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    FAQ/Driving Guide by Wolf Feather

    Version: Final | Updated: 07/10/02 | Printable Version | Search This Guide

    TEST DRIVE LE MANS: GAME GUIDE
    
    by
    
    Jamie Stafford/Wolf Feather
    feather7@ix.netcom.com
    
    
    
    Initial Version Completed: July 4, 2002
    FINAL VERSION Completed:   July 10, 2002
    
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    CONTENTS
    Spacing and Length
    Permissions
    Introduction
    Game Modes
    Tuning
    Tips
    Circuit Details: Le Mans
    Circuit Details: Test Course (Bugatti)
    Contact Information
    
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    SPACING AND LENGTH
    For optimum readability, this driving guide should be
    viewed/printed using a monowidth font, such as Courier.
    Check for font setting by making sure the numbers and letters
    below line up:
    
    1234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012
    ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
    
    This guide is nearly 20 pages in length using Courier 12 font
    in the Macintosh version of Microsoft Word 98.
    
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    PERMISSIONS
    Permission is hereby granted for a user to download and/or
    print out a copy of this driving guide for personal use.
    However, due to the extreme length, printing this driving
    guide may not be such a good idea.
    
    This driving guide may only be posted on: FeatherGuides,
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    InsidePS2Games.com, CheatPlanet.com, The Cheat Empire,
    gamespot.com, ps2domain.net, a2zweblinks.com, Games Domain,
    Gameguru, cheatingplanet.com, neoseeker.com, RobsGaming.com,
    ps2fantasy.com, gamespot.com, and vgstrategies.com.  Please
    contact me for permission to post elsewhere on the Internet.
    
    Should anyone wish to translate this driving guide into other
    languages, please contact me for permission(s) and provide me
    with a copy when complete.
    
    Remember:  Plagiarism in ANY form is NOT tolerated!!!!!
    
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    INTRODUCTION
    Shortly after I bought my original PlayStation console in
    1999, I happened upon Test Drive Le Mans.  I remember really
    liking the game at the time, although my driving skills were
    not truly up to par at that time, so I eventually sold off
    the game.
    
    Since then, I have upgraded to a PlayStation2 and greatly
    improved my driving skills.  I have also owned Le Mans 24
    Hours (for PS2) since its release in August 2001 and have
    recently been thinking that it would be great to reacquire
    Test Drive Le Mans to see how the two games compare,
    especially in their renditions of the famous Le Mans circuit
    (La Circuit de la Sarthe).
    
    Stepping backward from the PS2 Le Mans 24 Hours to the PSX
    Test Drive Le Mans is very a eye-opening experience.  In
    Quick Race mode, where car adjustments such as fuel and
    aerodynamics are not available, car handling is VERY twitchy,
    to the extent that even the cars with the best handling
    characteristics are simply not driveable.  Some of the other
    game modes, however, DO allow for car adjustments; if the
    right combination can be found, the cars can be driven fairly
    well... although the cars will still be somewhat twitchy in
    terms of handling.  Le Mans 24 Hours is also more of a
    simulation-style game, whereas Test Drive Le Mans is much
    more of an arcade-style game with a (very) few tuning and
    adjustment options available.
    
    What disappointed me most, however, is the 'lack of
    faithfulness' to the real-world Le Mans circuit.  Le Mans 24
    Hours does an excellent job of this; real-world drivers can
    complete a lap at Le Mans in about 3:40, give or take a few
    seconds.  Test Drive Le Mans, however, severely compresses
    the Le Mans circuit, to the point that I currently have a
    record lap time of 1:24.86 :-(   This is most likely due to
    the limitations of the PlayStation itself (the console for
    which the game was designed), but this also means that there
    is no true sense of the immense length of the world-famous
    Mulsanne/Hunaudieres straight; also, there are also virtually
    NO elevation changes in Test Drive Le Mans.  For those with
    any level of familiarity with Le Mans 24 Hours, the Le Mans
    circuit in Test Drive Le Mans is definitely recognizable, but
    also very much an abomination :-(
    
    Just to clarify, Test Drive Le Mans is definitely NOT a bad
    game!!!!!  However, despite being an arcade-style game, Test
    Drive Le Mans definitely does require better-than-average
    driving skills.  As such, it is NOT a good game for young
    children, as they will quickly become frustrated at their
    lack of success (especially in Quick Race mode).  Some
    measure of patience is certainly required in any driving
    game, but Test Drive Le Mans requires a lot more patience
    than any other driving/racing game I have ever played -
    either on PlayStation OR PlayStation2.
    
    Portions - primarily the two Circuit Details sections - of
    this guide have been lifted from my Le Mans 24 Hours Game
    Guide and Le Mans 24 Hours: Le Mans 2000 Guide, with
    alterations made where appropriate.  In the Le Mans and Test
    Course (Bugatti) circuit details, where the corner/segment
    names are known, I have translated these names to English and
    dropped any accent markings, as standard text-only Internet
    documents are based on the English-language ASCII character
    set.  Also, circuit detail information is for dry-conditions
    daylight driving; appropriate modifications are required for
    nighttime driving and driving in other weather conditions.
    
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    GAME MODES
    There are several game modes available in Test Drive Le Mans.
    To check progress in the various game modes (except
    Multiplayer Mode), go to Game Progress (available within
    Options from the Main Menu).
    
    Le Mans: This mode comprises both Amateur and Professional
    difficulties.  The options here are 12-minute, 24-minute, 2-
    hour, and 24-hour races at Le Mans (La Circuit de la Sarthe).
    The 12-minute, 24-minute, and 2-hour races condense a full
    24-hour race into the chosen time frame, so that events in Le
    Mans mode are run during both day and night.  Once a
    difficulty level has been selected, players must choose a
    team for which to drive based upon offers via e-mail; each
    team has a particular car, so team choice affects the car
    available for the big race.  Each team's car can be first
    tested, using the Test Course (based upon the real-world
    Bugatti Circuit).  Qualifying is a good option, used to
    attain the best possible starting position for the big race.
    
    Arcade:
       Challenge: There are six different Challenge series.
          There are no opportunities to adjust car
          characteristics before a race, and there are also
          initially only two cars from which to choose.  New
          cars are unlocked as you progress through Challenge
          series.  A win is required to advance to new
          Challenges.
       Time Attack: There are six different Time Attack series.
          There are no opportunities to adjust car
          characteristics before a race, and there are also
          initially only two cars from which to choose.  New
          cars are unlocked as you progress through Time Attack
          series.  A win is required to advance to new
          Time Attack series.  However, as you progress through
          Time Attack, the object is to try to set new lap
          records.  Also, there is a countdown timer, which is
          reset every time you pass through a Checkpoint; if you
          fail to reach the next Checkpoint before the timer runs
          out, you will automatically fail/lose that Time Attack
          attempt, and must restart.
       Quick Race: This is certainly the most unforgiving mode in
          the game, as there are NO opportunities to adjust car
          characteristics before a race.  The player DOES get to
          choose the venue for the race, however.
    
    Championship Mode: Once a team has been selected for the
          ten-race season, the action begins!!!  For each race,
          players are given the option to qualify for the ten-
          lap races.  Points are awarded in FIA style:
             First Place:  10 points
             Second Place: 6 points
             Third Place:  4 points
             Fourth Place: 3 points
             Fifth Place:  2 points
             Sixth Place:  1 point
          This means that, with twelve cars in the field, only
          half the entrants will receive points in each race.
          The object is to have the most possible points at the
          end of the season to thus win the Championship :-)
    
    Multiplayer Mode: Le Mans, 3-race Championship, and 5-race
       Championship for two players at once.
    
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    TUNING
    Tuning options in Test Drive: Le Mans are extremely limited.
    Here are the options presented (only in certain game modes)
    and what adjustments will do to affect car handling:
    
    Aerodynamics
       Aerodynamics affects the airflow over the car, which in
          turn affects car handling in acceleration, top-end
          speed, and cornering ability.
          Low: This setting will provide the fastest-possible
             acceleration and highest-possible top-end speed, but
             cornering will be more difficult.
          Medium: This is the 'middle ground' setting, and may be
             just fine for many players.
          High: This is the opposite of the Low setting, thus
             resulting in a low top-end speed (important on long
             straightaways, such as at the Mulsanne Circuit) and
             slower acceleration (important from a standing start
             and when exiting slow corners), but will improve
             cornering ability.
    
    Fuel: Players can select the amount of fuel a car has at the
       beginning of a race or qualifying attempt, and how much
       fuel to put into the car when serviced in Pit Lane during
       a race.  The amount of fuel does affect car handling, as a
       full fuel tank weighs more than a nearly-empty fuel tank.
       Car handling will most be affected in acceleration from a
       standing start or from slow corners, and in cornering.
    
    Steering: This affects how quickly the car reacts to steering
       inputs by the driver/player.  For many players, this can
       usually be kept at its neutral/middle setting.
    
    Tires
       Hard Slicks: Hard Slicks have the longest possible tire
          durability, but provide the least amount of pavement
          grip.  Only experts should use Hard Slicks.
       Soft Slicks: Soft Slicks are the exact opposite of Hard
          Slicks, providing maximum pavement grip but the
          shortest durability.  Using Soft Slicks will mean more
          trips to Pit Lane just to change tires; also, off-
          course excursions (through sand and grass) will
          shorted tire durability through increased tire wear.
       Intermediates: These are good tires to use when the road
          conditions are damp.
       Wets: Wets should be used in rainy conditions.  The other
          tire compounds do not adequately shove the water out of
          the way to allow the car to move forward and corner as
          well as it should in wet conditions.
    
    ==============================================
    
    TIPS
    In most race modes, the player will always start from the
    final position on the grid.  Once the race begins, passing
    can legally take place; there is absolutely NO reason to wait
    until crossing the Start/Finish Line to begin passing other
    cars.  This can mean gaining valuable positions immediately,
    as the other cars at the rear of the field tend to accelerate
    quite slowly and/or make mistakes (such as knocking each
    other off the circuit).
    
    While Yellow Flags (slow and do not pass) and Blue Flags
    (pull aside to let faster cars pass) are used in Test Drive
    Le Mans, there are no penalties for not obeying the flags
    shown.  Therefore, make use of Yellow Flags to pass one or
    more cars as they are greatly slowed, and continue fending
    off challengers even if the Blue Flag is shown.
    
    Also relating to flags, the Oil Flag will occasionally
    appear.  When it does, speed is still important, but
    cornering is likely to be trickier than normal, possibly
    resulting in a major spin (and thus possibly a collision).
    
    To win the Le Mans Mode races, you need only win at any ONE
    time period given.  Therefore, for fastest advancement
    through the game, select the 12-minute race for each of the
    car categories (GT2, Prototype, and GT1).  When you go to
    Game Progress (in the Options selection from the Main Menu),
    you will see that you have been credited with completing Le
    Mans for the car category and difficulty level (Amateur or
    Pro) selected.  For those stepping backward from Le Mans 24
    Hours, this is different from LM24H, which requires winning
    the Le Mans (and Petit Le Mans) races at ALL the time periods
    provided in the game in order to attain the 100% game
    completion rating.
    
    At Arnage, there is a point about 2/3 through the course (in
    the standard configuration; this is about 1/3 through the
    course in the reverse configuration) where the barrier gives
    way on the inside of a corner, revealing a nice wide patch of
    grass.  To gain time and hopefully make a few passes, make
    use of this grassy area.  However, the grass will cause the
    car to slide, so it is best to turn sharply into the grass
    well before the corner, and allow the slipperiness of the
    grass and the momentum of the car to carry the vehicle
    through this 'shortcut' to the pavement on the other side,
    where the wheels will regain grip; it may be best to lift off
    the accelerator while taking this 'shortcut.'  It is possible
    that the car will bang the outside barrier on corner exit,
    but it should only be a sideswipe which will not slow the car
    much.  This is an excellent place to make passes (especially
    around packs of traffic), as the official corner is a sharp
    perpendicular turn, thus the CPU-controlled cars will slow
    tremendously to clear the official corner.
    
    Near the end of Maison Blanche, there is a tight left-right-
    left segment.  Because races at Maison Blanche are typically
    run at dusk, it is difficult to discern the corners, as the
    barriers all look essentially the same.  Slowing a little is
    certainly a good idea here until intimate familiarity of the
    circuit is gained.  In the reverse configuration, this
    segment is much easier to see, and can be cleared easily at
    full acceleration unless encumbered by traffic.
    
    Especially in Time Attack Mode, be careful about banging
    other cars or bumping the barriers.  Time Attack Mode
    requires placing first AND finishing each segment of the
    given circuit before time expires.  One or two minor offs
    during a Time Attack race will not usually be detrimental to
    success.  However, banging a barrier or another car and
    getting spun around WILL be detrimental to success; in this
    case, restart.  This same advice also holds true for EVERY
    race at Pro level.
    
    For those stepping backward from Le Mans 24 Hours, Test
    Drive: Le Mans does NOT have the bands of red lights to
    indicate corners or the entrance to Pit Lane at the Le Mans
    circuit.  Therefore, until intimate familiarity with the
    circuit is attained, be wary of missing the Michelin and
    Motorola Chicanes and instead banging the barriers.
    
    ==============================================
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    CIRCUIT DETAILS: LE MANS
    This is without question the longest circuit of the game...
    and quite likely the reason players buy or rent this game!!!
    It is IMPERATIVE to learn this circuit flawlessly during
    daylight conditions, as visibility is unbelievably poor at
    night and in wet-weather conditions.
    
    Turn 1 (Dunlop Curve): This is a rather nice right-hand fade
    which can be taken flat-out.  However, it may be a good idea
    to begin braking for Dunlop Chicane when exiting Dunlop
    Curve.  An elevation change begins here.  Pit Exit rejoins
    the main circuit at the entry to Dunlop Curve.
    
    Turns 2-4 (Dunlop Chicane): Given the continual upward slope
    through Dunlop Chicane, it is extremely easy to slip off the
    pavement on either side of the circuit... and both sides are
    filled with plenty of kitty litter.  Braking well before
    entering the Dunlop Chicane is of UTMOST importance -
    especially in wet conditions - as the corners of the chicane
    are rather tight.  At the beginning of a race, all the
    traffic can make this segment even more treacherous than it
    would be normally - which should be enough incentive to try
    to qualify on pole.
    
    Straightaway: The significant hill crests as you pass
    underneath the big Dunlop tire.
    
    Turns 5-6 (Red Mound S): This left-right chicane begins just
    after passing the Ferris Wheel (lit with bright red lights at
    night) on the left side of the course, and is a good
    reference point to use in picking your braking zone.  The
    barriers are rather close to the pavement on both sides
    through the chicane, so any off-pavement excursions will
    certainly result in sliding along the rails; this is
    especially important in case you carry too much speed through
    this chicane.
    
    Turns 7-9 (Red Mound Curve): This is a set of three right-
    hand semi-corners which can usually be taken flat-out, unless
    you find yourself encumbered by traffic.  However, keep a
    tight line to the apex of each of the three semi-corners, or
    you may find yourself with a few wheels in the sand and grass
    on the outside of the course.  The outside of the final
    corner is actually paved (where public roads form the major
    portion of the circuit), so this can be used as a good swing-
    out area if necessary, and can also be used to pass a small
    group of cars on the inside of the corner; beware the outside
    barrier here as you will be likely be carrying A LOT of
    speed.
    
    The 'Back Stretch:' Approximately one minute, forty seconds
    is spent here on the back side of the circuit.  This is
    without question the best place for drafting and passing
    other cars.  The 'Back Stretch' (the Hunaudieres Straight) is
    broken by two chicanes.
    
       Straightaway (Hunaudieres Straight - Part I): This is the
       longest straightaway of the circuit, and very good top-end
       speeds can be achieved here, especially if you were able
       to blast your way through Red Mound Curve without even
       tapping the brakes.  However, there is no room for error
       if you get involved in a three-abreast situation, as the
       barriers come almost directly up to the pavement.  During
       the day, look for the distance-to-corner markers or else
       you will miss Motorola Chicane (flashing red lights alert
       you to the chicane at night and in poor-visibility
       conditions).  All along this straightaway, make use of the
       draft if at all possible to increase your overall speed.
    
       Turns 10-12 (Motorola Chicane): This is the same chicane
       format as the Dunlop Chicane (right-left-right), but wider
       and without the hill.  Beware the barriers.  In poor
       visibility conditions, the first corner of the chicane is
       easily identifiable by the red lights; during the day,
       however, the chicane is very difficult to see from a
       distance, so be sure to look for the distance-to-corner
       markers.
    
       Straightaway (Hunaudieres Straight - Part II): Very good
       top-end speeds can be achieved here.  However, there is no
       room for error if you get involved in a three-abreast
       situation, as the barriers come almost directly up to the
       pavement.  During the day, look for the distance-to-corner
       markers or else you will miss Michelin Chicane (flashing
       red lights alert you to the chicane at night).  All along
       this straightaway, make use of the draft if at all
       possible to increase your overall speed.
    
       Turns 13-15 (Michelin Chicane): This is exactly like the
       Motorola Chicane, but is a left-right-left combination
       with a tighter initial turn.  In poor-visibility
       conditions, the first corner of the chicane is easily
       identifiable by the red lights; during the day, however,
       the chicane is very difficult to see from a distance, so
       be sure to look for the distance-to-corner markers.
    
       Straightaway (Hunaudieres Straight - Part III): Yet
       another long straightaway, but with a small fade to the
       right almost one-third of the way along its length.
       After clearing the small rise (similar to a bridge over a
       small country stream, about two-thirds of the way along
       the straightaway), look for the distance-to-corner markers
       for Mulsanne Curve.  All along this straightaway, make use
       of the draft if at all possible to increase your overall
       speed.
    
    Mulsanne: If you can carry enough speed into Mulsanne and
    have sufficient tire grip, you can essentially treat both
    Mulsanne Hump and Mulsanne Curve as one long double-apex
    corner by riding up on the inside rumble strip of Mulsanne
    Curve.  Mulsanne Hump and Mulsanne Curve together essentially
    form a 135-degree (double-apex) megacorner.  It is very easy
    to go too wide exiting this megacorner, and CPU-controlled
    cars often will find themselves in the sand trap, so keep
    watch for such activity as you round Mulsanne Curve.
    
       Turn 16 (Mulsanne Hump): The distance-to-corner markers
       actually are for the following right-hand turn, but no one
       can afford to miss Mulsanne Hump, whose apex is almost
       exactly in line with the 100m marker and bounded on the
       left by a nasty barrier.
    
       Turn 17 (Mulsanne Curve): The distance-to-corner markers
       are actually for THIS corner.  This is a ninety-degree
       corner requiring moderate braking and a solid, clean
       racing line to keep out of the sand trap.  It may help
       to keep tight to the apex and roll the right tires up on
       the inside rumble strips; however, the barrier is just
       barely off the pavement, so do not edge TOO far toward
       the inside of the corner here, or your car will be bounced
       back across the pavement and possibly into the sand trap
       on the outside of Mulsanne Curve.
    
    Straightaway: This straightaway has three fades to the right
    along its length.  All along this straightaway, make use of
    the draft if at all possible to increase your overall speed.
    At the apex of the third fade, begin braking for the
    Indianapolis Curve.
    
    Turn 18 (Indianapolis Curve): This left-hand right-angle
    corner can easily be missed, so use plenty of braking
    beginning at the apex of the third fade along the previous
    straightaway.  Do not cut this corner too sharp or you will
    likely bang the barrier on the inside of the turn, which is
    set rather close to the pavement.  Indianapolis Curve is
    marked by bright red lights.
    
    Turn 19 (Arnage Curve): After a very brief straightaway, this
    is a right-hand right-angle corner.  The trick here is to NOT
    come up to full speed following the Indianapolis Curve, thus
    saving your brakes a little (which is extremely important in
    endurance races).  Do not cut this corner too sharp or you
    will likely bang the barrier on the inside of the turn, which
    is set very close to the pavement.  If you go wide, say
    'Bonjour' (daytime) or 'Bonsoir' (evening/nighttime) to the
    outside barrier.  Likewise, if you carry too much speed over
    the inside rumble strip, countersteer immediately to avoid a
    spin (and that still may not help).  Arnage Curve is marked
    by bright red lights.
    
    Straightaway: This 'straightaway' has four fades (left-right-
    left-right).  After the fourth fade, get ready for the fast-
    approaching Porsche Curve.
    
    'Chicane:' This next segment essentially forms an extra-wide
    right-left-left-right (classic 'bus stop') chicane as it
    leaves the public roads.  Extreme care is required here, as
    the pavement is extremely narrow.
    
       Turn 20 (Porsche Curve): Light braking will likely be
       needed here, although - with a tight racing line - experts
       can probably blast through here at top speed if not
       encumbered by traffic.  An uphill rise begins here.
    
       Turn 21: The rise crests here as the course turns to the
       left.  The barrier on the left is very close to the
       pavement here.
    
       Turns 22-23: The course elevation drops at Turn 22 as the
       circuit turns to the left, making this corner more
       challenging than it would at first appear.  Turn 23
       follows immediately, turning to the right.  The left-side
       barrier is extremely close to the pavement through these
       two corners.
    
    Turns 24-27 (Prairie): There are four significant semi-
    corners (right-left-right-left) here.  Top speed can be
    carried all the way through Prairie, but only with a flawless
    racing line, else you risk dropping a wheel in the grass and
    slowing yourself down.  On exiting Turn 27, the single yellow
    line marking the Pit Entry begins on the right; often, even
    the computer-controlled cars which are not going to Pit Lane
    will be straddling or driving to the right of this Pit Lane
    Line.
    
    Turns 28-31 (White House): These tight left-right-left-right
    S-curves are the finale of a rather lengthy lap of the Le
    Mans circuit.  The pavement here is extremely narrow, making
    safe passing impossible; if any passing is to be done here,
    it is only by ramming another car off the pavement and into
    the kitty litter.  The entire area is surrounded by massive
    sand traps, so if you slip off the pavement, you will be
    slowed almost to a snail's crawl, losing valuable time and
    allowing those behind you to pass with the greatest of ease.
    A VERY brief straightaway separates the first left-right
    combination from the second.  Note that to keep your time in
    this section to a minimum, you will need to make use of the
    rumble strips on the inside of each corner; however, if you
    come through ANY corner of White House carrying too much
    speed (especially in wet racing conditions), the car will
    bounce severely and perhaps spin or slide out into the kitty
    litter.
    
    Pit Entry: Just like White House, Pit Entry is a double-
    chicane, so severe braking is required before reaching the
    first corner.  Pit Entry is also surrounded by sand traps,
    and the outside of the second corner of the double-chicane
    has a barrier to protect cars in Pit Entry from out-of-
    control cars sliding off the main circuit.
    
    ==============================================
    
    CIRCUIT DETAILS: TEST COURSE (BUGATTI)
    The Test Course in Test Drive: Le Mans is actually the real-
    world Bugatti Circuit, the permanent section of the Le Mans
    Circuit.  Bugatti is a rather technical circuit, so top-end
    speed is generally not the best way to set up a car here.
    Those familiar with the Nevers Magny-Cours F1 circuit will
    certainly appreciate its similarity to the four semi-parallel
    straightaways on the first half of the Bugatti circuit.
    
    Turn 1 (Dunlop Curve): This is a rather nice right-hand fade
    which can be taken flat-out.  However, it may be a good idea
    to begin braking for Dunlop Chicane when exiting Dunlop
    Curve.  An elevation change begins here.
    
    Turns 2-4 (Dunlop Chicane): Given the continual upward slope
    through Dunlop Chicane, it is extremely easy to slip off the
    pavement on either side of the circuitŠ and both sides are
    filled with plenty of kitty litter.  Braking well before
    entering the Dunlop Chicane is of UTMOST importance as the
    corners of the chicane are rather tight.  At the beginning of
    a race, all the traffic can make this segment even more
    treacherous than it would be normally.
    
    Semi-parallel Straightaways: These four semi-parallel
    straightaways can produce an unexpected aural effect.  Once
    traffic stretches out all around the circuit, whenever you
    are on the middle straightaways, you will almost certainly
    hear cars speeding past you on the straightaways to either
    side of you.
    
       Straightaway: The significant hill crests as you pass
       underneath the big Dunlop tire.
    
       Turn 5 (Chapel): This is a rather tight right-hand hairpin
       which will require moderate breaking on entrance.  Chapel
       begins immediately after passing the tall Ferris Wheel on
       the left.
    
       Turn 6 (Museum Curve): This is a wide left-hand hairpin
       with an extensive sand trap to the outside of the
       pavement.  Of the three consecutive hairpins, this is by
       far the easiest to handle, allowing for most cars to still
       carry some considerable speed through the hairpin, but
       braking is still required before entry.
    
       Turn 7 (Green Garage): Yet another tight right-hand
       hairpin requiring harsh braking.  If you miss your braking
       zone, you will find yourself beached in the kitty litter
       to the outside of the hairpin.
    
    Turns 8-9 (Ox Way S): Hard braking is required here after the
    fourth of the semi-parallel straightaways.   Beware the sand
    traps to the outside of each corner, and make sure not to
    overcompensate and roll through the grass on the inside of
    the corners.  Turn 8 begins immediately after passing
    underneath the Bridgestone bridge.
    
    Turns 10-11 (Blues S): Brake early or Turn 10 will have you
    either out in the kitty litter or spinning around in the
    middle of the pavement.  The right-handed Turn 10 is rather
    straightforward.
    
    Turns 12-13 (Connection): Pit Entry is to the right
    immediately before entering Connection, so beware of slower
    cars here.  The Connection complex is extremely complex, as
    the final chicanes and the Pit Entry of the Le Mans course
    rejoin the Bugatti course here.  Just make two right-hand,
    ninety-degree turns at a moderate pace (likely making good
    use of the rumble strips) and you will soon find yourself
    safely back on the Pit Straight.  The pavement here is
    extremely narrow, making safe passing impossible; if any
    passing is to be done here, it is only by ramming another car
    off the pavement and into the kitty litter.
    
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    latest version will always be immediately available at
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