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    FAQ by GG6

    Version: Final | Updated: 01/24/09 | Search Guide | Bookmark Guide

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    O===========================================================O
    |                                                           |
    |                    Luke’s RPG Maker 3                     |
    |                    Help/Strategy Guide                    |
    |                Started On: October 3, 2008                |
    |              Release Date: October 13, 2008               |
    |                 Author: Luke (GoalieGuy6)                 |
    |                                                           |
    O===========================================================O
    
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                     Table of Contents                     |
    O===========================================================O
    
    In order to help find what you are looking for in this guide, 
    I have implemented a CTRL+F system. If you do not know what 
    this is, hold CTRL, and then press F.  A box should pop up, 
    where you just have to type in the code in parentheses after 
    the section you are looking for, then click find.
    
    A. Introduction.........................................(A00)
    B. Version History......................................(B00)
    C. Game Information.....................................(C00)
    D. Title Screen.........................................(D00)
       1. Edit..............................................(D10)
       2. Play..............................................(D20)
       3. Options...........................................(D30)
    E. Playing the Sample Game..............................(E00)
       1. Game Screen.......................................(E10)
       2. Menu..............................................(E20)
       3. Battling..........................................(E30)
          a. Treasure Screen................................(E3a)
    F. Editors..............................................(F00)
       1. The World.........................................(F10)
          a. Field Editor...................................(F1a)
          b. Town Editor....................................(F1b)
          c. Dungeon Editor.................................(F1c)
          d. Layout Editor..................................(F1d)
       2. Characters & Items................................(F20)
          a. Classes........................................(F2a)
          b. People.........................................(F2b)
          c. Monsters.......................................(F2c)
          d. Monster Parties................................(F2d)
          e. Items..........................................(F2e)
       3. Story and Rules...................................(F30)
          a. Storyteller Editor.............................(F3a)
          b. Events.........................................(F3b)
          c. Story Settings.................................(F3c)
          d. Playtest.......................................(F3d)
       4. Data management...................................(F40)
          a. Load...........................................(F4a)
          b. Save...........................................(F4b)
          c. Database.......................................(F4c)
    G. The World............................................(G00)
       1. Field Editor......................................(G10)
       2. Town Editor.......................................(G20)
       3. Dungeon Editor....................................(G30)
       4. Layout Editor.....................................(G40)
    H. Characters & Items...................................(H00)
       1. Classes...........................................(H10)
       2. People............................................(H20)
       3. Monsters..........................................(H30)
       4. Monster Parties...................................(H40)
       5. Items.............................................(H50)
    I. Story and Rules......................................(I00)
       1. Storyteller Editor................................(I10)
       2. Events............................................(I20)
       3. Story Settings....................................(I30)
       4. Playtest..........................................(I40)
    J. Data Management......................................(J00)
       1. Load..............................................(J10)
       2. Save..............................................(J20)
       3. Database..........................................(J30)
    K. Events...............................................(K00)
       1. Modes.............................................(K10)
       2. Events............................................(K20)
          a. Display........................................(K2a)
          b. Control........................................(K2b)
          c. Property Control...............................(K2c)
          d. Party Control..................................(K2d)
          e. Effects........................................(K2e)
    L. Secrets/Tips & Hints.................................(L00)
       1. Extra Game Space..................................(L10)
       2. Weapon Equip Trick................................(L20)
       3. Reputation System.................................(L30)
       4. Creating Secret Areas.............................(L40)
       5. Larger Towns/Cities.*NEW*.........................(L50)
    M. Additional Game Mechanics............................(M00)
       1. Playtesting/Debug Menu............................(M10)
       2. Field Creation Editor.............................(M20)
       3. Dungeon Creation Editor...........................(M30)
       4. Special Editor Access.............................(M40)
          a. Building Editor................................(M4a)
          b. Decoration Editor..............................(M4b)
          c. Save Point Editor..............................(M4c)
          d. Special Skill Editor...........................(M4d)
       5. Creating A Good Game..............................(M50)
          a. Create A Main Character........................(M5a)
          b. Create Partners................................(M5b)
          c. Create A Bad Guy...............................(M5c)
          d. Write A Storyline..............................(M5d)
          e. Design The World...............................(M5e)
          f. Create Enemies.................................(M5f)
          g. Creating NPCs..................................(M5g)
          h. Create Items...................................(M5h)
          i. Create Events..................................(M5i)
          j. Layout Editor..................................(M5j)
          k. Game Settings..................................(M5k)
          l. Test Play......................................(M5l)
       6. Experience Table..................................(M60)
    N. Contact Info.........................................(N00)
    O. Credits..............................................(O00)
    P. Cool Stuff To Know About This Guide..................(P00)
    Q. References/Resources.................................(Q00)
    R. Copyright/Legal Info.................................(R00)
    S. Need More Help?.*NEW*................................(S00)
     
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                       Introduction                  (A00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    Welcome to my RPG Maker 3 FAQ/Strategy Guide, your full 
    resource to the world of RPG Maker 3.  Included in this guide 
    is help with every category, from playing someone’s game, 
    down to every last script.  If you wish to use this guide, 
    you may print it, but it may not be printed for any other 
    use, as is stated in the copyright info.  I think RPG Maker 3 
    (here on out known as RPGM3) is a great game for any young 
    designer, regardless of the E-10 rating.  This guide is great 
    for anybody who has any trouble understanding any part of the 
    game.  Without further ado, I present the actual guide.
     
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                      Version History                (B00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    New To The Guide
    
    Version 1.6
     -Added Larger Towns Trick
     -Added A "Need More Help?" Section
    
    Version 1.5
     -Added EXP Table
     -All New Features Now Say *NEW* in The Table of Contents.
    
    Version 1.4
     -Added Extra Game Space/Weapon Equip Trick
    
    Version 1.3
     -Added Secrets/Tips & Hints
    
    Version 1.2
     -Added Creating A Good Game
    
    Version 1.1
     -Added Debug Menu
     -Added Events
    
    Version 1.0
     -First Version
    
    Soon to Come
     -Dear Brave Heart Walkthrough
     -More information and help with events, variables, etc.
     -More Tips and Tricks
    
    Guide Length Milestones
     -Reached   6,000  Words on.................December 20, 2008
     -Reached  10,000  Words on.................December 23, 2008
     -Reached  14,000  Words on.................December 26, 2008
     -Reached  18,000  Words on.................December 28, 2008
     -Reached  40,000  Total Characters on......December 21, 2008
     -Reached  80,000  Total Characters on......December 24, 2008
     -Reached 120,000  Total Characters on......December 27, 2008
     -Reached   6,000  Spaces on................December 21, 2008
     -Reached  12,000  Spaces on................December 23, 2008
     -Reached  18,000  Spaces on................December 25, 2008
     -Reached  24,000  Spaces on................December 28, 2008
     -Reached  30,000  Spaces on................January  17, 2009
     -Reached   1,200  Lines on.................December 21, 2008
     -Reached   2,000  Lines on.................December 26, 2008
     -Reached   2,800  Lines on.................December 29, 2008
    
    Version Dates
     -December 16, 2008 – Version 1.0 Began
     -December 21, 2008 – Version 1.0 Completed
     -December 22, 2008 – Version 1.1 Began
     -December 24, 2008 – Version 1.1 Completed
     -December 26, 2008 – Version 1.2 Began
     -December 28, 2008 – Version 1.2 Completed
     -December 30, 2008 – Version 1.3 Began
     -January  1,  2009 – Version 1.3 Completed
     -January  4,  2009 – Version 1.4 Began
     -January  6,  2009 – Version 1.4 Completed
     -January  16, 2009 – Version 1.5 Began
     -January  22, 2009 – Version 1.5 Completed
     -January  24, 2009 - Version 1.6 Began
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                     Game Information                (C00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    Platform: PlayStation2
    Developer: Agetec Inc.
    Players: 1
    ESRB Rating: E-10
    
    Game Description: RPG Maker 3 is a great game for young 
    designers.  It is easy for almost anyone to create a game, 
    and all you must provide is your ideas.  Included is some 
    sample data, which you are free to use however you wish, and a 
    sample game you may want to try before you start creating, so 
    you can see what RPGM3 is capable of.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                       Title Screen                  (D00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    Whenever you start up RPGM3, you will be taken to the title 
    screen.  From here, you can choose 1 of 3 different options.  
    These options are edit, play, and options, each of which is 
    explained in further detail below.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                    Edit               (D10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    This is the button you will select most if you are creating a 
    game.  It will take you to the editor screen, which is 
    explained later on in the guide.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                    Play               (D20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    This is the option you should choose if you want to play 
    either your game, someone else’s game, or the sample game.  
    When you press play, you will have the option to load a game 
    you or someone else has created from a memory card, or you 
    can choose to play the sample game, Dear Brave Heart.  When 
    you choose the game to play, you will be given the option to 
    start or continue.  Choose start to create a new game, or 
    continue to load a previously saved game.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                   Options             (D30) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    You will probably only use the option once or twice.  When 
    you press options, you will be taken to the options menu, 
    where you can change various things.  All the options in the 
    menu are listed below, along with what they do.
    
    BGM Volume – This option allows you to change the volume of 
    the background music in the editor.
    SFX Volume – This option allows you to change the volume of 
    the sound effects in the editor.
    Editor Background – This option allows you to change the 
    background in the editor.
    Editor BGM – This option allows you to change the background 
    music for the editor.
    HDD Install – This lets you install RPGM3 data to the 
    internal hard disk drive.
    HDD Uninstall – This lets you uninstall RPGM3 data to the 
    internal hard disk drive.
    Reset Database – Deletes all data from the currently loaded 
    database.  You will not be able to recover deleted data.
    Credits – This shows you the developer credits.
    String Input Type – This allows you to change what the 
    keyboard looks like when you are typing things in.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                  Playing the Sample Game            (E00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    Before you jump in and start creating your own RPG, it would 
    be a good idea to play the sample game “Dear Brave Heart”.  
    This gives you an idea of what your game will look like when 
    it is done, and allows you to see what RPGM3 is capable of 
    making.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                 Game Screen           (E10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When playing a game created with RPGM3, you will see a few 
    things on the game screen.  In the center is your character, 
    controlled with the left analog stick.  On the top left, you 
    will see the name of the region/map you are currently in.  
    The compass in the top right shows you which way your 
    character is currently facing.  Next to the compass the 
    current time in the game is displayed, indicated by position 
    of the sun/moon.  When you approach an object or character 
    that has an event attached to it, a yellow exclamation point 
    will appear below the time indicator.  Press X to trigger the 
    event.  In order to save your game, you need to find a save 
    point, which can be found anywhere depending on where the 
    game creator decided to put them.  There are 3 save slots to 
    choose from, so up to 3 people can be playing the same game 
    at a time.  If you are in a field map, you can simply choose 
    the save option in the configuration menu to save.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                    Menu               (E20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    To access the menu during gameplay, press the [] button.  
    The menu displays various information for each character in 
    your party.  You can view status information, items, skills, 
    formation, and the configuration screen.  Under status, you 
    can see your characters current stats, such as hitpoints, 
    strength and defense attributes, race, class, exp, etc.  
    Under items you can choose to use an item, equip or unequip 
    an item.  Equipped items have an “E” to the left of them.  
    You can also give an item to another member of your party, or 
    discard an item.  Under skills you can view the skills your 
    character has learned, and use them if applicable.  Formation 
    lets you view your party’s formation, along with the ability 
    to change the current leader.  You can move characters by 
    selecting them with X, and moving them with the left analog 
    stick or d-pad.  Characters in front get attacked more often, 
    but characters in the back need a ranged weapon to attack.  
    In the configuration menu, you have the following options.
    
    BGM Volume - Change the volume of the background music.
    SFX Volume - Change the volume of the sound effects.
    Save - Lets you save your game. (This is only available if 
    you are on a field map.)
    Return to Title Screen - Quits the game and takes you back to 
    the title screen.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                  Battling             (E30) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When you enter a battle, your game screen will change.  You 
    will have a broad view of your party and the monster party.  
    In the top-left is still displayed the name of the map/region 
    you are in.  At the bottom of the screen your party is 
    located, whereas the monster party is at the top of the 
    screen.  At the bottom-right of the screen your party’s info 
    is displayed.
    
    On your turn, you will have a menu which you can choose 
    different actions from.  Use the d-pad to select an option, 
    and press X to choose that option.  The options, along with 
    what they do, are listed below.
    
    Attack – Allows your character to make a direct attack.  You 
    must choose an enemy to attack, and that enemy must be in the 
    first row unless your character has a ranged weapon.
    Defense – This option makes your character go into defensive 
    mode, which can reduce the amount of damage your character 
    takes from enemy attacks.
    Use Items – This allows you to use an item you have in your 
    inventory.  Depending on what the item does, you may have to 
    choose a target.
    Use Skills – This allows you to use any skill your character 
    has learned, as long as you have enough MP/HP.  You will 
    usually have to choose a target.
    Escape – This is the option you choose to run away from the 
    battle.  Depending on some character stats, your chances of 
    escaping varies.  Also, if you are in a battle that occurred 
    in a special event, you will not have the option to escape.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |           Treasure Screen      (E3a) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    After you either open a treasure chest, or win a battle, you 
    will come to the treasure screen.  The treasure screen gives 
    you any gold, experience, and/or items that you earned.  If a 
    character receiving an item does not have enough room in 
    their inventory for the item, you will have to rearrange some 
    items, and possibly discard some.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                          Editors                    (F00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    If you can’t figure out how to use the editors, you can’t 
    make a game period.  The editors are what are used to create 
    everything in your game.  There are various different editors 
    you can use, but there are also a lot of options you must use 
    in every editor, which are explained below.
    
    Text Input
    Every editor has a text input somewhere, whether it is for a 
    name or description, or some other thing.  When you select a 
    text box, you will come to the keyboard.  Move the cursor 
    with the d-pad, and select a character with X.  Press 
    triangle to delete the character to the right of the cursor.  
    Press [] for backspace, and L3 for a space.  Move the text 
    cursor by holding down R1, and using the d-pad.
    
    Number Input
    A lot of editors also require you to input numbers, whether 
    it’s for item stats, prices, etc.  The number input box is 
    simple.  Just select the number to change with X, and use the 
    d-pad to change the values.
    
    Data List
    When you choose an editor, you will be brought to a screen 
    with a list of all the data you have created in this editor.  
    Press X on a blank spot to create new data, or load sample 
    data.  You can also change the order of the list.  Press X on 
    some data to edit, delete, or make a copy of the selected 
    data.  
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                  The World            (F10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    The World is basically everywhere your character will go in 
    your game.  Here you will create all your landscapes, such as 
    a world, town, or dungeon.  The layout editor is used to 
    place objects in your maps, such as placing buildings in a 
    town, towns in a world, characters in buildings, etc.  Your 4 
    options here are field editor, town editor, dungeon editor, 
    and layout editor.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |             Field Editor       (F1a) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Of all the map editors, you will most likely spend the least 
    time in the field editor.  I used it once or twice during the 
    process of making my game, and although I didn’t use it much, 
    creating a good field is a lengthy process.  Explained in 
    more detail later on, the field editor is mostly used for 
    creating large regions such as continents, countries, or even 
    different planets for some games.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |             Town Editor        (F1b) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    You will probably be spending a fair amount of time in the 
    town editor, depending on the size of your game.  I 
    definitely spent a fair amount of time in the town editor, 
    but fortunately the process for creating a town is not too 
    long.  You could arguably spend less time in the town editor 
    than the field editor, depending on how long you much time 
    you put into making fields, but you probably won’t be 
    spending too much time here either.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |            Dungeon Editor      (F1c) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Other than the layout editor, the dungeon editor is probably 
    the most used.  A good game on RPGM3 usually has at least 5 
    or 6 dungeons, each with their own distinct properties that 
    make the game good.  When you use the dungeon editor, it is 
    good to think about things such as what level your player 
    will be around when they enter this dungeon, so you can set 
    up things such as trap damage.  Mastery of the dungeon editor 
    is not required, but most good games have many great dungeons 
    in them.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |            Layout Editor       (F1d) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    The layout editor is definitely the editor you will spend 
    most of your time in.  The layout editor is where you place 
    everything in your fields, towns, dungeons, and buildings.  
    You will use the layout editor to place dungeons and towns on 
    field maps, place people and events in dungeons, buildings in 
    towns, and even people in buildings.  You should definitely 
    learn how to use the layout editor as early as possible.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |             Characters & Items        (F20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Characters and Items are what can make or break an RPG.  Even 
    if the gameplay and graphics aren’t that great, when you have 
    characters that make the storyline good, and items that can 
    enhance the player’s experience, such as a key to a secret 
    gallery.  If you don’t have any characters in your game, why 
    even bother calling it an RPG?  Take note that you will be 
    spending a lot of time in this sections if you want to make a 
    good RPG.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |               Classes          (F2a) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Agetec’s description of classes in the instruction manual:
    
    “In RPG Maker 3, characters can have certain occupational 
    classes, which confer certain skills and benefits on them.  
    In the Class Editor, you may create these occupational 
    classes.  For each occupation you can set options such as 
    stats, fighting techniques, and magical abilities for use 
    in-battle.”
    
    Note: The above was taken from the RPG Maker 3 manual.
    
    Basically what they are saying is that classes are like jobs.  
    You can create many different classes, and assign each one a 
    character model.  Along with the ability to create different 
    appearances for each class, you can give each class special 
    abilities, and set a level for a character of that class to 
    learn the skill at.  It is not absolutely necessary to use 
    classes in your RPG, but they definitely make it better.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |                People          (F2b) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    People are what make up the base of a good RPG.  Without 
    people, your game couldn’t even be called an RPG...  The 
    point is, you need to learn how to use this editor 
    effectively.  People make up the basis of your entire game.  
    They give the main character quests, important information, 
    and basically run the entire storyline.  It is impossible for 
    you to create a good RPG without using this editor.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |               Monsters         (F2c) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Although your RPG doesn’t need them, most RPGs have them.  
    Monsters are what players usually use to gain experience.  
    Throughout a good RPG, a game creator places various bosses 
    for the player to fight, along with random monster encounters 
    in most games.  Monsters should be created based on what you 
    think the player’s stats will be at the time they fight the 
    monster.  A monster system that is not balanced well with 
    player stats can easily ruin a perfectly good RPG for the 
    character.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |           Monster Parties      (F2d) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Monster parties are basically groups of monsters.  In order 
    to have battles in your game, you need to create monster 
    parties for the player to fight.  Even if you have monsters, 
    there can’t be a fight without a monster party.  You can 
    place up to 4 different monsters in a party, and you have the 
    ability to place them however you want.  You can place a 
    monster in the back so the player needs a ranged weapon to 
    attack it, or in the front so it can make direct attacks.  
    When you place your monsters in a party, you need to set 
    their levels.  You can also set items for monster parties to 
    drop upon being defeated, and set the probability of that 
    item being dropped.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |                Items           (F2e) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Without items, you can’t have a good RPG.  Most RPGs will 
    have the same generic items, such as weapons, armor, and 
    potions.  Although these items are good to include in your 
    game, and you probably should have a variety of these items, 
    it is also good to place unique items in your games.  For 
    example, in one of my RPGM3 games, I made a secret key the 
    player would receive from a random NPC, which gave the player 
    access to a special gallery full of treasure chests that gave 
    super items to the character.  If you really want to make a 
    great RPG, I suggest coming up with some original ideas for 
    items.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |               Story and Rules         (F30) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    The story and rules section is where you can do various 
    things regarding your storyline, such as creating the 
    cutscenes that appear throughout your game.  You can also set 
    the settings for your story, such as the main character’s 
    starting location, the party’s starting gold, and your game 
    name and author.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |          Storyteller Editor    (F3a) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    The storyteller editor is where you create all the cutscenes 
    that appear periodically throughout most RPGs.  This editor 
    is hard to use, and takes a while to master.  Although it 
    isn’t necessary to use the storyteller editor, it is good to 
    use once you learn how, since it really helps along the 
    storyline, especially to create a beginning and ending to 
    your story.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |                Events          (F3b) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Events are what control literally everything that happens in 
    your game.  If you can’t figure out how to use events, even 
    after reading help guides, then you might as well give up, or 
    find someone who does know how to use them.  Events are what 
    makes characters talk, give the player quests, and change 
    things in the game such as weather, time of day, etc.  My 
    advice is to learn how to code events as early as possible.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |            Story Settings      (F3c) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    The story settings basically set up how the player starts out 
    in the world of your RPG.  You can set up a starting location 
    here, starting gold, and enter a story name and author.  You 
    can also choose whether or not to apply a lens flare effect 
    here.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |               Playtest         (F3d) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Playtesting is basically just running a test of your game, 
    with a few exceptions.  For example, during a playtest, you 
    have access to the debug menu, which you can use to edit 
    variables, change your location, give yourself items, edit 
    stats, etc.  In playtest mode you can also speed up time.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |               Data Management         (F40) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    The data management section is where you can save your game 
    database, load a game database, or view the database.  I 
    really don’t spend much time here, and generally only go into 
    data management to save and load databases.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |                 Load           (F4a) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    This is just what it says.  Use the load function to load a 
    database from a memory card.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |                 Save           (F4b) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Use the save function to save your current database to the 
    memory card.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |               Database         (F4c) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Here you can view your entire game database.  It shows you 
    everything you have created, from fields, all the way down to 
    every last item.  I generally don’t use this often, except 
    every once in a while to see how much space I have used up 
    total, so I can get an idea of how much room I have to work 
    with.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                         The World                   (G00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    The World is where you will create everywhere your player 
    will be going in your game.  You create every place here, 
    regardless of whether or not it is a city, a dungeon, a 
    building, a continent, country, planet, etc.  When you select 
    the world, you will get four options.  These four options are 
    as follows:
    
    Field Editor – Allows you to create large landscapes to place 
    towns and dungeons on.  Used to create large regions like 
    countries or continents.
    
    Town Editor – Allows you to create a town by selecting from a 
    few different models.  Used to create any town such as a 
    small village, large city, or anywhere in between.
    
    Dungeon Editor – Allows you to create a dungeon manually.  
    Dungeon is just a generic name, since really you can use the 
    dungeon editor to make whatever you want, such as a cave, or 
    inside a tower, or even a town, although you can’t place 
    buildings in a dungeon.
    
    Layout Editor – Allows you to place objects on your fields, 
    towns, dungeons, and in buildings.  Used to place everything 
    in your game, such as characters, buildings, decorations, 
    dungeons, events, etc.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                Field Editor           (G10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When you select field editor, you will be taken to your field 
    database.  Although it gives you a lot of slots to create 
    fields in, you will probably use less than 3 for your first 
    game.  When you select an empty slot, you will create a new 
    field.  When you get into the editor, you will see a screen 
    with a few textboxes, along with a few options and a map on 
    the right.  All your options are as follows:
    
    Name – Type in a name for your field. (this will be displayed 
    to the player)
    Description – Type in a description for your field.  I 
    generally use this option to write a note to myself since the 
    player won’t see this.
    Create Field – Press this button to create a new field, or 
    edit the field you already have.
    Load Map – This gives you the option to load a premade sample 
    field.  Beware, if you want to create your own map, making a 
    *good* map is a lengthy process.
    Field Preview – This lets you preview your field as the 
    player would see it.  Just select a spot on the field, and 
    you will appear there.  Note: The red areas when you select 
    this are areas the player cannot go in.
    Map – Below the field preview button is a map of your field.
    
    After you are done with those, press R1 to move to the next 
    page.  On the next page, you will find the following options:
    
    Background Music – Set the music that will play in the 
    background when the player is on this field.
    Climate – Set the climate for your field.  Take note that 
    this affects how far the player can see ahead of them.
    Season – Set the season for your field.  This affects what 
    the environment looks like.
    Time – Set the time of day on your field.  This also affects 
    how the environment looks.
    Weather – Set the weather on your field.  This option will 
    also change how the environment looks.
    NOTE: The default settings for season, time, and weather are 
    spring for season, morning for time, and sunny for weather.  
    If you set any to default, they will change by themselves 
    with the game clock.
    Field Background – Turn the field background on or off.
    Field Elevation – Set the elevation for your map.
    Allow/Suppress Magic – Set whether or not the player can use 
    magic on this field.  (This applies to battles on this field 
    too.)
    Amount of Trees – Set how many trees will appear in forest 
    areas of your field.
    
    Now, go to the third and final screen of the field editor by 
    pressing R1.  The options on the third page are:
    
    Terrain – Select the type of terrain to edit monster 
    encounters on.  Note: You can have different monster 
    encounter settings for each terrain on your field by 
    selecting each type of terrain from this list and changing 
    the settings.
    Random Encounter Rate – Set the probability of a monster 
    encounter for the player.  This can change for each type of 
    terrain on your field.  (This works well for making a fire 
    monster appear more often on lava terrain than on grass 
    terrain, and other things like that.)
    Monster Parties – Set up which monster parties the player 
    will encounter on each terrain type.  (Again, this works well 
    for making grass monsters appear on grass, but not on lava.)
    
    After you finish with the encounter settings, you can press O 
    to leave the field editor.
    NOTE: How to create a field will be explained later on, in 
    the Additional Game Mechanics section of the guide.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                 Town Editor           (G20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When you select Town Editor, you will be taken to the town 
    database.  You will probably be making a fair amount of towns 
    for an average size game, but we probably won’t be filling up 
    the town database just yet...  Now, when you select an empty 
    slot, you will be able to create a new town, or to load a 
    premade sample.  Creating a new town doesn’t take too long, 
    but you can load a premade sample if you’re feeling rather 
    lazy.  When you open up the town editor, you will have the 
    following options on page 1.
    
    Size – This cannot be changed.  It simply shows the size of 
    your town.  You determine the size when you select what type 
    of town you want to make.
    Name – Create a name for your town. (This will be displayed 
    to the player.)
    Description – Write a short description of the town, or 
    simply a note to yourself to remember what the town is for.  
    (The player will not see the description.)
    Graphic Type – Select a graphic to represent your town on the 
    field map.  (This is what the town looks like from the 
    outside, not the inside.)
    Graphic Preview – This displays the graphic you chose for 
    your town.  Once you select it, you can use the right analog 
    stick to rotate the preview.
    
    Move on to page 2 when you’re ready, which has the following:
    
    Background Music – Select the background music you want to 
    play while the player is in this town.
    Castle Background Music – Select the background music you 
    want to play while the player is in the town’s castle.  (This 
    option only shows up for towns with castles in them.)
    Allow/Suppress Magic – Set whether or not the player is 
    allowed to use magic in your town.
    Season – Choose what season it is while the player is in your 
    town.
    Time of Day – Choose what time of day it is while the player 
    is in your town.
    Weather – Select the weather in your town.
    Field Map Name – This cannot be changed, it simply displays 
    the name of the field the town is in.  (It will say none if 
    you haven’t placed the town on a field yet.)
    
    Now, move on to page 3, which gives you the following:
    
    Initial Entry Setting – Choose whether or not the player is 
    allowed to enter this town at the start of the game.  (This 
    can be changed at any time through an event code.)
    Message – Set a message for the player to receive if they try 
    to enter the town when they are not allowed.
    
    You can only get to page 4 if your town has a castle.  Page 4 
    displays the following:
    
    Initial Entry Setting – Set what time of day the player can 
    enter the town’s castle at.  (This can be changed at any time 
    through an event code.)
    Message – Set the message for the player to receive if they 
    try to enter the castle when they are not allowed.
    
    The following page is also only for towns with castles.  It 
    gives these options:
    
    Preview Town - Preview what your town looks like.  Choose a 
    starting point and you will be inserted into the town as if 
    you were a player.
    Preview Castle – Inserts you into the castle as if you were a 
    player.
    How to Use Open Land – Choose how you want to use the town’s 
    extra land.  You can choose from three different landing pads 
    graphics, which allow the player to go to a town of your 
    choice, or you can simply make an open space.
    Destination – Set the town this transport ship will take the 
    player to.
    Cost – Set the cost for the player to use the transport ship.
    
    After you’re done with this editor, you can press O to leave 
    it.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |               Dungeon Editor          (G30) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    In RPGM3, dungeon is just a generic name.  You can really 
    use this editor to create anything you want, such as a cave, 
    inside a tower, or even a town.  (Take note that you can’t 
    place buildings in a dungeon, but you can set up events that 
    act like doors and teleport you into a building, or even 
    another dungeon.)  Basically what I’m saying is that you can 
    use the dungeon editor to create anything you can imagine.  
    Really, it’s possible to create an entire game without using 
    the town or field editors!  Now, when you open up the dungeon 
    editor, you have the following options:
    
    Name – Set a name for your dungeon.  (This will be displayed 
    to the player.)
    Description – Write a description of the dungeon.  (This will 
    not be displayed to the player.)
    Create Dungeon – Takes you into the dungeon creation editor, 
    which is explained with detail under the additional game 
    mechanics section.
    Graphic Type – Set the graphic for your dungeon.  (This is 
    what it looks like from the outside.)
    Graphic Preview – This displays your dungeon graphic.  Rotate 
    it with the right analog stick.
    
    On page 2, you should see the following:
    
    Background Music – Set the background music to play in your 
    dungeon.
    Allow/Suppress Magic – Set whether or not the player can use 
    magic in your dungeon.
    Type of Dungeon – Select a dungeon type.  (This affects how 
    your dungeon looks on the inside.)
    Internal Lighting – Set the lighting inside the dungeon.  
    (This affects how you see things inside the dungeon.)
    Ceiling Height – Set how high or low the ceiling is in your 
    dungeon.  (This affects the way the dungeon looks, but 
    doesn’t affect anything majorly.)
    Dungeon Name – This just displays the name of your dungeon.
    Secret Door – Allows you to choose a secret door for your 
    dungeon.  In order to use this option, you must place a 
    secret door in your dungeon, and place a secret door option 
    on a field map.
    Dungeon Preview – Allows you to preview your dungeon, by 
    placing you in it as a player at a selected point.
    
    On page 3, you will find the following encounter settings:
    
    Floor – Select what floor you want to edit monster encounters 
    on.  (You can have different settings for each floor of your 
    dungeon.)
    Probability – Select how often the player will encounter your 
    selected monster parties on the selected floor.
    Monster Parties – Select up to four monster parties for the 
    player to encounter on the selected floor of the dungeon.
    
    On page 4, you find the trap settings.  It shows a trap name, 
    then you set the damage the party takes when they trigger 
    that type of trap in your damage.  It is wise to take into 
    account when the player will enter this dungeon in your game, 
    so you can adjust trap damage accordingly.
    
    After you are done with your dungeon, press O to exit the 
    editor.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                Layout Editor          (G40) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    The layout editor is probably will you will spend most of 
    your time in the world section.  When you open up the layout 
    editor, you will see a database, which displays every field, 
    town, dungeon, and building you have created.  When you 
    select one, you will be taken into the layout editor.  Once 
    in the layout editor, you must use the following controls to 
    place objects:
     ___________________________________________________________
    |           | When Placing Objects   | When Moving Objects  |
    |-----------|------------------------|----------------------|
    |X Button   | Place Object           | Confirm Movement     |
    |O Button   | Cancel                 | Cancel               |
    |L1 Button  | Switch Objects         | Turn Object Left     |
    |L2 Button  | None                   | Change Object Height |
    |R1 Button  | Switch Objects         | Turn Object Right    |
    |R2 Button  | None                   | Change Object Height |
    |SELECT     | Display Operation List | None                 |
    |L Analog   | Move Cursor            | Move Object          |
    |R Analog   | None                   | Turn Object          |
    |L3 Button  | Zoom In                | Zoom In              |
    |R3 Button  | Zoom Out               | Zoom Out             |
    
    When you press X to place an object, you will have a few 
    options, depending on what you are editing.  Selecting an 
    object with X will give you the option to move, edit, copy, 
    or delete the object.  Special Editor Access through the 
    layout editor is explained later on under the Additional Game 
    Mechanics section.
    
    The chart below shows what type of objects you can place in 
    each map with the layout editor.  An X indicates that you can 
    place that object in the specified map.
    
     ___________________________________________________
    |               | Field | Town | Dungeon | Building |
    |---------------|-------|------|---------|----------|
    |Character      |       |  X   |    X    |     X    |
    |Town           |   X   |      |         |          |
    |Dungeon        |   X   |      |         |          |
    |Building       |       |  X   |         |          |
    |Standard Event |   X   |  X   |    X    |     X    |
    |Save Point     |   X   |  X   |    X    |     X    |
    |Warp Point     |   X   |  X   |    X    |     X    |
    |Treasure Chest |       |  X   |    X    |     X    |
    |Decoration     |   X   |  X   |    X    |     X    |
    |Secret Door    |   X   |      |         |          |
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                    Characters & Items               (H00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    Characters are what make up the basis of an RPG.  Without 
    characters to help move your storyline along, I doubt your 
    game could even be called an RPG.  Items are also one of the 
    main components in a basic RPG.  As a matter of fact, even 
    the most basic RPGs make use of items throughout the story.  
    As I like to say, characters can either make or 
    break your RPG.  What this means is that even if your RPG has 
    great gameplay, a great storyline, and has very good ideas in 
    it, if you don’t have characters to help the player in your 
    game, you might as well not make it.  The same can also be 
    said for items, although having bad items can’t really ruin a 
    good game.  But, on the contrary, having good items can make 
    any RPG a lot better.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                   Classes             (H10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When you select classes from the characters and items menu, 
    you will be taken to the class database.  When you select a 
    blank slot, you can either create your own class, or load a 
    premade one.  After you choose one of these options, you will 
    have to make another decision.  You can choose to create 
    either a male class, a female class, or an animal class.  The 
    type of class you choose affects the class model.  After you 
    choose one of these class types, you will also have to choose 
    a weapon type for your class to wield.  (You only have to 
    choose a weapon for new classes.)  After you finish, you will 
    be taken into the class editor.  On page 1, you will see the 
    following:
    
    Name – Enter the name of your class.
    Description – Enter a description of your class.
    Gender – Displays the gender of your class.
    Equipment – Displays what type of equipment the class can 
    wield.
    Model Type – Choose a character model for characters of this 
    class.
    Model Colors – Change the colors of the model you selected 
    from 4 preset color themes.
    Model Preview – Preview your character model.  Rotate with 
    the right analog stick.
    
    On page 2, you will see these options:
    
    Base HP – Set the base HP for this character class.  A 
    character’s total HP is determined with the following 
    formula: Base HP + (HP Bonus * Level).
    Stat Bonuses – Set bonuses for each character stat.  The 
    bonus is how much the stat increases when the player levels 
    up.  A list of all the stats and what they do is below.  The 
    formula to determine a stat is: Stat Bonus * Level.
    
    HP – HP is the character’s Hitpoints/Health.  When HP reaches 
    0, the character dies.
    MP – MP is the character’s magic points.  It is required to 
    use magic, and is reduced by a set amount for each spell the 
    player uses.
    STR – STR is the character’s strength.  It affects the damage 
    the player can do with physical attacks.
    AGI – AGI is the character’s agility.  It affects the turn 
    order in battle, and how well the character can dodge 
    attacks.
    MAG – MAG is the character’s magic power.  It affects how 
    strong magic cast by the character is.
    INT – INT is the character’s intelligence.  This is only used 
    for an enemy of this class in battle.
    DEF – DEF is the character’s defense.  It affects how much 
    damage the character takes from physical attacks.
    LUCK – LUCK is the character’s luck level.  It affects how 
    often the character’s attack is a critical hit.
    MDF – MDF is the character’s magic defense.  It affects how 
    much damage the character takes from magical attacks.
    
    Level Up Rate – Choose how quickly a character in this class 
    levels up.  It changes rates by adjusting the amount of exp a 
    character needs to level up.  An exp rate for each level up 
    rate is provided in the tips and hints section of this guide.
    
    On page 3, the following options are provided for you:
    
    Attacks – Select up to 2 special offensive traits for a 
    character of this class to have in battle.
    Defense – Select up to 2 special defensive traits for a 
    character of this class to have in battle.
    Special Traits – Select a special trait for any characters of 
    this class to have.
    Weaknesses – Select a weakness for any characters of this 
    class to have.
    
    On page 4, you have the option to create special skills for 
    characters of this class to have.  The special skill editor 
    is explained further in the Additional Game Mechanics section 
    of this guide.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                   People              (H20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When you select people, you will be taken to your character 
    database.  Of all the databases, I think this is the one that 
    people run out of space with the most.  In the tips and hints 
    section of the guide, I will explain how to gain more space 
    incase you run out of room.  The trick works with any 
    database you need more room in, but is most widely used for 
    the character database.  When you select a blank slot in this 
    database, you will get the option create a new character, or 
    load a premade one, as always.  Then, you will have to choose 
    from either a male character, female character, or an animal.  
    Once you get into the editor, you will see the following on 
    page 1:
    
    Name – Give your character a name.
    Description – Write a description of your character.
    Race – Select the race of your character.  This affects the 
    character in battle, because of the “strong against/weak 
    against whatever” special traits applied to a character 
    class.
    Gender – Select the gender of the character.  This affects 
    the character in battle the same way the race does, and it 
    affects the character model.
    Battle Style – Select a battling style for this character 
    to use in battle.  (This does not apply for characters in the 
    player’s party.)
    Class – Select what class this character is a part of.  (You 
    must first create a class in the class editor.)
    Level – Select what level this character starts out at.
    Stats – Displays all the character’s stats based on the class 
    and starting level you chose.
    
    On page 2, you will find the following graphic settings:
    
    2D Graphic Type – Select a graphic type for the 2D picture.
    2D Graphic Model – Select a model for the 2D picture.
    Character Model – Choose a model for your character.  Note: 
    If you change this from the character’s class model, the 
    character will still appear as the class model in battle, 
    instead of the character model you choose.
    Color Scheme – Select one of four color schemes for your 
    character model.
    Model Preview – Displays the character model.  Rotate with 
    the right analog stick.
    
    On page 3, you can assign items and equipment with these 
    options:
    
    Items – Select up to 10 items for the character to have at 
    the start of the game.  (You must first create items in the 
    item editor.)
    Starting Equipment – Select the starting equipment for the 
    character.  First you must place the item in the character’s 
    inventory above, and make sure the character’s class can 
    equip the selected item.
    
    On page 4, you can assign which special skills the character 
    starts with, based on the character class’s created skills.  
    It is possible to have a character start out with a skill 
    that they wouldn’t normally have at their starting level.
    
    And finally, on page 5, you have the NPC event codes, which 
    are explained in more detail under the Events section.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                  Monsters             (H30) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    The monster editor is used to create all the enemies your 
    player will be fighting, with the exception of character 
    battles.  When you load up the monster editor with either a 
    new or premade monster, you will get to page 1 with the below 
    options:
    
    Name – Create a name for your monster.
    Description – Write a description of your monster.
    Size – Displays the monster size, which you chose when you 
    selected a slot in the database.
    Graphic – Choose a graphic for your monster.  Each size you 
    choose has different graphics.
    Color Scheme – Choose a color scheme for your monster.
    Preview – See a preview of what your monster looks like.  
    Rotate with the right analog stick.
    
    On page 2, you will be able to customize:
    
    Base HP – Set the monster’s Base HP.  Total HP uses the same 
    formula as the total HP from the class section of this guide.
    Stat Bonuses – The same stat bonuses you see in the class 
    editor, which is explained above.
    Gold – Set the amount of gold the player gets for killing 
    this monster.
    Exp – Set the amount of experience the player gets for 
    killing this monster.
    Race – Set the race of the monster, used to determine what 
    races the monster is strong/weak against.
    Gender – Set the gender of the monster, used the same way as 
    the race in battle.
    Battle Style – Set a battle style for this monster.  Affects 
    who and how the monster attacks in a battle.
    
    On page 2, you will see the same special trait settings I 
    described in the class editor.  You can set 2 special 
    offensive traits, 2 special defensive traits, 1 additional 
    special trait, and 1 weakness.
    
    On page 3, you will be able to create special skills for the 
    monster to use in battle.  The special skill editor is 
    described under Additional Game Mechanics.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |               Monster Parties         (H40) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Monster parties are used to create battles between characters 
    and monsters.  After you create a monster, you must put it 
    into a monster party if you want the player to fight it.  You 
    can put up to 4 monsters in a party, as long as they can all 
    fit in the battle grid.  For example, you can only put 1 
    large monster in a party, but you can put up to 4 small 
    monsters in a single party.  On page 1 of the editor, you can 
    find:
    
    Name – Name the monster party.
    Description – Write a description of the monster party.
    Item Drops – Select an item for the monster party to drop 
    upon defeat, and set the probability of the party dropping 
    this item.
    
    On page 2, you will be able to set monsters for the party.
    
    Monsters – Place up to 4 monsters in the party, as long as 
    you can fit them all on the battle grid.
    Monster Level – Select a level for each monster.
    Formation – Allows you to move the monsters in the party on a 
    3 x 3 grid.  The amount of space each monster takes up 
    depends on the monster size.
    Preview – Shows you what the monster party will look like in 
    a battle.
    Stats – Shows you the stats of the selected monster, based on 
    it’s level.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                    Items              (H50) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Items are what I use a lot of the time to personalize my RPG.  
    For example, if you place some super-cool item in your RPG, 
    such as “Super Sword”, which gives the player a lot of super 
    stat bonuses, and can only be unlocked by doing some super 
    secret task, it makes the game a whole lot better for the 
    player.  When you select either new item, or premade sample, 
    you must select what type of item you want to make, from 
    item, weapon, shield, armor, accessory, or treasure.  Item 
    is something you can create that restores stats, boosts 
    stats, or creates some other special affect.  Treasure items 
    are like keys, and are used for events in the game.  For 
    example, you could create a treasure chest that can only be 
    opened if you have a certain treasure item.  An accessory is 
    an item the character brings into battle, which boosts 
    whatever stats you want.  Once you enter the item editor, you 
    will see the following on page 1:
    
    Name – Create a name for your item.
    Description – Write a description of your item.
    Graphic – Select a graphic for your item.
    Visual Effect – Select a special visual effect for your item, 
    such as a glowing sword.
    Preview – Displays your item graphic.  Rotate with the right 
    analog stick.
    
    On page 2, you will see various things, depending on what 
    type of item it is.  I will list all the options it can show 
    below.
    
    Effect – Select an effect type, and a specific effect.
    Effect Area – Select how many characters the item affects.
    Effect Power – Determine how effective the item is when used.  
    Determines damage for attacking items, and HP recovered for 
    healing items.
    Uses – Set how many times the item can be used before it is 
    destroyed.
    Condition – Set the condition for the item to be used.  (e.g. 
    to create a revival ring that revives the character upon death 
    you would set the condition to on death.)
    Extra Effect – Select an extra effect that happens upon item 
    use.
    Price – Set how much the item costs in stores.  If the item 
    price is set to 0, the character cannot sell or throw it away.  
    This is useful for creating something the character needs to 
    keep for something later in the game.
    Attack Bonus – Set how much the item boosts the character’s 
    attack upon being used/equipped.
    Defense Bonus – Set how much the item boosts the character’s 
    defense upon being used/equipped.
    Stat Bonuses – Set how much the item boosts the character’s 
    additional stats upon being used/equipped.
    Character – Select what characters can equip the item.  The 
    item must first be equippable by the character’s class.
    
    The following chart shows which of the above options are 
    shown for each type of item.  An X means the option will be 
    shown for the designated item type.
    
     ___________________________________________________________
    |Option           |Item |Weapon |Armor |Accessory |Treasure |
    |-----------------|-----|-------|------|----------|---------|
    |Effect           |  X  |       |      |          |         |
    |Effect Area      |  X  |       |      |          |         |
    |Effect Power     |  X  |       |      |          |         |
    |Uses             |  X  |       |      |          |         |
    |Conditions       |  X  |       |      |          |         |
    |Extra Effect     |  X  |   X   |  X   |          |         |
    |Price            |  X  |   X   |  X   |    X     |         |
    |Attack Bonus     |     |   X   |      |          |         |
    |Defense Bonus    |     |       |  X   |          |         |
    |Stat Bonuses     |     |       |      |    X     |         |
    |Character        |     |   X   |  X   |    X     |         |
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                      Story and Rules                (I00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    The story and rules section is where you can edit settings 
    for your story, create cutscenes to play whenever you want, 
    view all the events in your game, and playtest.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |             Storyteller Editor        (I10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    The storyteller editor is used to create all the cutscenes 
    that you can play whenever you want throughout the game.  
    The storyteller editor is a bit hard to learn to use, but 
    once you get the hang of it, creating a cutscene actually 
    goes by pretty quickly.  In this section of my guide, I will 
    explain the process I take when creating a cutscene for my 
    game.  When you first open up the storyteller editor, you 
    will see the following options:
    
    Name – Name your cutscene/story.
    Style – Select color effects for the cutscene.  You choose 
    from normal, sepia, or monochrome.
    Preview Story – Preview your cutscene.
    Create Storyteller – Open up the actual storyteller editor, 
    where you set up everything that happens.
    
    When you select create storyteller, you will be taken into 
    the actual editor.  Below, I will explain the process I 
    usually take to create a storyteller event for my game.
    
    First of all, I will explain the screen.  On the screen you 
    should see a big chart, with numbers going down the left side 
    of the screen, and a bunch of little pictures across the top.  
    From left to right, the pictures represent the following:
    
    BG (Background), Character A, Character B, Character C, 
    Effect, OBJ (Object), Msg (Message), SE (Sound Effects), and 
    BGM (Background Music).
    
    Now, I will explain what each one does.
    
    BG – Controls what background is displayed throughout the 
    scene.
    Character A/B/C – Display up to 3 characters (A, B, and C) on 
    screen.
    Effect – Display an effect on the screen.
    OBJ – Display an object on the screen.
    Msg – Display text on the screen.
    SE – Play a sound effect
    BGM – Controls the background music.
    
    Now, I will explain the process of creating a storyteller 
    scene.
    
    Step 1: The first thing I usually do when creating a scene is 
    set a background.  Select box 1 under the BG section (the top 
    left box) and select a background.  You can turn background 
    display on or off, then select a background, and place a 
    decoration (preset text or frame) into the background.  
    Unless you designate a background change, the background 
    stays the same throughout the whole scene.
    Step 2: Next, I usually set BGM.  Select the first box under 
    BGM, and then change the settings to whatever you want.  Set 
    whether or not you want the music to play, select what song 
    you want to play, and select how loud you want it to be under 
    volume.  The BGM also stays the same unless you designate a 
    change.
    Step 3: After settings the backgrounds, I usually add in 
    characters.  Select the first box under character A, and fill 
    in all the settings.  Choose a 2D character graphic, move it 
    around the screen, change the size, and choose whether or not 
    to display the character as a silhouette.  Note: If you don’t 
    want a character to come into the scene at the very start, 
    select the second box instead of the first.  Also, if you 
    want more than 1 character on screen at once, simply select 
    the boxes under character B and C.
    Step 4: Next, I set up text to make it look like my 
    characters are talking.  Select the first box under Msg, and 
    fill in all the settings.  Enter a message to be displayed, 
    select a message type, select which character you want the 
    speech bubble to go towards (if the type is conversation), 
    select a frame type, text speed, size, position, and color.  
    In order to create conversations, you would display the first 
    line of the conversation in key 1 of the scene, the second 
    line of the conversation in key 2, the third in key 3, etc.
    Step 5: This is not required, but if you want to, you can 
    mess around with the effect and object sections.  Object 
    displays an object on the screen, and effect makes various 
    effects, such as fade in or out.
    
    Now that you know how, go out and create the best cutscenes 
    the RPGM3 world has ever seen!
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                   Events              (I20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Events are absolutely necessary in order to make your game.  
    They control every little thing that happens.  Although you 
    don’t create them, even stores are run by RPGM3’s internal 
    events.  Basically, you have to learn how to code events, or 
    your game will never be successful.  Here I will give you a 
    few samples of events, and how to use them, but if you want 
    to learn more, see the Events section of this guide.
    
    When you create an event, you will be taken into the event 
    editor.  On page 1, you must set up a few things.
    
    Name – Enter the name of the event.
    Graphic – Select a graphic for the event.  Use transparent if 
    you don’t want to display anything.
    Preview – Displays the graphic you choose.  Rotate with the 
    right analog stick.
    
    On page 2, you will set conditions that must be met for your 
    event to occur.
    
    Mode Number – At the top, you will see 2 numbers.  The number 
    on the left is the mode you are editing, and the one on the 
    right shows how many different modes the event has.  
    Explained in further detail under the Events section, modes 
    make it so that you can have an event do 2 different things.
    Map – Displays the name of the map the event’s object is on.
    Trigger Type – Select when the event starts.  Touch starts it 
    when the player touches the object, button starts it when the 
    player interacts with the object by pressing X, and auto 
    starts it automatically.  Auto events should be used with an 
    end, so they don’t just keep repeating themselves.
    Condition List – Select the conditions that need to be met 
    for this mode to execute its event code.  If all the 
    conditions you make are not met, the event cannot play.  The 
    conditions you can set are as follows:
      Variables
        Variable is equal to a number.
        Variable is greater than a number.
        Variable is less than a number.
      Time Of Day
        Time matches the specified time.
        Time doesn’t match the specified time.
      Treasure Items
        Player has specified treasure.
        Player doesn’t have specified treasure.
      Dungeon Switches
        Specified dungeon switch is on.
        Specified dungeon switch is off.
    Change Modes – You can change the mode you are editing with 
    the left and right arrow buttons.  You can also add or delete 
    modes with the + or – buttons.
    Event Code – Press the event code button to edit the event 
    code that will be executed for this event.  For more help, go 
    to the Events section of this guide.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |               Story Settings          (I30) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    The story settings are where you set up how your story starts 
    off, and how it ends.  It is very basic, and gives you the 
    following options:
    
    Title – Enter a title/name for your game.  This will show up 
    when somebody loads up your game to play.
    Author – Enter your name, or whoever is the author.  This 
    also shows up when the player loads up your game.
    Prologue – Select a storyteller scene to play at the start of 
    your game.
    Game Over – Select a storyteller scene to play when the 
    player gets a game over.
    Starting Money – Select how much money the party has at the 
    game’s start.
    Starting Location – Select where the player is at the start 
    of your game.
    Starting Season – Select the season at the game start.
    Starting Weather – Select the weather at the game start.
    Starting Time – Select the time at the game start.
    Lens Flare – Choose whether or not to apply a lens flare 
    graphical effect.
    
    On page 2 of the story settings, you find the party settings.
    
    Active Member – Select the active member.  You must first put 
    this person in the party first.  The active member is the 
    character controlled by the player.
    Party Members – Select up to 4 members to be in the player’s 
    party.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                  Playtest             (I40) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When you select playtest, it is basically the same as someone 
    selecting play from the title screen.  You can save games in 
    playtests, and do virtually everything an actual player can, 
    with one exception.  You have access to the debug menu.  The 
    debug menu is basically like a cheat mode where you can do 
    almost whatever you want.  You can edit variables, force 
    battles to occur, give yourself loads of money, and plenty 
    more things.  For more information on using the debug menu, 
    refer to the Additional Game Mechanics section of this guide.  
    
    Also, please note that, in order to save your game during a 
    playtest, you must first save your game’s database.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                      Data Management                (J00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    The data management section is where you have access to all 
    your game data.  You can save a database to a memory card, 
    load a database from a memory card, and view your entire game 
    database as a whole.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                    Load               (J10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    The load option is very simple.  Just select a memory card, 
    the select a database to load.  Always make sure you save 
    whatever you are working on before loading a new database, or 
    you will lose your data.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                    Save               (J20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Saving your database is crucial if you ever want to complete 
    your game.  Completing an entire RPG, even with the RPGM3 
    software, can take months depending on game size.  Just 
    select a memory card to save to, then select what database 
    you want to save all your data to.  Be cautious, because if 
    you accidentally save on the wrong database, you will lose 
    all of the data you saved over.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                  Database             (J30) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When you select database, you get access to your entire game 
    database.  It displays everything from every database, all the 
    way from the field editor, down to the item editor.  You 
    probably won’t be going here often, unless you just want to 
    get an overview of how much space you have used, and how much 
    you have left.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                          Events                     (K00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    Events control EVERYTHING in RPGM3.  Although you don’t code 
    battles and shops and all them, they are still controlled by 
    the game’s internal events.  Learn how to code events as soon 
    as you can.  The better you are at coding them, the more you 
    can do with your game.  You can make extremely elaborate 
    quests if you learn how to use coding well.  Actually, you 
    can use coding to make an entirely different non-RPG game if 
    you wanted.  For example, you could make a quiz-type game, or 
    even one of those really old games where the players just 
    selects an option from a multiple choice list.  Events can be 
    used to create a lot of really cool things, although they are 
    pretty limited sometimes.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                    Modes              (K10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Modes are what make it so you can have a character say two 
    different things.  For example, if you have a man who lost 
    his map, you could create 2 modes for him.  Mode 1 would 
    make him say “Have you seen a map around here?  I seem to 
    have lost mine.”  Then you could have man who says “I 
    found this map, is it yours?”  You could have that man give 
    you the map, mainly by telling the first man to go to mode 2, 
    although you didn’t even create a map item.  Then, when you 
    went back to the first man, since he was in mode 2, he would 
    say “You found my map!  Thanks a lot!”  and you could have 
    him give the player a reward, and make him go into mode 3, so 
    if the player talked to him again, he would be in mode 3 and 
    say “Thanks again for finding my map.”
    
    That explanation was probably a bit complicated, but once you 
    start fooling around, you’ll get the hang of how to use modes 
    eventually.  you can create multiple modes for each event, 
    and in order to change the event’s current mode, you would 
    have to use one of the event codes that changes an event’s 
    current mode.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |                   Events              (K20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When coding events, there are many different options you 
    have.  One of the most basic is to make an NPC talk by just 
    just using the message display code.  Codes can also be used 
    to do a lot more complicated things though, such as having an 
    NPC say two different things based on the value of some 
    variable you can set.  All the event codes you can use are 
    listed below, under their proper categories.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |               Display          (K2a) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Display codes are used to make the game screen do things, 
    such as display a message, fade in or out, etc.  They can 
    also be used to make objects temporarily invisible.
    
    Message Display – Displays a message you create.
       Frame Type – Select the message frame type from 2 choices
       Display Name – Choose a name to display above the 
       message.
       Select name frame type – Select the frame type for the 
       name from 2 choices.
       Display 2D Graphic – Choose whether or not you want the 
       character’s 2D graphic to be displayed.
       Message – Enter a message to display.
    
    Fade In – Redisplays the screen from a previous fade out. 
    Nothing will happen if the screen wasn’t faded out.
       Fade-In Speed – Choose how fast the screen will fade in.
    
    Fade Out – Makes the screen go blank by fading out.  The 
    screen will stay blank until the event ends, or is cancelled 
    out by a fade in code.  You can still display messages on a 
    blank screen.
       Fade-Out Speed – Choose how fast the screen fades out.
    
    Play Animation – Plays an animation assigned to the graphic 
    of a selected object.  This is limited to items with an 
    animation.
       Select Object – Choose the object to animate.  It must be 
       in the same map as the event.
       Wait for animation – Choose whether or not you want the 
       event to wait for the animation to finish before .
       continuing
       Animation Speed – Choose how fast the animation is.
    
    Rotate – Rotate a specified character.
       Select Character – Choose a character to rotate.
       Direction – Choose the rotation direction. (clockwise or 
       counter-clockwise)
       Rotation Degree – Choose how much the character rotates.
    
    Display Off – Makes an object temporarily invisible.  An 
    object’s event cannot execute while the object is invisible.
       Select Object – Select an object to make invisible.
    
    Display On – Redisplay an object that was invisible.  Nothing 
    happens if the object was not invisible.
       Select Object – Select an object to redisplay.
    
    Refresh Display – Refreshes the game screen.  This must be 
    used after you modify a property such as time or weather for 
    the change to take place immediately.
    
    Decorative Display Off – Makes a decorative object invisible.  
    (The object on top of a treasure point model)
       Select decorative model – Select an object whose 
       decorative object you want to make invisible.
    
    Decorative Display On – Redisplays a previously hidden 
    decorative object.  Nothing happens if the object was not 
    invisible.
       Select decorative model – Select an object whose 
       decorative object you want to redisplay.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |               Control          (K2b) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Control codes are used to control various things that are 
    happening in the game.  You can set up character battles, 
    give the player multiple choice, or yes/no questions, or 
    branch off your event in to a few different things based on 
    the value of a variable.
    
    Event Transition – Ends the current event and starts a new 
    one.
       Select Event – Select the event you want to start.  It 
       must be on the same map as the current event.
       Mode Number – Select which mode of the event to start.
    
    Value Conditional Branch – Execute up to 4 different codes 
    based on the value of a variable.  Set up the codes for each 
    value between the start and end event codes.
       Select Variable – Select which variable you want to use to 
       determine which branch executes.
       Value Judging Type – Select how to compare the variable 
       with the options for each value.  You can choose equal to, 
       greater than, or less than the values you chose.
       Value to Judge – Select a number to compare with the 
       variable.
    
    QA Branch – Gives the player a question in which they can 
    answer either yes or no.  Set up the codes for each answer 
    between the start and end event codes.
       Question – Enter the question to ask the player.
    
    Decision Branch – Gives the player a multiple choice question 
    which you can set the answers for.  Set up the codes for each 
    answer between the start and end event codes.
       Question – Enter the question to ask the player.
       Answers – Enter up to 4 answers for the player to choose 
       from.
    
    Battle Result Branch – Execute 2 different codes based on the 
    results of the player’s last battle.  Set up the codes for 
    each result between the start and end event codes.  This code 
    is used with the “Battle” event code.
    
    Wait – Pauses the event.
       Wait Time – Select how long to wait.
       Wait Animation – Turn the animation on or off during the 
       wait.
    
    Wait For Key Entry – Pauses the event until the player hits a 
    button.
    
    Ending – Ends the game after the specified storyteller scene 
    is over.
       Ending – Select the storyteller scene to play.
       Credit – Select the storyteller scene to play for the 
       credits after the specified ending.
    
    Game Over – The player gets game over after the specified 
    storyteller scene.
       Game Over – Select the storyteller scene to play.
    
    Event Ending – Ends the event.  Any event codes after this 
    will not execute.
    
    Battle – Forces the player to battle with the specified 
    monster party.
       Monster Party – Select a monster party for the player to 
       fight.
       Battle Stage – Select a background for the battle.
       Game Over After Battle – Decide whether or not the player 
       gets game over when the whole party is dead.  If not, set 
       what happens instead with the “Battle Result Branch” event 
       code.
       BGM – Select the BGM to play during the battle.
    
    Battle (Characters) – Forces a character battle with the 
    specified characters.  The player does not earn exp, money, 
    or items from a character battle.
       Characters – Select up to 4 character for the player to 
       fight, and set up their formation.
       Battle Stage – Select a background for the battle.
       Game Over After Battle – Decide whether or not the player 
       gets game over when the whole party is dead.  If not, set 
       what happens instead with the “Battle Result Branch” event 
       code.
       BGM – Select the BGM to play during the battle.
    
    Storyteller – Plays the specified storyteller scene.
       Storyteller – Select the storyteller scene to play.
    
    Modify Weather – Change the weather.
       Change Weather – Select the weather to change.
    
    Modify Time – Change the current time.
       Change Time – Select the time to change.
    
    Modify Season – Change the current season.
       Change Season – select the season to change.
    
    Movement – Warps the player to a new location on the current 
    map.  Any event code after this will not execute.
       Select Location – Set up a location to warp the party to.
    
    Warp - Movement – Warps the player to a new location.  Any 
    event code after this will not execute.
       Select Location – Set up a location to warp the party to.
    
    Escape – Warps the player out of a dungeon if they are in 
    one.  Nothing happens if the dungeon is not on a field, or if 
    the player is not in a dungeon.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |           Property Control     (K2c) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Property Control Codes modify things in-game such as event 
    modes, map properties, and variables.  All the property 
    control event codes are listed below.
    
    Modify Field Property – Change the environment settings (page 
    2) of a field map.  This, along with all the other event 
    codes that modify map properties, must have a refresh display 
    code after it for the changes to occur immediately.  
    Otherwise, the change occurs when the player leaves the map 
    and comes back.
       Select Field – Select the field map to change the settings 
       on.
       BGM – Select the new BGM for the map.
       Environment Settings – Set all the new environment 
       settings for the specified field map.
    
    Modify Town Property – Change the environment settings of a 
    town map.
       Select Town – Select the town map to change the settings 
       on.
       BGM – Select the new BGM for the map, and the castle, if 
       the town has one.
       Enter Setting – Select whether or not the player can enter 
       the town, and if there is one, the castle.
       Environment Settings – Set all the new environment 
       settings for the specified town map.
    
    Modify Dungeon Property – Change the environment settings of 
    a dungeon.
       Select Dungeon – Select the dungeon to change the settings 
       on.
       BGM – Select the new BGM for the dungeon.
       Environment Settings – Set all the new environment 
       settings for the specified dungeon.
    
    Modify Building Property – Change the interior settings of a 
    building.
       Select Building – Select a building to change the settings 
       in.
       Interior Settings – Set the new interior settings for the 
       specified building.
    
    Modify Mode – Modify the current mode for the selected event.  
    The mode will not change until the current event ends.
       Select Event – Select an event to change the mode of.
       Mode Number – Select what mode to change to.
    
    Add Mode – Adds 1 to the current mode of the selected event.
       Select Event – Select an event to add 1 to the mode of.
    
    Subtract Mode – Subtracts 1 from the current mode of the 
    selected event.
       Select Event – Select an event to subtract 1 from the mode 
       of.
    
    Modify Shared Variable – Modify the value of the specified 
    shared variable.
       Select Shared Variable – Select a shared variable to edit.
       Select Variable Value – Select the new value of the 
       specified variable.
    
    Increase Shared Variable – Increase the value of the 
    specified variable by a certain amount.
       Select Shared Variable – Select a shared variable to edit.
       Amount To Add – Specify how much to add to the specified 
       variable.
    
    Decrease Shared Variable – Decrease the value of the 
    specified variable by a certain amount.
       Select Shared Variable – Select a shared variable to edit.
       Amount To Subtract – Specify how much to subtract from the 
       specified variable.
    
    Copy Shared Variable – Copy the value of one shared variable 
    on to another shared variable.
       Shared Variable To Copy – Select the shared variable to 
       copy the value of.
       Shared Variable To Paste – Select the shared variable to 
       paste the copied value onto.
    
    Modify Internal Variable – Modify the value of an internal 
    variable.
       Select Object – Select the object whose variable you want 
       to edit.
       Select Internal Variable – Select which variable to edit.
       Select Variable Value – Select the new value for the 
       specified variable.
    
    Increase Internal Variable – Increase the value of the 
    specified variable by a certain amount.
       Select Object – Select the object whose variable you want 
       to increase.
       Select Internal Variable – Select which variable to 
       increase.
       Amount To Add – Specify how much to add to the value of 
       the specified variable.
    
    Decrease Internal Variable – Decrease the value of the 
    specified variable by a certain amount.
       Select Object – Select the object whose variable you want 
       to decrease.
       Select Internal Variable – Select which variable to 
       decrease.
       Amount To Subtract – Specify how much to subtract from the 
       value of the specified variable.
    
    Copy Internal Variable - Copy the value of one internal 
    variable on to another internal variable.
       Internal Variable To Copy – Select the internal variable 
       to copy the value of.
       Internal Variable To Paste – Select the internal variable 
       to paste the copied value onto.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |            Party Control       (K2d) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Party Control event codes control things that happen to the 
    player’s party.  It can be used to give the party experience, 
    gold, items, heal, poison, or revive the party, and various 
    other things.  All the party control event codes are listed 
    below.
    
    Recover Party HP/MP – Recover the entire party’s HP or MP by 
    the specified amount.
       Recovery Type – Select either HP or MP to recover.
       Amount – Select how much to recover.
    
    Cure Party Poison – Cures the entire party of poison status.
    
    Poison Party – Gives the entire party poison status.
    
    Revive Party – Revives the entire party at a specified HP.
       Revive Type – Select revival type.  Near Death revives the 
       party at 1 HP, Half HP revives the party at half HP, and 
       Full HP revives the party at full HP.
    
    Fully Recover Party – Fully recovers the entire party, 
    removing bad statuses, and healing all HP and MP.
    
    Change Character Name – Changes the specified character’s 
    name.
       Select Character – Select the character to change the name 
       of.
       New Name – Enter the new name for the character.
    
    Enter Character Name – Allows the player to rename a 
    character.
       Select Character – Select the character for the player to 
       change the name of.
    
    Recover HP/MP – Recover the selected character’s HP or MP by 
    a certain amount.
       Select Character – Choose a character to recover.
       Recover Type – Select either HP or MP to recover.
       Amount – Select how much to recover.
    
    Damage HP/MP – Damages the selected character’s HP or MP by a 
    certain amount.
       Select Character – Choose a character to damage.
       Damage Type – Select either HP or MP to damage.
       Amount – Select how much to damage.
    
    Cure Poison – Cures the selected character of poison status.
       Select Character – Select the character to cure.
    
    Poison – Gives the selected character poison status.
       Select Character – Select the character to poison.
    
    Revive – Revive the selected character.
       Select Character – Select the character to revive.
       Revive Type – Select revival type.  (Same as party revival 
       types.)
    
    Fully Recover – Fully recovers the selected character, 
    removing bad statuses, and healing all HP and MP.
       Select Character – Select the character to recover.
    
    Modify Ability Points – Change the selected character’s 
    ability stats.
       Select Character – Select the character to change.
       Ability Stat Type – Select the ability type to change.
       Amount – Enter the new value.
    
    Increase Ability Points – Increase the selected character’s 
    ability stats.
       Select Character – Select the character to change.
       Ability Stat Type – Select the ability type to change.
       Amount To Add – Select the value to add.
    
    Decrease Ability Points – Decrease the selected character’s 
    ability stats.
       Select Character – Select the character to change.
       Ability Stat Type – Select the ability type to change.
       Amount To Subtract – Select the value to subtract.
    
    Modify Level – Change the selected character’s level.
       Select Character – Select the character to change.
       Level Amount – Select the new level.
    
    Increase Level – Increase the selected character’s level by a 
    certain amount.
       Select Character – Select the character to change.
       Amount To Add – Select the value to add to the level.
    
    Decrease Level – Decrease the selected character’s level by a 
    certain amount.
       Select Character – Select the character to change.
       Amount To Subtract – Select the value to subtract from the 
       level.
    
    Join Party – The specified character joins the player party.  
    You can only have up to 4 members in the party.
       Select Character – Select a character to join the party.
    
    Leave Party – The specified character leaves the player 
    party.  The character must be in the party in order to leave.
       Select Character – Select a character to leave the party.
    
    Modify Active Member – Changes the active member.  The new 
    active member must be in the party or nothing happens.
       Select Character – Select a new active member.
    
    Obtain Items – The selected character receives the specified 
    item.
       Select Item – Select the item for the character to get.
       Select Character – Select the character to receive the 
       item.
    
    Lose Items – The selected character loses the specified item.
       Select Item – Select the item for the character to lose.
       Select Character – Select the character that loses the 
       item.
    
    Obtain Treasures – The party receives the specified treasure 
    item.
       Select Item – Select the treasure item for the party to 
       get.  Nothing happens if the party already has the item.
    
    Lose Treasures – The party loses the specified treasure item.
       Select Item – Select the treasure item for the party to 
       lose.  Nothing happens if the party doesn’t have the item.
    
    Obtain Money – The party receives the specified amount of 
    money.
       Amount – Select the amount of money for the party to 
       receive.
    
    Lose Money – The party loses the specified amount of money.
       Amount – Select the amount of money for the party to lose.
    
    Gain Experience – The party gains the specified amount of 
    experience.  It is shown on the treasure screen when the 
    event ends.
       Amount – Select the amount of experience to give the 
       party.
    
    Learn Skills – The selected character learns the specified 
    skill.  Nothing happens if the character already knows the 
    skill.
       Select Character – Select a character to learn the skill.
       Select Skill – Select the skill to learn.
    
    Forget Skills – The selected character forgets the specified 
    skill.  Nothing happens if the character doesn’t know the 
    skill.
       Select Character – Select a character to forget the skill.
       Select Skill – Select the skill to forget.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |               Effects          (K2e) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Effect Codes create special effects on the game screen, such 
    as shaking the screen for an earthquake, or creating flashing 
    strobe effects.  All the effect codes are listed below.
    
    Play BGM – Plays the selected BGM.  The BGM continues after 
    the event ends.
       BGM – Select the BGM to play.
    
    Stop BGM – Stops the BGM from playing.  THE BGM will stay 
    paused after the event ends.
    
    Play Sound Effect – Plays a sound effect.
       Sound Effect Type – Select an effect type.
       Select Sound Effect – Select a sound effect to play.
       Wait To End – Select whether or not the event should pause 
       while the effect plays.
    
    Play Melody – Plays the selected melody.  BGM Volume is 
    lowered for a melody to play.
       Select Melody – Select a melody to play.
       Wait To End – Select whether or not the event should pause 
       while the melody plays.
    
    Flash Screen – Create a strobe-light effect on the screen.
       Flash Amount – Select the number of flashes.
       Flash Color – Select the color of the flash.
       Flashing Speed – Select the speed of the flashing.
    
    Shake Screen – Shakes the screen.
       Length – Select how long the screen should shake.
    
    Screen Effects – Displays the selected screen effect.
       Screen Effect – Choose a screen effect to play.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                   Secrets/Tips & Hints              (L00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    Almost every guide for any game out there has these, so why 
    shouldn’t I?  Secrets are practically what guides were made 
    for, and I’m going to exploit some I have found in RPGM3.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |              Extra Game Space         (L10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    As you have probably noticed, RPGM3 does have some annoying 
    limitations on how much you can store in it’s database.  For 
    example,  you can only create 100 NPCs in your game.  There 
    is fortunately a few ways to get by this limitation, although 
    you will need more than one memory card.
    
    Start off making your game like you normally would.  Once you 
    finish the first half of your game, you will have to copy it 
    onto another memory card.  Now you will have two game files, 
    File A and File B.  File A will be the beginning of your 
    game.  Go into File B and delete everything the player no 
    longer needs after they finish the first half of the game.  
    Make sure you keep the town they player is in at the end of 
    Part I, all the characters in they party, the items they 
    have, etc.  After you erase all the old items, you can 
    continue creating Part II like you normally would.  Now, when 
    somebody plays your game, they will start out on Part I, 
    which is File A.  When they finish Part I, they should save 
    their game, and go into the editor.  Give them a message 
    telling them to copy File B over File A (make sure you have a 
    backup copy of File A first.)  Then the player goes back to 
    the title screen, and loads up their game, where they will 
    now be on Part II.  If you really wanted to, you could use 
    many more memory cards to create an utterly massive game.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |             Weapon Equip Trick        (L20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    This simple trick is used to have a character class equip a 
    weapon they normally couldn’t equip.  For example, you could 
    have a priest class wielding a sword and shield.
    
    To explain this trick, I will use the example of having a 
    priest equip a sword and shield.
    1) Create your priest class, and an adventurer class (sword 
    and shield).
    2) Create your priest character.
    3) Set adventurer as your priest’s class.
    4) Create the sword and shield for your priest.
    5) Go to page 2 of your sword and shield, and set them to be 
    used by your priest.
    6) Go back to your priest character and assign them to the 
    priest class.
    7) Don’t edit the sword/shield again, and they will be 
    equippable by your priest, although he will still use the 
    priest’s animations, so it won’t look like he/she is actually 
    swinging a sword.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |              Reputation System        (L30) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    If you put your  mind to it, you can create a lot of cool 
    things in RPGM3, even though scripting is pretty limited.  
    For example, you can create a reputational system, where you 
    can have NPCs treat your character differently, depending on 
    their reputation.  For example, you can have events where if 
    you are kind to a person, your reputation increases, and 
    people treat you better, but if you are mean to a person, 
    your reputation drops, and people treat you worse.  This is 
    often cool because the player doesn’t know that how they 
    treat people is affecting the way people treat them.  I am 
    going to explain the basic process of creating your own 
    reputational system below.
    
    First of all, you should have a variable, either an internal 
    variable from the player, or a shared variable, that you have 
    reserved for your character’s reputation.  I would suggest 
    setting it to start at 50, so you can use 50 as a neutral, 
    and change it during the game depending on the character’s 
    actions.
    
    Next, you have to create events that modify the reputation 
    variable.  For example, you could have an event where a man 
    has lost his map.  When the player talks to him, you could 
    create a multiple choice question.  The player could choose 
    option A: “I’ll find your map for you!”, option B: “I would 
    help you find your map, but I don’t have time.”, or option C: 
    “That’s not my problem!”
    
    You could then have each option modify the reputation 
    variable accordingly.  For option a, you could increase the 
    reputation by 3, since the player was nice to the man.  For 
    option b, you could increase the reputation by 1, since the 
    player was kind of nice the man.  For option c, you could 
    lower the reputation variable by 2 or 3, since the player was 
    rude to the man.
    
    Next, you would create an NPC that talks to you differently 
    based on what your reputation is.  To do this, you would 
    place a value conditional branch in the event code.  You 
    would set it to use the reputation variable, then adjust the 
    values to compare accordingly.  For example, if the player’s 
    reputation was below 35, NPCs wouldn’t want to talk to the 
    character much, and would generally ask the character to 
    leave them alone.  If the reputation was above 35, but below 
    50, you could have some NPCs still talk to the character, but 
    others would still generally not want them around.  If the 
    reputation was above 65, then NPCs would be really nice to 
    your character, and possibly even give them gifts.  Lastly, 
    if the reputation was above 50, but below 65, then NPCs would 
    generally be nice to your character, and maybe ask for help 
    every once in a while.
    
    You can mess around with the system all you want, and you 
    could probably make it a lot more complex, but for now, I’m 
    going to stick with the basic reputation system, and maybe 
    I’ll post a more complicated one later.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |            Creating Secret Areas      (L40) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    The process of creating secret areas is pretty simple.  If 
    you want the player to need special items to get into the 
    area, first create these treasure items in the item editor.  
    If not, head straight to the next step.  How to change the 
    requirements for your room is described in more detail later.
    
    I find it most easy to create secret areas in the dungeon 
    editor, although you could in truth create a whole secret 
    town.  If you want to create a secret town though, it will be 
    harder to set a treasure item requirement for it.  Ok, now if 
    you are using the dungeon editor, follow the steps below.
    
    First, you must create your dungeon.  You will need to place 
    locked doors that lead into the secret areas of the dungeon, 
    or the player will be able to enter them any time they want.  
    Once you have all of your secret rooms in the dungeon set up, 
    make sure they are all blocked by locked doors, head into the 
    layout editor to set up which treasure items are required to 
    open the locked doors.  Then just set up anything you want in 
    the room, and you’re done!  (Don’t forget to make a way for 
    the player to obtain the secret item.)
    
    Now, if you’re creating a secret area in the town editor, it 
    is different from the dungeon editor.  Basically, create your 
    town in the town editor, and set the entry settings to not 
    allowed.  Then, in order for the player to be able to enter 
    the secret area, you would need to create an event that 
    changes the town’s entry settings to allowed.  This is good 
    if you want to create a quest for the character to go on, 
    then as a reward you set the town entry settings to allowed.  
    You could also use this strategy for treasure item areas, by 
    creating a quest that gives the player the treasure item as a 
    reward.  In my secret areas, I like to put a bunch of things 
    such as a few chests with rewards in them, NPCs or other 
    events that help out the character by giving them tips and 
    hints, and some events that give the player a little insight 
    on the making of the game.
    
    If you want a treasure item requirement for a secret town, 
    you should first start by following the steps above to create 
    a secret dungeon.  Then, in the secret room of the dungeon, 
    place another something such as a door or staircase that will 
    lead to the town.  Place an invisible event in front of the 
    door, so when the player presses X to "open" the door, the 
    invisible event will activate instead.  Then, in the event 
    place an event code that warps the player to your town.
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |             Larger Towns/Cities       (L50) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Have you ever wanted to create a town larger than the default 
    town?  This trick shows you how.  First, make a town and use 
    the extra spaces as open land.  Then, go to the layour editor.  
    At the opening in the town wall, place an invisible event that 
    activates when touched.  In this event place a multiple choice 
    option that says something like "Would you like to go another 
    section of the city?"  with Yes or No options.  Under the 
    "Yes" branch, place a warp event code which warps the player 
    to another town (meant to be another section of town.)  Under 
    the "No" option, place a code that warps the player back a few 
    feet, or else they will be able to walk into the open land 
    when the event ends.  Just make sure in that town you place an 
    event somewhere like the open land or the city gate that warps 
    you back to the main town.  (Make sure you don't place the 
    other towns on the field map.)
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                 Additional Game Mechanics           (M00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    This section of the guide I will be using to further explain 
    things I didn’t go into much earlier on in the guide.  It 
    includes things such as the field and dungeon creation 
    editors, the debug menu in playtests, and special editor 
    access.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |           Playtesting/Debug Menu      (M10) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Playtesting is basically just playing your game like a player 
    would, except you can use the debug menu.  All the options on 
    the debug menu, and what they do, are listed below.
    
    Battle Encounters – Force-Start a monster battle based on the 
    encounter settings of your current location.
    
    Current Map Data Settings – Edit the environment settings and 
    internal variables of the map you are currently on.
    
    Variable Settings – Edit the shared and internal variables in 
    your game.
    
    Mode Number Settings – Edit the mode number of any event on 
    the current map.
    
    Modify Story Settings – Edit the story settings and shared 
    variables.  The only options that can’t be edited are title 
    and author.
    
    Precious Item Settings – Give important items to your party.
    
    Character Data Settings – Edit your character stats, items, 
    skills, and internal variables.
    
    Modify Current Position – Warp to any map in your game.
    
    Return To Editor – Quit playtesting and return to the editor.
    
    During Battle, you will have the following options on your 
    debug menu:
    
    Force Victory – Force the game to finish the battle as a win.
    
    Force Defeat – Force the game to finish the battle as a loss.
    
    Force Game Over – Force the game to finish the battle as a 
    game over.
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |            Field Creation Editor      (M20) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When creating a field, there are two modes in the field 
    creation editor.  The first mode is terrain editing, and the 
    second mode is altitude editing.  In the terrain editing mode 
    you will set up the landscape, such as forest area, desert 
    area, rocky areas, etc.  In the altitude editing mode, you 
    can edit the altitude/elevation of the land in order to 
    create mountains, hills, valleys, etc.
    
    Once you get into the field editor, you will see a lot of 
    things in front of you.  On the left of the screen, you will 
    see your whole map on the top, along with the area you are 
    viewing surrounded by a red box.  Under the map, you will see 
    some numbers.  The Pos X is the x coordinates of where your 
    cursor is, the Pos Y is the y coordinates of where your 
    cursor is, and the Pos Z is the z coordinates of your cursor 
    (height).  Under this, you will see either “G-Mode” or 
    “V-Mode”.  G-Mode means you are in terrain editing mode, and 
    V-Mode means you are in altitude editing mode.
    
    In the center of the screen, you will see your editing area.  
    This is where you will be creating your field.  In terrain 
    editing mode, press X or O to place whatever landscape you 
    have assigned to that button, and in altitude editing mode, 
    you can raise or lower land using the X and O buttons.
    
    On the right of the screen, you will see a few panels.  The 
    topmost one says System, and allows you to open the system 
    menu, which has the following options:
    
    Cancel – Closes the menu.
    Reset Terrain – Deletes everything you have made.
    Save – Saves the map you are editing.
    Save And Exit – Saves the map you are editing and exits the 
    editor.
    Exit Without Saving – Exits the editor without saving the map 
    you are editing.
    
    Under the system panel, you will see another panel which 
    allows you to switch between G-Mode (terrain editing) and 
    V-Mode (altitude editing).  Under that panel, you will see 
    another one that says Undo.  Press this button to undo the 
    last thing you did.  You may undo up to 4 steps.  Under the 
    undo button, you will see all your tools.  All the tools, 
    along with an explanation of what they do, are listed below.
    
    Pen – Use the pen to draw terrain in freehand mode.  Use X or 
    O to draw.
    
    Line – Use the line tool to draw a straight line.  Press X or 
    O to place one point, then move the cursor and place the 
    second point using X or O.
    
    Box – The box tool is used to draw a rectangle.  Place the 
    first point using X or O, then place the point for the 
    opposite corner using X or O.
    
    Circle – The circle tool draws a circle.  Place the first 
    point (the center) with X or O, then place any point on the 
    outside of the circle using X or O.
    
    Fill – The paint bucket tool fills in a closed space.  Move 
    the cursor over the space to fill, and press X or O.
    
    Tool Size – Change the size of your pen and line tools.  x1 
    the normal size, x2 is twice as thick, and x4 is four times 
    as thick.
    
    Zoom – Zoom in or out using the magnifying glass tool.  You 
    can also use L2 and R2 to zoom.
    
    Select Terrain – Select what type of terrain X and O place 
    by pressing square.  Highlight a terrain, and press X or O to 
    assign it to that button, then press square to close the 
    window.
    
    In altitude editing mode, you will have the following tools:
    
    Rounded – Creates a rounded hill when you raise land.
    
    Mound – Creates a mound/plateau when you raise land.
    
    Sloped – Creates a steeper mountain-like shape when you raise 
    land.
    
    Bump – Creates a mountain-like shape with a smaller slope 
    when you raise land.
    
    Smooth – This tool makes all the land selected flattened.
    
    Stretch – This tool stretches/smears the landscape.  Press X 
    and move the cursor to stretch the altitude changes.
    
    Tool Shape – Select either a circle or square shaped tool.
    
    Zoom – Zoom in or out using the magnifying glasses, or L2 and 
    R2.
    
    Adjust Tool Size  - Changes the size or your current tool.  
    This can also be done with L1 and R1.
    
    Lastly, under your tool palette, you will see a preview 
    button.  Press this button to be inserted into the map as a 
    player.  Select a location to start on the map.  Red areas 
    are areas where the player cannot walk.  Below is a chart 
    listing all the controls in the field creation editor.
    
     ___________________________________________________________
    |Button             |V-Mode             |G-Mode             |
    |-------------------|-------------------|-------------------|
    |D-Pad              |Move Cursor        |Move Cursor        |
    |X Button           |Draw Terrain       |Raise Landscape    |
    |O Button           |Draw Terrain       |Lower Landscape    |
    |Square Button      |Select Terrain     |None               |
    |Triangle Button    |Cursor Shortcut    |Cursor Shortcut    |
    |L1 Button          |None               |Shrink Tool Size   |
    |R1 Button          |None               |Expand Tool Size   |
    |L2 Button          |Zoom Out           |Zoom Out           |
    |R2 Button          |Zoom In            |Zoom In            |
    |SELECT Button      |Operation List     |Operation List     |
    |START Button       |Overlay Mode       |Overlay Mode       |
    |Left Analog Stick  |Move Cursor        |Move Cursor        |
    |Right Analog Stick |Move Editing Area  |Move Editing Area  |
    |L3 Button          |Undo               |Undo               |
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |           Dungeon Creation Editor     (M30) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    When creating a dungeon, you have loads of space, so just let 
    your imagination run wild!  The dungeon creation editor is 
    simple, and doesn’t take much time to learn to use.  Pretty 
    much what you do is place floors wherever you want to create 
    rooms and passageways.
    
    When you enter the dungeon creation editor, you will see a 
    few things on your screen.  In the center of the screen you 
    will see your building area.  This is where you set up your 
    dungeon layout.  Move the cursor with the left analog stick, 
    and place floorspace with the X button.  Press O to erase 
    floorspace, and press square to place special features such 
    as traps or doors.  press  L2 and R2 to zoom in, and use the 
    right analog stick to move the map when you are zoomed in.
    
    On the right side of the screen, you will see a few panels.  
    The top one says System, and is used to open the system menu, 
    which has the following options:
    
    Cancel – Closes the system menu.
    Clear Floor – Deletes everything on the current floor.
    Copy Other Floor – Copy the layout of one floor onto another 
    floor.  Special features are not copied.
    Jump To Other Floor – Select a floor to move to and edit.
    Save And Exit – Saves your dungeon and returns to the regular 
    editor.
    Exit Without Saving – Return to the regular editor without 
    saving your work.
    
    Under the system button, you will see another 2 buttons that 
    say Up and Down.  Press the up button to move up one floor, 
    and the down button to move down one floor.  You can also do 
    this with the L1 and R1 buttons.
    
    Under the up and down buttons, you will see your cursor 
    information.  It shows you the Vertical and Horizontal 
    coordinates of your cursor, and tells you what your cursor is 
    currently over.
    
    Under the information panel is the preview button.  This 
    button inserts you into the dungeon as a player.
    
    All the controls for the dungeon creation editor are listed 
    below.
     _________________________________________________
    |Button               |Operation                  |
    |---------------------|---------------------------|
    |X Button             |Create Passage/Floor Tile  |
    |O Button             |Erase Passage/Place Wall   |
    |Square Button        |Place Special Feature      |
    |Triangle Button      |Open System Menu           |
    |L1 Button            |Move Down 1 Floor          |
    |R1 Button            |Move Up 1 Floor            |
    |L2 Button            |Zoom Out                   |
    |R2 Button            |Zoom In                    |
    |SELECT Button        |Display Operation List     |
    |START Button         |Preview Dungeon            |
    |Left Analog Stick    |Move Cursor                |
    |Right Analog Stick   |Move Editing Area          |
    
    Unfortunately, the dungeon editor also has limitations on how 
    many of each special feature you can place.  All the special 
    features are listed below.
     ___________________________________________________________
    |Feature        |Description                    |# Per/Area |
    |---------------|-------------------------------|-----------|
    |Entrance/Exit  |Entry and exit point.          |1/Dungeon  |
    |Door           |Normal Door. Can be opened.    |30/Floor   |
    |Trap           |Normal Trap. Damages the party.|30/Floor   |
    |Stairs         |Connect different floors.      |10/Floor   |
    |Crumbling Wall |Interact with to create space. |10/Floor   |
    |Switch         |Used to trigger events.        |20/Dungeon |
    |Locked Door    |Door opened with treasure item.|20/Dungeon |
    |Secret Door    |Alternate entrance/exit.       |1/Dungeon  |
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |            Special Editor Access      (M40) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Special Editor Access is when you access one editor, without 
    actually going to it, through another.  The only real use of 
    special editor access is when you access the building, 
    decoration, and warp/save point editors through the layout 
    editor, when you place them on a map, although you do use 
    special editor access to create special skills too.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |           Building Editor      (M4a) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    The building editor is accessed through the layout editor, 
    when you use it to make a building.  There are 4 different 
    building types, which are house, shop, inn, and sanctuary.  
    Each one provides you different options in the building 
    editor.  On page 1, you will see the basic settings for every 
    building type.
    
    Name – Enter the name of your building.
    Description – Enter a description of your building.
    Graphic – Choose a graphic for your building.  This also 
    affects how the inside looks.
    Graphic Preview – Preview your building.  Rotate with the 
    right analog stick.
    Preview Room – Inserts you into the building as a player.
    
    On page 2, you will see the interior settings for every
    building type.
    
    Key – Select an item needed to enter the building.
    Allow/Suppress Magic – Set whether or not magic can be used 
    in the building.
    BGM – Select BGM to play in the building.
    
    On page 3, you will see staff settings for the shops, inns, 
    and sanctuaries.
    
    Name – Enter a name for the building’s employee.
    Graphic – Select a character model for the building employee.
    Color Scheme – Select a premade color scheme for the worker.
    
    On page 4, you will see the following for shops:
    
    Price Markup – Determine how much the shop sells items for.
    Items – Select up to 8 items for the shop to sell to players.
    
    On page 4 for inns and sanctuaries, you will see this:
    
    Price – Select a price for the player to pay to use the inn 
    or sanctuary.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |          Decoration Editor     (M4b) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    When using the decoration editor, which is accessed through 
    the layout editor, you will see the following:
    
    Name – Name your decoration.
    Description – Write a description for your decoration.
    Location – Shows the name of the map your decoration is on.
    Graphic – Select a graphic for your decoration.
    Preview – Preview your decoration.  Rotate with the right 
    analog stick.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |          Save Point Editor     (M4c) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    The save point editor is very basic.  In has only one page, 
    and is automatically accessed when you place a save point 
    using the layout editor.  It has the following in it:
    
    Name – Name your save point.
    Location – Shows the name of the map your save point is on.
    Graphic – Select a graphic for your save point.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |         Special Skill Editor   (M4c) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    The special skill editor is accessed through the class editor 
    and the monster editor when you are creating special skills 
    for that class/monster.  Choose a blank spot, and select 
    create to start creating a skill.  The special skill editor 
    has 2 pages.  The options on page 1 are as follows:
    
    Name – Give a name to the special skill.  The player is 
    usually able to figure out what the skill does by the name.
    Description – Write a short description of your skill.
    Learning Level – Select what level the class will 
    automatically learn the skill at.
    Skill Type – Select a skill type.  Skill consumes HP, and 
    Magic consumes MP.
    Effect Type – Decide what type of effect your skill has.
    Specific Effect – Select a specific effect.
    Effect Area – Decide how many characters your skill effects, 
    from either 1 or an entire party.
    Effect Power – Decide how effective your skill is.  This 
    determines HP damaged for offensive skills, HP healed for 
    healing skills, etc.
    Point Cost – Decide how much HP or MP a skill uses.
    Extra Effect – Choose one additional effect the skill has.
    
    On page 2, you will find the skill display settings.
    
    Visual Effect – Select a visual effect to be displayed when 
    the skill is used in battle.
    Animation – Select what motion the character makes when they 
    use the skill in battle.
    Equipment – Choose equipment for the character to equip in 
    the preview.
    Weapon Visual Effect – Select a visual effect for the 
    character’s weapon in the preview.
    Preview Skill – Lets you preview what the skill looks like in 
    battle.  You can change animations and effects during the 
    preview.  The controls for the preview are listed below.
    
     _____________________________________________
    |Button               |Operation              |
    |---------------------|-----------------------|
    |X Button             |Watch Preview          |
    |O Button             |Exit                   |
    |Square Button        |Select Visual Effect   |
    |Triangle Button      |Select Animation       |
    |L1 Button            |Change Viewpoint       |
    |R1 Button            |Change Viewpoint       |
    |SELECT Button        |Display Operation List |
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |            Creating A Good Game       (M50) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    Creating a good game with RPGM3 is an extremely long process, 
    and takes a lot of planning.  In this part of my guide, I 
    will provide a basic process for you to go through in order 
    to create a good game in time.  Know before you start that if 
    you want to make a good game, you must be devoted to working 
    on your game.  By following the process I have outlined, you 
    should be able to create a pretty good game eventually.  
    Also, it is my advice that you plan out everything listed in 
    the process below, then actually start making your game when 
    all your planning is done.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |       Create A Main Character  (M5a) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    When you start planning out your RPG, the first thing you are 
    going to need is a main character.  It helps to make some 
    background information on the character, such as where they 
    came from.  When you design your main character, you should 
    think about the following:
    
       -What is your character’s origin/Where do they come from?
       -What does your character do for a living?
       -What is your character’s personality?
       -Why is your character in the position they are in?
    
    For example, in my first game, I had a character that came 
    from a farm.  For a living, my character used to farm, but 
    becomes a mercenary.  My character was a caring person, as I 
    was able to show throughout the game, and only became a 
    mercenary because he needed the money the job would pay.  
    My character is in the position he is in because the king 
    hired him to assassinate all the spies living in his kingdom, 
    and if he doesn’t complete his mission, his family will be 
    kicked out of their farm, because they can’t pay the king’s 
    taxes.  Using this as a basis for my game, I was able to 
    create an elaborate storyline, along with many sidequests.  
    
    When designing your character in the character editor, you 
    might first want to create a class for him/her in the class 
    editor.  Now, when you are designing your character, think 
    about the following:
    
       -How does your character’s background influence their 
        stats?
          For example, my character has good strength bonuses, 
          because he had to carry around heavy farm tools as a 
          child.
       -How does your character’s background influence their 
        special skills?
          For example, my character had a special skill that 
          allows him to successfully escape from battle every 
          time, since he has good stealth.  He had good stealth 
          because his family often had to hide from the tax 
          collectors, because they couldn’t pay their taxes.
    
    Remember, when planning and creating a main character, the 
    more you know about your character’s background, the better 
    you are able to make your game.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |           Create Partners      (M5b) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    After you create your main character, he or she is probably 
    going to need a partner.  This is not absolutely necessary, 
    but I think you will notice that most RPGs do have somebody 
    that follows the main character around.  When thinking about 
    partner(s) for the main character, think about the following:
    
       -How does his/her past affect their current personality?
       -What does the character do for a living?
       -Why is the character helping your main character?
       -Where/when does this character join with the main 
        character?
       -Does this character stay with the main character through 
        the whole game?
       -If no, where and why does the character split up with the 
        main character?
    
    For example, I have an elven archer join my character during 
    my game.  My character is journeying to a far-off city, and 
    travels through an elf city on the way there.  The elven 
    ambassador is about to set out the same way my main character 
    has to go, when they meet up.  The elven ambassador joins my 
    character party, then when they reach the city the elf is 
    going to, the elf leaves the party.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |           Create A Bad Guy     (M5c) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    After you have all the main character and all the members who 
    will help him throughout the game, it is time to think about 
    an enemy.  You can’t have any RPG without an enemy, so your 
    main character needs some bad guy to fight or something like 
    that.  In a lot of games, the player wins by beating the bad 
    guy at the end of the game in a boss battle.  When you come 
    up with an enemy, think about the following:
    
       -Why are the main character and this character enemies?
       -What does the enemy do throughout the game to thwart the 
        main character’s plans to stop him/her?
       -What type of resources would this enemy have access to?
        (e.g. An evil dictator would have access to armies.)
       -Does the enemy have any main strengths and/or weaknesses?
       -How does the enemy turn out in the end?  (e.g. He/she 
        dies, becomes good, etc.)
    
    As an example, I played a game where the enemy was a zombie 
    king.  The zombie king was trying to take over the world, and 
    my character was trying to stop him.  Throughout the game, 
    the zombie king sends out various spies and assassins to try 
    and kill my character.  In the end, I had to fight the zombie 
    king, and was able to win by exploiting his weakness, which 
    was the sunlight.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |          Write A Storyline     (M5d) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    After designing all the characters and the enemy, you should 
    write a storyline.  You should write it in some sort of 
    outline form, so everything is easy to find later on when you 
    are making the actual game.  When writing the storyline, you 
    should write down everything, even if you already have some 
    things, write them again.  This helps keep everything a lot 
    more organized.  When I write my storylines, I like to start 
    by coming up with names for everything.  I keep it in outline 
    form, as I described above, so it looks like this.
    
    1. Characters
       a. Main Character
          i. Bob
       b. Partners
          i. Joe
          ii. Steve
          iii. Frank
          iv. Fred
       c. Enemy
          i. Super Zombie
       d. NPCs
          i. Rebel Leader
    2. The World
       a. Field Maps
          i. Zombie World
          ii. Secret Rebel Island
       b. Towns
          i. Zombie World
             1. Zombopolis
          ii. Secret Rebel Island
             1. Rebel Fort
             2. Rotanburg
       c. Dungeons
          i. Zombie World
             1. Super Zombie’s Lair
          ii. Secret Rebel Island
             1. Bear Cave
    
    I could continue on this list and make it another 10 pages, 
    but I think you get the idea...
    
    When writing a storyline though, after you have down the 
    names for everything, start coming up with the actual story.  
    I like to write down things such as quests the player will 
    have to go on, special sidequests, etc.  After you have a 
    storyline, you will have to start actually creating 
    everything.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |           Design The World     (M5e) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    The first step when you’re done writing the storyline is to 
    create the world, but if you haven’t already, create your 
    main character and the rest of the party first.  When 
    creating your world, you should go in a set order.  First, 
    create all of the field maps your game will have.  After 
    those are all done, set to work on your towns, then your 
    dungeons, which will probably take up the most time.  Do not 
    go into the layout editor yet, you will do this when you are 
    done everything else.  The steps required to make good field 
    and dungeon maps are described in Additional Game Mechanics.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |            Create Enemies      (M5f) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    After your world is done, your character needs enemies to 
    fight in it!  Create as many monsters as you wish, and if you 
    want, your main enemy can be created in the character editor, 
    and you can set up a character battle at the end of your 
    game.  Make sure you balance your monster stats, or either 
    the monsters or the player will win almost every time they 
    battle.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |             Create NPCs        (M5g) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    The next step to creating your game is making your NPCs.  
    This will probably take a while, since you will have around 
    100 if you’re creating a fairly big RPG.  When you are doing 
    this, you might want to code some of the NPC events at the 
    same time, or you can wait until later on, because you may 
    want to wait until you place NPCs on maps before coding the 
    events.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |             Create Items       (M5h) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Items can be whatever you feel like making at the time.  You 
    will have several 100s of item most likely, and they will 
    take a long time to make.  Be sure you assign weapons and 
    armor to be equippable by the correct characters, and also 
    make sure you create some unique items to make your game 
    original.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |            Create Events       (M5i) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    After everything else is done, it’s time to start creating 
    all the events that will run your game.  I find it best to 
    create events in the order the player will be going through 
    them, so I don’t confuse myself.  For example, if you have 
    someone ask the player for help, code that event first, then 
    code the event where you find whatever item/information the 
    NPC was looking for, then lastly code the event where the 
    player returns the item/information and gets a reward.  Make 
    sure you also throw in some random sidequests for the player 
    to do in order to receive additional rewards.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |            Layout Editor       (M5j) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    Almost the last thing you will be doing in the creation of 
    your game is using the layout editor.  Once everything else 
    is complete, start placing everything with the layout editor.  
    You will also be adding in shops in this step, so make sure 
    you have prices set for all your items.  Make sure you place 
    everything, from towns and dungeons on fields, to every last 
    NPC and event in buildings, towns, and dungeons.  The order I 
    usually place things in is as follows:
    
    1. Place everything you need to place on your fields.
    2. Place everything you need to place in your dungeons.
    3. Place buildings in towns.
    4. Place everything you need to place in your buildings.
    5. Place everything else you need in your towns.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |            Game Settings       (M5k) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    When you are done everything else, set up all your game 
    settings such as starting money and location.
    
    
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
             |               Playtest         (M5l) |
             O~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~O
    
    When everything is done, playtest!  Run through your entire 
    game, and go pretty much everywhere, even if you know you 
    don’t have to go somewhere, so you can find any glitches or 
    errors you made when creating the game.  Correct any errors 
    you find, add anything you want to add, then let someone else 
    play your game!
    
    
          O---------------------------------------------O
          |              Experience Table         (M60) |
          O---------------------------------------------O
    
    This experience chart will show you how much experience a 
    character will need to level up depending on whether you 
    choose fast, average, or slow character leveling.
    
    Level | Exp - Fast | Exp - Avg. | Exp - Slow |
    ------|------------|------------|------------|
    1     | 0          | 0          | 0          |
    2     | 11         | 15         | 30         |
    3     | 31         | 43         | 89         |
    4     | 71         | 99         | 165        |
    5     | 131        | 183        | 281        |
    6     | 221        | 309        | 453        |
    7     | 356        | 498        | 711        |
    8     | 558        | 781        | 1116       |
    9     | 861        | 1206       | 1723       |
    10    | 1316       | 1843       | 2634       |
    11    | 1999       | 2799       | 4000       |
    12    | 3023       | 4233       | 6048       |
    13    | 4303       | 6025       | 8608       |
    14    | 5903       | 8265       | 11808      |
    15    | 7903       | 11065      | 15808      |
    16    | 10403      | 14565      | 20808      |
    17    | 13528      | 18940      | 27058      |
    18    | 17434      | 24408      | 34870      |
    19    | 22316      | 30560      | 43658      |
    20    | 27808      | 37480      | 53544      |
    21    | 33986      | 45264      | 64665      |
    22    | 40936      | 54021      | 77176      |
    23    | 48755      | 63873      | 91251      |
    24    | 57551      | 74956      | 107084     |
    25    | 67446      | 87424      | 124896     |
    26    | 78578      | 101451     | 144934     |
    27    | 91101      | 117230     | 167476     |
    28    | 105189     | 134982     | 192836     |
    29    | 121038     | 154953     | 221366     |
    30    | 138868     | 177420     | 253462     |
    31    | 158926     | 202695     | 289569     |
    32    | 181491     | 231129     | 330189     |
    33    | 206877     | 263117     | 375886     |
    34    | 235436     | 299103     | 427294     |
    35    | 267564     | 339586     | 485127     |
    36    | 303708     | 385129     | 550189     |
    37    | 344369     | 436365     | 623384     |
    38    | 390113     | 494005     | 705727     |
    39    | 441574     | 558850     | 798363     |
    40    | 499468     | 631800     | 902578     |
    41    | 564598     | 713868     | 1019819    |
    42    | 637869     | 806195     | 1151715    |
    43    | 720299     | 910062     | 1300097    |
    44    | 813033     | 1026913    | 1448479    |
    45    | 905767     | 1143764    | 1596861    |
    46    | 998501     | 1260615    | 1745243    |
    47    | 1091235    | 1377466    | 1893625    |
    48    | 1183969    | 1494317    | 2042007    |
    49    | 1276703    | 1611168    | 2190389    |
    50    | 1369437    | 1728019    | 2338771    |
    51    | 1462171    | 1844870    | 2487153    |
    52    | 1554905    | 1961721    | 2635535    |
    53    | 1647639    | 2078572    | 2783917    |
    54    | 1740373    | 2195423    | 2932299    |
    55    | 1833107    | 2312274    | 3080681    |
    56    | 1925841    | 2429125    | 3229063    |
    57    | 2018975    | 2545976    | 3377445    |
    58    | 2111309    | 2662827    | 3525827    |
    59    | 2204043    | 2779678    | 3674209    |
    60    | 2296777    | 2896529    | 3822591    |
    61    | 2389511    | 3013380    | 3970973    |
    62    | 2482245    | 3130231    | 4119355    |
    63    | 2574979    | 3247082    | 4267737    |
    64    | 2667713    | 3363933    | 4416119    |
    65    | 2760447    | 3480784    | 4564501    |
    66    | 2853181    | 3597635    | 4712883    |
    67    | 2945915    | 3714486    | 4861265    |
    68    | 3038649    | 3831337    | 5009647    |
    69    | 3131383    | 3948188    | 5158029    |
    70    | 3224117    | 4065039    | 5306411    |
    71    | 3316851    | 4181890    | 5454793    |
    72    | 3409585    | 4298741    | 5603175    |
    73    | 3502319    | 4415592    | 5751557    |
    74    | 3595053    | 4532443    | 5899939    |
    75    | 3687787    | 4649294    | 6048321    |
    76    | 3780521    | 4766145    | 6196703    |
    77    | 3873255    | 4882996    | 6345085    |
    78    | 3965989    | 4999847    | 6493467    |
    79    | 4058723    | 5116698    | 6641849    |
    80    | 4151457    | 5233549    | 6790231    |
    81    | 4244191    | 5350400    | 6938613    |
    82    | 4336925    | 5467251    | 7086995    |
    83    | 4429659    | 5584102    | 7235377    |
    84    | 4522393    | 5700953    | 7383759    |
    85    | 4615127    | 5817804    | 7532141    |
    86    | 4707861    | 5934655    | 7680523    |
    87    | 4800595    | 6051506    | 7828905    |
    88    | 4893329    | 6168357    | 7977287    |
    89    | 4986063    | 6285208    | 8125669    |
    90    | 5078797    | 6402059    | 8274051    |
    91    | 5171531    | 6518910    | 8422433    |
    92    | 5264265    | 6635761    | 8570815    |
    93    | 5356999    | 6752612    | 8719197    |
    94    | 5449733    | 6869463    | 8867579    |
    95    | 5542467    | 6986314    | 9015961    |
    96    | 5635201    | 7103165    | 9164343    |
    97    | 5727935    | 7220016    | 9312725    |
    98    | 5820669    | 7336867    | 9461107    |
    99    | 5913403    | 7453718    | 9609488    |
    
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                       Contact Info                  (N00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    If for any reason, you need to contact me, send an e-mail to 
    me with RPGM3 FAQ as the subject, so I don’t accidentally 
    delete the message.  I can be reached at goalieguy6@gmail.com, 
    or message me on GameFAQs.  Please do not message me on IGN or 
    GameSpot, because I don’t check my messages as I do on 
    GameFAQs.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                          Credits                    (O00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    Me – Writing this Guide!
    My friends and family – Giving me ideas for this FAQ!
    All the Hosting Websites... – Hosting the FAQ!
    
    Special Thanks To:
    
    Agetec – Making the Game =)
    Logitech – Making the USB Keyboard which cut the time used to 
    make a game almost in half!
    Everyone at The RPG Maker Pavilion – Providing help and 
    checking things I was unsure of.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |            Cool Stuff To Know About This Guide      (P00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    This guide currently contains:
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    O===========================================================O
    |                   References/Resources              (Q00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    In order to help me make this guide as accurate as possible, 
    I had some help from the sources below.
    
    RPG Maker 3 Instruction Manual – By Agetec Inc.
    RPG Maker Community at The RPG Maker Pavilion
    A few different game samples made by various people I know.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                   Copyright/Legal Info              (R00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    ©2008-2009 GoalieGuy6.
    
    Note: This guide is copyrighted to me, GoalieGuy6.  This 
    guide is for personal use only, and may not be altered, 
    modified, or redistributed.  This guide may not be used to 
    make a profit, and may not be reposted on any site other than 
    the following without my permission.  If you wish to post 
    this guide on your site, please contact me.  Use of this 
    guide on any other website or as a part of any public display 
    is strictly prohibited, and a violation of copyright.
    
    All trademarks and copyrights contained in this document are 
    owned by their respective trademark and copyright holders.
    
    The following websites have my permission to host this FAQ.
    
    GameFAQs.com
    IGN.com
    GameSpot.com
    Supercheats.com
    CheatCC.com
    
    If you see this guide on a website other than those five, 
    please contact me at goalieguy6@gmail.com with RPGM3 FAQ as 
    the subject.
    
    
    O===========================================================O
    |                      Need More Help?                (R00) |
    O===========================================================O
    
    Come across a problem?  Can't find the answer in this guide?  
    Here's a few sites that you may be able to find the answer to 
    your problem at.
    
    The RPG Maker Pavilion - http://www.rpgmpavilion.com/
    The RPG Maker Magazine - http://www.rpgmmag.com/
    
    In fact, I learned a few of the tips and tricks in my guide 
    over there.  Head on over sometime, I'm sure you'll find 
    plenty of people willing to help you solve your problems and 
    help you develop your game.

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