the circuit itself.

Turn 3: Light braking will be needed with most vehicles to
keep them on the pavement for this right-hand corner.  There
is little room for error on either side of the pavement
through Turn 3.

Turns 4-6: On approach, the back side of the paddock area is
to the right of the raceway.  Then the circuit makes a left-
right-left chicane which requires moderate braking.  Turning
too soon will be costly, however, as the left-hand barrier
does not give way until after the apex of Turn 4.  The inside
of Turn 5 is filled with sand, so straightlining this chicane
may not be very beneficial.  Fortunately, the swing rate of
the corners is not very great, so turning left just a little
bit can allow drivers to make ample use of the inside rumble
strip for Turn 5, and then straightline Turn 6; however, if
encumbered by traffic, this tactic will likely result in a
collision with one or more competitors.

Turn 7: This left-hand bend can be taken at full
acceleration.  However, at corner exit, it is best to begin
braking for the next corner.

Turns 8-10: This is a rough right-left-right chicane with a
much wider swing rate than the former chicane, so
straightlining this chicane will never be a viable option.
Due to the much greater angle of each corner, moderate or
even severe braking will be required to slow enough for
safely negotiate Turn 8 and properly set up the approach for
Turn 9.  Most cars should be able to handle full acceleration
from the apex of Turn 9 through Turn 10.

Turn 11: Except for the most powerful of vehicles, this
right-hand corner can be taken at full acceleration.  There
is a nice recovery area to the outside of the corner,
however, for those who may need to make use of its services.

Turn 12: This left-hand bend can be handled at full
acceleration without problems.

Turns 13-15: Severe braking is required for Turn 13, a right-
hand J-turn.  Exiting Turn 13 leads into a gentle left-right
chicane which can be handled at full acceleration.

Turns 16 and 17: After passing underneath an advertisement
comes a 'junction.'  Pit Entry is directly ahead, whereas the
main circuit makes a left-right chicane.  Moderate braking
will be needed to slow enough to handle the chicane without
getting bogged down in the sand trap.  Like the initial
chicane of the circuit, the left-side barrier protrudes all
the way to the apex of Turn 16, so it is not possible to turn
early to have a better racing line.  Because of the
'junction' setting here, those going to Pit Lane should
remain hard to the right side of the circuit (perhaps even
with the right-side tires just slightly OFF the pavement) to
allow the best-possible racing line for those remaining on
the circuit itself.

==============================================
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CONTACT INFORMATION
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