Review by Retro

"Man, I have to be really bored to play Solitaire, so I must be SUPER bored to actually reivew it.....!"

If you have a computer, Solitaire should be on it as a free game. I'm sure most of you already know how to play Solitaire. If so, skip down to the “Alright” paragraph. If not, just read the whole dang review.

To play Solitaire, you have to use the standard deck of cards, which consists of everything from an Ace to a King, and all the symbols: clubs, hearts, diamonds, and spades. To start off, you will already have some cards lined up at the bottom part of the screen. You also have a deck at the top left which you can click to gain access to other cards when you need them. Finally, there are four empty slots at the top right, one for each symbol of the cards.

The object of Solitaire is to use all of the cards in the deck and all the cards at the bottom half of the screen, and then place all of them into the empty slots at the top right. First of all, you can place the cards at the bottom of the screen and the ones from the deck under the ones that are face up at the bottom. But they have to be the right one for that card. You have to do that in descending order. For instance, if you have a King that is red (hearts or diamonds) and you see a Queen that is black (clubs or spades), then you can place that Queen under the King. You can do that because a Queen is the next highest card after a King and because they are of a different color. You can do that with the rest of the cards all the way down to the Aces.

Here is the main objective and your main goal of winning a game of Solitaire. Starting out with the Ace of any of the four symbols, you have to place the Ace at the top right of the screen in one of the four slots. Let's say you get an Ace of hearts and place it at the top. Next you would place a two of hearts, then a three of hearts, and so on, on top of that Ace of hearts, all the way up until you get to a King of hearts. And to win a game of Solitaire, you have to do that with all four of the symbols.

Alright, now that you know how to play Solitaire, I'm going to explain the nice extras and options this game has. I'm not going to explain the scoring of the game, you can read the rules or just find that out for yourself. You can choose from several looks and options of play in Solitaire for your computer.

First of all, you can choose what design your deck and the other unturned cards will have on them. There are a total of 12 designs to choose from. A few of them are: fish swimming around with a blue background, a haunted house at night, acorns and vines, the beach, roses, and a robot. Most of the designs are stationary and don't have any parts of the picture that move. However, some of them do, which are the ones I like the best. For example, the robot's lights will flash and a mark will move back and forth, in the beach, from time to time the sun will put on sunglasses and stick out its tongue at you, and in the haunted house one, the bats' wings will move.

When it comes to scoring, you will have three options to choose from. You can choose Standard scoring, Vegas, or no score keeping at all. There are options that let you choose whether or not you play a timed game, whether or not to have a status bar, and also outline dragging.

Finally, you can choose whether to draw one card at a time from the deck, or draw three at a time. If you draw one card at a time, Solitaire will be a lot easier to beat than it would be in a Draw Three game. If you choose to draw three cards at a time, then every time you click the deck of cards at the top left, it will show 3 cards, but you won't be able to use but one at a time.

Last but not least is the Help option in this game. If you don't know how to play Solitaire and want to learn, this would be where you need to go. It also tells you some good hints and strategies to use while playing the game.

Solitaire is my favorite card game to play on the computer, even if that's not saying much (I'm not one of the biggest card fans). Solitaire is no Minesweeper or 3D Space Cadet Pinball. I play those two all the time, mainly to make my mark on the high score lists. Sometimes I just enjoy playing Solitaire, but 94.3% of the time I only bring it up when I'm in class wasting time or when I'm bored beyond belief. That's none of Solitaire's fault though – it's just my not being high and drunk at the same time on cards like many other people are.

With the ability to choose different deck designs, scoring options, and fun of playing Solitaire when there's nothing better to do, I'm glad that I have this game on my computer. It's a cool classic that anybody can learn to play in two seconds. It's also cool what the cards do when you complete a game.


Reviewer's Score: 7/10 | Originally Posted: 04/12/01, Updated 10/29/04


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