Dragon Ball Z Budokai Tenkaichi 2
-Advanced Mechanics-
PlayStation 2

---------------------------------
- By ZeroAnnihilated
- Copyright 2008 ZeroAnnihilated
- Date Jul/1/2008
- Updated April/20/2014
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This guide is very extensive, using additional technical terminology that the 
average player may not initially understand. It is advised that one learns how 
to use the Ctrl+F function to find the desired key words as this document is 
created through progression. Some aspects of technicality may be mentioned in 
the beginning, but not dissected in depth until much later. While the Table of 
Contents is fairly detailed, using the Ctrl+F function will help the player 
navigate at a much faster pace.
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Table of Contents

I Intro
II Controls/Buttons
III Basic Mechanics
	(A) - Lock On
	(B) - Basic Movement
		1. Direction
		2. Dash
		3. Step-In
		4. Side Steps/Back Steps
		5. Ascension/Descent
		6. Ascension/Descent Hops
	(C) - Combos
		1. The Combo Set
			a. Channeling
		2. Combo Set Hooks and Transitions
		3. Supplementary Combo Sets
	(D) - The Charge Meter
	(E) - Ki/Ki Blasts
		1. Ki Work
		2. Dash Melee
	(F) - Offensive Teleportation
		1. Base Offensive Teleport
		2. Banishing Attack
	(G) - Sparking Mode
		1. Methods
		2. Advantages
	(H) - Ki Stocks
	(I) - Hit Counter
	(J) - Super Blasts
		1. Blast 1
		2. Blast 2
		3. Ultimate Blasts
	(K) - Throws
	(L) - Natural Cancels
	(M) - Defense
		1. Blocking
			a. Focal Adherence
				I. Aggression
		2. Deflection
		3. Dragon Dash Counter
		4. Defensive Teleportation
		5. Step-In
	(N) - Priority
	(O) - Blast 1 Incorporation
	(P) - Counter Stance
	(Q) - Transformations/Fusions
IV Advanced Mechanics
	(A) - Recovery Rate
		1. Offensive Recovery
		2. Defensive Recovery
	(B) - Advanced Combos
		1. Ground & Pound
		2. Telattack
		3. Hook Recovery
		4. Greening/Redding
		5. Ki Whoring
		6. Ki Control
	(C) - Advanced Movement
		1. Dash Cancellation
		2. Shift
			a. Fake-Out
			b. Switch
		3. Sling Shot
		4. Lift Strike Switch
	(D) - Advanced Defense
		1. Combo Breaker
		2. Ascension Evasion/Surfing
		3. Rise Over Run
		4. Auto Teleport
		5. Last Chance Defense
	(E) - Fixed Animation Exploitation
		1. Chaining
	(F) - Grid Check
		1. Knocking
		2. RA Capitalization
		3. Throw Check
		4. Dragon Dash Check
V Z Mechanics
	(A) - Z Movement
		1. Grounded Will
			a. Enigma Dash
			b. GW Fake-Out
			c. GW Switch
			d. Close Tango
			e. Wide Tango
			f. Mad Dash
			g. MD Tango
		2. Free Will
			a. Double Taps
			b. FW Fake-Out
			c. FW Switch
			d. FW Tango
		3. G2 Sling Shot
	(B) - Z Defense
		1. Recoil
		2. G2 Recoil
		3. Swipers
			a. Side Swiper
			b. Forward Swiper
		4. G2 Absent Recoil
		5. Sling Shot Recoil
		6. Challenging
		7. IT Counter
	(C) - Z Offense
		1. Ki Dash
			a. Energy Cloud
		2. Beat Down
			a. Dust Cloud
		3. FW Sweep
		4. G2FW Sweep
		5. Taxing
		6. GW Sweep
		7. G2GW Sweep
		8. Absent Recoil Sweep
		9. G2 Sling Shot Sweep
VI Accreditation
VII Conclusion
VIII Legal/Contact Information

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I. Intro
--------


"I did yesterday what they wouldn't, so today I can accomplish what they 
can't." - Dwayne Johnson

It is intriguing to me how this expression holds true to so many aspects of 
life. If you are anything like me, you possess a desire to challenge the 
opposition, break records, hold your fist in the air and declare dominance as 
you have finally and effectively seized glory. As this expression proves to 
hold true, one does not obtain glory by merely hoping it lands in his or her 
lap while they continue to play by the rules and accept limitations. One 
obtains glory by breaking these limitations, running when opposition screams 
"Stop!", and ignoring those who claim: "Impossible". Champions are not born, 
they are made. Only through hard work and dedication can one truly be the 
best... but I decided to make things a little easier on you.

Within this document, you will find advanced Tenkaichi 2 technical and 
mechanical manipulation. As this guide reaches far beyond the novice level, 
you as the competitor will do well to work your way through the game's 
tutorials first in order to obtain a better understanding of what is 
considered basic knowledge. A great deal of basic knowledge may be repeated in 
this guide as a reference for advanced techniques, but I still urge you to 
prepare yourself before moving forward.


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II. Controls/Buttons
--------------------


R1 = Ascend/Jump
R2 = Descend
R3 = Transform
L1 = Lock On
L2 = Charge Ki
X  = Dash/Step-In
O  = Guard
Tr = Ki Blast
Sq = Melee

U = Up/Forward
D = Down/Back
L = Left
R = Right

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III. Basic Mechanics
--------------------


What are the basics? Why are they so important? It is often very easy to get 
caught up in learning advanced techniques and not paying enough attention to 
the basics that can lead to one's downfall. The basics are the foundation of 
advanced game-play. If one does not take the time to master the basics, 
education in the advanced aspect of any game is purely a waste of time.


III (A) -Lock On-
-----------------
First and foremost, in order to engage your opponent, you must be locked on. 
This is performed by pressing and holding L1 while near your opponent until 
your Lock On takes hold. Understand that different characters have different 
Lock On ability.

-Normal Search:

	(This search allows the player to Lock On to characters that are 
	visibly seen within the arena. Opponents that are hiding behind rocks 
	and building can't be seen and are therefore protected from the 
	player's Lock On ability.)

-Z Search:

	(This search allows the player to Lock On to characters that are 
	visibly seen within the arena. Opponents that are hiding behind rocks 
	and building can't be seen and are therefore protected from the 
	player's Lock On ability. However, with this Z-Type search, the player 
	can sense the opponent's Ki Signature by means of watching his/her 
	radar; found at the bottom right of the screen. This Ki Signature will 
	be displayed as a pulsing light. This will help the player know which 
	direction to search in terms of where the opponent's position may be. 
	However, it is also important to know that some characters have the 
	ability to hide their Ki by means of performing certain Blast 1's and 
	some androids have the innate ability to remain hidden from such a 
	search as they do not emit a Ki Signature.)

-Scouter Search:

	(This search allows the player to Lock On to characters that are 
	visibly seen as well as those who are hiding behind rocks and 
	buildings. Therefore, they are not protected from the player's Lock On 
	ability. However, the scouter can be destroyed during combat, which 
	will then change their search ability into the normal type. This type 
	of Lock On is subject to characters that have the scouter equipped. 
	Additionally, the scouter will also pick up on the opponent's Ki 
	signature as well.)

-Android Search:

	(This search allows the player to Lock On to characters that are 
	visibly seen as well as those who are hiding behind rocks and 
	buildings. Therefore, they are not protected from the player's Lock On 
	ability. Unlike the scouter, this Lock On ability can't be affected 
	from combat. This type of Lock On is subject to certain Androids.)

It is important to know that each player will automatically lock onto one 
another when in close proximity of each other. In other words, if you are able 
to see the other opponent, you can simply walk close to him and both 
characters will automatically lock-on to each other.

Once you have achieved the Lock On, the camera will focus on your opponent and 
you may begin your battle strategy.


III (B) -Basic Movement-
------------------------


III-B-1. Direction:
-------------------
Without direction, a player is lost. When using the Left Joystick or D-Pad 
(Directional Pad) to control the character, pressing 
Left/Right/Forward/Backward will direct the character accordingly. If this is 
not the case, it may be time to get a new controller. It must also be noted 
that the character will only move in the specified direction until the player 
releases the button of direction. If the player is not pressing the 
directional button, the character will not move in that direction. As most 
characters have the ability of flight, the characters are shown to hover in 
the suggested direction instead of walking. 


III-B-2. Dash:
--------------
As briefly explained in III-B-1, most characters in the game are granted the 
ability of flight. While the ability of flight does not completely limit the 
character's ability to dash, it is definitely an aspect of the game to 
consider when regarding advanced ability. However, these are the basics so 
let's not get ahead of ourselves.

To dash, one must become familiar with the "X" button. Understand that when 
Locked On to the opponent, pressing "X" without any directional influence will 
initiate a neutral Dash that will seek the opponent. Understand now that 
directional influence can be incorporated during the Dash. In other words: 
Once the Dash has begun, the player can continually manipulate the directional 
approach of the Dash until it concludes by pressing any direction. It is in 
such a case that Forward and Back become Up and Down respectively. It is 
important to take note of the difference between directional influence of a 
neutral dash and initiating a directional Dash. For example, pressing a 
direction to influence a neutral Dash is not the same as Dashing in that 
direction. Pressing Dash at the same time as holding a direction will allow 
you to Dash in that direction without seeking the opponent. However, the 
opponent will still be the focal point of your dash, which will simultaneously 
cause the player to Dash at a circumference to the opponent. When initiating a 
directional Dash, Forward and Back are not translated to Up and Down like the 
neutral Dash's directional influence.

Regardless of the direction you choose, you must also take note of the 
distance of the Dash as it will conclude on its own. It is possible to end the 
Dash prematurely by pressing "X" a second time or even holding a different 
direction and initiating a new Dash.


III-B-3. Step-In:
-----------------
Understanding the limitations of the Dash is key to maximum maneuvering 
capability. The more we know, the more we can manipulate. The distance between 
the player and the opponent is the defining factor that separates a Dash from 
a Step-In. This factor is the difference between close quarters combat and 
distanced combat. This factor; this line of scope-differential definition is 
called the Step-In Barrier. Outside of this barrier, the Dash is just as 
described above (III-B-2). However, within this barrier, the player enters the 
circumference of close quarters combat. Movement changes to befit close combat 
ability.

When inside the Step-In Barrier, pressing the neutral "X" will result with the 
Step-In. The Step-In is a technique that contains many praiseworthy features:

-The Step-In can be used to link the first two combo sets together (if first 
combo set is a full combo set)
-The Step-In ensures the player invulnerable to physical hand-to-player 
contact (This includes Rush Attacks).
-The Step-In can be used transitionally to combo Hooks.
-The Step-In can be used transitionally to counter stances or sway ability.

(All of this will be explained in further detail as the document progresses.)


III-B-4. Back Steps/Side Steps:
-------------------------------
As discussed in III-B-3, there are maneuvering limitations within the Step-In 
Barrier. Such limitations have already been discussed in regarding the Step-
In. It is also important to note that Dashing to the side or back will not 
result with a Dash either. Instead, side stepping and back stepping are 
initiated. Depending on the character and whether or not the player is 
airborne, such movement may result with side flips and back flips. Such 
movement is performed by simply pressing the desired direction at the time of 
pressing "X". Pressing Forward while attempting to Dash inside the Step-In 
Barrier will result with the player attempting to grab the opponent. This will 
be discussed later in the document.

Take note: Like the Step-In, Side Hops and Back Hops can transition into 
counter stances, which will also be discussed later.


III-B-5. Ascension/Descent:
---------------------------
In this section, you will learn the difference between grounded and airborne 
maneuvering. As most characters have the ability of flight, the Ascension and 
Descent ability will be used in the advanced section extensively. However, it 
is important to understand the limitations of Ascension and Descent on the 
basic level to understand how to manipulate them for advancement.

-Grounded:

	(When positioned on the ground (not hovering), trying to Descend (R2) 
	will get you nowhere. However, trying to Ascend (R1) will allow the 
	player to Jump about 10 feet into the air. The Jump contains its own 
	combat potential, but we'll get to that later as well. If left alone, 
	the Jump will conclude with the player falling back to the ground. The 
	player can use this Jump to seek the opponent by holding Forward if 
	he/she so chooses. Jumping to the Left/Right/Back is also allowed.)

-Airborne:

	(When positioned high in the air (Distanced), trying to Descend (R2) 
	will result with the player falling in a controlled manner until the 
	button is released. In other words, you're not falling so much as 
	controlling your flight altitude. Therefore, you may be descending but 
	you are still in flight mode. Respectively, trying to Ascend (R1) will 
	result with the player increasing altitude through flight. Once the 
	Ascension/Descent buttons are released, the player's character will 
	retain concluded position in the air (unless the descent resulted with 
	grounded position).)

(Also take note: Characters that do not possess flight capability will not 
retain airborne positioning very long and descending will result in gravity 
taking full control; brining the player back to ground level.)


III-B-6. Ascension/Descent Hops:
--------------------------------
Much like Side Steps and Back Steps discussed in III-B-4, the Step-In Barrier 
effects airborne Ascension/Descent. Instead of simply changing altitude, the 
Step-In Barrier changes the movement into hops. So when the player attempts to 
Ascend in close quarters combat, he will Hop diagonally (Up + Back) a single 
time. Respectively, when the player attempts to Descend in close quarters 
combat, he will Hop diagonally (Down + Back) a single time. Also like Side 
Steps and Back Steps, these Ascension/Descent Hops can transition into counter 
stances (discussed later).


III-B-7. Dragon Dash:
---------------------
The player is allowed to use this Dash regardless of the Step-In Barrier. 
Scope differential has no bearing on the Dragon Dash but the player must be 
willing to sacrifice Ki to use it. Yes, Dragon Dash consumes Ki. Therefore, it 
is always important to keep your Ki bars at full capacity as often as 
possible. Remember this concept: "It is always important to keep your Ki bars 
at full capacity as often as possible." For there are many aspects of game-
play that are viable through Ki consumption. You may not always need it, but 
it is better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.

To Dragon Dash, the player must press "L2" and "X" at the same time with any 
direction to Dragon Dash in that direction. If the player chooses to allow the 
Dragon Dash to persist, it will eventually come to a conclusion when the Ki 
meter runs out.

Take note that when two players Dragon Dash into each other at the same time, 
they will enter the "clash" simulation where both players will battle it out 
in a Joystick struggle for the most hits. Whoever get the most hits in the hit 
counter wins the struggle and knocks the opponent away, usually to be followed 
up with continued attack. The average player can reach numbers up in the 60's 
and 70's. To make sure one wins these struggles, it is important to understand 
how to engage the struggle with the best hand position possible. While many 
players believe the struggle should be won by moving the joysticks side to 
side, the player must learn how to move his/her hands in the circular motion 
while moving the forearm side to side. This will take practice. Ensure that 
the left joystick is placed at the base of the thumb (flexed) and the right 
joystick at the heel. When ready, the player should be able to reach numbers 
as high as the upper 80's.


III-B-8. Dragon Ascension/Descent:
----------------------------------
Much like what is explained for the Dragon Dash in III-B-7, the Dragon 
Ascension/Descent is performed by using "L2" incorporation with 
Ascension/Descent. Therefore, to Dragon Ascend, the player must hold "L2" and 
press "R1". If the player is already grounded, the button input skips past the 
Jump and goes straight into Dragon Ascension. To Dragon Descend, the player 
must hold "L2" and press "R2". Much like when using basic Descent on the 
ground, trying to Dragon Descend while already grounded will do nothing. 
Finally, like Dragon Dashing, the Step-In Barrier holds no limitation on the 
Dragon Ascension/Descent, but also like the Dragon Dash, the Dragon 
Ascension/Descent also consumes Ki.


III (C) -Combos-
----------------
One of the most fundamental properties of any fighting game is building a 
proper conception of how to link attacks together. One of the most basic ways 
of doing this resides in the combo system of Tenkaichi 2. Here, I will be 
explaining the most basic aspects of the combo system of Tenkaichi 2 to help 
build a foundation for advancement as this document progresses.


III-C-1. The Combo Set:
-----------------------
At its most basic level, a combo can be created by merely tapping the "Square" 
button 5 times. This is called the Combo Set. Attain the concept of a Combo 
Set well, for it will be one of the more significant building blocks for 
combat manipulation; The Combo Set is the root of combo exploration.

There can be more than one Combo Set in a given combo. Such sets can be linked 
together by means of various extensions; all of which, I will cover in this 
document.

For now, the first combo set is performed by the following:

	-Sq, Sq, Sq, Sq, Sq-

While practicing, it is important to take note exactly what happens during 
this process. Many aspects are used in the incorporation of advanced game-
play. Such as:

-If the player's character is smaller than the opponent's character, how does 
this affect the Combo Set?

	(In order for smaller characters to effectively perform melee upon the 
	opponent, the smaller character must use his/her flight ability to 
	hover to the height necessary for effective combat.)

-If the player's character is taller than the opponent's character, how does 
this affect the Combo Set?

	(Depending on how tall the player's character is in relation to the 
	height of the opponent's character, it can be possible that some 
	attacks residing in the Combo Set may miss the opponent.)

-Knowing that the player only hit the Square button five times, how many times 
did the character land an attack?

	(Some characters only expel a single melee attack per press of the 
	Square button. Other characters expel more. Knowing the character's 
	physical melee is important for advancement.)

-How much damage does the player's character deal to the opponent as opposed 
to other characters?

	(Some characters may seem to have great combo capability, but it is 
	also important to note that some characters deal a greater amount of 
	damage in their melee than others.)

-What effect does the environment have on the player's ability to work the 
Combo Set?

	(When grounded, performing Combo Sets can be affected by the variations 
	of ground elevation. Therefore, there are times that the Combo Set may 
	fail due to gravitational interference.)

-Once the Combo Set has concluded, what happens to the opponent?

	(Once the Combo Set has concluded without interference, the last hit 
	will push the opponent away a few feet; keeping the opponent at a 
	standing position.)

III-C-1-a. Channeling:

	(Channeling is a mechanical aspect of the game that guides one's Base 
	Melee to attack one's opponent from the front or the rear. When 
	positioned at the opponent's side, performing Base Melee will guide the 
	player to the opponent's front or rear, depending on which initial 
	position the player holds in respect to the opponent's profile. If one 
	begins the Combo Set while positioned closer to the opponent's front, 
	further Base Melee will direct one to the front. If one begins the 
	Combo Set while positioned closer to the opponent's rear, further Base 
	Melee will direct one to the rear. Many games, especially in the past, 
	will force the player's attacks to be redirected to the opponent's 
	front, as the creators seemed to always give the opponent a chance to 
	defend. For example, in Mortal Kombat Deception, if Player 1 were to 
	begin attacking Player 2 from behind, Player 2 would immediately begin 
	to face Player 1 even while suffering through the assault. Other games, 
	such as Tenkaichi 2, allow the player's attack to continue to affect 
	the side of initiation, be it the back or the front.)


III-C-2. Combo Set Hooks and Transitions:
-----------------------------------------
Now that the Combo Set has been established, it is time to move on to the 
Extensions and Transitions.

-Hooks:

The Hook is a break in the Combo Set that can be used to transition into 
additional combo sets or end the combo set as a terminus. Depending on which 
Hook the player chooses to perform, the terminus may include more than one 
extended terminus level. The Hook resides in the "Triangle" button that must 
interfere in the Combo Set before the Combo Set concludes. As the Combo Set 
consists of five "Square" buttons, one of the last four Squares must be 
replaced by "Triangle" to perform a Hook. It is also important to note that 
the Hook can also be charged for stronger effect.

Hook 1: Heavy Finish

	(The player's character will perform a physical attack that stuns the 
	opponent in such a way that he/she must press the "Circle" button for 
	faster recovery. Depending on the character, the Heavy Finish may be 
	extended into the Heavy Crush terminus by hitting the "Triangle" button 
	two more times and finish with "Square". In such a case, the player's 
	character will hit the opponent with two more Heavy Finish attacks 
	followed by one more melee attack that knocks the opponent away.)

Hook 2: Kai Cannon

	(The player's character will perform a physical attack that stuns the 
	opponent temporarily. If the Kai Cannon is charged fully, the attack 
	will push past the opponent's guard and knock them away, sometimes de-
	Locked. Depending on the character, if the Kai Cannon is fully charged 
	and effective, the Kai Cannon may be extended into another terminus by 
	hitting the "Triangle" button once. In such a case, the player's 
	character will teleport forward to the opponent and knock them down to 
	the ground.)

Hook 3: Sweep

	(The player's character will perform a physical attack that sweeps the 
	legs of the opponent. If the opponent is not able to "Tech" properly, 
	he/she will fall flat on his/her back. Most characters are granted the 
	Sweep combo extension by hitting the "Triangle" button two more times 
	and finish with "Square". In such a case, the player's character will 	
	hit the swept opponent several feet away, teleport forward to hit the 
	opponent into the air and finally, teleport up to the opponent and 
	knock him/her down to the ground. This is known as the Dragon Tornado 
	Terminus.)

Hook 4: Lift Strike

	(The player's character will perform a physical attack that lifts the 
	opponent several feet into the air. Most characters are granted the 
	Lift Strike combo extension by hitting "X" to ascend to the opponent's 
	position and finish the combo in one of four terminuses:

	1. Triangle, Square, Square, Square, Triangle

	...in which case the player's character will initiate with a Heavy 
	Finish, followed by three base melee attacks and concluded with a Smash 
	Attack that knocks the opponent to the ground, de-Locked.

	2. Triangle, Square, Square, Square, Square

	...in which case, the player's character will initiate with a Heavy 	
	Finish, followed by three base melee attacks and concluded with a final 
	base melee attack that sends the opponent tumbling to the ground.

	3. Square, Square, Square, Square, Triangle

	...in which case, the player's character will initiate with a base 
	melee attack, followed by three base melee attacks and concluded with a 
	Smash Attack that knocks the opponent to the ground, de-Locked.

	4. Square, Square, Square, Square, Square

	...in which case, the player's character will initiate with a base 
	melee attack, followed by three base melee attacks and concluded with a 
	final base melee attack that sends the opponent tumbling to the ground.

	Take note that the Lift Strike combo is considered to be the player's 
	most powerful combo in terms of damage to hit ratio.)

Hook 5: Rolling Hammer

	(The player's character will perform a physical attack that turns the 
	opponent around, allowing the player to gain rear positioning. If the 
	player already has rear positioning, the attack will turn the opponent 
	around, allowing the player to gain frontal positioning.)

Transition 1: The Step-In

	(As already explained before in III-B-3, the Step-In can be used to 
	link the first two combo sets together if first combo set is a full 
	combo set. In other words, if a Hook is used in the first Combo Set, 
	the player cannot use the Step-In to advance to further Combo Sets. As 
	explained in III-C-1, once the Combo Set has concluded without 
	interference, the last hit will push the opponent away a few feet; 
	keeping the opponent at a standing position. It is at this point where 
	the Step-in can be utilized to transition into the second Combo Set. 
	After the last hit of the first complete Combo Set, the Step-In will 
	close the distance and the player is allowed to continue into the 
	second Combo Set.)

Transition 2: Flying Kicks

	(The Flying Kicks are initiated as a Hook, yet serve as a transition. 
	Therefore, if the player's character possesses the Flying Kicks 
	ability, the player can interrupt the first Combo Set with this Hook 
	and simultaneously transition into the second Combo Set.)

-Hook Limitations: Regardless how long the player is able to stretch the combo 
along, any single Hook can only be used once without ending the combo. 
Therefore, it is important for Hook users to incorporate a variety of Hooks 
into their combos if they wish to continue the combo uninterrupted. While 
Hooks can be considered as a combo's terminus, it is also used as a means of 
transitioning into the 2nd Combo Set.

-Hook Management: Each character's fighting style may consist of a variety of 
Hooks. Some have more than one of the same Hook in his/her combo, some may 
have one of each Hook. There may be some characters who's combos lack certain 
Hooks. To discover these Hooks, the player must replace one of the last four 
"Square" buttons of the Combo Set. However, the formula for each Hook depends 
entirely on which character the player decides to use. For example:

	Character 1: (Square, Square, Square, Triangle = Heavy Finish)
	Character 2: (Square, Square, Square, Triangle = Kai Cannon)

As any of the last four "Square" buttons can be replaced by Triangle to engage 
the Hook, it is still possible that Character 2 possesses a Hook that 
Character 1 possesses, just in a different position of the Combo Set.

	Character 1: (Square, Square, Square, Triangle = Heavy Finish)
	Character 2: (Square, Square, Triangle = Heavy Finish)

Ultimately, it is up to the player to learn the combo formula their character 
possesses to manage his/her Hooks effectively. Understand that every character 
possesses the ability to perform the Sweep by replacing one of the last four 
"Squares" of the Combo Set with Down + Triangle. Also understand that every 
character possesses the ability to perform the Lift Strike by replacing one of 
the last four "Squares" of the Combo Set with Up + Triangle. However, the 
Rolling Hammer is a significantly special technique that only a handful of 
characters possess and it's special quality also resides in the fact that it 
can be performed absent a Combo Set. By pressing Left/Right + Triangle, the 
player can spin the opponent around whether the opponent is being subject to a 
Combo Set or even if he/she were simply standing still.


III-C-3. Supplementary Combo Sets:
----------------------------------
Supplementary Combo Sets are the Combo Sets that follows the initial Combo 
Set. These Combo Sets can be reached through various means, including the 
Hooks and Transitions explained in III-C-2. The physical attacks that the 
player's character displays in the Supplementary Combo Sets are usually 
different than the attacks displayed in the initial Combo Set. Therefore, 
understanding when a specific Hook may be available must not always be judged 
by the physical display of the character, but the press of the button.

To reach the first Supplementary Combo Set, the player can use a Hook in the 
first Combo Set including the Flying Kicks and immediately transition 
accordingly. Additionally, and more often seen in experienced players, the 
player can use the Step-In to follow the initial complete Combo Set to 
transition into the first Supplementary Combo Set. It is at this point that 
the player must understand that the aftermath from a natural terminus of 
Supplementary Combo Sets is not like that of the initial Combo Set.

The aftermath of a Supplementary Combo Set is decided on many factors, from 
how the Supplementary Combo Set was approached to what the opponent is doing 
as an attempt to fight back. The approach is derived from transitions and 
Hooks but keep in mind that the Flying Kicks Hook is also considered to be a 
transition, like the Step-In.

Aftermath types:

-Initial Aftermath:

	(Once a player has completed the initial Combo Set with a string of 
	five "Squares", the opponent is then pushed away from the player by the 
	last melee attack. The opponent is still standing, yet not fully 
	recovered. This short distanced push is the Initial Aftermath. It is 
	this Aftermath distance that allows the Step-In to transition into the 
	first Supplementary Combo Set.)

-Boost Aftermath:

	(Once a player has completed the Supplementary Combo Set with a string 
	of five "Squares", the opponent is then pushed away from the player by 
	the last melee attack. The opponent is still standing yet not fully 
	recovered. The distance is significantly farther than the Initial 
	Aftermath.)

-Collapsed Aftermath:

	(Once a player has completed the Supplementary Combo Set with a string 
	of five "Squares", the opponent is then pushed away from the player by 
	the last melee attack. The opponent is no longer standing. Instead the 
	opponent tumbles to the ground several feet away from the player. The 
	distance is significantly farther than the Boost Aftermath.)

-Greening Aftermath:

	(Explained in III-D.)

-Red Aftermath:

	(Explained in III-D.)

-Smash Aftermath:

	(Explained in III-D.)


III (D) -The Charge Meter-
--------------------------

At the bottom right corner of the fighting screen, a player can find his/her 
radar. To the right of this radar, the player will find his/her Charge Meter. 
This meter is the deciding factor of how powerful your charged attacks will 
be. There are three levels of the Charge Meter that the player must consider 
during combat.

	1. Green: Weakest Level
	2. Red: Medium Level
	3. Full: Strongest Level

In order to charge an attack, the player must hold the attack button down. The 
main buttons to consider when dealing with basic attack are "Square" for base 
melee and "Triangle" for Hooks and Ki Blasts. The concept of the charge is as 
easy as it sounds. The longer the player holds the attack button down, the 
higher the Charge Meter will fill; from Green, to Red and finally to Full. 
Take note here that when a player decides to charge a melee attack, he/she can 
choose which direction the attack will approach the opponent by holding Up, 
Left, Right, Down or simply allowing the attack to conclude for a Neutral 
direction. This is a great addition to the game as the opponent must decide 
which direction to defend an oncoming attack.

It is at this point that the player must understand the remaining Aftermath 
Types that were not detailed in III-C-3.

-Greening Aftermath:

	(When the player charges the "Square" button and releases during the 
	Green level, the opponent is guided through the Greening Aftermath; in 
	which case the opponent is not pushed anywhere. The opponent is still 
	standing yet not fully recovered.)
 
-Red Aftermath:

	(When the player charges the "Square" button and releases during the 
	Red level, the opponent is guided through the Red Aftermath; in which 
	case the opponent is knocked in the desired direction of the attack, 
	plummeting to the ground much further than the Collapsed Aftermath. The 
	opponent is no longer standing.)

-Smash Aftermath:

	(When the player charges the "Square" button and releases during the 
	Full level, the opponent is guided through the Smash Aftermath; in 
	which case the opponent is hit with a very powerful attack that sends 
	the opponent flying limp in the desired direction of the attack. The 
	opponent is no longer standing.)

At this time, it is important for the player to understand that different 
characters possess different charge speeds. Therefore it is important for the 
player to become familiar with the character at hand on all aspects of combat, 
even to the details regarding charge speed.

When regarding the speed of the charge, this factor will fluctuate; depending 
on how the battle progresses. For as the player lands attacks upon the 
opponent, the Charge Meter will begin to flash red. The more attacks landed 
during a short period of time, the faster the Charge Meter will flash. 
Regardless of any specific character's innate charge speed, the faster the 
Charge Meter flashes, the faster it will charge when engaged. Therefore, the 
player must always keep in mind that even as his/her offense progresses, the 
situation is not always the same. The player must also keep in mind that the 
speed of the flash is strictly related to charged melee, NOT charged Ki 
Blasts.

Final note: Any Super Blasts such as Blast 2's and Ultimate Blasts that can be 
charged will also use the Charge Meter.


III (E) -Ki/Ki Blasts-
----------------------
The player's Ki Meter is the key that allows the execution of Ki based moves 
such as Ki Blasts, Blast 2's and Ultimate Blasts. While Blast 2's and Ultimate 
Blasts may be initiated in a variety of strategic methods, once they are 
initiated, they use the associated Ki according to their design, unless 
adjusted through potara incorporation. The Ki Meter is located directly below 
the player's headmost health bar. The player is granted five Ki Guages that 
measure up to the character's full Ki Meter. This meter can be filled by a 
means of Ki Charging via the pressing and holding of the "L2" button and will 
deplete as Ki Blasts, Blast 2's and Ultimate Blasts are discharged or as 
Dragon Dashing is performed.


III-E-1. Ki Work:
-----------------
Ki Blasts are discharged by pressing the "Triangle" button. Similarly to 
melee, Ki Blasts can be released in succession as a means to connect one 
attack to the next. Therefore, if one were inclined to do so, one could expel 
several Ki Blasts into a Ki Blast combo. However, I would advise that the 
player keep a close eye on the Ki Meter as Ki management is very important in 
any Dragon Ball Z game. Also, different characters can only expel a certain 
amount of successive Ki Blasts at a time. Get to know the characters.

As Ki Blasts are important to incorporate into different methods of combat, it 
is also important for the player to understand the different ways Ki Blasts 
can be dispersed as well as the differences in Ki usage. This opens up an 
understanding of how one manages his/her Ki for full effect. Now that the 
concept behind Ki Blasts, Dashes, Jumps and the Charge Meter have been 
established, it is safe to move on to the different forms of Ki Blast 
incorporation.

-Normal Ki Blasts:

	(In this form, the Ki Blast requires a greater deal of Ki in order to 
	expel a single Ki Blast. Therefore, if a player were to consecutively 
	press the "Triangle" button for successive Ki Blasts, it would deplete 
	the Ki Meter fairly quickly.)

-Dashing Ki Blasts:

	(Unlike the Normal Ki Blasts, the Dashing Ki Blasts are released by 
	simply pressing the "Triangle" button once during a dash for a flurry 
	of successive Ki Blasts; All of which require a mere fraction of the Ki 
	required for the same number of Normal Ki Blasts. While using the 
	Dashing Ki Blasts during side Dashes can be effective for establishing 
	a secure battling distance between the player and the opponent, the 
	highest damage such successive Ki Blasts will reach will be if all Ki 
	Blasts manage to hit the opponent. Therefore, for the highest damage, 
	using a neutral Dashing Ki Blast attack should do the trick.)

-Jumping Ki Blasts:

	(Much like the Dashing Ki Blasts, the Jumping Ki Blasts are released by 
	simply pressing the "Triangle" button once. Except this time, the blast 
	is being performed during a Jump. Also like the Dashing Ki Blasts, the 
	Jumping Ki Blasts require a mere fraction of the Ki required for the 
	same number of Normal Ki Blasts as a flurry of Ki Blasts are released.)

-Charged Ki Blast:

	(The Charged Ki Blast is performed much like the Charged Melee Attack, 
	except with the "Triangle" button. These blasts may have different 
	effects depending on the character. For example, some character may 
	have similar Normal Ki Blasts, but when charged might be expelled as 
	something completely different. Here are a few of the different Charged 
	Ki Blasts one might expect:

	1. Destructo Disk: Cuts through guard, even in Charged Ki Blast Form.
	2. Stunner: Not enough to knock the opponent down, but enough to stun 
	them.
	3. Paralyzer: Leaves the opponent temporarily paralyzed.
	4. Strong Ki Blast: Like a Normal Ki Blast, but bigger and more 
	powerful; will knock the opponent down.
	5. Multi Ki Blast: The character disperses several Ki Blasts at once.

	...Charged Ki Blasts can be incorporated into Normal Ki Blasts, Dashing 
	Ki Blasts and Jumping Ki Blasts.)

It is also important for the player to understand that Ki Blasts have a nature 
of their own that is directly related to the character. Not only the number 
and type of Ki Blast as explained above, but the speed and accuracy of the Ki 
Blast as well. Some characters may disperse a flurry of Ki Blasts that go all 
over the place, while only one or two actually it the opponent. Then there are 
some that are extremely accurate and will hit the opponent most of the time. 
Some Ki Blasts are expelled in a circular fashion while other characters shoot 
their Ki Blasts in a straight line. It is important to get to know the 
characters.

Finally, one must understand that the Charge Meter may not apply the same for 
each character when regarding Ki Blasts. It is important for the player to 
understand how the Charge Meter applies to Ki Blast incorporation for 
different characters so one can have a variety of attack options available at 
all times. Some characters may only have one type of Charged Ki Blast. The 
difference of force in Charge may vary in relation to damage dealt, but the 
type of Ki Blasts may not vary. However, some characters may have more than 
one type of Ki Blast available that depends on the three levels of Charge 
specified in III-D. For example:

Super Saiyan 4 Gogeta possesses 4 levels of Ki Blasts.

	1. Base Ki Blast (Consisting of normal Ki Blasts/Green Aftermath)
	2. Green Ki Blast (Consisting of a larger Ki Blast/quick paced/Green 
	Aftermath)
	3. Red Ki Blast (Consisting of two large Ki Blasts/slower 
	paced/Collapsed Aftermath)
	4. Full Ki Blast (Consisting of three large Ki Blasts/Slower 
	paced/Collapsed Aftermath)

Again, one must get to know the characters.


III-E-2. Dash Melee:
--------------------
As the player begins to understand how attacks can be incorporated into the 
Dash by means of Ki Blasts, it is also important to understand that melee 
attacks (even charged ones) can also be incorporated into the Dash and Jump 
maneuvers. However, it is important to note that directional influence can 
only be applied to the Dash Melee Attack, not the Jump Melee Attack. However, 
if the Jump Melee Attack does make full contact, the player can follow this 
attack with a Sweep by following the attack with the "Triangle" button. This 
of course can lead into the Sweep Combo Terminus or whichever means the player 
decides works best. If the Dash Melee Attack makes full contact, the player 
can follow this attack with two more melee attacks, the last one smashing the 
opponent into the ground. This terminus is called Sonic Impact and is 
performed by Dashing at the opponent, landing a "Square" onto the opponent and 
then immediately following with "Triangle" and concluding with "Square". These 
Dash/Jump attacks are great circumstances to begin Combo Sets and continue the 
assault accordingly, assuming Sonic Impact is not engaged.

Additionally, when regarding Dash Melee Attacks, one must also understand that 
charged melee attack can be incorporated into Dragon Dashes as well. It is in 
such a case that there are two charge levels: Weak and Strong. If charged less 
than full power, the Charged Dragon Dash Melee attack will simply hit the 
opponent with the same power as a medium-fully charged Dash Melee Attack, 
allowing the player to continue with Combo Set incorporation. If charged at 
full power, the Charged Dragon Dash Melee attack will knock the opponent away 
in the same fashion as a Standing Smash Attack. However, it is important to 
note that a medium-fully charged Dash Melee or a weakly charged Dragon Dash 
Melee attack will connect in a strong manner, which will be regarded in the 
same fashion as a Supplementary Hook but without recovery incorporation 
(discussed later). If this Supplementary Combo finds its natural terminus via 
"Square", the combo will end with Collapsed Aftermath.


III (F) -Offensive Teleportation-
---------------------------------
As the Dragon Ball Z games have progressed, the creators have applied further 
emphasis on the teleport system. While teleports have been established in 
defensive purposes in previous games, the Tenkaichi 2 system of offensive 
teleports allow the player to teleport at will, as long as he/she has the 
means to do so in terms of Ki. Offensive teleports consume Ki, so one must 
learn to manage his/her Ki levels well and recognize when using offensive 
teleports are the most optimal choice during combat. It is in such a case that 
one must also keep his/her eye on the opponent's Ki Meter as well; to decide 
whether or not engaging in a teleport dance with the opponent is a wise 
decision. Understand that there are potara's that can be added to the 
character that allow the player to teleport without consuming Ki. It would be 
wise to keep this in mind.

To fully understand the offensive teleport system, one must understand that 
there are different teleport types that can be used offensively.


III-F-1. Base Offensive Teleport:
---------------------------------
The base offensive teleport is performed during the Combo Set. Which Combo Set 
an offensive teleport is to be used is solely for the player to decide. 
However, one must understand where these teleports reside. Every natural Combo 
Set consists of five "Squares". The offensive teleport resides between 
"Square" activations, therefore the offensive teleport can only be activated 
within the attack span of post-first "Square" and before the last "Square" of 
any single Combo Set. In other words, a natural Combo Set that consists of 
five "Square" buttons includes the potential of three offensive teleports.

To perform the offensive teleport, one must press "Square" to initiate a Combo 
Set. Assuming the next move would be to teleport offensively, the player would 
then press "Circle" and any direction such as Forward, Left, Right or Back. If 
performed correctly and the Ki Meter has enough Ki to allow the movement, the 
player's character will directionally teleport according to the direction 
desired. Much like the side Dash, the opponent is the focal point of your 
directional teleport. Therefore, if the player is directly in front of the 
opponent and inside the Step-In Barrier, teleporting to the left or right will 
not simply result with the player teleporting in a straight line to the left 
or right, but teleporting around the opponent from the left or the right. As a 
well versed opponent may be able to react in time to turn around and defend 
him/herself, further offensive teleports may be required to gain rear 
positioning.

If the opponent engages in the same strategy to gain rear positioning on the 
player at the same time the player is attempting to gain rear positioning on 
the opponent, this is a display of the offensive teleport dance. It is also 
important to understand that the Combo Set does not reset with every offensive 
teleport. Therefore, if the player performs an offensive teleport after the 
first hit of the Combo Set, the next melee performed in succession to the 
offensive teleport will continue with the second hit of the Combo Set. This 
can be confusing as the Hit Counter does not rise when regarding offensive 
teleport incorporation, but as explained before, it is important to know 
exactly what is going on in combat at all times.


III-F-2. Banishing Attack:
--------------------------
The Banishing Attack is considered to be an offensive form of teleporting, but 
only in certain conditions with inclusive limitations. Like the offensive 
teleport, the Banishing Attack can only follow a melee attack. However, the 
Banishing Attack can only be activated once the player has successfully 
connected a Smash Attack. As explained in III-D, the Smash Aftermath of a 
Smash Attack sends the opponent flying limp in the desired direction. Once 
completed, the player must immediately press "Triangle" to engage the 
Banishing Attack. In this instance, the player will teleport offensively to a 
position beyond the opponents trajectory and perform another Smash Attack. 
This Smash Attack can be directionally influenced, yet a neutral Banishing 
Smash Attack will knock the opponent downward to the ground. These attacks are 
easy to dodge, so as a player's skill and experience progress, this display of 
offensive teleporting will be seen less and less.


III (G) -Sparking Mode-
-----------------------
As explained in III-E, the Ki Meter consists of five Ki Guages. When all five 
Ki Guages are full, the player has reached full power. However, there is a 
level beyond full power called Sparking. When the player is in Sparking Mode, 
there are additional attacks and abilities granted to the player's combat 
repertoire. In order to reach Sparking Mode, the player must use one of three 
methods, two of which are subject to the character(s) at hand.


III-G-1. Methods:
-----------------
-Charging Beyond:

	(When a player has reached full power, there is a level beyond full 
	power called Sparking Mode. This specific method of getting to this 
	mode is to keep charging Ki even when the Ki Meter is full. The 
	eligibility for Sparking Mode resides in the question of how many Ki 
	Stocks the player has attained during the match. In order to reach 
	Sparking Mode, the player must have at least one Ki Stock. Each time 
	Sparking Mode is reached via charging Ki, a single Ki Stock is 
	consumed. Therefore, it is important for the player to keep an eye on 
	his/her Ki Stock consumption which is located under the player's 
	character icon, which is located next to the character's health bar.)

-Ki Stock Operation:

	(Most characters possesses a different set of Ki Stock Operations. Of 
	which, include different effects. Some Ki Stock Operations result with 
	the player instantly achieving Sparking Mode, usually at the cost of 
	multiple Ki Stocks. It is very important that the player gets to know 
	the character as such operations are explained in the practice menu. 
	This will be explained further as the document progresses.)

-Fusion:

	(Some characters can fuse together in tag-team format to create a new 
	character displayed in the show as a much more powerful being. As a 
	result of fusion, the fused character may be granted instant Sparking 
	mode. To learn how to fuse, check later in the document.)


III-G-2. Advantages:
--------------------
When in Sparking Mode, the player is granted a variety of techniques and 
freedom of offense. Offense in melee as well as offensive teleportation. In 
fact, depending on the character, teleportation may be as free as directional 
movement. However, it is important to understand that the Sparking Meter 
drains as time passes. This time span can be lengthened with potara 
incorporation, but inclusion is for the player to decide. Once a Blast 2 or 
Ultimate Blast is used, the player is immediately taken out of Sparking Mode, 
as Blast 2's use normal Ki and the Ultimate Blast uses normal Ki as well, but 
can only be accessed through Sparking Mode.

-Advantage 1 = Melee Longevity:

	(When in Sparking Mode, most characters' melee is extended. Giants are 
	not afforded this luxury but the average character get the perks. 
	Sparking Mode allows the player to combine the initial Combo Set with 
	the first Supplementary Combo Set in a rinse & repeat fashion without 
	Step-in/Hook/Transition requirement. In other words, the very last 
	melee attack of the initial Combo Set is immediately succeeded by the 
	first melee attack of the first Supplementary Combo Set. The last melee 
	attack of the Supplementary Combo Set is immediately succeeded by the 
	first melee attack of an additional initial Combo Set. This will 
	continue as long as the player continues to spam the "Square" button or 
	until the Sparking Meter runs out. A player can easily force the Hit 
	Counter to reach 99 hits with very little effort.)

-Advantage 2 = Offensive Teleport Longevity:

	(As long as the first Advantage holds true to the character at hand, 
	then so must the mechanical system of offensive teleports. For each 
	teleport is placed between two natural melee attacks. According to the 
	nature of the base offensive teleport, the player cannot perform 	
	offensive teleports before the first melee attack of the initial Combo 
	Set, and after the last melee attack of the Combo Set. However, as 
	Advantage 1 explains Melee Longevity, the player is granted a 
	continuation of offensive teleports as long as melee is continued. 
	Therefore, a player can punch, teleport, punch, teleport, repeatedly 
	until Sparking Mode runs out.)

-Advantage 3 = Free Teleportation:

	(Certain characters are allowed to teleport on a free basis when in 
	Sparking Mode. In essence, the character can teleport without the 
	requirement of melee incorporation by merely holding a direction and 
	pressing "Circle". This ability will last as long as the player remains 
	in Sparking Mode.)

-Advantage 4 = Additional Banishing Attacks:

	(As explained in III-F-2, the Banishing Attack follows the fully 
	charged melee. When in Sparking Mode, the player may be awarded several 
	Banishing Attacks in succession to each other as well as Dragon Homing 
	Attacks. It is important that the player gets to know the characters.)

-Advantage 5 = Additional Dragon Homing:

	(The Dragon Homing is very similar to that of the Banishing Attack as 
	it follows the fully charged melee. Instead of immediately following 
	the charged melee with "Triangle", the player will immediately press 
	"X". This will result with the player engaging Dragon Dash without 
	using "L2" to change Dash type. This particular Dash only has one type 
	of attack, fully charged melee. This occurs regardless of whether the 
	player decides to charge the attack or not. In other words, the player 
	will immediately follow the fully charged melee with "X" for Dragon 
	Homing and press or hold "Square" to knock the opponent away, yet 
	again. The only advantage to charging the melee involved in the Dragon 	
	Homing is to confuse the opponent on defensive timing. Depending on the 
	character chosen, when in Sparking Mode, the player may be awarded 
	several Dragon Homing Attacks in succession to each other as well as 
	Banishing Attacks. It is important that the player get to know the 
	characters.)

-Advantage 6 = Camera Angled Smash Attack:

	(The camera angled smash attack is performed by holding "L2" and 
	charging a melee attack with "Square" and any direction. If performed 
	correctly, the camera will zoom in on the player performing the attack. 
	When the player connects the attack, it will automatically de-lock the 
	opponent and result with Smash Aftermath.

-Advantage 7 = Ultimate Blast:

	(While Blast 2's can be used as long as the Ki is available, the 
	Ultimate Blast can only be activated when in Sparking mode. This is 
	usually the character's signature attack and typically the most 
	powerful attack the character has in his/her arsenal.)

-Advantage 8 = Sparking Combo:

	(The Sparking Combo, as suggested in the title is tightly connected to 
	being in Sparking mode. This is probably the most favorited combo among 
	the Tenkaichi community. This combo is initiated by using Dragon Dash 
	and instead of transitioning into the charged "Square", the player will 
	make contact with the opponent by use of the "Triangle". Once achieved, 
	the player will then unleash a spamming flurry of "Squares". At this 
	point, the camera will do one of two things. Either the camera will 
	zoom around the two combatants in a circular motion with the two 
	fighters as the focal point or the camera will go absolutely crazy, 
	displaying several angles in succession until the combo is concluded. 
	To conclude the combo, one can simply continue pressing "Square" until 
	the Sparking Mode runs out or one can press "Triangle" again to knock 
	the opponent away with Smash Aftermath. The completed terminus of the 
	Sparking Combo is performed by holding "L2" and hitting "Triangle" as 
	the opponent is sent flying away.)

-Advantage 9 = Auto Deflection:

	(When in Sparking Mode, some characters are awarded the additional 
	attribute of Auto Deflection. This will be discussed further as the 
	document progresses.)


III (H) -Ki Stocks-
-------------------
Blast Stocks are in many cases, just as important as Ki in the game of 
Tenkaichi 2. Blast Stock Operations include allowing the player to fight under 
different circumstances than the opponent. Blast Stock Operation is conducted 
through the player's Blast 1 ability. The player is able to activate one of 
two types of Blast 1. The base Blast 1 and the secondary Blast 1. Such Blasts 
can range in terms of effects from allowing the player to automatically 
teleport through the opponent's attacks, use Instantaneous Transmission, reach 
Sparking Mode immediately and many, initiate an explosive wave to knock people 
off their assault, android barriers that can accomplish the same or even 
nullify Ki Blasts or even Blast 2/Ultimate Blasts and many more. In order to 
activate the base Blast 1, the player would hold "L2" and press "Circle". In 
order to activate the secondary Blast 1, the player would hold "L2", "Up" and 
press "Circle". Know this, in order to perform the operation, the player must 
have attained the necessary amount of Ki Stocks. Different effects require a 
different number of Ki Stocks.

How to attain Ki Stocks? Ki Stocks increase in number as the match progresses. 
However, there are faster ways to attain Ki Stocks. When the player is able to 
deflect Ki Blasts, manually defensive teleport through the opponent's attacks 
or use a Combo Breaker, the Ki Stocks will increase much faster. Such methods 
will be discussed later as the document progresses.


III (I) -Hit Counter-
---------------------
The Hit Counter is one of the most important aspects of the game. At its most 
basic level, the Hit Counter simply counts the hits the player connects to the 
opponent, simple enough. However, as the combo system of Tenkaichi 2 is much 
deeper on the advanced level than shown by the Hit Counter, one must learn to 
understand that Combos are connected together as a means of understanding the 
Hit Counter, the player's position in combo activity, the physical attacks of 
the given Combo Set and how the Hit Counter is affected by Hooks, Transitions, 
Offensive Teleports, Recovery Teleports, Cancels and Charged Melee. It is for 
this reason that though the Hit Counter may reset, it does not mean the Combo 
itself has reset. Most Tenkaichi 2 players will never realize the depth of the 
Combo system simply because they can only count numbers. Understanding the 
broken limitations of the game's hidden mechanical system is where the true 
combo system lies. Such concepts will be discussed as the document progresses.


III (J) -Super Blasts-
----------------------
When considering a character's main blasts, there are only three categories to 
mention. The Blast 1 as mentioned in III-H, the Blast 2 and the Ultimate 
Blast.


III-J-1. Blast 1:
-----------------
(See III-H)


III-J-2. Blast 2:
-----------------
Aside from combo ability, Blast 2's are one of the most effective abilities 
the character possesses. That being said, the creators made sure to vary these 
blasts into different types of Blasts. Some are based on melee animation, some 
are based on Beam type Blasts, some are unblockable. This is one more 
important reason for the player to get to know the characters. It is also 
important for the player to understand that most Blast 2's cannot be initiated 
within the Step-In Barrier. In such cases, the character will automatically 
perform a back flip/back step in order to reach the appropriate position for 
Blast 2 execution. To perform the Blast 2, the player must first know that 
he/she has enough Ki to perform the Blast. Some Blasts require more Ki than 
others. It is important to know the characters.

Much like the Blast 1, there is a Base Blast 2 and a Secondary Blast 2. In 
order to perform the Base Blast 2, the player must hold "L2" and press 
"Triangle". In order to perform the Secondary Blast 2, the player must hold 
"L2" and "Up" and then press "Triangle".

Types of Blast 2's:

-Type 1 = Kamehameha:

	(The Kamehameha type blast is fairly powerful. What makes the 
	Kamehameha special is the fact that when it connects, it does not only 
	deal damage once, but a string of damage as long as the blast is still 
	active. These type of blasts typically have a wide circumference of 
	blast. These blasts can be charged according to the Charge Meter OR can 
	be initiated through a close-up animation sequence.)

-Type 2 = Death Beam:

	(The Death Beam type blast is fairly powerful as well, but its damage 
	is instantly dealt upon impact. Depending on the specific blast, this 
	technique may be unblockable. It is important for the player to know 
	the character. These blasts can be charged according to the Charge 
	meter OR can be initiated through a close-up animation sequence.)

-Type 3 = Bladed:

	(These types of blasts are based on the bladed attribute. In other 
	words, these blasts consist of blasts resulting from the swing of a 
	Sword or construction of Destructo disks. These specific blasts require 
	no charge and are initiated through the close-up animation sequence. As 
	a major perk, these blasts are unblockable.)

-Type 4 = Super Explosive Waves:

	(The Super Explosive Wave can be performed inside the Step-In Barrier. 
	As this Blast can be performed without the back step delay, characters 
	that possess this Blast are automatically held in high regard as 
	dangerous characters; Not only because of the instant attack available, 
	but also for the fact that an opponent cannot simply dodge one time in 
	order to defend this attack. The Super Explosive Wave creates a wide 
	circumference around the player. Anyone within the circumference will 
	have to deal with the Blast in their own way, or become victim to it. 
	This attack deals seven instilled attacks. These attacks were once 
	believed to be waves as suggested by the name of the attack. However, 
	this is now believed to be false. The first Wave unleashed by the 
	player is considered to be a wave. The remaining six attacks are 
	considered to be pulses. These attacks cannot be charged and always 
	require the close-up animation sequence.)

-Type 5 = Rush Attack:

	(The Rush Attack is one of the most effective blasts available in the 
	game. There are three reasons for this consideration. First, the Rush 
	Attack is considered to be unblockable by the Base Guard. There is a 
	stronger form of Guard that can deflect the opposing attacker and this 
	will be discussed later in the document in Defense. Second, the Rush 
	Attack is an animation sequence once the attack connects to the 
	opponent. Once the animation begins, the opponent has no choice but to 
	let the animation conclude before continuing combat; at which time of 
	release, the opponent is left limp and in need of recovery. Third, the 
	player's character is able to become the blast, so to speak. In other 
	words, there is no projectile. The player's character covers the 
	distance and deals the damage accordingly. All Rush Attacks require the 
	close-up animation sequence. There are different types of Rush Attacks 
	to consider, all of which are based on three categories:

	Category 1: Speed/Range
	-----------------------

	-Speed/Range 1
	This Rush Attack is extremely fast but covers short distances; cannot 
	be directionally influenced.

	-Speed/Range 2
	This Rush Attack is a bit slower but covers a longer distance; can be 
	directionally influenced (noted as the average Rush Attack).

	-Speed/Range 3
	This Rush Attack is much slower than the first two but covers a great 
	length of distance; can be directionally influenced.

	Category 2: Assault Location
	----------------------------

	-Assault Location 1
	This Rush Attack is always performed in a specific part of the arena. 
	The Wall will never get in the way. A good example of this: SSJ4 
	Vegeta's Rush Attack.

	-Assault Location 2
	This Rush Attack is performed wherever the initiation took place. 
	Therefore, if both combatants were next to the wall when the Rush 
	Attack connected, the Rush Attack conclusion may result with the 
	opponent being thrown along the wall, or even into it.

	Category 3: Release Trajectory
	------------------------------

	-Release Trajectory 1
	This Rush Attack will send the opponent in the upward trajectory. A 
	good example of this Rush Attack is performed by Kid Buu.

	-Release Trajectory 2
	This Rush Attack will send the opponent in a forward trajectory. A good 
	example of this Rush Attack is performed by Goten.

	-Release Trajectory 3
	This Rush Attack will send the opponent in a downward trajectory. A 
	good example of this Rush Attack is performed by SSJ Goku.)

-Type 6 = Volley Blasts:

	(Some characters have the Volley Blast ability. This is one of the more 
	suitable attacks for keeping the opponent on the defense. Like the 
	Super Explosive Wave, Volley Blasts require the close-up animation 
	sequence. This type of blast can vary from a considerably small amount 
	of blasts to a higher range of blasts in succession in a given 
	direction. However, the accuracy of the blasts may vary depending on 
	the character.)

-Type 7 = Berzerker:

	(This type of blast has breaks in a chain of Blasts. There are only a 
	small handful of characters that possess this type of blast. Some 
	characters possess more damage and attacks within this blast. Super 
	Android 17 holds the most attacks in the Berzerker Blast. Others have a 
	significantly less amount such as Super Janemba.)

-Type 8 = Explosive:

	(This type of blast is created through concentrated explosive energy 
	near the opponent or directed toward the opponent. These attacks are 
	extremely difficult to defend against, much like the Super Explosive 
	Wave. When these blasts connect, they deal several hits of damage. 
	These attacks require the close-up animation sequence.)

-Type 9 = Energy Ball:

	(This type of blast is created as a concentrated ball of energy that 
	the enemy simply throws in the opponent's direction. These blasts can 
	be seen in a variation of sizes. While most of these can be used on 
	command of the attack, the Spirit Bomb must be created first before 
	execution. These attacks can be charged according to the Charge Meter 
	OR by means of the close-up animation sequence.)


III-J-3. Ultimate Blast:
------------------------
Ultimate Blasts can only be performed while in Sparking Mode. That being said, 
they share a major similarity in Blast 2 networking as their types vary in the 
same regard. As a general rule, a character's Ultimate Blast will leave the 
opponent de-locked. However, it is important to know that just because an 
Ultimate Blast is supposed to be the characters strongest feature, it is 
important to get to know the characters. Some characters may have other Blasts 
that are far more effective than their Ultimates. Once Sparking Mode has been 
achieved, in order to perform the Ultimate Blast, one must hold "L2" and 
"Down" and press "Triangle". Ultimate Attacks require the close-up animation 
sequence.


III (K) -Throws-
----------------
Throws are one of the hardest obstacles to overcome at beginner level. 
Therefore, it is also one of the more important aspects of combat that one 
must learn before moving on to advanced combat.

Throws are performed by three methods. The Base Throw, the Giant Throw and the 
Counter Throw.

-Base Throw:

	(The base throw is a technique that all characters possess. This throw 
	is executed by the player grabbing the opponent and performing some 
	form of melee to the opponent knocking them away or throwing them in a 
	specified direction. This grab is performed by holding "Forward" and 
	pressing "X" while inside the Step-In Barrier.)

-Giant Throw:

	(The Giant Throw cannot be performed by just any character. Some 
	characters possess this ability, some do not. It is important for the 
	player to get to know the character. The Giant Throw can only be 
	performed when the opponent is laying on the ground, face up and with 
	the player positioned at the opponent's feet. If the character 
	possesses the ability to perform the Giant Throw, the player must hold 
	"Forward" and press "Triangle". In such a case, the player will grab 
	the opponent's ankle and lift the opponent into the air in a swinging 
	motion. There are different methods to get the opponent into such a 
	position, such as Sonic Impact or the Sweep, but it is ultimately up 
	for the player to decide through experiencing the game through combat.)

-Counter Throw:

	(When the player chooses to initiate the counter stance, the counter 
	attack may come in different forms. Sometimes it will be a counter 
	melee attack, sometimes it will be a mirage and sometimes it will 
	result with a counter throw. If this be the case, the player will knock 
	the opponent's hands away and grab him/her for the throw the player's 
	character possesses. There are several methods to reach the counter 
	stance which will be explained as the document progresses.)


III (L) -Charge Cancels-
------------------------
One of the most trickiest quality of any decent combat game is the Charge 
Cancel system. Many fighting games possess this quality and are therefore 
considered to possess a great deal of tactical and technical depth. For what 
is more dangerous than an opponent that can fake his/her attack before 
launching a different one? One may find this concept in martial arts and 
boxing as feints play a very significant part of one's strategy. Convincing 
the opponent that a specific attack is worthy of defending, only to be hit 
with an attack the he/she never saw coming is one of the most lethal strategic 
means a combatant can possess.

The Charge Cancel may seem self explanatory, but simply understanding the 
concept of the Charge Cancel does not ensure that professional performance is 
guaranteed. There is more to consider than the core concept. Technical 
manipulation such as the Charge Cancel requires timing and practice. Not to 
mention, the pace of high level Charge Cancelling combos will leave the hand 
sore for days during the adaptive levels of advancement.

Unlike a lot of games that possess the Charge Cancel system, Tenkaichi 2's 
combat system allows nearly every melee attack to be charged. With a slim few 
exceptions, every melee attack that can be charged... can be cancelled. 
Comparative example:

	-Normal Fighting Game Combo: Punch, Punch, Kick, Kick, KICK (in this 
	case, only the highlighted "KICK" can be charged and therefore is the 
	only attack of this string that can be cancelled.)

	-Tenkaichi 2 Combo: PUNCH, PUNCH, KICK, KICK, KICK (As one might 
	notice, all attacks are highlighted, suggesting that all attacks of the 
	string can be charged and therefore cancelled.)

While the person defending the first combo will only need to worry about the 
ONE attack that can be charged and cancelled, the person defending the combo 
in Tenkaichi 2 will need to be weary of every attack the opponent is 
presenting as they all can be charged and cancelled.

To Charge Cancel: The player must charge a melee attack in accordance to the 
Charge Meter. As this attack may be initiated via "Square" or "Triangle", the 
player must charge the respective button. Before the Charge Meter reaches 
maximum charge, the player must tap one of the remaining face buttons to 
cancel the attack. For example: If the player charged a base "Square" attack, 
the player would then tap one of these remaining buttons: "Triangle", 
"Circle", or "X" in order to cancel the charged melee. If the player were 
charging a Hook via "Triangle", the player would tap one of these remaining 
buttons: "Square", "Circle", or "X" in order to cancel the charged Hook.

As a means of enlightenment, here are some examples of when a Charged Cancel 
can be incorporated during the different aspects of combat.

-Base Melee Cancels:

	(As explained already, a base "Square" can be charged. During this 
	charge, the melee can be cancelled. What makes this technical concept 
	so dangerous is the fact that nearly every punch or kick thrown by the 
	player can be cancelled. If one were to recall from III-D, when a 
	player decides to charge a melee attack, he/she can choose which 
	direction the attack will approach the opponent by holding Up, Left, 
	Right, Down or simply allowing the attack to conclude for a Neutral 
	direction. When the player has the ability to cancel these charged 
	melee attack, this coincides with the strategic value of constantly 
	keeping the opponent guessing.

	One of the most difficult things to do when regarding Base Melee 
	Cancels, is to perform them fast enough for the next base melee to 
	continue the hit counter increment. The opponent's recovery time is 
	very fast in Tenkaichi 2 when it comes to base melee, so to be able to 
	continue a combo without breaking the hit counter increment is 
	extremely difficult, but possible. Once accomplished, the player is 
	then able to break one of the first mechanics of the game. For every 
	Combo Set following the Initial Combo Set is the Supplementary Combo 
	Set. The Supplementary Combo set consists of the physical means 
	dissimilar to those of the Initial Combo Set. When the player is able 
	to cancel the Initial Combo Set or even the Supplementary Combo Set via 
	Base Melee Cancels, the physical attacks of the following Combo Set 
	will be displayed as the Initial Combo Set while the hit counter 
	continues to rise. It is in such a case that one must consider which 
	Combo Set he/she is actually performing, for as the hit counter will 
	continue to rise, the player will continue to stay inside the realm of 
	one particular Combo Set. For example:

	If the player begins the Initial Combo Set and begins to cancel the 
	combos via Base Melee Cancels and continues to attack, he/she may work 
	through several Combo Sets, without ever reaching the first 
	Supplementary Combo Set. Therefore, the hit counter could reach 99 if 
	the player is skilled to do so without ever reaching the first 
	Supplementary Combo Set. However, if the player at some point chose to 
	transition to the first Supplementary Combo Set via Step-in or Flying 
	Kicks, the player will then have another opportunity to cancel this 
	combo via Base Melee Cancels for a continuous first Supplementary Combo 
	with the physical appearance of Initial Combo Set attacks. Regardless 
	of how many times the Initial Combo Set is cancelled, the player will 
	always be able to transition into the first Supplementary Combo Set by 
	simply allowing the Initial Combo Set to conclude naturally. In this 
	case, the last non-cancelled combo set will produce the Initial 
	Aftermath, allowing the Step-In to bridge the gap and transition into 
	the first Supplementary Combo Set. However, it is also important to 
	understand that if at any point the non-cancelled Supplementary Combo 
	Set concludes, this will produce a Collapsed Aftermath.)

-Hook Cancels:

	(Much like the Base Melee Cancels, Hooks can be cancelled in the same 
	fashion. As Hooks are just as much a part of the combo as base melee in 
	terms of cancel ability, one would only need to make the proper 
	adjustments to the Hooks specifically assigned to the character at 
	hand. As explained in III-C-2, the formula for each Hook depends 
	entirely on which character the player decides to use. As long as the 
	player is able to remember which Hook goes where in the Combo Set 
	formula, he/she will always know which attack he/she is cancelling. It 
	is important to get to know the characters. As one may have already 
	deduced, the Hook is cancelled by charging the "Triangle" button at the 
	specific position of the Combo Set formula and then tapping one of the 
	remaining three face buttons before the charge reaches maximum.)


-Dash Melee Cancels:

	(The Dash melee attack is very useful, but it does have its flaw. For 
	when the opponent is sent into a collapsed aftermath, the Dash Melee is 
	very effective in remaining offensive. For though the opponent may be 
	spiraling out of control, the melee from the dash attack has the 
	ability to stop the collapse and bring the opponent back to standing 
	position, but the recovery is not complete. In this case, the player 
	can continue to attack and work into an Initial Combo Set, even if the 
	"true" combo is Supplementary. Once again, it is important to keep an 
	eye on the Hit Counter. The problem with the Dash Melee is that when 
	the opponent blocks the attack, the player's offensive recovery is 
	longer than that of the opponent's ability to simply let go of guard 
	and begin his/her own assault. It is in this case that the Dash melee 
	should only be used when the player feels it would be a safe tactic. 
	When the opponent recognizes the attack before connection, the 
	attacking player can be in for quite a consequence.
	
	However, as the Dash Melee can be charged, it can therefore be 
	cancelled as well. This will allow the attacking player to judge what 
	the opponent is able to do in response to a Dash Melee before 
	connection and decide if cancelling is the best option. It is important 
	to remember that the Dash possesses two attacks: the Dashing Melee 
	explained in III-E-2 and the Dashing Ki Blast explained in III-E-1. As 
	the standing position possesses an astounding variety of attack 
	options, it is sometimes better to cancel the Dash Melee and bring the 
	player to standing position as the player's Dash approaches the 
	opponent. As the opponent is likely to be blocking for the anticipated 
	Dash Melee, one's Dash Melee Cancel can bring an immediate advantage to 
	the player as one who is blocking is already forced into defense.

	Though it might already be clear as to how the Dash Melee Cancel is 
	performed, it is always a good idea to verify for greater 
	understanding. When Dashing at the opponent, the player must charge a 
	melee attack via "Square". Before the melee has reached full charged, 
	the player must then cancel the attack by simply tapping one of the 
	remaining three face buttons. The player will cancel the Dash Melee 
	attack and immediately be brought to fighting stance, ready to execute 
	the next technique.)

-Jump Melee Cancel:

	(The Jump Melee Cancel is strictly related to the Jump Melee, also 
	known as the Spiral Slash. This technique is performed when the player 
	is planted on the ground first. For the player's character will not 
	jump if he/she is not already grounded. Regardless of the direction of 
	the jump, there are only two directions of melee attack that the player 
	must take into consideration. When jumping forward, left, right or 
	neutral and charging the Jumping Melee, the attack will automatically 
	zone in on the opponent. It is at this point that one must understand 
	that if the player is too close to the opponent, it is possible that an 
	uncontrolled Jumping Melee could overstep the opponent and miss the 
	target; landing on the rear side of the opponent, facing the opposite 
	direction. When jumping backward and charging the Jumping Melee, the 
	attack will continue in that trajectory. If the initial charged melee 
	makes contact to the opponent, the transitional terminus may be 
	activated by pressing "Triangle" to initiate a Sweep. This sweep can 
	then transition into the remaining transitional terminus of the Dragon 
	Tornado.

	As suggested by previous cancelling techniques, the initial Melee 
	attack residing in the Spiral Slash can be cancelled by charging the 
	"Square" button and tapping any of the remaining face buttons before 
	the charge reaches maximum. It is important to understand these 
	concepts of the Jumping Melee Cancel as this will be a reference point 
	for advanced technical ability explained as the document progresses.)


III (M) -Defense-
-----------------
"Invincibility lies in defense; the possibility of victory in the attack."
-Sun Tzu

Any knowledgeable combatants of any real fighting game knows that defense is 
just as important as offense. While one cannot win without a strong offense, 
one cannot lose with a strong defense.

In order to ensure that one has a strong defense, one must understand the 
different methods of defense. These methods include the Guard, Deflecting, 
Dragon Dash Counter, Defensive Teleportation, Offensive Teleportation, Step-In 
Evasion, Side-Step Evasion, Priority, Blast 1 Incorporation and Counter 
Stance.


III-M-1. Guard:
---------------
At the basic level, blocking with the Guard is the most common form of 
Tenkaichi 2 defense. This stems from the concept that most games only have one 
button assigned for the Guard and therefore are suggested to use that button 
for most if not all defense purposes. As this document progresses, one might 
find that the defense system of Tenkaichi 2 is far more advanced than initial 
expectations.

In this section of the document, three major concepts must be taken into 
consideration: Base Guard, Strong Guard and Focal Adherence.

-Base Guard:

	(First, the simplest form of defense must be understood. In order to 
	fully understand the defense, one must understand the offense. As a 
	single punch may be initiated through neutrality, as such does a guard 
	of neutrality exist. As another melee attack may be initiated through 
	directional influence, as such does the guard possess directional 
	influence. For example: As discussed in III-D, when a player decides to 
	charge a melee attack, he/she can choose which direction the attack 
	will approach the opponent by holding Up, Left, Right, Down or simply 
	allowing the attack to conclude for a Neutral direction. As this is the 
	case, one must understand that the defending player can hold Guard and 
	directionally influence where the Guard will absorb the blow by holding 
	Up, Left, Right, Down or simply holding a neutral Guard. By 
	understanding this concept, the player should be quick to judge which 
	direction the opponent's attack is approaching for a proper and 
	successful block. While a neutral Guard will defend perfectly fine 
	against a Green or Red Charged Melee, the Full Charge carries a 
	different outcome. It is also within this lesson that the player must 
	also understand the consequences for each resulting successful block 
	and misjudged block. There are three results one must expect during the 
	Base Guard in regarding the Full Charged Melee:

	-Result 1: 100% 
	When the player chooses the Guard direction that matches the opponent's 
	melee attack, the player will completely block the opponent's 
	advancement; of which a thunderous sound of acknowledgement will 
	resonate. It is in this case that the opponent's attack will be stopped 
	in its track and the opponent will bounce off of the player's Guard.

	-Result 2: 50%
	When the player chooses the Neutral Guard position that does not match 
	the opponent's Melee attack or when the player chooses a Guard of 
	directional influence when the opponent's Melee attack is neutral, the 
	50% result takes place. In such a case, the player is able to stop the 
	attack from inflicting damage, but the Guard is consequently broken. As 
	the Guard breaks, 3/2 Ki Guages are consumed. It is in this case that 
	the opponent may have time to take advantage, for the recovery of the 
	broken Guard may not be fast enough to block the opponent's following 
	attack. If the player's Ki Meter possesses less than 3/2 Ki Guages 
	during the Guard Break, the player must undergo Rest Recovery. In this 
	state, the player must press the "Circle" button repeatedly to recovery 
	Ki until the Base Ki level is reached. During which time, the player is 
	unable to Move, Attack or Guard.

	-Result 3: 0%
	When the player chooses the opposite direction of Guard than the 
	opponent's melee attack of directional influence, this will result with 
	full impact and therefore result with the Smash Aftermath. For example: 
	If the opponent were releasing a fully charged Upward Melee attack and 
	the player were holding block while holding Up; expecting to block an 
	attack from above, the player will be knocked away through Smash 
	Aftermath in the upward trajectory.

-Strong Guard:

	(When regarding the Guard, one might come to find that blocking energy 
	based attacks such as Ki Blasts or even the Kamehameha doesn't stop 
	100% of the attack from causing damage. This damage is known as Chip 
	Damage; the damage still inflicted when blocking the bulk of the 
	attack. The same effect will take place when Guarding against Giant Ape 
	Melee as well. While there are other means of defending such attacks to 
	keep Chip Damage from occurring, the Strong Guard can be used to reduce 
	Chip Damage by 50%. This advanced block cannot be directionally 
	influenced, therefore will fall victim to a Result 2 Guard Break 
	against directionally influenced, fully Charged Melee. However, it is 
	important for the player to understand the advantages of such a Guard. 
	As a major example, the Strong Guard holds the ability to keep the Rush 
	Attack from commencing. As explained in III-J-2, the Rush Attack is 
	considered to be unblockable. This is not entirely true when regarding 
	the Strong Guard. However, if successfully blocked, the Rush Attack 
	will still result with breaking the player's Guard.

	In order to perform the Strong Guard, the player must hold "Circle" and 
	then also hold "Triangle". When performed correctly, the player's 
	character will change his Base Guard form into the Strong Guard. It is 
	important for the player to understand that when in Strong Guard, Ki is 
	slowly consumed. As this is important to consider for Ki Management, 
	one must also consider the consequences for blocking a Rush Attack. For 
	the Rush Attack will cause a Guard Break which consumes 3/2 Ki as well 
	as the Ki consumed during the Strong Guard itself. As there are other 
	means of defending such attacks, one must understand the pros and cons 
	for using any suggested techniques.)

III-M-1-a. Focal Adherence:

	(Focal Adherence represents the mechanical laws of battle that two 
	combatants must adhere to in relation to their focal point: the 
	opponent. In other words, it is how the player moves, defends and 
	attacks in direct relation to where the opponent is positioned. For a 
	brief example with Street Fighter II, the game will begin with player 1 
	on the left and player 2 on the right. The match begins with both 
	players already facing each other. This means Focal Adherence already 
	holds control over both characters from the beginning of the match. In 
	order for player 1 to move forward, he must hold right. In order for 
	him to move backward, he must hold left. Without Focal Adherence, if the 
	player held left, he wouldn't move backward. Instead, his character 
	would turn around and face the left and begin to move forward, while 
	moving away from the opponent. Additionally, if player 1 were to move 
	forward and jump over his opponent, landing on the other side... both 
	characters would immediately turn and face each other. This is Focal 
	Adhesion forcing both characters to face each other as all existing 
	combatants must direct their focus toward their focal point, being the 
	opponent. To conclude the example with Street Fighter II, I will also 
	include the fact that even special techniques such as the Hadouken are 
	affected by Focal Adherence, for the quarter circle forward and attack 
	is directionally executed differently, depending on which side of the 
	opponent the player is on.

	As games have evolved, so has Focal Adherence. While the original 
	fighting games were based on the 2D environment, there would eventually 
	come a time when the 3D environment would be tested. As the Side Step 
	was initially introduced in a game called Dark Edge, the understanding 
	of Focal Adherence began to evolve. I have never played Dark Edge, so 
	I'll explain this concept with a different game, one in which I have 
	extensive experience: Mortal Kombat, Deadly Alliance. Now, the Side-
	Step was even present in MK4, but I think Deadly Alliance is a good 
	place to start for explanation because it also exhibits Side-Walking. 
	As a general rule, a game that has side-stepping to represent the 3D 
	environment in a 2D fighting game holds two levels of Focal Adherence. 
	The first level would relate to the traditional style, explained 
	earlier with Street Fighter II. The second level would be how the 
	player moves, defends and attacks in relation to side movement.

	If the player were to perform a Side-Step into the background, this 
	movement is in direct relation to the opponent's position. In other 
	words, the side-step is not a 90 degree movement to the side, but a 
	movement that follows a circumference in which the opponent is 
	positioned at the center. Without Focal Adherence, a side-step would 
	move the opponent into the background of the stage without the camera 
	adjusting to keep both opponents on the 2D fighting ground. A 
	continuation of side-step or side-walking movement would allow the 
	opponent to move farther and farther away from his opponent and the 
	camera, into the depths of the background. Fortunately, Focal Adherence 
	does exist and this does not take place. Instead, any side-step 
	movement will keep the player within the boundaries of combat.

	At this point, I will need to briefly explain a concept known as 
	Aggression.

III-M-1-a-I. Aggression:

	(Aggression represents the forward displacement and measure of 
	additional reach that is created by a character's attack. Every attack 
	has a specific measure of Natural Reach, which is the extent of reach 
	an attack may have without character displacement. In other words, if a 
	player's character were to perform an attack while positioned at ground 
	zero, and when the attack is concluded, the player is still at ground 
	zero, the attack possesses zero aggression. The measure of distance 
	that the attack covers is its natural reach. This is important when 
	regarding Zoning and Spacing tactic, for some characters may have 
	longer arms and legs than their opponents. Aggression, on the other 
	hand, is the measure of distance that is covered character 
	displacement. In other words, if the player has an attack that begins 
	at ground zero, but concludes with the player's character repositioning 
	several feet from ground zero, the attack holds aggression. Such 
	attacks can be as simple as a punch/kick that includes a single step 
	forward, but they can also include attacks such as Ryu's Tatsumaki Kick 
	from Street Fighter II.

	The advanced player should know the difference between Natural Reach 
	and Aggression, for while a character with longer Natural Reach may be 
	good for Zoning Tactic, a character with a shorter Nautural Reach may 
	still be better for Zoning Tactic based on his level of aggression. An 
	attack with High Aggression may cover more distance than a different 
	character with a longer Natural Reach.)

	Focal Adherence Continued...

	Now that you understand aggression, you can understand the following: 
	For most games, Focal Adherence will release its hold on the character 
	during their melee attacks. This is what allows the side-step to be 
	used as a means of counter attack. When a single attack is initiated, 
	it will go in the direction it was initially expected to when last 
	referenced to Focal Adherence. However, if the opponent performs a side-
	step, the attack will not follow the opponent's position because Focal 
	Adhesion is not at work. If performed correctly, the opponent can 
	perform a side-step and then begin attacking you from the side. The 
	only way to regain Focal Adherence is to stop attacking and begin any 
	other movement that relates to Focal Adherence, be it a single movement 
	in any direction, a new approach for an attack or finding a new way to 
	defend an attack.

	Understanding this, one should also consider how much time is required 
	to regain Focal Adherence. For example, an attack that has no Aggression 
	may take much less time to regain Focal Adherence and therefore presents 
	a much smaller window of opportunity for counter attack. An attack with 
	higher levels of aggression requires more time for the attack to 
	conclude, presenting a larger window of opportunity for counter attack. 
	While attacks with high aggression are great for zoning and spacing, 
	they can also be a curse to the player that underestimates his 
	opponent's evasive capabilities.

	Now, at this level of gaming evolution, it is also important to 
	understand that unlike the single level of Focal Adherence included in 
	Street Fighter II, Focal Adherence holds no control over idle characters 
	when regarding the 3D environment. In other words, Player 1 could use 
	side-step or side-walking movement to maneuver around the circumference 
	of the opponent without the opponent automatically facing his opponent. 
	Therefore, if inclined to do so, Player 1 could walk around his 
	opponent and to the rear where initial attack is unblockable. To this 
	degree, one would do well to reference "Channeling" covered earlier in 
	this document.

	Finally, to explain Focal Adherence in Tenkaichi 2...

	When each match begins, both players are required to lock-on to their 
	opponent before effective combat can take place. This is due to the 
	lack of Focal Adherence presented during a de-locked player. During this 
	phase, any movement is in no relation to the opponent's position, but 
	instead related to the player's radar. Up is not forward, but North. 
	Left and Right are not circumferential, but direct 90 degree angle 
	movement West and East. Down is not back, it is South. One can dash, 
	ascend, descend, etc, but will still be in no relation to the 
	opponent's position.

	Once locked on to the opponent, however, Focal Adherence immediately 
	takes hold. At this point, one should understand the different levels 
	of Focal Adherence for effective combat.

	-Level 1: Distanced Focal Adherence
	This is how the player's movement, offense and defense is performed 
	when positioned outside of the Step-In Barrier. When pressing Forward, 
	Back, Left and Right, each movement is in direct relation to the 
	opponent, with Up being Forward, Left and Right following the 
	circumference of the opponent and Down being Back. However, each 
	movement allows the player to physically face each direction. 
	Therefore, if inclined to do so, the player could hold back and face 
	the opposite direction of the opponent, while Focal Adherence still 
	holds the opponent as the focal point in the background. At this level 
	of Focal Adherence, one can Dash, ascend, descend, etc, but all movement 
	is still in direct relation to the opponent's position. A neutral Dash, 
	for example, will still be directed toward the opponent's position as 
	it is directly linked to him through Focal Adherence.

	-Level 2: Approximal Focal Adherence
	This is how the player's movement, offense and defense is performed 
	when positioned inside the Step-In barrier. When pressing Forward, 
	Back, Left and Right, each movement is in direct relation to the 
	opponent, with Up being Forward, Right and Left following the 
	circumference of the opponent and Down being Back. However, unlike the 
	first level of Focal Adherence, one cannot Dash at close proximity. 
	Instead, any attempts to Dash will result with Side-Steps, Back Steps, 
	and the Step-In. If Airborne, any attempts to ascend/descend will 
	result with ascended steps or descent steps. However, Focal Adherence 
	holds no control on the opponent that is already grounded when relating 
	to Jumps and descent (a player that is grounded cannot descend anyway). 
	Also, when in Approximal Focal Adherence, the player's character will 
	always face his opponent. If the player chose to move back, left, right 
	or forward, the character's physical focus will remain fixed on the 
	opponent. This allows the player to attack and defend at the most 
	effective level.

	It is at this point that one must understand the importance of 
	Approximal Focal Adherence. As explained in III-F-1, offensive 
	teleportation is commonly used for rear positioning. While two player 
	may initiate the Teleport Dance in attempts to gain the better 
	position, it is sometimes very easy to become a defending victim of the 
	offending teleporter. As the teleporting opponent may mix up the 
	direction of the offensive teleport, one must be able to incorporate 
	Approximate Focal Adherence with their Base Guard. Offensive Teleports 
	are created through the inclusion of Base Melee. Therefore, one must be 
	able to bring up their Guard in time for the Base Melee and then 
	initiate active Approximal Focal Adherence during the offensive teleport 
	to follow the teleport terminus. This will allow the player to bring up 
	their Guard as the second attack is initiated by the opponent. If 
	performed correctly, the player will never lose focus on the position 
	of their opponent and will therefore continuously be able to defend 
	oneself.)


III-M-2. Deflection:
--------------------
The Deflection has been established as a major aspect of DBZ combat. In order 
to present Tenkaichi 2 defense as relative to the show, the combatants are 
awarded the ability to hit oncoming Ki Blasts with their bare hands and knock 
them into a different direction. In this case, the Ki Blast deflected may go 
into a random direction or even back at the attacking opponent. Though this 
may be the more well known form of Deflection, physical attacks such as the 
grab attempt can also be Deflected. As interesting as this concept may seem, 
one must understand the pros and cons of Deflection in order to realize when 
it is the optimal choice.

As it currently stands, there does not seem to be any negative aspects to 
Deflecting a grab. However, when regarding tactical abuse, one must understand 
the drawbacks to the Ki Blast Deflection. It is in such regard that one must 
consider "Absolute Block".

-Absolute Block

	(This concept is usually based on the idea that if the player begins to 
	block an attack or string of attacks, that the player has no choice but 
	to continue Blocking the attack until the full attack is concluded. It 
	is within this understanding that one must realize that Ki Deflection 
	is quite similar by nature. Through Deflecting Ki Blasts, one is unable 
	to defend against any other attack during Deflection. Therefore, it is 
	also important for the player to understand the speed of one's Ki 
	Blasts in relation to that of their Blast 2. Many advanced players will 
	use this tactic as defense manipulation. As a player Deflects a flurry 
	of Ki Blasts that move half the speed of a Kamehameha, the attacker is 
	able to seize advantage of the player's Ki Blast Deflection and connect 
	with the Kamehameha that is able to outrun the Ki Blast flurry 
	terminus. Similarly, as a player decides to hold Guard and block the 
	oncoming Ki Blasts, the attacker is able to seize advantage of the 
	player's locked Guard and connect with a Rush Attack that is able to 
	outrun the Ki Blast flurry terminus.)

In order to Deflect properly, one must press "Circle" at the very instant of 
impact. If performed correctly against the grab attempt, the player will 
Deflect the opponent's hands, resulting with the opponent stumbling backward a 
couple feet. If performed correctly against the Ki Blast, the player will 
Deflect the Ki Blast toward a different direction or as explained earlier, 
back at the attacker. Every time the player successfully deflects a Ki Blast, 
his/her Ki Stocks will increase, which will speed up the overall process of 
attaining Ki Stocks. However, this only works for manual Ki Blast Deflection. 
As explained in III-G-2, when specific characters reach Sparking Mode, they 
are awarded Auto Deflection. In this case, the player's manual Ki Blast 
Deflection is not necessary as the state of Sparking Mode allows Ki Blasts to 
automatically be deflected off of the character's physical body.)


III-M-3. Dragon Dash Counter:
-----------------------------
As explained in III-B-7, when two players Dragon Dash into each other at the 
same time, they will enter the "clash" simulation where both players will 
battle it out in a Joystick struggle for the most hits. This concept holds 
true to any aspect of the Dragon Dash. While initiate through different means, 
Dragon Pursuit and Rush Attacks are based on the Dragon Dash.

As one may use a Tech from being knocked away via Smash Aftermath into a Clash 
simulation with the Dragon Pursuit, one must always be prepared to engage the 
Joystick Struggle. However, the Dragon Dash Counter is typically used as a 
means of defending against Rush Attacks.

The Rush Attack is considered to be one of the most useful techniques in the 
Tenkaichi 2 arsenal. The speed differential as well as its unblockable nature 
describes the Rush Attack as one of the most dangerous techniques to defend. 
However, as explained earlier, the Rush Attack is built upon the Dragon Dash. 
Therefore, in regards to the Dragon Dash, one can counter the Rush Attack by 
simply initiating one's own Dragon Dash to initiate the Clash simulation. It 
is in this case that the player with the fastest hands will win the Joystick 
Struggle and be awarded the next move. However, as these struggles can be 
extremely exhausting at times and even more important: a wear on the 
controller, one must take note that there are other methods of defending the 
Rush Attack. The more skill the player gains, the less energy wasted.


III-M-4. Defensive Teleportation:
---------------------------------
As briefly mentioned in III-M-3, Absolute Block concepts can present a problem 
during game-play. While the Absolute Block exists as a safety net to ensure 
the majority of the attack is blocked, on the stronger level of Absolute 
Blocking, an aggressive opponent may find ways to keep the player trapped in 
this Blocking state after the attack has concluded. For example: the 
Kamehameha can be blocked with the Base Guard. However, it is not just the 
Base Guard that has been initiated. The Absolute Block is also taking place to 
ensure that the player does not drop his Guard in the middle of the Blast. If 
the opponent is able to offensively recover before the Absolute Block has been 
concluded, the opponent can keep the player in the state of Absolute Block by 
continuing attack methods and force the player to remain in the Absolute 
Block. This can be performed by Ki Blasts and Aggressive style combos.

To ensure that the player does not fall victim to the Absolute Block, one must 
become familiar with Defensive Teleportation system. This aspect of the game 
requires timing and proper judgment of depth perception and by nature, is much 
more difficult than holding Guard for defense. However, once the player is 
practiced in the Defensive Teleportation system, he/she will begin to realize 
the advantages of using a defensive method to instantly transition into 
offensive ability.

When regarding Defensive Teleportation, there are two situational means to 
consider: Defending against Melee and Defending against the Blast 2/Ultimate 
Blast.

-Melee Defense:

	(When regarding the Defensive Teleport for melee, one must understand 
	that only charged attacks and Hooks can be teleported. When regarding 
	Hook defense, one should also take note that the Flying Kicks Hook 
	cannot be Teleported as it is regarded as a transition in this 
	instance. The player is also not able to Defensively Teleport against a 
	Kai Cannon Hook as the attack does not intend for direct contact. In 
	order to Defensive Teleport against a charged melee attack or Hook, one 
	must develop an alert sense of awareness as well as understanding what 
	attacks are available to the opponent. It is very important for the 
	player to get to know the characters. One must recognize what the 
	character looks like when a specific charge attack is being initiated. 
	Finally, one must develop an extremely tight sense of responsiveness. 
	Reactivity is the key factor of any defense system. To perform the 
	Defensive Teleport against a charged melee attack or Hook, one must 
	press "Circle" the very instant before the attack makes contact. This 
	will take a bit of practice for the user to get comfortable with, but 
	this defense concept is well worth the training. With the defensive 
	teleport, one may bypass the strain of being caught in Absolute 
	Blocking and go for the counter attack. It is in such a defense that 
	the player's character will teleport to the side or sometimes backward. 
	The player can directionally influence the defensive teleport by 
	holding the desired direction. This holds the potential to allow the 
	player to engage in various strategies as there are various tactical 
	methods to consider from close combat as well as distanced.)

-Blast 2/Ultimate Defense:

	(While the Absolute Block can be a problem when considering Blast 2 
	Defense, this dilemma falls secondary to the consequences that using 
	Guard against a Blast 2 can possess. Some Blast 2 attacks are 
	unblockable, which is why it is also important to get to know the 
	characters. One must consider what Blast 2 is being executed by the 
	opponent in order to defend properly. It is in this case that one must 
	understand that the Defensive Teleport is always the optimal option 
	when compared to Base Guard. However, one must realize the difficulty 
	of the Defensive Teleport when regarding Blast 2 based on Depth 
	Perception.

	-Depth Perception vs Motion Perception
	The average brain is able to pick up on Motion quite easily. This is 
	based on how the player is able to pick up on the differences in 
	lighting during the progression of movement. This concept is what 
	defense in 2d fighters is based on. When the attack of "A" reaches the 
	target, "B", the player knows to react accordingly. Depth Perception is 
	much more difficult for the brain to pick up on. This is why the car in 
	front of the driver is required to have working tail lights. Otherwise 
	and in the instance that the front driver must break, the human brain 
	has a hard time picking up on Depth Perception and therefore lies the 
	danger of causing the wreck. The ability for the brain to pick up light 
	is much quicker and therefore allows the rear driver to react 
	accordingly to tail lights as to not rear-end the front driver. This 
	concept is what defense in Tenkaichi 2 is based on. While other fighter 
	games include the luxury of judging their defense on a two dimensional 
	scenario, the player of Tenkaichi 2 must judge their defense based on a 
	far more difficult basis.

	Understanding that the Blast 2 is judge via Depth Perception, the 
	Defensive Teleport must be conducted with such judgment. Similarly to 
	Defensive Teleporting charged melee and hooks, one must judge exactly 
	when the attack is going to make contact. As explained in III-J-2, 
	there are many types of Blast 2's in Tenkaichi 2, all of which must be 
	judged and handled in a different manner. 

	-Defending Types: Kamehameha/Death Beam/Energy Ball
	These types of attacks may vary in speed, but all follow the same 
	guidelines to Defensive Teleportation. As the attack reaches the 
	instant of impact, it is up for the player to judge exactly when that 
	impact will take place. When the player is able to time the attack 
	accordingly, he/she is able to Defensively Teleport the attack by 
	pressing "Circle" the instance before the Blast 2 makes contact.

	-Defending Types: Volley Blasts/Bladed/Berzerker
	These types of attacks may also vary in speed, but follow different 
	guidelines to Defensive Teleportation. For some may consist of more 
	than one attack and direction. For example: The Volley Blast will 
	always consist of more than one blast. These blasts are usually 
	directed in one general direction, but may vary in accuracy. Therefore, 
	the player must expect to use the Defensive Teleport more than once 
	before the attack is concluded. This requires a keen eye and quick 
	reflexes as while the player may be able to influence the direction of 
	the Defensive Teleport, such blasts of the Volley Blast may cover a 
	wide range in all directions. Bladed blasts may vary in the quantity of 
	blasts per execution, therefore it is important for the player to get 
	to know the characters. As Bladed attacks are unblockable, it is very 	
	important that the player keeps a responsive defense in teleportation. 
	Many times, these attacks will follow the opponent through directed or 
	controlled accuracy. In other words, as some Bladed Blasts may be 
	executed with higher quantity, the attacking opponent is able to 
	redirect each attack in accordance to his/her focal point: the player. 
	Therefore, if the player were to move in any direction to dodge a 
	previous Bladed Blast, the following Bladed Blast will adjust to the 
	new position the player has chosen to take. Controlled Bladed Blasts 
	will be executed in their own fashion; be it through directed or 
	stationary, but will begin to follow the target after execution. This 
	requires the player to understand exactly where the projected blast is 
	at all times until conclusion. As explained as Defensive Teleportation, 
	one must dodge these techniques by pressing "Circle" the instance 
	before the Blast 2 makes contact. As the quantity of the attack may 
	count higher than one attack, the player must be able to redirect his 
	attention at an instant in order to dodge following blasts. The most 
	difficult type of blast to teleport defensively when regarding this 
	section is the Berzerker type: Super 17's Hell's Storm. While the blast 
	releases 32 attacks within execution, the player must understand that a 
	single defensive teleport may overlap several attacks of the execution. 
	Ultimately, the player must learn to teleport through the entire blast, 
	resulting with seven consecutive defensive teleports. As this blast may 
	be defended at different distances, such depth perception judgment must 
	be considered for effective teleportation.

	-Defending Types: Super Explosive Waves/Explosive
	These types of attacks require a more advanced form of defense. For one 
	must recognize that these types of Blasts are based more on location of 
	the opponent or the player him/herself. These blasts may cover a great 
	radius from the point of origin and therefore require a different form 
	of Defensive Teleportation. Unlike the types of Blast 2's previously 
	discussed, the Super Explosive Wave and Explosive types of Blast 2's 
	are not judged through depth perception. Instead, one must understand 
	the full timing of the Blast 2 from initiation to execution. For some 
	attacks may be initiated with the close-up animation sequence, but 
	require a time pause before the attack is executed for impact. Gaining 
	an understanding of this time pause is but a small part of Defensive 
	Teleportation when regarding the Super Explosive Wave and Explosive 
	types. For once the attack commences, the remainder of the attack 
	requires a much tighter form of Defensive Teleportation timing than the 
	remaining blasts as it requires consecutive Defensive Teleportation 
	without motion or depth perception to judge such timing. However, as 
	depth perception is not an issue to consider in defending this blast, 
	the player must train in order to defend on the pace of the attack for 
	proper defensive teleportation. For example: The Super Explosive Wave 
	is initiated as a giant wave of energy. However, it is not simply the 
	first wave that must be dodged. For after the wave is executed, there 
	are 6 remaining attacks that follow the initiating wave. These attacks 
	were initially considered to be waves as well, but after closer 
	inspection, it has been established that such attacks are considered to 
	be "pulses" as the distance from the focal point has no bearing on the 
	rate of defensive teleportation. Therefore, the player must learn the 
	timeframes between each attack residing within these types of blasts. 
	It is in such case that there are seven defensive teleports that are 
	required to dodge a complete Super Explosive Wave, as well as most 
	Explosive attacks.

	-Defending Type: Rush Attack:
	This type of attack requires one to use depth perception as well as a 
	trained understanding of the different types of Rush Attacks. As 
	explained in III-J-2, there are different types of Rush Attacks. In 
	this case, the player only needs to consider the Speed categories, for 
	these categories explain the different speeds of the Rush Attack as 
	well as the directional influence conducted by the opponent's approach. 
	The Rush Attack may share some aspects of the Kamehameha type Blast 2 
	in that a Rush Attack is a one shot deal. Either the attacker connects 
	with the attack, or he/she does not. To defend the Rush Attack, the 
	player must consider the three speeds and directionally controlled Rush 
	Attack being initiated. When regarding the first Speed/Range, as the 
	Rush Attack is extremely fast but covers short distances, the player 
	must recognize when he/she must have a much tighter control over quick 
	reflexes. As this Rush Attack cannot be directionally influenced, the 
	player must react to depth perception alone, but quickly. When 
	regarding the second Speed/Range, as the Rush Attack is a bit slower, 
	but covers longer distances, the player must be able to judge the 
	distance accordingly along with the speed of the attack. If the attack 
	arrives too soon or too late, the Defensive Teleport will not take 
	place. As this Rush Attack can be directionally influenced to some 
	degree, one must also understand that the attacker has the option to 
	cause abstraction in the player's depth perception, making it harder to 
	judge the correct timing for Defensive Teleportation. When regarding 
	the third Speed/Range, as the Rush Attack is much slower, but covers 
	even longer distances, the player must be able to judge the distance 
	accordingly along with the speed of the attack. If the attack arrives 
	too soon or too late, the Defensive Teleportation will not take place. 
	As this Rush Attack can be directionally influenced to a much greater 
	degree, one must understand that the attacker has the option to cause 
	abstraction in the player's depth perception, making it even harder to 
	judge the correct timing for Defensive Teleportation. It is in this 
	instance that the player must get to know the characters he is facing. 
	In order to Defensively Teleport the Rush Attack, one must press 
	"Circle" at the instance before the Rush Attack makes contact.

Additionally, every time the player successfully defensively teleport dodges 
an attack, his/her Ki Stocks increase; speeding up the process of attaining Ki 
Stocks.


III-M-5. Offensive Teleportation:
---------------------------------
As explained in III-F-1, Offensive Teleportation can be initiated through 
Combo Sets. Although one may typically use Offensive Teleportation as an 
offensive means to gain position, one can also use such a concept as a means 
for Defense. In using the Offensive Teleportation system as a means for 
defense, one must consider the fact that the Offensive Teleport is initiated 
at the whim of the player. Therefore, a player that lacks the timing required 
for the Defensive Teleport might find value in using the Offensive Teleport 
system instead. It is within the nature of the Teleport itself that allows the 
player to remain unaffected by the suggested attack. Through such concepts, 
one must learn to perform this technique in close combat as well as distanced.

-Melee Defense:

	(Aside from the Teleport Dance concept that is used for gaining optimal 
	position, the Offensive Teleport can be used to escape Charged Melee as 
	well. While the Defensive Teleport is based upon the player's ability 
	to time the exact release of the Charged Melee, the Offensive Teleport 
	can be initiated as soon as the player realizes the opponent is 
	Charging his/her Melee attack. This possibility resides in the fact 
	that a character that is in Charge Melee Mode is endowed with Armor. 
	This means that if the player were to hit the Charging opponent with a 
	Base Melee attack, it would inflict damage, but it would not physically 
	affect the opponent. Therefore, while the opponent is Charging his/her 
	Melee, the player is able to connect Base Melee and incorporate 
	Offensive Teleportation before the release of the Charged Attack. 
	Though the Base Melee will inflict the damage, its true purpose will be 
	used as a means to initiate the Offensive Teleport for escape. As this 
	offensive strategy is used as a means of defense, one must understand 
	that the line between offense and defense sometimes coincide.)

-Blast 2:

	(As one might deduce from the explanation for Melee Defense, one can 
	use the Offensive Teleport as a means to Defensively Teleport from 
	Blast 2 Attacks. However, the player must understand that such a tactic 
	is only optimal against certain Blast 2 types, such as the Kamehameha, 
	Death Beam, Energy Ball and Rush Attack. Other types that include 
	multiple attacks within the execution cannot be effectively dodged by 
	Offensive Teleportation means.

	In order to use the Offensive Teleport as a means to dodge the 
	suggested Blast Types, one must judge when the attack will make 
	contact. Once this has been established, the player must be sure he/she 
	can release at least one "whiff" attack to enable Offensive 
	Teleportation. This must be done before the attack makes contact. As 
	the timing of the "whiffed" Offensive Teleportation is far more lenient 
	in regarding the Kamehameha/Death Beam/Energy Ball attacks, one can 
	initiate the whiff attack long before the attack makes contact. For the 
	following Offensive Teleport will place the player out of danger long 
	before the attack reaches the initial targeted position. However, the 
	Rush Attack requires a fairly tight timing, though not as tight as the 
	Defensive Teleport. As the nature of the Teleport suggests that the 
	Rush Attack cannot make contact to the target that is not physically 
	present, the Teleport allows the player to move to the desired position 
	completely unharmed. However, as the timeframe of the Teleport is 
	relatively small, one must time the Offensive Teleport to match the 
	approach of the incoming Rush Attack. To perform correctly, the player 
	must judge when the opponent's Rush Attack will make contact. As the 
	Offensive Teleport can be initiated through three potentials of the 
	Combo Set, the player can begin his/her whiff attacks as the opponent 
	approaches and Offensively Teleport accordingly. If performed 
	correctly, the Rush Attack will arrive at the exact instant of the 
	Offensive Teleport, unable to deliver the desired damage.)


III-M-6. Sparking Teleportation:
--------------------------------
As explained in III-G-2, certain characters are allowed to teleport on a free 
basis when in Sparking Mode. In essence, the character can teleport without 
the requirement of melee incorporation by merely holding a direction and 
pressing "Circle". Also, in correlation with the explanation in III-M-5: the 
nature of the Teleport suggests that the Rush Attack cannot make contact to 
the target that is not physically present, the Teleport allows the player to 
move to the desired position completely unharmed. This suggests that as the 
player is able to Teleport Freely through Sparking Mode, the Free 
Teleportation can be used Defensively as well as Offensively. One only needs 
to choose a direction and Teleport accordingly. This technique can be used in 
a similar fashion as Offensive Teleports, but the Base Melee is not required.


III-M-7. Step-In Evasion:
-------------------------
The Step-In is one of the most useful techniques in Tenkaichi 2. Not only does 
it allow the player to transition into Supplementary Combo Sets, but it also 
allows the player to incorporate a strong Defense. In order to understand the 
importance of the Step-In Evasion, one must understand that during the Step-In 
movement, the player is completely invulnerable to Melee Attack. This does not 
suggest that Ki based attacks cannot cause damage. Therefore, one must never 
Step-In to a Kamehameha unless the player has a concealed subsequent strategy 
to deal with the blast. When regarding the Step-In Evasion, one must consider 
four means of practice: Base Melee, Charged Melee, Grabs and Rush Attack.

-Base Melee Evasion:

	(As explained above, the Step-In movement allows the player to be 
	completely invulnerable to Melee Attack. This means that during the 
	timeframe of execution to conclusion, the attacker's melee will have no 
	effect on the player, physically or otherwise. However, it is important 
	to understand that the Combo Set of any given character can stretch 
	well beyond the timeframe of the Step-In. Advantages of this concept 
	will be explained as the document progresses.)

-Charged Melee Evasion:

	(For one to understand the workings of a proper Step-In Evasion for 
	Charged Melee, one must understand the timeframes of both the Step-In 
	and the Charged Melee being released. One must understand the speed of 
	the opponent's attack, which relates to the speed of the character as 
	well as the speed of the opponent's charge which relates to the speed 
	of the Charge Meter's flash. While most of this may seem very 
	complicated, one may come to find that the length of the Step-In 
	timeframe is long enough to effectively defend against any Charged 
	Melee. The only factors one must consider are of the following:

	-Release Timing:
	If the opponent releases their Charged Melee sooner than the player 
	initiates the Step-In Evasion, the player will fall victim to the 
	attack. If the player initiates the Step-In Evasion too quickly before 
	the opponent releases the Charged Melee, the player may recover too 
	quickly and fall victim to the attack. One must have quick reflexes and 
	a strong combat mentality for using strategic guidance to reflect what 
	the player knows of his/her opponent.

	-Charge Melee Cancels:
	If the player charges a melee attack and the player initiates a Step-In 
	Evasion to a cancelled melee attack, the player may recover to fall 
	victim to the opponent's secondary attack. One must understand the 
	skills the opponent is willing and able to use during combat. The 
	ability to judge when using certain defensive tactics against an 
	advanced player is the optimal choice or not is one of the most 
	important aspects of advanced combat.

	When performed correctly and against the predicted execution of the 
	opponent, one would press "X" to Step-In while inside the Step-In 
	Barrier at the instant one's opponent releases their Charged Melee. It 
	is within this concept that one must understand that unlike the 
	Defensive Teleport, the Step-In can be performed with, or without the 
	opponent's cooperation. As mentioned in III-M-4, the Kai Cannon Hook 
	cannot be Defensively Teleported. However, as the Step-In Evasion does 
	not require direct contact intention, the maneuver can be used to dodge 
	the Kai Cannon. While the Step-In technique may seem to cover a decent 
	timeframe, one must also understand that the recovery rate is typically 
	faster than that of the Charging Attacker's recovery rate. This allows 
	the player to counter attack with well deserved payoff.

-Grab Evasion:

	(As one may begin to learn from the training mode, the Grab can be 
	defended by means of deflection. Similar to Ki Deflection explained in 
	III-M-2, in order to Deflect properly, one must press "Circle" at the 
	very instant of impact: the grab connection. Since this means of 
	defense has a much tighter timeframe than the Step-In duration, one may 
	feel much more relaxed in using the comparative times between the grab 
	execution and the Step-In to evade the oncoming attack effectively. 
	Since the Step-In can be initiated at the whim of the player, one can 
	press the command well before the grab makes contact. As the duration 
	of the Step-In lasts a lot longer than the timeframe of the grab's 
	contact frames, the defensive timing is much more forgiving. Therefore, 
	as soon as the opponent begins to lunge for the grab attempt, one may 
	execute the Step-In, ensuring the grab will not make contact. However, 
	like the Chargeable Melee Attacks, the grab can be cancelled via 
	Natural Cancels. Therefore, one must consider that the Grab Deflection 
	keeps the player in defense by using the Guard. It is important to know 
	your opponent and adapt to their ability.)

-Rush Attack Evasion:

	(The Rush Attack Evasion is built strictly upon the concept of the 
	Step-In Barrier. Without the understanding of the Step-In Barrier as 
	well as the circumference of the Step-In Barrier, the foundation of 
	which the Rush Attack Evasion stands would crumble, leaving the player 
	to defend through other means. In order to perform the Rush Attack 
	Evasion effectively, one must fully understand the difference between 
	using a Dash and using a Step-In; ultimately knowing the Step-In 
	Barrier Circumference and the maneuvering limitations each realm 
	governs.

	As explained in III-B-3, the distance between the player and the 
	opponent is the defining factor that separates a Dash from a Step-In. 
	This factor is the difference between close quarters combat and 
	distanced combat. This factor; this line of scope-differential 
	definition is called the Step-In Barrier. In order to instill the 
	understanding of the Step-In Barrier circumference, one must test the 
	line through using the Dash and Step-In until one finds the Barrier. 
	Once this line has been established, one can then understand how to use 
	the Step-In Evasion against Rush Attacks.

	As explained in III-J-2, the Rush Attack is not like other Blast 2's. 
	The Rush Attack is not a projectile of energy, but an attack in which 
	the player's character is projected as a means of physical melee 
	animation activation. As this is the case, one can begin to understand 
	that as the Step-In Evasion works against Melee Attacks, it will also 
	work against the Rush Attack. It is within this concept that one must 
	understand why the Step-In Barrier is so important. For the difference 
	between judging the opponent's physical placement within the Rush 
	Attack correctly and incorrectly can consequentially end in taking the 
	full effect of the Rush Attack.

	As many Rush Attacks differ by means of approach: Speed/Length types 1, 
	2 and 3, one must consider the opponent's initiated position, the speed 
	of the Rush Attack involved as well as the Directional Influence being 
	controlled by the opponent. As the Step-In can be used to neutralize 
	the Rush Attack when used properly, a misjudged distance, speed or 
	Directional Influence can lead to the player taking the full effect of 
	the Rush Attack.

	When performed correctly, the player must allow the opponent to 
	initiate the Rush Attack while taking note of the initial position of 
	execution. Then the player must wait until the opponent's Rush Attack 
	brings them within the Step-In Barrier. As soon as the opponent 
	breaches the player's Step-In Barrier, the player must press "X" to 
	initiate the Step-In for proper evasion. If one presses "X" to Step-In 
	too soon; before the opponent has breached the Step-In Barrier, one 
	will execute the Dash maneuver and direct him/herself right into the 
	opponent's path of destruction. If the player waits too long to press 
	"X" even after the player has breached the Step-In Barrier, the Rush 
	Attack will make contact and the player will fall victim to the full 
	attack. It is for these reasons that one must recognize the character's 
	Step-In Barrier circumference, understand that Directional Influence 
	can distort the opponent's actual distance from the target, and know 
	that some Rush Attacks are faster than others. Judging all Rush Attacks 
	the same will lead to a player losing a lot of health when all could 
	have been avoided with a little bit of practice.)


III-M-8. Side-Step Evasion:
---------------------------
The Side Step was first introduced to the fighting engine for "Dark Edge". 
This technique allowed the player to maneuver to the side in order to evade 
the opponent's oncoming attack. In the instance of Tenkaichi 2, the Side Step 
exists as a means of offensive and defensive tactics, but due to the 
aggressive nature of the combo system, the value of the Side Step when 
compared to the alternatives has significantly gone down. While the player may 
find opportunities to use the Side Step as an evasive maneuver, such 
opportunities relate to but a small part of the game.

-Charged Melee Evasion:

	(Unlike the Step-In, the Side Step does not render the player 
	invincible during the frames of movement. Therefore, attempting to Side 
	Step while within the range of the opponent's combos may result in 
	becoming a victim of the opponent's attacks. However, when the opponent 
	chooses to use the Charged Melee attack, one may find the time to use 
	the Side Step effectively during the release of the attack. As one may 
	deduce from understanding the basic concept of any defensive technique, 
	one would merely need to consider the time needed to charge and release 
	the attack in relation to time needed to use the Side Step effectively. 
	However, one must once again keep in mind that such attacks can be 
	cancelled via Natural Cancellation. Knowing the opponent's capabilities 
	is key to any victory.)

It would also be important to note that the Back Flip/Back Step can also be 
used in the same scenario as an effective defensive maneuver. However, as some 
characters may hold a more aggressive style of attack, using the Back Step may 
not be the optimal choice as it may still leave the player in the danger zone.


III (N) -Priority-
------------------
As it is understood, the Priority aspect of any fighting game is the tendency 
of an attack of High Priority to strike through an attack of Low Priority. In 
essence, if both opponents attack each other at the same time and one player's 
attack is able to inflict damage while the other is valued as null and 
ineffective, the victorious attack is considered to be High Priority. On the 
other hand, if both opponents attack each other at the same time with the same 
attacks or level of attacks, it is possible that both attacks will cancel each 
other out. However, there are certain circumstances in which two attacks of 
equal Priority collide and the opponents must battle/struggle for victory; 
usually initiating a Beam Struggle or Joystick Rotation Animation Sequence.

While many aspects of the game's Priority balance must be explored though 
one's continued experience, it is important that one learns the basics of 
Priority when regarding Base Melee, Charged Melee, Hooks, Ki Blasts and Super 
Blasts. Ultimately, one must learn how to manipulate the concept of Priority 
to best suit one's tactical stance for the given circumstance. As there are 
different types of Charged Ki Blasts, the following will be regarding the 
Strong Ki Blast as different forms of Ki Blasts have different results due to 
Priority. For example, the paralyzer will carry a different Priority than the 
strong blast or Destructo Disk. The Destructo Disk is typically unblockable 
and therefore holds higher Priority than the rest.

-Base Melee vs Base Melee:

	(In essence, if two players begin their Combo Sets at the same time, 
	one would be sure to notice that neither opponent will take damage from 
	the other as each attack will collide with the opponent's attack of the 
	same Priority. This is an important aspect of the Combo Set chess game 
	simply because one must understand more aspects of the character's 
	combo ability such as speed and hit quantity. In other words, as two 
	opponents share the exact same attack qualities of their combo sets, as 
	long as each opponent's attack begins at the exact same time, each 
	attack will value each other as null and ineffective. However, if one 
	player's character has a Combo Set that consists of more than one hit 
	per button pressed, then it is possible that the player's Combo Set 
	will out-last that of his opponent's Combo Set. As the speed of a 
	player's Combo Set is also an issue to consider, this may also cause a 
	player's Combo Set to out-last that of his opponent's Combo Set. If 
	both Combo Sets are allowed to reach their Natural Terminus, the player 
	who's Combo Set extends beyond the opponent's Combo Set will inflict 
	damage with the remaining Base Melee of the Combo Set.)

-Charged Melee vs Base Melee:

	(As explained in III-M-5, a character that is in Charge Melee Mode is 
	endowed with Armor. In such a case, one must understand that the 
	Charged Melee attack holds Higher Priority than Base Melee. In essence, 
	the Charged Melee will continue to charge while the opponent's Base 
	Melee will have no physical effect to stop the charge. This will result 
	with the Charged Melee completely ignoring the Base Melee and crushing 
	through for the desired impact. However, in relation to what is also 
	explained in III-M-5, such a concept can also be used as a defensive 
	opportunity. A player that is performing Base Melee against a Charged 
	Melee has the opportunity to unleash the first Base Melee and initiate 
	an Offensive Teleport in a defensive manner to avoid the impact from 
	the Charged Melee. As Base Melee is released in a shorter time frame 
	than the Charged Melee, the Offensive Teleport can be initiated in time 
	to defend accordingly.)

-Hooks vs Base Melee:

	(Whether it be normal or Transitional, a Hook will take Priority over 
	Base Melee.)

-Hooks vs Charged Melee:

	(Hooks are to be considered as possessing the same Priority as Charged 
	Melee as the Hook can also be charged. However, as the Transitional 
	Hook is released without a means of Charging, the Transitional Hook 
	will take Priority over a Charged Melee attack unless the Charged Melee 
	is released at the exact time of Transitional Hook impact.)

-Charged Melee vs Charged Melee:

	(Much like Base Melee, when two Charged Melee Attacks collide with the 
	same force, they will cancel each other out. If both attacks are 
	released at the same instance, it is the attack with the stronger 
	charge that will punch through victorious. However, one must consider 
	the following: While Base Melee has no physical effect on a Charging 
	opponent, a Charged Melee will puncture the armor of a Charging 
	opponent. Therefore, while a Green or Red Charged Melee attack may not 
	possess the same executing Priority as a Fully Charged Melee, it is 
	enough to cease the Charge and interrupt the attack.)

-Hooks vs Hooks:

	(Much like Base melee, when two Hooks collide with the same force, they 
	will cancel each other out. If both attacks are released at the same 
	instance, it is the attack with the stronger charge that will punch 
	through victorious. However, one must consider the following: As the 
	normal Hook can be charged, one must understand that a Charged Hook 
	will puncture the armor of a Charging opponent. Therefore, while a 
	Green or Red Charged Hook may not possess the same executing Priority 
	as a Fully Charged Hook, it is enough to cease the Charge and interrupt 
	the Hook.)

-Ki Blasts vs Base Melee:

	(Ki Blasts hold a higher Priority over Base Melee. Therefore, when the 
	opponent is attempting a Combo Set, a simple Ki Blast to the face will 
	bring his assault to a halt.)

-Ki Blasts vs Charged Melee:

	(The Priority of Ki Blasts and Charged Melee is defined by the force 
	applied by the charge. Therefore, while Ki Blasts may hold a higher 
	Priority over Base Melee, a Charged Melee will physically ignore the Ki 
	Blast and power through.)

-Ki Blasts vs Hook:

	(A Hook is to be considered the same way a Charged Melee is considered 
	when regarding Ki Blasts. A Hook will physically ignore the Ki Blast 
	and power through. However, one must take note that this only applies 
	to the normal Hook. When regarding the Transitional Hook, one must 
	understand that it cannot be charged and therefore is not considered 
	the same as a normal Hook. In essence, a Transitional Hook will always 
	be interrupted by the Ki Blast.)

-Green Ki Blasts vs Green Charged Melee:

	(As there are different levels of charge when regarding Ki Blasts and 
	Melee, one must consider Priority when these two collide. When a Ki 
	Blast with a Green charge is unleashed and makes contact with an 
	opponent that is charging a Green Melee or stronger, the Green Ki Blast 
	is overpowered due to the Green Charged Melee's higher Priority.)

-Red Ki Blasts vs Charged Melee:

	(While the Charged Melee can overcome the Ki Blast and Green Ki Blast, 
	any Ki Blast that is charged to the Red level or beyond will take 
	higher Priority against the Charged Melee.)

-Super Blasts vs Super Blasts:
 
	(As specified in III-E-1, there is a wide range of specific attacks in 
	the game that vary in strength and priority, one must play through the 
	game to understand which specific Blasts carry Priority over others. 
	However, it has been shown that Super Explosive Waves can stop any 
	incoming Blast. As each Super Explosive Wave is initiated nearly 
	instantaneously, one could deduce that the Super Explosive Wave holds 
	the highest priority in the game, but this would be mere speculation as 
	the Super Explosive Wave cannot be aimed at an opponent like a Blast. 
	It is also understood that the only Super Blast that holds the lowest 
	Priority and will concede to all other Super Blasts is the Rush Attack. 
	This proves to be true as the Rush Attack is not so much as a 
	projectile Blast as it is the character's form moving in place of the 
	projectile.)

-Base Melee vs Rush Attacks:

	(Rush Attacks are noted as being unblockable to the base guard. A 
	Strong Guard may be able to temporarily put a stop to the Rush Attack, 
	but at a cost of Ki. Using a Dragon Dash or Rush Attack to counter the 
	opponent's Rush Attack can be useful for battling the opponent's 
	approach with a joystick struggle simulation, but that can become 
	tiresome. The Defensive Teleport and Step In Evasion are great 
	techniques to use in times of defending a Rush Attack, but there is 
	another tactic one should keep in mind when defending against the Rush 
	Attack. As explained in III-J-2, the player's character is able to 
	become the blast, so to speak. In other words, there is no projectile. 
	The player's character covers the distance and deals the damage 
	accordingly. Therefore, until the character's attack makes contact with 
	the opponent, the character is still in a vulnerable state. This is why 
	the Super Blast will hold higher Priority to the Rush Attack as 
	explained above, and much to be held in surprise, so does the Base 
	Melee. The timing may be tight, but it is possible to unleash a single 
	Base Melee Attack at the very instant of the Rush Attack's approach 
	that will inflict damage upon the opponent before the Rush Attack can 
	make contact. This will automatically interrupt the Rush Attack and 
	result with the assailant becoming a victim to the player's offensive 
	Combo Set.)


III (O) -Blast 1 Incorporation-
-------------------------------
During battle, a player can initiate his/her Blast 1 by holding "L2" and then 
pressing "Circle" or by holding both "L2" and "Up" and then pressing "Circle". 
Through such a command, one can execute a variety of techniques that will 
affect the circumstance of battle for a brief period of time. While some 
techniques are used as attacks, others are used as a means of defense and in 
some cases, used as a means of attribute amplification. Each Blast 1 may 
belong to a specific character while others are shared by many characters, yet 
stay true to that specific character. In essence, a character possesses two 
Blast 1's in his/her arsenal. These Blast 1's cannot change unless the 
player's character Transforms; in which case the player's character may be 
endowed with a new set of Blast 1's. Through the execution of such techniques 
results in a cost of Ki Stock. Some Blast 1's require but a mere single Ki 
Stock while others may require two to three. Such requirements must be 
discovered through experience and training. The following are the various 
Blast 1's that a player can execute during battle.

-Acid:
Causes paralysis to the opponent for a brief period of time.

-After Image:
Allows the player to automatically defensively teleport any Melee Attack as 
well as any Super Blast a single time.

-After Image Strike:
Allows the player to automatically defensively teleport any Melee Attack as 
well as any Super Blast to a total of three times.

-Android Barrier:
A small barrier of energy that formulates around the player for a brief period 
of time. During this time, the player is invincible to Ki Blasts, Super Blasts 
and Melee Attacks. When the opponent makes physical contact with this barrier, 
he/she is knocked away and to the ground. However, the player's character is 
locally fixed until the technique subsides.

-Burning Heart:
Automatically reach Sparking Mode with all attributes increased for a brief 
period of time. After Sparking Mode concludes, Ki Charge rate is reduced for a 
brief period of time.

-Dark Eyes:
Allows the player to automatically defensively teleport any Melee Attack as 
well as any Super Blast a single time.

-Explosive Wave:
A small barrier of energy that formulates around the player for a brief period 
of time. During this time, the player is invincible to Ki Blasts and Melee 
Attacks. When the opponent makes physical contact with this barrier, he/she is 
knocked away and to the ground. However, the player's character is locally 
fixed until the technique subsides.

-False Courage:
This technique temporarily endows the player's character with the "Brick Wall" 
effect in which the opponent's Base Melee holds no physical effect on the 
player. However, like attacking an opponent with armor, damage is still 
received.

-Finish Sign:
Ki Based Attacks and Melee power is briefly increased. Once a Blast 2 is used, 
the effects dissapate.

-Fruit of the Tree of Might:
Automatically allows the player to reach Sparking Mode with all attributes 
increased. Attributes will remain increased until execution of Super Blast.

-Full Power Charge:
Automatically brings a player's Ki Meter to full: Five full guages.

-Full Power:
Automatically brings a player into Sparking Mode with all attributes 
increased.

-Give Me Energy:
In order to perform Goku's Spirit Bomb, one must first create the Spirit Bomb 
in accordance to the show through gathering energy. When this technique is 
performed, Goku will raise his hands in the air and request for the energy. 
When performed, a Spirit Bomb will appear in the sky. This technique can not 
only create a Spirit Bomb, but also cause it to grow if performed more than 
once. This technique can only cause the existing Spirit Bomb to increase two 
times. Once the Spirit Bomb is in place, the player can then execute the 
Spirit Bomb technique once he/she reaches Sparking Mode for Ultimate Blast 
initiation.

-Hero's Flute:
A small barrier of energy that formulates around the player for a brief period 
of time. During this time, the player is invincible to Ki Blasts, Super Blasts 
and Melee Attacks. When the opponent makes physical contact with this barrier, 
he/she is knocked away and to the ground. However, the player's character is 
locally fixed until the technique subsides.

-Hidden Energy:
This technique allows the player to hide from the opponent and cause the 
opponent's focus to be de-locked. However, this is at the cost of one's full 
Ki Meter.

-Hi-Tension:
Automatically recovers two Ki gauges, increases Ki Charge Rate and increases 
Melee Power until the execution of a Super Blast.

-Howl:
This allows the player to automatically reach Sparking Mode with Ki Blasts and 
Melee power increased. However, this will briefly decrease one's Ki Charge 
Rate.

-Instant Transmission:
Signature Goku Technique that allows the player to disappear and reappear 
directly behind the opponent. This will temporarily cause the opponent's focus 
to de-lock. Must be locked-on to perform this technique.

-Justice Finish Pose:
Allows the player to automatically reach Sparking Mode with attributes 
increased.

-Justice Finish Pose 2:
Allows the player to automatically reach Sparking Mode with attributes 
increased.

-Justice Pose 1:
Endows the player with the "cloud" modifier, which will remain until the 
execution of a Super Blast.

-Kaikosen:
Temporarily paralyzes the opponent.

-Kaio-Ken:
This technique completely restores the Ki Meter and increases all attributes. 
During this time, the player's Ki meter will slowly deplete. When the Ki Meter 
is fully drained, the player will no longer be in Kaio-Ken state.

-Kakarot:
Allows the player to automatically reach Sparking Mode with specified 
attributes increased.

-Long Awaited for 100%:
This technique allows the player to automatically reach Sparking Mode with all 
attributes increased. Afterwards, the player's Ki Charge rate is briefly 
reduced.

-Mystic Breath:
Temporarily paralyzes the opponent.

-Power Up to the Very Limit:
This technique allows the player to automatically reach Sparking Mode with all 
attributes increased. Afterwards, the player's Ki Charge rate is briefly 
reduced.

-Psycho Barrier:
A small barrier of energy that formulates around the player for a brief period 
of time. During this time, the player is invincible to Ki Blasts, Super Blasts 
and Melee Attacks. When the opponent makes physical contact with this barrier, 
he/she is knocked away and to the ground. However, the player's character is 
locally fixed until the technique subsides.

-Psychokinesis:
Temporarily paralyzes the opponent.

-Pump Up:
Temporarily increases specified attributes until the execution of a Super 
Blast.

-Saiyan Soul:
Temporarily increases Ki and Melee power until a Super Blast is executed.

-Self Harm:
The player can choose to sacrifice a bar of life to instantly reach Sparking 
Mode. Additionally, the Melee attribute will be briefly increased.

-Sensu:
As related to the show, a Sensu Bean can restore all health.

-Sleep:
This technique requires a bit of time to perform successfully as it renders 
the player temporarily unable to defend. However, if the technique is pulled 
off successfully, the player restores a great deal of health, restores the 
Full Ki Meter and increases attributes.

-Solar Flare:
This technique will temporarily blind and de-lock the opponent. If the player 
falls victim to this technique, the screen will go completely white.

-SP Fighting Pose:
Automatically allows the player to reach Sparking Mode. Melee, Ki and Defense 
attributes are increased as well. However, Ki Charge Rate is reduced for a 
brief time.

-SP Fighting Pose 2:
Automatically allows the player to reach Sparking Mode. Ki and Cloud 
attributes are increased as well. However, Ki Charge Rate is reduced for a 
brief time.

-SP Fighting Pose 3:
Automatically allows the player to reach Sparking Mode. Ki and Defense 
attributes are increased as well. However, Ki Charge Rate is reduced for a 
brief time.

-SP Fighting Pose 4:
Automatically allows the player to reach Sparking Mode. Ki and Melee 
attributes are increased as well. However, Ki Charge Rate is reduced for a 
brief time.

-SP Fighting Pose 5:
Automatically allows the player to reach Sparking Mode. All attributes are 
increased as well. However, Ki Charge Rate is reduced for a brief time.

-Super Unyielding Spirit:
Automatically allows the player to reach Sparking Mode. All attributes are 
increased as well. However, Ki Charge Rate is reduced for a brief time.

-Telekinesis:
Temporarily paralyzes the opponent.

-Vice Shout:
Temporarily paralyzes the opponent.

-Wild Sense:
Allows the player to automatically defensively teleport any Melee Attack as 
well as any Super Blast a single time. Additionally, if the player uses Wild 
Sense to dodge a Melee Attack, the player will teleport behind the opponent 
and initiate a Smash Attack upon the opponent. If the player uses Wild Sense 
to dodge a projectile Super Blast, the player will simply automatically 
defensively dodge the attack.


III (P) -Counter Stance-
------------------------
The Counter Stance is a life saver through many aspects of the game. As the 
opponent will likely always be looking for a way to land his punches on the 
player, it is up for the player to know two things: 1) When he/she is capable 
of performing a Counter Stance and 2) When he/she SHOULD perform a Counter 
Stance. The first being completely conditional to the player's tactical 
performance; what he/she is already attempting, the latter being completely 
conditional to the situation at hand when regarding the opponent's intentions. 
The Counter Stance is only effective against Base Melee. Therefore, Charged 
Melee, Hooks, Ki Blasts or Super Blasts will disregard the Counter Stance and 
punch through. When one successfully performs a Counter Stance, the results 
may vary depending on the character, for different characters possess 
different results to their Counter Stances. Counter results:

	1. Counter Grab (Counters the attack with a Grab Attempt)
	2. After Image (Automatically Defensively Teleports Base Melee)
	3. Dragon Deflection (Counter Deflects the opponent completely away 
	from the player in an upward trajectory, in a semi-Collapsed 
	Aftermath.)

In this section, it is important that one understands the different methods of 
initiating the Counter Stance.

-Step-In Counter Stance:

	(As explained in III-M-7, the Step-In movement allows the player to be 
	completely invulnerable to Melee Attack. This means that during the 
	timeframe of execution to conclusion, the attacker's melee will have no 
	effect on the player, physically or otherwise. However, it is important 
	to understand that the Combo Set of any given character can stretch 
	well beyond the timeframe of the Step-In. It is in this situation that 
	a player can incorporate the Step-In Counter Stance for optimal 
	performance.

	After a player performs a Step-In maneuver, one can then initiate the 
	Step-In Counter Stance by pressing and holding "Circle". It is 
	important that the player knows the character, for some characters 
	transition into a Counter Stance while others transition into a Sway. 
	The Sway is simply a second evasive maneuver that is linked to the 
	Step-In that can help evade a prolonged attack.

	Once the Counter Stance is initiated, holding "Circle" will keep the 
	Stance fixed. During this period, Ki is consumed in order to hold the 
	Stance. This technique is perfect for countering opponents that love to 
	present an aggressive approach with Base Melee.

	Alternatively, one may also initiate the Step-In Hook as a means of 
	Counter Attack. While one can transition from the Step-In to the 
	Counter Stance by pressing "Circle" post Step-In, one can alternatively 
	transition into the character-specified Hook by pressing "Triangle". It 
	is important to understand that though pressing "Triangle" alone can 
	initiate the character-specified Hook, one can incorporate a Lift 
	Strike or Sweeping Hook in its place.)

-Side Step Counter Stance:

	(Unlike the Step-In, the Side Step does not render the player 
	invulnerable to Melee. Therefore, one must be very careful when 
	executing the Side Step. However, one must also understand that like 
	the Step-In, one can transition into a Counter Stance by following the 
	Side Step with "Circle". Also unlike the Step-In Counter Stance 
	initiation, the Side Step Counter Stance does not transition into a 
	Sway at any point. Therefore, one can always count on some form of 
	Counter Stance when transitioning from the Side Step. Again, for one to 
	continue holding the Counter Stance, one must hold "Circle" and 
	therefore consume Ki. Unlike the Step-In, one cannot incorporate the 
	Counter Hooks as suggested in the Step-In. The concept of the Side Step 
	Counter Stance holds true to Back Steps, Ascension Hops and Descent 
	Hops.)

-Melee Counter Stance:

	(As explained in III-F-1, Offensive Teleportation is performed by 
	following a Base Melee Attack with pressing a desired direction and 
	"Circle". In the instance of the Melee Counter Stance, one would do the 
	same command, but without directionally influencing the "Circle" press. 
	In essence, it is a sequence of initiating Base Melee Attack with 
	"Square" and immediately transitioning into a Counter Stance by 
	pressing "Circle". Like the Counter Stances previously discussed, one 
	must hold "Circle" to keep the Counter Stance in place. This will 
	consume Ki as well. This technique is very useful when battling in 
	close quarters combat as the foundation of close combat lies within a 
	swarm of Base Melee.)

-Cancellation Counter Stance:

	(As explained in III-L, a Chargeable Melee or Hook can be cancelled via 
	Natural Cancellation. In doing so, one must charge the attack and then 
	press one of the remaining face buttons for Natural Cancellation.

	In order to incorporate the Counter Stance into the Natural 
	Cancellation system, one only needs to continue holding the button used 
	for cancellation. Just as holding such a button to initiate and hold 
	the Counter Stance though other methods of Counter Stance previously 
	discussed, holding the face button of Natural Cancellation will 
	initiate the Counter Stance and hold the Stance as Ki is consumed. It 
	is in this instance that one must recall the different methods of 
	Natural Cancellation. For not all Natural Cancellation methods can 
	transition into a Counter Stance. The following are Natural 
	Cancellations that can transition into Counter Stance:

	1. Charged Melee Cancellation
	2. Charged Dash Melee Cancellation

	Once the Charged Jumping Melee is cancelled via Natural Cancellation, 
	the player's character cannot transition into the Counter Stance. 
	Instead, the player will merely continue his path of gravitational 
	pull.)

-Lift Strike Counter Stance:

	(When one has become a victim of the Lift Strike, it is imperative that 
	one finds a way to defend, for the Lift Strike Combo Terminus is one of 
	the most powerful and devastating combo the game has to offer. When the 
	player is lifted into the air via Lift Strike, one is given an 
	opportunity to transition into Counter Stance with the mashing of the 
	"Circle" button. If performed correctly, the player will tech in mid 
	air and engage the Counter Stance. However, as the Lift Strike Combo 
	Terminus can be initiated by one of two attacks: The Heavy Finish and 
	the Base Melee, one must make the judgment call. A Heavy Finish will 	
	ignore the Counter Stance and simply performing the aerial Tech will 
	likely move out of range of the Heavy Finish but will fall victim to 
	the Base Melee.)


III (Q) -Transformations/Fusions-
---------------------------------
In order to transform one's character, one must take note that this technique 
is performed in different ways, all of which relate to pressing the right 
Joystick; also known as "R3". If allowed, the player can choose which 
Transformation his/her character will perform by holding a specified direction 
while pressing "R3". One must also understand that Transformations require and 
consume Ki Stocks. Typically, a single Transformation from one level to the 
next will consume a single Ki Stock, but this will also relate to the 
character at hand. The initiation of a Transformation will result with an 
animation sequence close-up on the character in which the player will see the 
character Transform without worrying about the opponent inflicting damage. In 
essence, when initiated correctly, the character will Transform successfully 
without the opponent being able to stop it. When regarding this technique, one 
must take note that there are three forms of Transformations: Progressive, 
Flexible, Fusion, Absorption.

-Progressive:

	(The Progressive Transformation is a Transformation that is permanent 
	unless another Progressive Transformation is possible. In essence, one 
	can Transform in one direction progressively. However, once the 
	player's character has reached his/her final Transformation, no further 
	Transformations are possible.)

-Flexible:

	(The Flexible Transformation is a Transformation that is not permanent. 
	In essence, one can Transform in a progressive direction as well as 
	reverting back to Base Form. While one may possess the ability to 
	Transform progressively to the next level of Transformation or even 
	skip levels of Transformation with the required Ki Stocks available, 
	reversion will always result with Base Form.)

-Fusion:

	(The Fusion Transformation is a Transformation that requires the 
	specified teammate suggested for the desired Fusion. Like the 
	Progressive Transformation, the Fusion Transformation is permanent. 
	Once a Fusion has taken place, no further Fusion Transformations may be 
	performed by the character. However, there are cases where the 
	character may still have Progressive or even Flexible Transformations 
	available.)

-Absorption:

	(Like the Fusion Transformation, the Absorption Transformation is 
	permanent. However, the Absorption Transformation does not require a 
	specified teammate to perform and does not allow progressive 
	Transformations. However, there are times that additional Absorption 
	Transformations can take place that may act in place of Progressive 
	Transformations.)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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IV. Advanced Mechanics
----------------------


From this point forward, one will become familiar with the synergy 
incorporated in many aspects of the game on an advanced level. It is important 
that one understands the basics covered up to this section, for the complexity 
of techniques and the theories included here will require a solid 
understanding of the basic nature of the game. Thus far, this document has 
covered the boundaries and limitations of the nature of Tenkaichi 2, 
proceeding here will broaden one's understanding of how such boundaries and 
limitations can be bent and broken for ultimate exploitation.


IV (A) -Recovery Rate-
----------------------
There are two types of Recovery Rate: Offensive and Defensive. For one who 
attacks an opponent must also regain composure and become ready for the next 
attack just as the victim must also recovery from the initial attack and 
become ready for a following attack. While the Offensive Recovery is fairly 
self explanatory, the Defensive Recovery Rate is based on more than one aspect 
of the game.


IV-A-1. Offensive Recovery:
---------------------------
Many attacks may seem inherently linked together and must require a certain 
timeframe to allow any other offensive attack to be incorporated. As some 
buttons may have different results via execution during the given situation, 
one must understand the Offensive Recovery Rates in order to perform the 
desired attack. For example, the "Triangle" button is used for Hooks and Ki 
Blasts. As explained in III-C-2, the Heavy Finish Hook is initiated by the 
"Triangle" button and can progress into a Heavy Crush Terminus by pressing 
"Triangle" two more times and concluded with a "Square". There is a certain 
timeframe after the initiating "Triangle" that the button is still under 
consideration for the Heavy Crush terminus. If the player wished to follow the 
initiating "Triangle" with a Ki Blast, one must wait for the Offensive 
Recovery Rate to conclude before using the Ki Blast instead of proceeding into 
the Heavy Crush terminus. The same concept must be regarded to all Hooks that 
have transitional terminus potential such as the Sweep or Kai Cannon. More 
importantly though, is that the player understands that not all characters are 
the same in terms of Offensive Recovery. Some characters recover their offense 
fairly quickly while others take a very long time. Fighter Trunks is a very 
big fan favorite, for on a basic level, he does hold a lot of potential in the 
fight game. However, he holds a very slow Offensive Recovery Rate, which 
limits his exploitation factor.


IV-A-2. Defensive Recovery:
---------------------------
As explained above, there are many aspects of the game in which Defensive 
Recovery takes hold. Such aspects include: Turning around, standing up, Base 
Ki Recovery, Aftermath Recovery, Composure and Tech Recovery.

-Turning Around:

	(When the player manages to catch the opponent's rear, the opponent's 
	first response should be to turn around. This is important because 
	without the proper Blast 1 barrier, an opponent cannot defend nor 
	attack when being attacked from behind. However, one must also consider 
	that the timeframe of Turning Around is considered to be a Recovery 
	Rate. During this time, the opponent is not able to effectively defend 
	against attacks. However, the timing of exploitation is fairly small, 
	so it is possible for the opponent to turn around in time to defend if 
	the window of opportunity is missed.)

-Standing Up:

	(This Recovery Rate is also known as Waking Up. During this timeframe, 
	the character is trying to get to his/her feet and is physically 
	vulnerable to attacks that cannot be effectively defended. It is in 
	this instance that one must learn the value of "teching". An un-teched 
	impact will result with the player laying on the ground. During which 
	time, the player may fall victim to further attacks; be it via Ki 
	Blast, Super Blast, or even further Base Melee abuse.

	It is also important to understand that different characters possess 
	different attacks. While the Recovery Rate of standing up can be 
	exploited, one may feel it necessary to stay grounded in the ragdoll 
	position. In some cases, the opponent is unable to deal any real damage 
	as the player laying on the ground receives less damage than a standing 
	one. However, some characters possess a Dashing Charge Melee that will 
	bring the opponent off of the ground and to a standing position for 
	further damage. It is important that one knows the characters and never 
	underestimate the capabilities of his/her opponent. The concept of 
	delivering further damage to a downed or waking opponent is known as 
	Vortex. In this case, the player can continually deliver damage to a 
	downed opponent by taking advantage of the ragdoll effect via Dashing 
	Charged Melee or taking advantage of the Waking Up time frame of 
	vulnerability.)

-Base Ki Recovery:

	(As explained in III-M-1, when a Guard is Crushed, the Ki Meter is 
	depleted by several Ki Guages. If the Ki Meter becomes completely 
	drained through such regard, the victim is then rendered in Base Ki 
	Recovery. In this instance, the character must stand vulnerable until 
	his/her Ki Meter is raised to the Base line of Ki. This process can be 
	sped up by mashing the "Circle" button as suggested on the screen. One 
	must consider that Defensive Teleportation is still an option as well 
	as Blast 1 Barriers, but beyond this, the Recovery Rate must find 
	completion.)

-Aftermath Recovery:

	(When the player falls victim to a Smash Attack, one transitions into 
	the Smash Aftermath. In such a case, one has the ability to speed up 
	this Recovery Rate by mashing the "Circle" button as suggested on the 
	screen. Otherwise, the player will continue in such aftermath until the 
	Recovery is completed.)

-Composure:

	(When the player falls victim to a Charged Hook such as the Sweep or 
	Heavy Finish, one must find his/her recovery. For during this time, the 
	player may fall victim to continued Melee. While a transition of Hook 
	Terminus can be defended via Defensive Teleportation, an opponent that 
	chooses to continue via Base Melee must be dealt with by recovery 
	alone. Such Recovery must be gained through mashing the "Circle" button 
	as suggested on the screen. During the time of Composure Recovery, the 
	player is completely vulnerable to attacks that are not able to be 
	dodged defensively.)

-Teching:

	(The ability of Teching is understood as keeping oneself from rag-
	dolling. In other words, while a player might get knocked to the ground 
	like a ragdoll by simply pressing nothing, he/she missed the 
	opportunity to Tech off of the ground and bounce back to his/her feet. 
	This is done by pressing "Circle" at the instance of ground impact. The 
	ability of a player to Tech has been established in many fighting games 
	over the years. As Tenkaichi 2 is based on a 3d environment, one must 
	understand that he/she holds the potential to Tech off of the 
	boundaries as well as the ground.)

One may notice when watching the more advanced players that they always take 
advantage of Recovery Rates. When the opponent is attempting to Wake Up, it is 
likely that a Super Blast, Rush Attack, Ki Blast flurry or even a Charged 
Dashing Melee is on its way to make the adjusted impact. However, there are 
also times when the players may take advantage of Techs as well. As important 
as a Tech is, it is also important to note that a Rush Attack cannot connect 
with a player that is in Ragdoll position. Many players will initiate a Rush 
Attack that when timed correctly, will connect with the opponent at the exact 
instant of Tech Recovery. Therefore it is always important to know when to 
Tech and when to Ragdoll.


IV (B) -Advanced Combos-
------------------------
Thus far, the player should have a solid understanding that each Combo Set 
consists of five or less consecutive presses of the "Square" button, of which 
one may incorporate the Charged Terminus, the Hook Terminus or a Base "Square" 
Terminus. As explained in III-I, Combos are connected together as a means of 
understanding the Hit Counter, the player's position in combo activity, the 
physical attacks of the given Combo Set and how the Hit Counter is affected by 
Hooks, Transitions, Offensive Teleports, Recovery Teleports, Cancels and 
Charged Melee. It is for this reason that though the Hit Counter may reset, it 
does not mean the Combo itself has reset. As time has passed, there have been 
many breakthroughs in Tenkaichi 2's combo system regarding how the combo 
system relates to the Hit Counter and the character's physical activity during 
combat.


IV-B-1. Ground & Pound:
-----------------------
The Ground & Pound is based on a new type of cancellation that is derived from 
the limitations of the 3D environment in relation to the maneuvering 
capability of the characters. In essence, it is due to the character's 
limitations in movement that allow the player to break other limitations. As 
suggested by the name, this technique must be performed on or near the ground. 
One's experience will guide him/her to understand the exact height of 
technical allowance. One would do well to understand that the G&P is the most 
devastating technique in Tenkaichi 2. Once the rear of the opponent is 
reached, one may G&P to victory with very little opposition.

-Theory:

	(As explained in III-B, one must understand the circumference of the 
	Step-In Barrier in order to distinguish the realm of Dash ability from 
	the realm of Step-In ability. Once understood, such a boundary also 
	constructs the limitations of ascension and descent. For example, when 
	the player is airborne and distanced from the opponent, pressing "R1" 
	to ascend will cause the player's character to ascend with flight 
	capability. Respectively, if the player chose to press "R2" to descend, 
	the player's character would do so until he/she reached the ground. 
	However, inside the Step-In Barrier, the ascension and descent are 
	limited due to the close quarters combat circumference. In such a case, 
	an airborne player who chooses to press "R1" to ascend while inside the 
	Step-In Barrier will merely hop upward and back a few feet. 
	Respectively, if the player chose to press "R2" to descend while inside 
	the Step-In Barrier, he/she would merely hop downward and back a few 
	feet. During battle, such a tactic is less useful than the side step as 
	the player is left in a vulnerable maneuvering attempt. It is for this 
	reason that most players, even a lot of great players have chosen to 
	ignore the ascension/descent buttons during close quarters combat.

	What these people never figured out resides in the following concept. 
	When grounded and inside the Step-In Barrier, pressing "R1" to ascend 
	will cause a Jump. Pressing "R2" in the same situation will result in 
	no effect as an attempt to descend when already grounded possess 
	nullified influence. However, it is important to take note that any 
	character with flight ability will initiate a hovering ability while 
	performing Melee attacks. As over 90% of the characters on the roster 
	possess flight ability, it is safe to say that this technique holds 
	high potential for every fighter. When the player's character begins to 
	hover during his/her melee, it is important to note that the hover can 
	be grounded with the "R2" button. As the player's character is well 
	within the Step-In Barrer, pressing "R2" should cause the player to hop 
	down and backward a few feet. As the ground is clearly in the path of 
	doing so, the player's character merely cancels the Hop, instantly 
	allowing the player to perform the next technique desired. Since the 
	"R2" can be incorporated into any Combo Set, one is able to begin a 
	Combo Set and immediately cancel the Combo Set with R2 Cancellation and 
	begin his/her attack again. Though the Combo Set was indeed cancelled, 
	it's relation to the Hit Counter is not intertwined and therefore will 
	not reset the Hit Counter. It is within this concept that the player 
	can use R2 Cancellation through the same continued Combo Set well 
	beyond the Hit Count of 99. This concept is called the Ground & Pound.

	It is also important to understand that while the Melee of the player 
	typically initiates the Hover ability, this also relates strictly to 
	the attacks the player exhibits, and more importantly: the height 
	difference between the player's character and the opponent. The hover 
	ability compensates for the height difference when facing a taller 
	character. Therefore when using a character that is shorter than the 
	opponent, the hover is enabled during melee combat. However, if one 
	were to choose a taller character than the opponents, the hover is not 
	necessary and therefore not enabled. The player's character's feet are 
	already planting themselves with every attack. Therefore, any attempt 
	to descend would be as effective as if the player were standing still. 
	The attacks themselves, on the other hand, may hold potential to enable 
	the hover as some attacks bring the opponent off the ground as its 
	nature. Some attacks may simply bring the feet off the ground during 
	the attack exhibition which will also enable the hover. It is important 
	to know which characters can enable the hover against which characters 
	and why.

	Finally, the player must understand the fluidity of the G&P for any 
	given character. For example, some characters may R2 Cancel into the 
	G&P technique but a continuance of G&P may seem choppy. This fluidity 
	can usually be smoothed out through training and switching up 
	cancellation potentials, or which "Square" to replace with R2 
	Cancellation, but there are some characters in which the G&P is not 
	very effective. Once performed correctly, the only chance the opponent 
	has to even stall the player's attack is the possession of a Blast 1 
	Barrier. Fortunately, a player that can tech well, will be able to 
	reactivate the G&P before the opponent Offensively Recovers from the 
	Barrier. Again, it is important to know the characters and which ones 
	work best with the G&P.)

As briefly explained, the Hit counter is not intertwined with the Combo Set in 
order to cancel the Hit Counter, but the Hit Counter does share a connection 
with the Combo itself. Therefore, once the player decides to continue the 
prolonged Combo Set without the interruption of R2 Cancellation, the player 
can then treat the rest of the Combo Set as if it were his/her first Combo 
Set. Completing the Combo Set with a Base "Square" Terminus will result with 
an Initial Aftermath, allowing the Step-In to transition into the next 
Supplementary Combo Set. However, one must be advised that as the G&P Combo 
Set can be carried for a very long time, one must also keep an eye on the 
Charge Meter as it will still relate directly to the amount of connected 
attacks landed. Also, it is important to understand that every time R2 
Cancellation is used to initiate the G&P, the physical Combos performed by the 
player will always resemble that of the Initial Combo Set. As explained in 
III-C-3, the physical attacks that the player's character displays in the 
Supplementary Combo Sets are usually different than the attacks displayed in 
the initial Combo Set. Therefore, once a player transitions into the 
Supplementary Combo Set and then incorporates the G&P, the physical attacks 
will not resemble that of the Supplementary Combo Set, but that of the Initial 
Combo Set. The nature of the G&P will complicate things sometimes so it is 
important that the player knows exactly what Combo Set he/she is performing 
and what impacts different actions will have on the combo itself. One can not 
merely trust what the Hit Counter shows, but one can UNDERSTAND what the hit 
counter shows.

IV-B-2. Telattack:
------------------
As explained in IV-B-1, the relationship between the Combo Set and the Hit 
Counter is very flexible. In order to take full advantage and construct a 
strong offense, one must understand what impacts different actions will have 
on the combo itself. While the G&P will cancel the Combo Set without severing 
the link with the Hit Counter, an Offensive Teleport will reset the Hit 
Counter without severing the link with the Combo. It is at this point that one 
must learn the effects of using these techniques as well as the usefulness of 
the Recovery Teleport. Also, it is important that one performs this technique 
from the rear.

-Recover Teleport:

	(When the player is able to position the opponent into Boost Aftermath, 
	a simple Step-In will not cover the distance. As the Boost Aftermath is 
	initiated through the means of a Base "Square" Terminus, a continued 
	Offensive Teleport is not allowed as they must be incorporated before 
	the Terminus of a Combo Set. The Recovery Teleport is initiated by 
	holding Forward and pressing "Circle" after the Base "Square" Terminus 
	initiates the Boost Aftermath. If performed correctly, the opponent 
	will teleport forward a distance much longer than any directionally 
	influenced Offensive Teleport. This Recovery Teleport will allow the 
	player to continue his assault on the opponent. Typically, the Recover 
	Teleport allows the player to being his/her Recover Rate, resulting 
	with a reset in the Hit Counter. However, if the player's character has 
	a very fast Offensive Recovery Rate, then it is possible that the 
	player can enter a connected Combo Set through the Recovery Teleport.)

The idea of the Telattack is to incorporate the Offensive Teleport and the 
Recovery Teleport with the additional influence of the opponent's Recovery 
Rate to allow a continuous attack sequence that works from the Initiating 
Combo Set into the Supplementary Combo Set and then back into the Initiating 
Combo Set. To perform correctly, one must understand the following commands:

	1. Complete natural Combo Set consisting of five "Squares". Offensive 
	Teleports may be incorporated here, but there will be no serious 
	bearing on the Combo other than resetting the Hit counter. This is not 
	necessary at this point as the game's engine still believes one to be 
	in an Initial Combo Set. 

	2. As the last Base "Square" Terminus results with an Initial 
	Aftermath, the player will then transition into the Supplementary Combo 
	Set via Step-In. 

	3. It is during the Supplementary Combo Set that the Offensive Teleport 
	must be engaged. Without the Offensive Teleport, the natural Terminus 
	of the Supplementary Combo Set will result with Collapsed Aftermath. It 
	is the Offensive Teleport that initiates the Boost Aftermath. 
	Understand that if the G&P concept were to be initiated during this 
	Combo Set, the physical aspect of the Combo change will revert the 
	combo back into the Initial Combo Set state. Completing such a Combo 
	Set with the Base "Square" Terminus would only result with yet another 
	Initial Aftermath.

	4. Though the Offensive Teleport will reset the Hit Counter, the Combo 
	itself will continue. The resulting Boost Aftermath from the Base 
	"Square" Terminus will allow for the Recovery Teleport to take place. 
	Once the Recovery Teleport brings the player up to the right position, 
	one can begin the process over or conduct a different means of attack. 

Additionally, it would be an optimal choice to learn how the G&P can be 
incorporated into any Combo Set of any strategy to ensure one knows the full 
potential of Combo manipulation.


IV-B-3. Hook Recovery:
----------------------
The Hook Recovery follows the same guidelines as the Telattack, but requires 
the speedy Recovery Rate of the opponent to work successfully.

-Recovery Influence:

	(When the player lands a Hook such as the Sweep or the Heavy Finish, 
	the opponent is placed into Recovery mode. This Recovery Rate can be 
	sped up by the pressing of the "Circle" button. If the player 
	immediately continues into the Supplementary Combo Set through 
	transitioning from the Hook, the opponent is placed into Boost 
	Aftermath. However, if the player chose to use the Hook inside the 
	Supplementary Combo Set instead and then continue into the Base 
	"Square" Terminus, an opponent that presses nothing will merely fall 
	into Collapsed Aftermath. However, if the opponent were to try to 
	recover faster from the Heavy Finish or Sweep of the Supplementary 
	Combo Set by pressing the "Circle" button, his Recovery Rate is raised. 
	If the opponent chooses to entertain this method, a base "Square" 
	Terminus from the player will place the opponent into Boost Aftermath. 
	As explained in IV-B-2, the Recovery Teleport can cover the distance of 
	the Boost Aftermath, allowing a continuance of attacks.)


IV-B-3. Greening/Redding:
-------------------------
As explained in III-D, there are three levels of Melee Charged: Green, Red and 
Full. As any physical melee that can be charged can be defensively teleported, 
one must take note that the combos suggested here are not perfect. 
Greening/Redding can be used safely enough against the CPU, but one must take 
careful consideration when using such techniques against a human opponent.

-Greening:

	(Regarding III-D, when the player charges the "Square" button and 
	releases during the Green level, the opponent is guided through the 
	Greening Aftermath; in which case the opponent is not pushed anywhere. 
	The opponent is still standing yet not fully recovered. It is during 
	this instant that one must understand that as long as the player's 
	Offensive Recovery Rate is faster than the opponent's Defensive 
	Recovery Rate, the player can continue into the Supplementary Combo 
	Set. As the Greening technique is founded on Base Melee, one could use 
	the Greening Technique at will and in place of any "Square" of the 
	Combo Set. This can lead to a combo reaching beyond 99 hits as long as 
	the opponent finds no way of defending.)

-Redding:

	(Regarding III-D, when the player charges the "Square" button and 
	releases during the Red level, the opponent is guided through the Red 
	Aftermath; in which case the opponent is knocked in the desired 
	direction of the attack, plummeting to the ground much further than the 
	Collapsed Aftermath. The opponent is no longer standing. In such a 
	case, the opponent's trajectory can also be influenced with the 
	direction of the attack. In order to follow up this attack with further 
	Redding technique, one would simply incorporate a follow-up Dashing 
	Melee to catch the falling victim. As long as the hit counter rises, 
	one is still stringing the combo along. Continuing with the Redding 
	Technique can force the Hit Counter to reach 99 hits.)


IV-B-5. Ki Whoring:
-------------------
As explained in III-E-1, different characters can only expel a certain amount 
of successive Ki Blasts at a time. As there has yet to be a Cancellation 
process such as the G&P to cancel the Ki Blast Flurry for further Ki Blast 
addition, one can still use the G&P to incorporate Melee to Cancel the Ki 
Blast Flurry and continue one's assault. It is during this process that one 
would incorporate Ki Blasts within the G&P after every execution of the "R2" 
Cancellation. If performed correctly, one could force the Hit Counter to reach 
over 99 hits with the inclusion of Melee and Ki Blasts alike.

In order to perform correctly, one would begin with the Initial Combo Set and 
Cancel it with "R2" Cancellation. As soon as the combo is interrupted, one 
would press "Triangle" a few times to expel a few Ki Blasts and then begin a 
new Initial Combo Set again for a rinse and repeat concept. However, it is 
very important that one must ensure that the "Triangle" is pressed at the 
proper instant. For when one presses "Triangle" at the moment of ground 
contact, the Descent Sweep is initiated instead of the Ki Blast. It is 
important that one must practice the timing of such techniques to perform 
effectively.


IV-B-6. Ki Control:
-------------------
As discussed in III-E-1, the Charged Ki Blast is performed much like the 
Charged Melee Attack, except with the "Triangle" button. These blasts may have 
different effects depending on the character. For example, some character may 
have similar Normal Ki Blasts, but when charged might be expelled as something 
completely different. Here are a few of the different Charged Ki Blasts one 
might expect:

	1. Destructo Disk: Cuts through guard, even in Charged Ki Blast Form.
	2. Stunner: Not enough to knock the opponent down, but enough to stun 
	them.
	3. Paralyzer: Leaves the opponent temporarily paralyzed.
	4. Strong Ki Blast: Like a Normal Ki Blast, but bigger and more 
	powerful; will knock the opponent down.
	5. Multi Ki Blast: The character disperses several Ki Blasts at once.

In the instance of the Paralyzer, Strong Ki Blast and Multi Ki Blasts, there 
are some characters who's Charged Ki Blasts can be released at a Charge level 
to place the opponent into Greening Aftermath. While these Ki Blasts can 
usually be unleashed more than once per set, it is possible connect several of 
the suggested Charged Ki Blasts upon the opponent before the set runs out. 
This type of Ki Blast construct is called Ki Control. In such a case, one 
could use the Ki Whoring method to transition into Ki Control in order to 
incorporate variety into the G&P, or merely execute a variety of Base Ki 
Blasts and Ki Control as a means of connected Ki Blast assault.


IV (C) -Advanced Movement-
--------------------------
As discussed in III-B, there are limitations set on how the player can move in 
a 3D environment. Through mechanical exploration, many great players have 
found ways to work the system for optimal maneuvering capability. As this 
document progresses, such capabilities will be brought to light as the player 
must advanced accordingly. Maneuvering skills are regarded as being one of the 
most important aspects of any fighting game, as Tenkaichi 2 is built upon a 3D 
environment with flight capability, such skills are regarded as even more 
important. One would do well to acknowledge this concept and train to perfect 
it.


IV-C-1. Dash Cancellation:
--------------------------
As explained in III-B, the Dash is a maneuvering technique that allows the 
player to move at a fast pace toward the direction desired by holding the 
desired direction and pressing "X", all in regarding Focal Adherence. 
Normally, if a player wanted to bring the Dash to a halt prematurely, one 
would simply press "X" a second time. However, if one were to pay close enough 
attention, one might see that using "X" to bring a Dash to a premature 
conclusion will cause the character to slam on the breaks. In essence, the 
Dash is being put into the process of being stopped. One can see this more 
clearly when using Kid Buu. If one were to Dash with Kid Buu and stop the Dash 
with "X", one would see Kid Buu physically bring his legs into the air and 
attempt to stop the Dash. During this time, the character is trying to 
offensively recover from the Dash stoppage. In this section of the document, a 
new concept of Dash Stoppage will be discussed without the inclusion of 
Offensive Recovery.

-R1/R2 Cancellation:

	(As explained above, when attempting to bring the Dash to a halt, 
	pressing "X" will result with Offensive Recovery. However, if one were 
	to press "R1" or "R2" in the middle of an aerial Dash, the player is 
	immediately able to transition from Dash Mode to Ascend or Descend mode 
	respectively. As the "R1" or "R2" button is not being held, the 
	character does not continue into Ascension or Descent, but merely 
	returns to fighting stance. In this circumstance, the "R1" or "R2" 
	command simply cancels the Dash and immediately returns the character 
	to fighting stance. In such an instance, one would do well to 
	understand the mindset of the combatant, as most players that 
	acknowledge an approaching Dasher will expect the Charged Dash Attack. 
	If one can immediately transition into fighting stance, many 
	alternative attack methods are immediately at the player's disposal. It 
	is important that the player understands that both "R1" and "R2" are 
	capable of cancelling the Dash. However, it is also understood that the 
	advanced player will typically use "R2" as it relates to other forms of 
	cancellation that one will use later in which "R1" is not the optimal 
	choice.

	As the concept of "R2" Cancellation has now been covered, one must 
	understand how such a concept works on the ground. While all 
	directionally influenced aerial Dashes can be cancelled with "R1" and 
	"R2", such cancellation is far more limited on the ground. When a 
	player is Dashing on the ground, "R2" cancellation does not always take 
	form. As a Dash that is on the ground is considered to be a Grounded 
	Dash, pressing "R2" will usually hold no effect on the Dash at all 
	while pressing "R1" will initiate a Jump. It is important that one 
	understands the limitations of the grounded Dash Cancel. When one 
	Dashes to the side, pressing "R2" will typically have no effect on the 
	Dash. Therefore, if one were to attempt a Dash Cancel, one would stick 
	to the Neutral Dash. However, as the "R2" Cancellation does hold true 
	to the Neutral Dash, it is in relation to the height of the character. 
	If the character is too tall, pressing "R2" will have no effect on the 
	Neutral Dash. Such limitations have been explored and exploited as 
	progression through this document will explain.

	Additionally, as the "R2" Cancellation may take form on a grounded 
	player, one must also realize the potential of initiating a Descending 
	Sweep by pressing "Triangle" at the very instance the player's 
	character plants his/her feet.)

-R2C Super Blast:

	("R2C" or "R2" Cancellation can be used to bring an opponent directly 
	from Dash Mode into fighting stance. It is within this concept that a 
	player must acknowledge the potential to expel a Super Blast. As 
	discussed above, the opponent typically expects a specifically limited 
	number of attacks from the Dash. However, as the player can immediately 
	transition from Dash mode into fighting stance, the player is 
	immediately awarded Super Blast ability as long as he/she is not inside 
	the Step-In Barrier and holds the correct amount of Ki. In order to 
	perform one would merely perform a Dash, then tap "R2" and immediately 
	press the commands for the desired Super Blast.)


IV-C-2. Shift:
--------------
This technique is unlike the other maneuvering techniques explained in III-B, 
for it does not follow the same rules and limitations of such movements. The 
Shift is a technique that allows the player to move beyond the understanding 
of the typical Tenkaichi 2 player and thus gives the advanced player an upper 
hand on several methods of combat.

As explained in IV-C-1, "R2C" can immediately bring the Dashing player into 
fighting stance. However, this does not mean the player's character is brought 
to an immediate fixed position. While pressing "X" to stop a Dash will bring 
the player's character to a fixed position, the Offensive Recovery Rate is a 
drawback. However, this is assuming that one would want to reach an immediate 
fixed position. Through further exploration, there has been a new discovery in 
maneuvering techniques known as the Shift. The Shift is created by the initial 
momentum created by the initial Dash. Once the Dash is performed, with it, 
comes the momentum of moving forward. As the Offensive Recovery Rate of 
pressing "X" is used as a means of slamming the breaks of the Dash, pressing 
"R2" to cancel the Dash does not slam on the breaks. Therefore, when one 
presses "R2" to cancel the dash, it will bring the opponent to fighting stance 
as the momentum of the initial Dash will continue to project the player's 
character in the initial direction. Therefore, if a player were to Dash at the 
opponent and then press "R2" 3/4 the distance of the Dash, the momentum of the 
initial Dash will be stored into the new movement called the Shift. This 
technique will continue moving toward the opponent for a few feet. Depending 
on the distance of the initial Dash, "R2" Cancellation at 3/4 the distance may 
result with the player Sliding the remainder of the distance.

As explained above, the Descending Sweep should always be kept in 
consideration when dealing with grounded "R2C". One can Cancel the Dash and 
Shift forward to the opponent and initiate the Descending Sweep as an 
unexpected attack.

IV-C-2-a. Fake-Out:

	(The Fake-Out is a means of directionally manipulating the Shift even 
	when the Step-In Barrier has been breached. As explained above, the 
	momentum of the initiating Dash is stored within the Shift. However, 
	this does not mean that the Shift must continue in the same trajectory 
	as the Dash would lead one to expect. In fact, as one must understand 
	that the momentum is stored within the Shift itself, one can then 
	influence the Shift directionally as soon as the "R2" cancellation 
	takes place. As this technique is beyond the boundaries of the game's 
	maneuvering limitations, the Shift is free to roam even while inside 
	the Step-In Barrier.

	As a simpler explanation, one can Dash in a specific direction and then 
	use "R2C" with a different direction and will the Shift in the newly 
	desired direction. As the Step-In Barrier holds no bearing on the 
	Shift, one can Dash at the opponent, breach the Step-In Barrier, and 
	then Shift Back outside of the Step-In Barrier for Super Blast 
	positioning. As the typical Tenkaichi 2 player will not expect a Super 
	Blast from a Dashing opponent that has already breached the Step-In 
	Barrier, a Shift into Super Blast will in many cases be an optimal 
	choice. Such a maneuver does not necessarily have to transition into a 
	Super Blast, as the movement alone is defined as a Fake-Out.

	One must also understand now that even though the Shift does not cover 
	as much distance as the normal Dash, its stored momentum can be 
	redirected for boosting effect. In other words, if one were to Dash at 
	the opponent and then "R2C" to initiate the Shift while holding 
	Forward, it is possible that the forward directionally influenced Shift 
	will push faster than the initial Shift.)

IV-C-2-b. Switch:

	(As explained above, the Shift is beyond the boundaries of the game's 
	maneuvering limitations. It is free to roam even while inside the Step-
	In Barrier. As the Shift can be directionally influenced, it can be 
	used as a means of maneuvering around the opponent and Switching to the 
	opponent's rear in a very quick manner.

	While one may understand that the Shift can be directionally influenced 
	from the moment of "R2C", such directional influence can be further 
	guided as long as the Shift takes place. In essence, the Shift can be 
	manipulated with more than one direction before the maneuver is 
	concluded. It is through such manipulation that one can approach the 
	opponent by Dashing from the front and then move around the opponent 
	and to the rear via Shift.

	In order to perform correctly, one would Dash at the opponent and 
	breach the Step-In Barrier. Once the Step-In Barrier has been breached, 
	the player will then cancel the Dash via "R2C" and initiate the Shift. 
	The Shift will continue to move forward if left unaffected through 
	directional influence. As the player reaches the opponent's position 
	while in Shift motion, one will hold Left or Right to continue to Shift 
	to the side and past the opponent. As Focal Adherence still takes hold, 
	once the player Shifts past the opponent, one would hold Forward to 
	bring him/herself into rear position of the opponent. Once perfected, 
	such a movement should feel and look smooth. Once perfected, one should 
	also try to incorporate the Descending Sweep as this will be great 
	practice for an insulting attack. The Descending Sweep is the only 
	attack that can be initiated directly out of the Shift, save the 
	Rolling Hammer.)


IV-C-3. Sling Shot:
-------------------
As explained in III-L, the Charged Jumping Melee can be cancelled via Natural 
Cancellation. It is based within this concept that the Sling Shot was born. It 
is because of this technique that the Charged Jumping Melee stands alone from 
its fellow Natural Cancellations.

-Spring:

	(When one's character is grounded, it is possible to jump into the air 
	about 10 feet before gravity takes hold and brings the character back 
	to the ground. As one should have covered in III-L, this holds the 
	potential of a Chargeable Melee Attack. As also explained in III-L, 
	this Charged Jumping Melee can be cancelled by pressing one of the 
	remaining face buttons. It is within this Charge where the potential of 
	a new movement is stored: the Spring. If a player were to Charge the 
	Jumping Melee Attack, then hold a desired direction while cancelling 
	the Charge with a Natural Cancellation, the Spring will be engaged. For 
	example, if one were to Charge a Jumping Melee Attack and then hold 
	Left and initiate a Natural Cancellation, the player's character will 
	cancel the attack and then Spring off to the Left. Unlike the Shift, 
	the Spring is not created by the momentum built from the initiating 
	movement. Instead, the force of the Spring is built within the Charge 
	Meter. Therefore, if the player were to create a spring while the 
	Charge Meter were in the Green, the Spring will be relatively short. 
	However, if the player were to wait until the Charge Meter were in the 
	Red, the Spring will be relatively long and beyond the Step-In Barrier; 
	well within the realm of Super Blast capability. Since the move is 
	created though the Charge Meter and not the Jump, one must also 
	understand that the Jump itself can be cut short by an early execution 
	of the Charged Melee. The sooner the Charged is initiated, the shorter 
	the Jump. The player will remain in Charged Jumping Melee mode until 
	the Charge is complete or cut short via Natural Cancellation. The 
	closer to the ground the player can remain, the lesser the chance that 
	the opponent can recognize the technique. 

	One must be very tactical with this technique as the Charge may possess 
	enough armor to allow a successful execution, one may still take damage 
	from the opponent's attempted assault. It is also important to know 
	exactly when to initiate a Super Blast, for if the player executes the 
	"Triangle" button at the incorrect timeframe, the Descending Sweep will 
	be initiated instead.)


IV-C-4. Lift Strike Switch:
--------------------------
The Lift Strike Combo Terminus is one of if not the most devastating basic 
combos the game has to offer. When regarding the ratio of Hit to Damage 
percentage, the Lift Strike Combo Terminus is definitely the most powerful 
combo the game has to offer. As the opponent will most likely keep this in 
mind, one should expect a form of defense attempt from the opponent. In this 
case, the opponent will do one of three things: Aerial Tech, Counter Stance 
and Ragdoll.

-Switch Inclusion:

	(As explained above, when performing the Lift Strike upon the opponent, 
	he/she will react in one of three ways. Either the opponent will 
	perform the aerial Tech, perform the Counter Stance, or Ragdoll and 
	fall to the ground. If the opponent falls to the ground, the Lift 
	Strike Switch will not work. If the player performs the Aerial Tech, the 
	Lift Strike Switch will work most of the time, but it is also possible 
	that the opponent's Defensive Recovery Rate will be quick enough for 
	them to defend. However, if the opponent performs the Counter Stance, 
	the Lift Strike will work to perfection. In order to perform the Lift 
	Strike Switch, one would merely follow-up on the Lift Strike with "X" as 
	if he/she were to transition into the Lift Strike Combo Terminus. 
	However, instead of moving into the terminus, one would simply hold 
	Left or Right. In the event that the opponent recovers into a Counter 
	Stance, the momentum built from the "X" approach will then be 
	redirected into moving the player around to the opponent's rear. This 
	is a quick movement and will avoid the Counter Stance, positioning the 
	player into the optimal location for rear attack.)


IV (D) -Advanced Defense-
-------------------------
While the basic mechanics will explain several aspects of Tenkaichi 2's 
defensive system, one must understand the concepts that aren't in the practice 
menu. Of course, one must not forget the basics as they are the foundation of 
keeping the opponent's attacks in check, but to leave the advancements of 
Tenkaichi 2's defensive system to ignorance is not how one exhibits greatness.


IV-D-1. Combo Breaker:
----------------------
The name "Combo Breaker" was pioneered from the combo based video game "Killer 
Instinct". In this game, when a player has fallen victim to an opponent's 
combo, one has the ability stop the combo in its tracks. It is only befitting 
that this technique should share the same name as it is used in the same 
manner. This technique seems to be a part of Tenkaichi 2's defensive aspect of 
the fighting engine, but for some reason, it was not included in the practice 
menu. This technique was later modified and included in the Tenkaichi 3 game, 
known as the Z-Counter #2.

When one has become a victim of the opponent's combo, one must be very 
familiar with the speed of the opponent's character as well as the combos 
being used. Such is necessary, for one must press the proper commands at the 
very impact of the opponent's punch or kick. If the player presses the 
commands outside of the few framed window of opportunity, the technique will 
not work. It may be possible to button mash in hopes the technique will be 
executed, but one will always find that training for the proper timing will 
always bring one to a stronger, more solid defensive system.

In order to perform, one must press both the "Square" button and the "Up" 
direction at the very impact of the opponent's punch, kick or even grab 
attempt. If performed correctly, the player will exhibit a blocking motion 
unlike the other blocking exhibitions. A thunderous sound of acknowledgement 
will resonate as the opponent's attack will be immediately interrupted and the 
player will then have the opportunity to engage his/her offense. 

This technique can be performed during the player's Base Guard. For one must 
also understand that the Combo Breaker is based on the impact of the 
opponent's punch or kick, regardless of whether or not any damage was 
inflicted. However, one must also understand that the Combo Breaker can only 
be performed from the front. If the opponent is attacking the player from the 
rear, the player is unable to perform the Combo Breaker.


IV-D-2. Ascension Evasion/Surfing:
----------------------------------
As explained in III-M-1, the concept of Approximal Focal Adherence is based on 
how the opponent faces the focal point while inside the Step-In Barrier; focal 
point being the opponent. As a general rule, when two players are inside the 
Step-In Barrier, one's Base Melee Attacks can reach the opponent before the 
opponent has a chance to move out of the way via directional influence. In 
other words, if the opponent were to hold left, he would slowly move to the 
left while keeping his focus upon the player. If the player were to begin his 
Base Melee, the opponent's slow movement is not fast enough to move out of the 
path of destruction. This is why one is awarded the Side Step ability, but 
even the Side Step is not full proof. Depending on the Aggression aspect of 
the character's attacks, one may be able to maneuver around the attack if 
he/she were on the boundary of the Step-In Barrier, but the closer the player 
positions oneself to the opponent, the more unlikely this will succeed.

-Ascension Evasion:

	(When a player ascends to the sky, one will find that there is a limit 
	to the 3D environment. Once the player reaches this limit, he/she can 
	continue to hold "R1" to stay in the Ascending state even if the 
	ascension itself has ceased. It is in this state that one must 
	understand that directional influence is far more sensitive in 
	effective movement, especially within the Step-In Barrier. In fact, 
	such directional influence while inside the Step-In Barrier is in most 
	cases fast enough to out-maneuver the opponent's Base Melee. In 
	essence, one would have access to an amplified movement in regards to 
	Approximal Focal Adherence as one would not merely face the opponent 
	with such directional influence, but will hold true to the Focal Point, 
	being the opponent. As one would be able to move much faster with 
	directional influence in this state, one can evade the opponent's Base 
	Melee, even while inside the Step-In Barrier. The closer to the 
	opponent, the faster a player is able to maneuver around the opponent's 
	attack due to centripetal force. 

	To perform correctly, one would ascend to the sky until one reaches the 
	stage's limit. Once this is performed, one will hold this state of 
	ascension. Once the opponent approaches and begins to attack via Base 
	Melee, one would simply hold left or right. Such directional influence 
	of the ascension state will maneuver the player's character around the 
	opponent's attacks. Once the opponent realizes that his/her attacks 
	have not made contact, he/she will regroup and try again. Once the 
	opponent's Approximal Focal Adherence is re-established, he/she may 
	begin a new attack. As long as the player continues to hold a direction 
	to maneuver around the opponent, such attacks will be unlikely to make 
	contact. This is a very frustrating tactic to deal with for the 
	opposing side.)

-Surfing:

	(As one has already established an understanding of Ascension Evasion, 
	one will understand Surfing as it follows the same mechanical 
	construct. However, instead of using the upper limit of the 3D 
	environment, one would use the stage's lower limit of the 3D 
	environment. Unfortunately, not all stages have a lower limit without 
	the stage's ground interfering. Therefore, one must be sure to chose 	
	the correct stage that includes a lower limit such as Ruined Earth or 
	Kami's Lookout.

	In such a case, one would hold "R2" to descend to the lower limits of 
	the stage and hold "R2" to remain in the state of descent. In this 
	state, one can maneuver as effectively as the Ascension Evasion. This 
	technique will be performed by holding "R2" and incorporating 
	directional influence for optimal movement around the opponent's 
	attacks inside the Step-In Barrier.)


III-D-3. Rise Over Run:
-----------------------
This concept is in direct relation to outrunning a Rush Attack by simply 
holding Ascend or Descend, for the ascension and descent possess a speed 
greater than some Rush Attack types, but one must know which type of Rush 
Attack one is attempting to evade, for some Rush Attacks are faster than the 
Ascension and Descent. 

In order to perform, one must take note that there are 3 different categories 
of speed when dealing with the Rush Attack. As explained in III-J-2, the first 
is extremely fast but covers short distances. This Rush Attack cannot be 
directionally influenced. This type of Rush Attack cannot be outran via Dash 
nor Ascension nor Descent. This Rush Attack can sometimes be evaded as its 
path of destruction is a straight line, but outrunning is not an option. The 
second is a bit slower and covers a longer distance. This Rush Attack can be 
directionally influenced and is noted as the average Rush Attack. This type of 
Rush Attack can be outran by holding the "R1" to ascend or "R2" to descend. 
However, one must be sure that he/she has enough room to ascend the entirety 
of the Rush Attack's approach. For if the player reaches the upper or lower 
limit of the stage before the Rush Attack is concluded, one will fall victim 
to the attack. As the third type is even slower than the first two and covers 
a greater length of distance, one may conclude that the Ascension or Descent 
can outrun the approach, but as explained for the second type, one must be 
aware of where the stage's limits are. In the case that a Rush Attack is 
approaching the ascending or descending player, one may take notice that the 
Rush Attack is unable to make contact until the player's ascension or descent 
ceases. However, as the player is then able to evaluate where the opponent's 
approach is positioned, one can judge an appropriate Defensive Teleport or 
Step-In Evasion as a last resort before the upper or lower limits of the stage 
are reached.


IV-D-4. Auto-Teleport:
----------------------
When a player chooses to work with the Defensive Teleport, one must consider 
proper timing in relation to depth perception. In many cases, if the player is 
close enough to the opponent, one would merely judge his/her Defensive 
Teleport on the opponent's movement. However, there are certain Super Blasts 
that require the close-up camera animation prior to Super Blast execution. It 
is in such a case that the Auto-Teleport can be initiated.

When an opponent performs a Super Blast that requires the close-up camera 
animation, one must understand that there is a very small time span between 
when the animation is concluded and the Super Blast is unleashed. Fortunately, 
this time span coincides with the time needed for an opponent to initiate up 
his/her guard in time for a Defensive Teleport. For performing the Defensive 
Teleport is based on the concept of pressing "Circle" before the very instant 
of the Super Blast impact. As the times of both the execution and the defense 
coincide, it is possible to use this concept as a means for an Automatic 
Teleport.

In order to perform correctly, one must allow the opponent to initiate his/her 
Super Blast. During the close-up camera animation, the player must press and 
hold the "Circle" button. As soon as the close-up camera animation concludes, 
the opponent's Super Blast will be executed and the player's character will 
begin to execute his/her block as initiated during the close-up camera 
animation. As these two timeframes coincide for a Defensive Teleport, as long 
as the player is close to the opponent or within the boundary of the Super 
Explosive Wave, he/she will automatically teleport defensively through the 
first pulse or portion of the blast. Therefore, if the Super Blast were based 
on a Beam type, the blast will be dodged in its entirety. If the opponent were 
using a Super Explosive Wave, the player will automatically dodge the first 
pulse, but must defend the remainder of the Blast manually.


IV-D-5. Last Chance Defense:
----------------------------
Some Super Blasts may consist of multiple attacks before the conclusion of the 
attack's entirety. While one may be able to Defensively Teleport through each 
attack with the right timing, there are some cases when the first portion of 
such attacks have already made contact upon a guarding player. In such a case, 
one had not correctly executed the Defensive Teleport through judging depth 
perception, but simply held block. If the player were to continue to hold 
block, the full impact of the attack will be blocked, and only Chip Damage 
will be inflicted. However, once the attack has made impact with the player's 
guard, that does not mean the remainder of the attack cannot be Defensively 
Teleported.

While holding block through a Super Blast's impact, one can still judge the 
timing of the remaining attacks held within the Super Blast. As the guard will 
be locked due to Absolute Block explained in III-M-2. During this locked 
guard, one can cease to hold "Circle" and the guard will continue to hold. It 
is with this concept that one can press "Circle" again at the exact impact of 
an attack included within the Super Blast that a Defensive Teleport can be 
executed. Therefore, while the first portion of such attacks may be blocked, 
one can Defensively Teleport the remainder of the blast manually. In many 
cases, the advanced player will only teleport the very last portion of the 
blast as a means of playing safe, for Chip Damage is not as bad as a poorly 
judged Defensive Teleport that results with full impact.


IV (E) -Fixed Animation Exploitation-
-------------------------------------
The concept of the Fixed Animation stems from the Transformation system. 
However, it also stems into the "tag" system as well as the fusion techniques. 
There are two different "time" concepts one must consider when regarding this 
technique: Game Time and Real Time.

-Game Time:

	(How the game interprets the time that has gone by during battle. This 
	usually coincides with Real Time, but is still based on how the game is 
	keeping up with Real Time.)

-Real Time:

	(The actual amount of time that has passed during battle, regardless of 
	what happens in the game.)

All techniques in the game are based on Game Time. For the most part, Game 
Time keeps up with Real Time. However, there are some techniques that cause 
Game Time to stop as Real Time continues. Therefore, most techniques will are 
bound by Game Time in order to work according to the mechanics and rules the 
techniques are based upon. However, the Transformation system is still built 
upon Real Time while the rest of the game is stopped at Game Time. It is 
through this concept that one can take advantage of techniques that are 
limited through Game Time and Real Time.

When a player executes a Super Blast, there is a timeframe beyond the 
execution that the player is unable to initiate a sequenced Super Blast, even 
if the player possesses enough Ki to execute it. This is where the 
Transformation, Fusion, Absorption and Tag system is used to exploit Game 
Time. Once the player has executed the Super Blast, he/she can then Transform, 
Fuse, Absorb or Tag a teammate. During the Transformation, Game Time stops 
while Real Time continues. The time required to wait before a sequenced Super 
Blast is based on Real Time. Therefore, once the Transformation has concluded, 
an additional Super Blast is immediately awarded as the time required to wait 
has passed, yet Game Time has not. It is in this case that one can initiate 
"Chaining".


IV-E-1. Chaining:
-----------------
As explained above, Super Blasts can be executed directly after another 
through Game Time manipulation through Transformations, Fusions, Absorption 
and Tags. When one chooses to use a Super Blast, one can initiate a Rush 
Attack that may have the ability to be Chained with a sequenced Rush Attack, 
depending on the type of Rush Attack.

As explained in III-J-2, there are different categories to consider when 
regarding the Rush Attacks. It is with such categories that one can judge when 
a Rush Attack Chaining system can be applied. If the Rush Attack always takes 
place in a specific part of the stage, one will not have to worry about Stage 
boundaries interrupting the Chaining sequence. If the Rush Attack ends with 
sending the opponent in a straight trajectory, one can initiate another Rush 
Attack that can land on the opponent fairly successfully. However, one must 
understand that the Chaining of Rush Attacks only works if different 
Transformations possess Rush Attacks as well, otherwise one must consider 
Chaining with a different type of Super Blast such as a Kamehameha. If the 
Rush Attack sends the opponent in a downward trajectory, one might want to 
begin the Chaining sequence from an elevated height to ensure the ground does 
not interfere with the Chaining sequence. Finally, one must always keep an eye 
on the Ki Meter to ensure enough Ki is available for further Rush Attack 
execution as well as the Ki Stocks. Without Ki Stocks, one cannot Transform. 
If one were to incorporate the Tag system for Game Time manipulation, one must 
keep his/her eye on the Tag meter.

As some transformations are progressive, one may only be able to Chain a few 
times. However, there are some characters that possess Rush Attacks in both 
their base form as well as Transformed state and are allowed the Flexible 
Transformation system, it is possible to Chain by Progressive and Reversed 
Transformations as explained in III-Q.


IV (F) -Grid Checking-
----------------------
As there are upper and lower limitations to the 3d stages of Tenkaichi 2, one 
must also understand that there are Grid Barriers that confine the players to 
the battle site. The Grid Barrier is not visible until the player or opponent 
is next to or near it. Once the player gets too close to the Grid Barrier, one 
will see the barrier as it is displayed as a Grid. While it is in many cases a 
better idea to stray from the Grid as it limits one's maneuvering 
capabilities, one can also use such a barrier to one's own advantage if the 
proper techniques were executed. Ultimately, the technique known as Grid 
Checking allows the player to use one's surrounding Grid Barrier as a means to 
position oneself behind the opponent by manipulating the bounce one endures 
when knocked into the Grid Barrier. In such a concept, one must consider the 
three options: Knocking, Rush Attack Capitalization, Throw Check and Dragon 
Dash Check.


IV-F-1. Knocking:
-----------------
As explained above, when battling in close combat while next to the Grid 
Barrier, one must always know that the Grid Barrier can be used as a means of 
positioning manipulation. This is exhibited by causing the opponent to hit the 
Grid Barrier by Smash Attack and cause the opponent to bounce off as one 
position's oneself into rear positioning. As easy as this may sound, there are 
other aspects to the technique that one must consider such as distance from 
the Grid Barrier, the trajectory of the victimized opponent and the angle of 
which the opponent bounces off of the Grid Barrier.

When using the Knocking technique, one would ensure that the opponent is 
closer to the Grid Barrier. However, one must also ensure that when regarding 
a perpendicular angle to the Grid Barrier, one must be angled between 30 to 45 
degrees. If one were to smash the opponent any less than 30 degrees, the 
player will cause the opponent to bounce right back into his/her original 
location and rear positioning will not be gained. If the player is angled more 
than 45 degrees, the opponent will not bounce off of the Grid Barrier. 
Instead, he/she will be directed along the wall in Smash Aftermath.

As one must ensure the opponent is closer to the Grid Barrier, one must also 
ensure that his/her own character is also closer to the Grid Barrier than the 
distance caused by the bounce. This is what allows the player to reach rear 
positioning. Regardless of which angle one chooses between 30 and 45 degrees, 
when the opponent bounces off the Grid Barrier, his/her physical being is 
automatically sharpened to a parallel angle to the wall. Therefore, when the 
opponent bounces off the Grid Barrier, he/she will either be facing directly 
to the Grid Barrier, or directly away from it. In such a case of proper 
Knocking, one will ensure the opponent is facing away from the Grid Barrier as 
rear position is gained.


IV-F-2. RA Capitalization:
--------------------------
As explained in III-J-2, there are different types of Rush Attacks. When 
regarding the Grid Check, one only needs to consider the second and third 
categories of Rush Attacks. When considering Category Two of the Rush Attacks, 
one must always ensure that the Assault Location 2 is part of the Rush Attack 
construct. For a Rush Attack with Assault Location 1 will bring the opponent 
away from the Grid Barrier and therefore eliminate the chance for a proper 
Grid Check. As the Assault Location 2 can be directed as a means of sending 
the opponent in Smash Aftermath, one can use such trajectory to send the 
opponent toward the Grid Barrier. As one must also consider the third Category 
of Rush Attack construct, the Release Trajectory is also very important. For 
the Release Trajectory 1 will send the opponent up, but will also tend to be 
redirected by the Grid Barrier instead of bouncing off. Therefore, one would 
do well to stick with the Release Trajectory 2 and 3, for these trajectories 
will create a bounce as long as the angle is correct. 

Unlike the Knocking technique, one will not be preemptively standing in the 
opportune location for position advantage. Instead, one would follow the Rush 
Attack's Release Trajectory with a Dash. It is in this case that one must 
understand the Rush Attack's trajectory in regards to the angle from the Grid 
Barrier. As explained in IV-F-1, the angle of the bounce is very important. 
However, it is in the case of RA Capitalization that one can allow angles less 
than 30 degrees to perform a proper Grid Check.

When regarding angles from 30 to 45 degrees, the Release Trajectory of a Rush 
Attack can be followed by a Charged Dashing Melee. When the opponent bounces 
off of the wall, the initial dash created by the player will move slightly 
past the opponent's new location, but the Focal Adherence of the Charged Dash 
Melee will bring the player into the rear position. Therefore, it is always 
important to know where the Grid Barrier is as well as its angle, even when it 
can't be seen prior to the Rush Attack initiation. Also, as explained above, 
the angle of trajectory can accept a degree less than 30 degrees as it is no 
longer imperative that the player approach the opponent from the limited 
angles. While a Charged Dashing Melee attack would simply make contact upon 
the opponent's face instead of the rear, one can use this opportunity to 
substitute the Switch in place of the Charged Dashing Melee. As the player 
will bounce off of the Grid Barrier in a parallel angle to the Grid Barrier, 
one can take advantage of the expected opponent's position for proper 
Switching ability. In essence, one would recognize that the opponent is 
directly between oneself and the Grid Barrier, initiate the Rush Attack with 
Release Trajectory 2 or 3, follow up with a Dash and as the opponent bounces 
off of the Grid Barrier, one would simply use the Switching technique 
explained in IV-C-2 to gain rear position.


IV-F-3. Throw Check:
--------------------
The Throw Check is very similar to that of the RA Capitalization in that one 
would use the Dash to follow the throw for Charged Dashing Melee or Switching 
opportunity. However, one must always keep in mind that the direction of the 
throw can be changed depending on the position of the player and the opponent.

While using a Throw to send the player toward the Grid Barrier is a great 
tactic from a distance, trying to Grid Check the opponent by Throwing him/her 
when near the Grid Barrier will result with a directionally forced throw. For 
example, if one were to be facing the Grid Barrier with the opponent standing 
in front of him, one could throw the opponent from a distance and the 
opponent's trajectory would likely be directed toward the Grid Barrier. 
However, if both players were near the Grid Barrier; within Step-In Barrier 
distance from the Grid Barrier, the fighting engine would force the player to 
turn around during the Throw sequence and release the opponent in the opposite 
direction of the Grid Barrier. It is always important to understand the rules 
of which each technique is executed, for some rules are used as a basis for 
proper execution, others are used as a basis for exploitation.


IV-F-4. Dragon Dash Check:
--------------------------
The Dragon Dash Check is somewhat of a combination of the previous Grid 
Checking concepts. In order to Dragon Dash Check, one must use a Smash Melee 
as one would to perform the Knocking technique. However, instead of doing so 
in close proximity to the Grid Barrier, one would do so at a distanced 
position. Like the Knocking technique, the Dragon Dash Check must also be 
angled between 30 and 45 degrees to the Grid Barrier. However, instead of 
incorporating the normal Dash, Charged Dashing Melee or Switching techniques, 
one would merely follow the Smash Attack with "X" to engage the Dragon Homing 
technique. However, instead of following up the Dragon Homing with a Charged 
Melee, one would merely allow the Dragon Homing maneuver to conclude into 
close proximity of the opponent at the exact instant that the opponent bounces 
off of the Grid Barrier. If performed correctly, the Dragon Homing movement 
should conclude as the player is bouncing off of the Grid Barrier, positioning 
the player right behind the opponent. This technique requires a lot more 
timing than the other Grid Checking techniques and also requires Ki for Dragon 
Homing ability, but one must not discard any techniques at their disposal at 
any given time.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


V. Z Mechanics
--------------


"Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard." - Kevin Durant

It is not always enough to be talented. While one can surely reach victory by 
understanding the concepts discussed in the Basic and Advanced Mechanics, to 
reach true greatness, one must reach beyond. One must be willing to work hard, 
train as long as it takes, and be willing to endure the mental frustration of 
taking the long road as it is the one true path to greatness.

The Z Mechanics include a variety of techniques that may include a synergetic 
mold of two or more techniques to reach further advancement. Some techniques 
will include a mold of techniques previously discussed in the Basic and 
Advanced Mechanics, some techniques will include completely new concepts. It 
is important that one keeps an open mind and remain focused as the advancement 
of Z Mechanics reach beyond the understanding of the limitations of Tenkaichi 
2's mechanical system.


V (A) -Z Movement-
------------------
This section will include different means of elite maneuvering techniques. 
While one may have learned many aspects of Tenkaichi 2's maneuvering abilities 
in the Basic and Advanced sections of this document, it is important that one 
understands that such concepts may be referenced in order to develop a better 
understanding of what is being explained. In a 3D environment, it is widely 
understood that movement is just as important as one's offense or defense, for 
movement can lay the ground work for such aspects of the game. The more one is 
able to manipulate Tenkaichi 2's mechanical system to reach maneuvering 
abilities that are unmatched by the opponent, one will always be "one step 
ahead".


V-A-1. Grounded Will:
---------------------
Much like the Ground & Pound, one must always keep in mind that Grounded Will 
is directly linked to how one works when his/her character is planted on the 
ground. As the game allows flight capability, many fighters will ascend to the 
sky as they may feel the ground may limit their maneuvering abilities. 
However, as one continues to learn the newer concepts of advanced fighting, 
one may begin to understand that the ground can be used as a means of 
furthering one's combat abilities; reference G&P.

In the case of Grounded Will, one must now understand that as the ground can 
be used for furthering one's combat abilities, it can further one's 
maneuvering abilities as well. This all begins with the Enigma Dash.

V-A-1-a. Enigma Dash:

	(The maneuvering concept known as Grounded Will revolves around the 
	Enigma Dash. This technique gets its name from its mysterious nature as 
	it exists beyond the limitations of a grounded dash and Step-In 
	Barrier.

	While the normal ground Dash can only be cancelled via "R2" 
	Cancellation when using the Neutral Dash, this cancellation is also 
	bound by the height of the characters. The Enigma Dash can be cancelled 
	via "R2" Cancellation in any direction. However, what really highlights 
	this technique's potential is based on the fact that unlike the normal 
	Dash, one can use the Enigma Dash while inside the Step-In Barrier.

	As previously expressed, Grounded Will techniques may only be executed 
	once the player's character is planted on the ground. This concept 
	stems from the fact that the Enigma Dash is initiated by the Jump. 
	While Tenkaichi 2's mechanical limitations may hinder the Dash ability 
	while inside the Step-In Barrier, it does not hinder the ability for a 
	player to initiate the Jump. It is important that the player understand 
	that the Jump can then be transitioned into the Dash. It is this Dash 
	that can be initiated while inside the Step-In Barrier, unphased by the 
	limitations of close quarters combat. However, an aerial Dash that 
	stems from a Jump is still not considered an Enigma Dash as the ground 
	has no bearing on the Dash. As explained above, the ground can be used 
	as a means of furthering one's combat abilities, including the 
	potential of the Enigma Dash. The technique's mysterious nature also 
	stems from the fact that it stands upon the line between an aerial Dash 
	and a grounded Dash, which will be explained as the document 
	progresses.

	In order to perform the Enigma Dash, one must ensure that his/her 
	character is planted on the ground. If the player begins in hover mode, 
	the Jump cannot be initiated. Once grounded, the player must press "R1" 
	to initiate the Jump. As explained before, the Jump can then transition 
	into a Dash. However, the key to executing the Enigma Dash is to 
	shorten the time between the initiated Jump and the Dash. Once 
	perfected, the player should not be able to see the Jump take place at 
	all. Instead, the player will simply Dash from standing position. As 
	this Dash can be initiated inside the Step-In Barrier as well, one can 
	perform the Enigma Dash anywhere on the stage as long as the ground is 
	present.

	Finally, one must consider how the Enigma Dash relates to addressing 
	the Focal Point. To do so, one must understand that the nature of the 
	Directionally Influenced Enigma Dash inside the Step-In Barrier may 
	result with one of two outcomes. These outcomes relate directly to the 
	distance from the opponent inside the Step-In Barrier. Therefore, one 
	must consider that there are actually two Step-In Barrier levels: The 
	Outer Core and the Inner Core. When one performs a Directionally 
	Influenced Enigma Dash while inside the Inner Core, the player will 
	Dash into that direction while the influence of the Focal Point will 
	slowly take grasp. It is in this instance that one may expect to Dash 
	in a straight line to the Left or Right, one would find that the Dash 
	will begin to curve in the direction of the opponent to re-align with 
	the Focal Point: Being the opponent. However, when one performs a 
	Directionally Influenced Dash while inside the Outer Core of the Step-
	In Barrier, the Focal Point will have full influence on the player's 
	dash. In this instance, the Enigma Dash will circle around the 
	circumference of the opponent at the initial distance.)

V-A-1-b. GW Fake-Out:

	(As explained in IV-C-2, the Shift is created by the initial momentum 
	created by the initial Dash. Once the Dash is performed, with it, comes 
	the momentum of moving forward. When one presses "R2" to cancel the 
	dash, it will bring the opponent to fighting stance as the momentum of 
	the initial Dash will continue to project the player's character in the 
	initial direction. This same concept can be executed through Grounded 
	Will exhibition. As one can use "R2C" in any direction as long as the 
	Enigma Dash has been initiated, with it, comes the momentum of moving 
	in that direction and therefore presents Shift potential. As one can 
	initiate the Dash within the Step-In Barrier, one may find a variation 
	of techniques that would otherwise be unavailable.

	When one is able to perform the Enigma Dash within the Step-In Barrier, 
	one can use "R2" Cancellation to initiate a Shift which can be 
	directionally influenced. This Shift can be used as a means to reach 
	immediate Super Blast positioning. Alternatively, one can simply use 
	the Enigma Dash to reach Super Blast positioning and use "R2" 
	Cancellation in order to immediately initiate Super Blast ability. As 
	this technique allows immediate Super Blast ability from close quarters 
	combat, one may realize that such a technique is held in high regard to 
	becoming a dangerous adversary.

	Finally, it is also important that the player understand that such a 
	technique can be incorporated into other advanced techniques as a means 
	of linking one attack to the next. As the Enigma Dash is initiated by 
	means of the Jump, one understands that he/she must be planted on the 
	ground in order to perform the technique correctly. However, as 
	explained in IV-B-2, the essence of the G&P resides in incorporating 
	the "R2" Cancellation. As the "R2" Cancellation of the G&P does not 
	necessarily require the player's character to plant his/her feet on the 
	ground to cancel the Combo Set, one can in fact use such a technique to 
	plant his/her character's feet on the ground. At this instance, one 
	must then understand that a Jump is immediately awarded to the player 
	and by nature, so is the Enigma Dash. As this holds true to the 
	advanced player, one is then able to link the G&P into the Enigma Dash 
	and therefore into the Dash Cancellation for Super Blast ability. To 
	perform, one must have great timing and control. The execution of such 
	a link is as follows: Press "Square" a few times to execute the Combo 
	Set, cancel the Combo Set with "R2" and ensure that the character 
	plants his/her feet on the ground, immediately press "R1" to initiate 
	the Jump, immediately press "X" and the backward direction to ensure 
	the Enigma Dash is properly initiated, press "R2" for the Dash 
	Cancellation once outside the Step-In Barrier, initiate the desired 
	Super Blast by holding "L2" and pressing "Triangle" or holding "L2" and 
	"Up" or "Down" and pressing "Triangle" for the Base Super Blast, 
	Secondary Blast 2 or Ultimate Blast 2 respectively. As one can simply 
	use the Neutral Enigma Dash and use "R2C" while holding Back, one can 
	alternatively use the Backward Shift in order to position oneself for 
	Super Blast ability.)

V-A-1-c. GW Switch:

	(The GW Switch uses Grounded Will concepts in order to Switch around the 
	opponent and reach rear positioning. This technique requires a lot of 
	control and timing as each inclusive command must be executed in the 
	correct sequence or the technique will fall short of success. As the GW 
	Fake-Out is performed with the inclusion of the Enigma Dash, one would 
	perform the GW Switch with such incorporation. It is important that one 
	continually considers the fact that the Enigma Dash can be performed 
	while inside the Step-In Barrier, for the entirety of the Grounded Will 
	Switch will be executed within close quarters combat. While the Side 
	Step can be used as a means to reach rear positioning, the technique is 
	slow and therefore exhibits an ineffective means of reaching rear 
	positioning undamaged. The Offensive Teleport should always be 
	considered as an effective means to reach rear positioning. However, 
	such a technique will require Ki consumption without the proper Z-Item 
	attached. Additionally, the Offensive Teleport can be predicted when 
	combating a live opponent as his/her tactics may reflect Offensive 
	Teleportation as well. The GW Switch requires no Ki, it is just as fast 
	if not faster than the Offensive Teleport and is very difficult to 
	predict or detect until proper positioning has already been gained.

	As one may have considered at this point, the GW Switch is a synergetic 
	mold of the Enigma Dash created by Grounded Will means and the Switch, 
	explained in IV-C-2. Such a technique can be performed with Left or 
	Right directional influence, that is up for the player to decide during 
	any given grounded situation. In order to perform correctly, one would 
	execute the following commands in the proper sequence. One would also 
	do well to remember that control and timing are the keys that allow the 
	technique to work effectively: While standing inside the Step-In 
	Barrier; face to face with the opponent, one would initiate the Jump 
	technique by pressing "R1". One would immediately press "X" to initiate 
	the Neutral Enigma Dash. While this Dash will not last long for the 
	player is already face to face with the opponent, one would immediately 
	press "R2" for Dash Cancellation. In essence, the player will initiate 
	the Enigma Dash that will lead nowhere, but will still be initiated. 
	Once "R2C" is incorporated, the Shift is immediately created. As the 
	momentum of the initiated Enigma Dash is stored in the Shift, one can 
	use directional influence to maneuver the Shift accordingly. As soon as 
	the Shift is initiated, one must hold Left or Right to Shift past the 
	opponent. Once the Shift carries the player past the opponent, one must 
	hold Forward to conclude the Shift's directional influence for proper 
	rear positioning. As this technique requires five buttons in such a 
	short timeframe of control, one may find him/herself a bit intimidated 
	during live combat, but as expressed before: To reach true greatness, 
	one must reach beyond. One must be willing to work hard, train as long 
	as it takes, and be willing to endure the mental frustration of taking 
	the long road as it is the one true path to greatness. These technique 
	require training and focus, as one should expect at this point of the 
	document.

	Finally, one must understand that like the GW Fake-Out, the GW Switch 
	can also be incorporated as a link to G&P tactics. In essence, one can 
	initiate the G&P and use "R2" Cancellation to transition into Grounded 
	Will tactics in order to immediately incorporate the GW Switch for rear 
	positioning. In order to perform correctly, one would execute the 
	following commands in controlled succession: Press "Square" a few times 
	to execute the Combo Set, cancel the Combo Set with "R2" and ensure 
	that the character plants his/her feet on the ground, immediately press 
	"R1" to initiate the Jump, immediately press "X" to ensure the Neutral 
	Enigma Dash is properly initiated, immediately press "R2" to cancel the 
	Dash and initiate the Shift, immediately press Left or Right to 
	directionally influence the Shift and move past the opponent, conclude 
	the Shift by pressing Forward for rear positioning. If one were to 
	train hard enough, it is even possible that one could use such a 
	transitional maneuver quickly enough that the Hit Counter does not 
	reset before rear combat is continued.)

V-A-1-d. Close Tango:

	(Once the GW Switch has been perfected, one must understand how the 
	technique relates to Approximal Focal Adherence and how such concepts 
	can be manipulated during combat. As one GW Switch is concluded with 
	grounded position, one must understand that an immediate succession of 
	GW Switches can be executed. Once the ability to connect GW Switches in 
	succession is perfected, one will realize that the maneuvering ability 
	is much faster than the recovery time related to Approximal Focal 
	Adhesion. In essence, one can use the initial GW Switch to maneuver to 
	rear positioning. As the opponent attempts to turn around, the next GW 
	Switch can be executed to keep the opponent's Approximal Focal Adherence 
	from regaining focus. The succession of three or more GW Switches is 
	known as the Close Tango. This technique allows the player to stay one 
	step ahead from the opponent's ability to focus and face the player. As 
	this technique is a synergetic linkage of GW Switches, the Close Tango 
	requires an extreme level of control and timing to perform correctly. 
	In fact, for one to perform even the lowest form of the Close Tango 
	correctly, one would engage a command sequence of fifteen buttons 
	within a two second time span.)

V-A-1-e. Wide Tango:

	(One may inquire why the Tango consisting of GW Switches would be 
	considered as a Close Tango. This concept resides in the fact that the 
	circumference of the GW Switch is comparatively small. The player stays 
	very close to the opponent throughout the entirety of the maneuver. As 
	there is more than one way to use Grounded Will to reach rear 
	positioning, a Tango that consists of a similar technique that requires 
	a larger circumference will have a slower centripetal force and will 
	result in a Wider circular movement; hence the Wide Tango.

	While the GW Switch is performed by initiating the Neutral Enigma Dash, 
	the Enigma Dash can be directionally influenced by holding the desired 
	direction. This same concept is considered for GW Fake-Out ability. 
	However, when regarding Switch potential, one would initiate a Left or 
	Right Enigma Dash while inside the Step-In Barrier. As one can then use 
	"R2C" in order to initiate the Shift, one can then directionally 
	influence the Shift to maneuver around the opponent. This movement 
	works best when the player uses the forward/diagonal Enigma Dash to 
	push toward the rear of the opponent, the Shift can continue the 
	movement into rear positioning. To perform correctly, one would execute 
	the commands as follows: Press "R1" to initiate the Jump, immediately 
	hold Left/Forward or Right/Forward and press "X" to initiate the 
	directionally influenced Enigma Dash, immediately press "R2" and toward 
	the direction of the rear for Enigma Dash Cancellation and directional 
	Shift influence, hold forward for conclusive Shift manipulation. As the 
	sided Enigma Dash presents a small distance that extends further than 
	the GW Switch, it will ultimately create a wider Tango when used in 
	succession. Such a technique will be further referenced as the Side 
	Swiper as the document progresses.)

V-A-1-f. Mad Dash:

	(This chaotic machine of technical mastery is based on the concepts
	of Grounded Will. However, as most of the Grounded Will techniques 
	described in this document are concluded with the means of using the 
	descend button for controlling the final positioning, Mad Dashing skips 
	that idea altogether. One would do well to remember that when trying to 
	control a Grounded Will technique by bringing any movement to a stand, 
	a player will use the descend button for Shifts and basic dash cancels, 
	and in some cases of the Enigma Dash, one would use "X" to cancel the 
	dash completely. Though one could also use "R1" to cancel the airborne 
	Dash as well, a player must understand that using "R1" does not 
	effectively cancel a Dash as "R2" or "X" would with GW technique. 
	Instead, the execution of the ascend button will cause your character 
	to jump directly out of the dash and into the air as the game considers 
	the player to be airborne during the Enigma Dash, but also considering 
	the player to be grounded; allowing "R2" Cancellation.

	This is where the magic behind the chaos of Mad Dashing begins. As 
	explained above, trying to ascend out of the Enigma Dash will cause the 
	player to jump. As the initial Enigma Dash is initiated by a jump, it 
	is within this concept that one must cancel the first Enigma Dash with 
	a second Enigma Dash without "R2" Cancellation. In essence, one would 
	perform the Enigma Dash in one direction and immediately perform an 
	additional Enigma Dash in a different direction, directly cancelling 
	the first Enigma Dash for sequencing Enigma Dashes. As this can be 
	executed as many times as the player desires, a player can dash at high 
	speed throughout the battlefield, no matter the relation to the 
	opponent's position. The player can dash as fast as he/she desires in 
	any direction as the opponent's Step-In Barrier bears no limitation 
	over the player. At such high speeds, it becomes very difficult for the 
	opponent to follow the player's movement, making this technique very 
	useful in mind games and tactical advantages.)

V-A-1-g. MD Tango:

	(As explained in V-A-1-d and V-A-1-e, the Tango concept is structured 
	around the sequential execution of several GW Switches or Side Swipers. 
	Each one increasing in width with respect to the opponent's position 
	respectively. As the concept of Mad Dash is structured entirely upon 
	link Enigma Dash repetition, one must understand that a producing 
	Supplementary Enigma Dashes requires more skill than simply using "R2" 
	Cancellation and directional influence like the GW Switch and Side 
	Swiper. As this proves to be the case, one would venture to guess that 
	transitioning one Enigma Dash into a second Enigma Dash may take a bit 
	more time to recalibrate than using "R2" Cancellation for GW Switches 
and 	Side Swipers. Therefore, when using Mad Dash technique to maneuver 
	around the opponent as one would for Tango exhibition, one may find 
	that the circumference of the Tango is conducted at a farther distance 
	than the Wide Tango. It is with such a concept that this technique be 
	named the "MD Tango".

	To perform, one would consider how the Enigma Dash relates to the Inner 
	and Outer Core of the Step-In Barrier as explained in V-A-1-a. When one 
	performs a Directionally Influenced Enigma Dash while inside the Inner 
	Core, the player will Dash into that direction while the influence of 
	the Focal Point will slowly take grasp. When one performs a 
	Directionally Influenced Dash while inside the Outer Core of the Step-
	In Barrier, the Enigma Dash will circle around the circumference of the 
	opponent at the initial distance. As this concept holds to be true, 
	this would allow the player to use an Enigma Dash to reach the Outer 
	Core or even outside the Step-In Barrier and then immediately 
	transition into a Supplementary Enigma Dash with directional influence 
	to circle the circumference of the opponent at the given distance. As 
	each Enigma Dash can be transitioned into an immediate Supplementary 
	Enigma Dash, this would allow the player to continuously Dash around 
	the opponent in the same manner of a Tango. It is also important to 
	note that as each of the Dashes involved in the MD Tango is an Enigma 
	Dash, one must understand that "R2" Cancellation is always an option. 
	Therefore, one can incorporate an instant Cancel to the MD Tango if 
	one were inclined to do so.)


V-A-2. Free Will:
-----------------
As one may progress through the document for the full understanding of 
Grounded Will, one must then build an understanding that the movement 
abilities of the advanced player extend beyond the limitations of Tenkaichi 2. 
As the player continues progression of skillful maneuvering ability, it is 
important that he/she understands that such limitations can be exploited 
through more than one method. It is within the concept of Free Will that one 
can find similar exploitations explained within the Grounded Will concept, but 
through a means of Ki manipulation. Unlike Grounded Will concepts, Free Will 
allows such exploitation through aerial exhibition as well, so the Enigma Dash 
will not be used for Free Will consideration.

When considering Ki manipulation for maneuvering exploration, one must 
understand the impact of the Ki method being applied. As one is sure to 
understand the full concept of the Step-In Barrier and its maneuvering 
limitations on a basic level, one may progress through this document with the 
knowledge that such a barrier can be affected through Ki Blast incorporation. 
In fact, for one to truly understand such an impact, one must consider the 
fact that each character possesses a Step-In Barrier. While these Step-In 
Barriers may share the same effects through close quarters combat, one must 
still consider the fact that each character possesses their own Step-In 
Barrier. Once this is conceptualized, one must then understand that as Ki 
Blast incorporation can affect a Step-in Barrier, it does not ensure that the 
same effect will be exhibited on both Step-In Barriers. To understand such an 
effect, one must consider the following:

	(The Step-In Barrier limits the maneuvering capabilities of the 
	characters by means of setting a boundary between Dashing and 
	performing the Step-In and the like. However, as both characters 
	possess the Step-In Barrier, it has been questioned as to which Step-In 
	Barrier holds the limitations for which character. While the true 
	answer may never be fully understood, the inclusive concept explains 
	Free Will exploitation. If the opponent is inside the player's Step-In 
	Barrier, then the player's maneuvering ability is being limited to 
	Step-In based movement. While this alone does not affect the opponent's 
	maneuvering ability, the fact that the player is concurrently 
	positioned inside the opponent's Step-In Barrier limits the opponent's 
	maneuvering ability as well.

	When the player initiates a Ki Blast, his/her Step-In Barrier is 
	temporarily withdrawn. This Ki Blast does not cause the opponent's 
	Step-in Barrier to recede, therefore only affecting the player's 
	maneuvering ability. During this window of opportunity, the player is 
	able to use the Dash ability within the Step-in Barrier circumference. 
	As the player is still inside the opponent's Step-In Barrier, such free 
	movement is not awarded to the opponent.)

V-A-2-a. Double Taps:

	(In order for one to take full advantage of the Free Will advancement, 
	one must learn the Double Tap concept. Through the explanation of Free 
	Will, one may find that the concept of the Double Tap may not be 
	entirely necessary for the concept to work, but the Double Tap is used 
	as a means of presenting the right time-based position of the second 
	command for proper Free Will execution. As the document progresses, 
	this will be explained further as the concept of Free Will is based on 
	Double Tap advisement.

	The Double Tap is self explanatory as one would tap the same button two 
	times in an immediately sequenced time frame. Therefore, if one were to 
	present an execution of a Double Tap, one would tap the suggested 
	button twice, very quickly. As there is but one button to consider for 
	Double Taps, but several directions to incorporate for directional 
	influence, one must understand the following acronyms:

	-DTN: Double Tap Neutral
		Press "X" twice

	-DTL: Double Tap Left
		Hold Left and press "X" twice.

	-DTR: Double Tap Right
		Hold Right and press "X" twice.

	-DTB: Double Tap Back
		Hold Back and press "X" twice.

	-DTA: Double Tap Ascend
		Press "R1" twice.

	-DTD: Double Tap Descend
		Press "R2" twice.

	As explained above, when the player initiates a Ki Blast, his/her Step-
	In Barrier is temporarily withdrawn. During this window of opportunity, 
	the player is able to use the Dash ability within the Step-in Barrier 
	circumference. However, as this window of opportunity is within a very 
	tight timeframe, one would be wise to incorporate the Double Tap to 
	initiate the Dash with the right timing. Therefore, if one were to 
	choose to use Free Will to Dash in any direction in close quarters 
	combat, one would initiate the Ki Blast and use the Double Tap with the 
	desired direction. The same effect is available for Ascension and 
	Descent. The reasoning behind the timing of the Double Tap resides in 
	the fact that one must consider the Offensive Recovery from the initial 
	Ki Blast. While the window of opportunity to Dash exists during this 
	time, the Offensive Recovery of the initial Dash must pass. Therefore, 
	the first Tap of the Double Taps is executed during this recovery 
	period. The second Tap of the Double Tap is executed after the recovery 
	but before the window of opportunity closes. Therefore, the initial Tap 
	of the Double Tap is not completely necessary if one has the perfect 
	timing, but it helps one understand where to place the second Tap of 
	the Double Tap for proper Free Will execution.

	It is important that one understands that when disregarding the Free 
	Will concept, one is not set free through Double Taps, but limited by 
	them. For attempting a Double Tapped Dash will simply initiate a Dash 
	and conclude it. Therefore, one must understand that Double Taps are 
	directly linked to Free Will and nothing else.)

V-A-2-b. FW Fake-Out:

	(As explained in IV-C-2, the Shift is created by the initial momentum 
	created by the initial Dash. Once the Dash is performed, with it, comes 
	the momentum of moving forward. When one presses "R2" to cancel the 
	dash, it will bring the opponent to fighting stance as the momentum of 
	the initial Dash will continue to project the player's character in the 
	initial direction. This same concept can be executed through Free 
	Will exhibition. As one can use "R2C" in any direction as long as the 
	related Dash has been initiated, with it, comes the momentum of moving 
	in that direction and therefore presents Shift potential. As one can 
	initiate the Dash within the Step-In Barrier, one may find a variation 
	of techniques that would otherwise be unavailable.

	When one is able to perform the Double Tap Dash within the Step-In 
	Barrier, one can use "R2" Cancellation to initiate a Shift which can be 
	directionally influenced. This Shift can be used as a means to reach 
	immediate Super Blast positioning. Alternatively, one can simply use 
	the Double Tap Dash to reach Super Blast positioning and use "R2" 
	Cancellation in order to immediately initiate Super Blast ability. As 
	this technique allows immediate Super Blast ability from close quarters 
	combat, one may realize that such a technique is held in high regard to 
	becoming a dangerous adversary.

	However, as this technique is not based on the Enigma Dash like the 
	closely related Grounded Will concept, one must understand that the 
	Double Tap Dash involved in Free Will is to be considered as a normal 
	Dash held within an extraordinary circumstance. This explains that if 
	one were to initiate Free Will while grounded, one must ensure that 
	his/her character is short enough for the Dash to create height during 
	execution. This allows "R2" Cancellation, creating potential for 
	grounded Free Will Fake-Out ability for immediate Super Blast 
	initiation. It is important that the player gets to know the characters 
	and their distinctive strengths and limitations.)

V-A-2-c. FW Switch:

	(The FW Switch uses Free Will concepts in order to Switch around the 
	opponent and reach rear positioning. This technique requires a lot of 
	control and timing as each inclusive command must be executed in the 
	correct sequence or the technique will fall short of success. As the FW 
	Fake-Out is performed with the inclusion of the Double Tap Dash, one 
	would perform the GW Switch with such incorporation. It is important 
	that one continually considers the fact that the FW Dash can be 
	performed while inside the Step-In Barrier, for the entirety of the 
	Free Will Switch will be executed within close quarters combat. The FW 
	Switch is just as fast if not faster than the Offensive Teleport and is 
	very difficult to predict or detect until proper positioning has 
	already been gained.

	As one may have considered at this point, the FW Switch is a synergetic 
	mold of the Double Tap Dash created by Free Will means and the Switch, 
	explained in IV-C-2. Such a technique can be performed with Left or 
	Right directional influence as well as Ascension and Descent, that is 
	up for the player to decide during any given grounded situation. In 
	order to perform correctly, one would execute the following commands in 
	the proper sequence. One would also do well to remember that control 
	and timing are the keys that allow the technique to work effectively: 
	While placed inside the Step-In Barrier; face to face with the opponent 
	and preferably at an aerial position, one would first unleash a single 
	Ki Blast. It does not matter if the Ki Blast makes contact with the 
	opponent, so working with a character that has poor accuracy with Ki 
	Blasts is not a direct problem. It does not matter if the Ki Blast is 
	blocked or deflected, unless the Ki Blast is deflected back at the 
	player. What matters is that the player executed the Ki Blast. This 
	execution withdraws the player's Step-in Barrier, allowing further Free 
	Will exploitation to continue. One would then initiate the DTN by 
	Double Tapping "X" for a neutral Dash. While the player's initial 
	position is already placed directly in front of the opponent, the 
	animation of the Neutral Dash must take place, even for an instant. 
	During this small time frame, one must initiate "R2C" to initiate the 
	Shift. Once the Shift is initiated, one must remember that directional 
	influence is an option. Such Directional Influence will be used to 
	maneuver around the opponent with the Shift. Therefore, one would press 
	Left/Right to maneuver past the opponent. Once the Shift has pushed the 
	player past the opponent, one would conclude the Shift by pressing 
	Forward to reach rear positioning. As this technique includes six 
	buttons in succession and in a timely fashion, it will require training 
	and focus, as one should expect at this point of the document.)

V-A-2-d. FW Tango:

	(When relating to the previous Tango concepts discussed in V-A-1, one 
	can quickly develop an understanding that the FW Tango will follow 
	similar measures of technicality. For as the previous Tangos discussed 
	throughout the document consist of repeated Techniques that the Tango 
	is based upon, the FW Tango is based upon FW Switches in succession. 
	However, as Free Will is based upon different mechanics, one must be 
	willing to make the proper adjustment for efficient Tango execution. 
	Such adjustments are explained as follows:

	When Grounded Will concepts are at play, the Tango is based upon moving 
	in harmony with the opponent's recovery rate of Focal Adherence. 
	However, such recovery rate is solely based upon the opponent's ability 
	to gain Focal Adherence without any other factors at work. When Free 
	Will concepts are at play, the Tango is based upon moving in harmony 
	with the opponent's recovery rate of Focal Adherence that has also been 
	affected by the initial Ki Blast. Therefore, the timing is not the 
	same. Also, in order to perform the FW Tango in the same manner as the 
	previous Tangos, one must be able to reach the opponent's level of 
	hover for proper sequential execution. While holding Forward at the 
	tail of the FW Switch will bring one to rear positioning, initiating 
	further melee assault is what brings such a level to balance. 
	Therefore, performing sequenced FW Switches may not keep the player at 
	the opponent's level of hover. One must also consider the fact that 
	some character possess the "Giant's Throw". As explained in III-K, to 
	perform the Giant's Throw, one must hold Forward and press "Triangle". 
	If one were to perform the Free Will Tango using immediate successive 
	FW Switches, one must be sure to release the tail end "Forward" before 
	initiating the Supplementary FW Switch. For as each FW technique is 
	initiated with a Ki Blast by pressing "Triangle", it is possible that 
	one may perform a mistaken Giant's Throw instead. It is for this 
	problem that it is encouraged that one link FW Switches with 
transitional 	Melee and Offensive Teleportation.

	To perform, one must initiate the first Free Will Switch by releasing a 
	Ki Blast while positioned directly in front of the opponent. Once 
	released, one would immediately follow the Ki Blast with a Double 
	Tapped Neutral Dash or DTN by pressing "X" twice in fast succession. As 
	the Dash is initiated within the Step-In Barrier, one would then cancel 
	the Dash with "R2" Cancellation. As this cancellation will alter one's 
	state into the Shift technique, one would then be awarded directional 
	influence. One would then immediately press Left or Right to Shift past 
	the opponent. Once past the opponent, one would press Forward to 
	conclude the Shift for rear positioning. From this point, one would 
	perform a single Base Melee attack and then initiate a Backward 
	Offensive Teleport for Outer Core position within the Step-in barrier. 
	From here, one would allow the opponent's recovery rate to take hold. 
	During this Recovery time frame, one would release a second Ki Blast 
	and start the process over again.)


V-A-3. G2 Sling Shot:
---------------------
As explained in IV-C-3, if a player were to Charge the Jumping Melee Attack, 
then hold a desired direction while cancelling the Charge with a Natural 
Cancellation, the Spring will be engaged. While the Spring is based upon the 
Charge Meter as a means of determining the distance of the maneuver, one can 
further manipulate the Spring into additional maneuvering exploitation through 
further cancellation.

In order to understand such exploitation, one must consider the fact that at 
this level of advancement, one must learn to combine exploited techniques to 
reach new levels of advancement. It is within such a mindset that one will 
find the way to reaching the G2 Sling Shot. As one may notice through Sling 
Shot training, the Spring involved in the Sling Shot can be directed, but not 
manipulated directionally like the Shift. However, it is with a similar 
concept that we will transition into an optimal option for Sling Shot 
directional influence. While inside the Spring, one must use "R2C" in order to 
cancel the Spring itself. During this time. the momentum stolen from the 
Spring will be stored into the Sling Shot Shift. Access to this Shift is far 
more difficult to activate than the previous Shift stemming from the Dash 
concept.

Like the Shift concepts previously discussed in this document, directional 
influence becomes a simple matter of holding the desired direction. Once the 
Spring is cancelled via "R2C", a very small window of opportunity will present 
itself for directional influence. To perform the G2 Sling Shot, one must 
incorporate such directional influence into the Neutrally Cancelled Sling Shot 
Cancellation. It is important that one remembers that there are two 
cancellations being incorporated into the G2 Sling Shot. The first includes 
Natural Cancellation, the second: "R2" Cancellation. One must wait until the 
second cancel has been activated before directional influence takes place. 
Once the Spring has been cancelled via "R2" Cancellation, one must consider 
the fact that such momentum is now stored in the neutral Shift. Therefore, one 
must treat such directional influence as one would with the G2 Switch. To 
perform correctly, one would initiate a Charged Jumping Melee Attack, Cancel 
the attack via Natural Cancellation, immediately cancel the Spring with "R2" 
Cancellation to transition into the Shift, press Left to bypass the opponent, 
immediately press Forward to conclude the Shift into rear positioning.


V (B) -Z Defense-
-----------------
As one reaches level Z Defense, one has proven to have progressed through the 
Basic and Advanced forms of Defense. It is at this point that one must 
understand that it is possible to reach beyond the advanced level of Defense 
and strive for something greater. No matter what, it is always up for the 
player to decide which form of defense is the optimal choice. However, it is 
also important that one arms him/herself with as many options as possible as 
it allows the player to hold the highest form of control during battle. From 
this point forward, the options explained for Defensive purposes will be based 
on concepts far more difficult than the Defensive Techniques explained earlier 
in the document.


V-B-1. Recoil:
--------------
The Recoil is one of the most difficult Defensive Techniques that Tenkaichi 2 
has to offer. While other Defensive techniques such as the Defensive Teleport, 
Step-In and Deflection require the timing of a single button command, the 
Recoil requires the player to initiate a sequence of five buttons within the 
time-framed window of a Charged Melee Attack or Grab attempt.

In order to fully understand the concept of the Recoil, one must first 
reference the Fake-Out explained in IV-C-2-a. The Fake-Out is a means of 
directionally manipulating the Shift even when the Step-In Barrier has been 
breached. While the momentum of the initiating Dash is stored within the 
Shift, this does not mean that the Shift must continue in the same trajectory 
as the Dash would lead one to expect. In fact, as one must understand that the 
momentum is stored within the Shift itself, one can then influence the Shift 
directionally as soon as the "R2" cancellation takes place. As this technique 
is beyond the boundaries of the game's maneuvering limitations, the Shift is 
free to roam even while inside the Step-In Barrier. Typically, the Base Fake-
Out is performed by Dashing at the opponent and then initiating "R2" 
Cancellation while holding Back to Shift Backward. While the "R2C" can take 
place within the Step-In Barrier, the Shift can still take place and maneuver 
the player's character back outside of the barrier for Super Blast 
opportunity.

Inverted Fake-out AKA "Recoil":

	(While the Base Fake-Out is performed by Dashing at the opponent, 
	breaching the Step-In Barrier and then incorporating "R2C" to Shift 
	Backward; outside of the Step-In Barrier, the Recoil is based on a 
	similar concept, but reversed. It is with this understanding that one 
	must consider that to reverse such a movement, one would be positioned 
	inside the Step-In Barrier, Dashing Backward to break free of the Step-
	In Barrier and incorporating "R2C" to Shift Forward into one's original 
	position. As one may have guessed, the Enigma Dash will be required to 
	initiate this technique. However, the movement alone is not the only 
	factor to consider. As this technique is used as a Defensive means, one 
	must also understand that such a sequence of commands must also be 
	performed within the window of the opponent's Grab attempt or Charged 
	Melee Attack. 

	To perform, one must be inside the Step-In Barrier; grounded and on the 
	Defense. As the opponent begins to Charge his/her Melee Attack or 
	attempt to Grab the player for a throw, the player must immediately 
	press "R1" to Jump and consequently present potential for Grounded Will 
	movement. Directly after the Jump, one must transition into the 
	Backward Dash, initiating the Enigma Dash to break free from the Step-
	In Barrier. As one leaves the Step-In Barrier, the opponent's attack 
	will swing wildly at thin air or the opponent's attempt to grab will 
	result with empty hands. It is at this point that one must press and 
	hold Forward as the player also presses "R2" for "R2C". At this point, 
	the player will be transitioning into the Forward Shift, bringing 
	him/her back into his/her original position as the opponent's attack 
	concludes. While this technique may require more button commands than 
	the Step-In or Defensive Teleport, one must consider the advantages: 
	Defensive Teleports cannot be used against Grab attempts; Recoils are 
	faster and allow quicker recovery for attack; Recoils include the "R2" 
	Cancellation, allowing the player to incorporate Super Blast ability 
	instead of Sliding Forward into original position.)


V-B-2. G2 Recoil:
-----------------
As one must understand, the Recoil is a technique used to manually maneuver 
out of harm's way during the opponent's Charged Melee Attack or Grab attempt 
by means of manipulating the Enigma Dash through "R2" Cancellation and 
Directional Influence. It is through such a concept that one may consider the 
G2 Recoil, as it is factoring in the GW Switch explained in V-A-1-c as a 
defensive means to maneuver around the opponent to avoid the oncoming attack.

While the concept of the G2 Recoil is more difficult to perform than the Base 
Recoil, one must also understand that the result of the G2 Recoil places the 
player in a much safer position with a higher advantage than the Base Recoil, 
for the G2 Recoil ends with rear positioning. While the Base Recoil requires 
the full timing of the opponent's attack, the G2 Recoil allows immediate 
safety as the opponent begins the Charged Melee Attack or Grab. When 
performing the Base Recoil, one must judge and in some cases, gamble on how 
much charge is being applied to the Charged Melee Attack. Some opponent's may 
release as a Green charged, some as a Red charged some as a Full Charge. If 
one cancels forward into the Shift too early, the player may position 
him/herself back into the original danger zone. One must also consider the 
possibility that the opponent may use Natural Cancellation for the Charged 
Melee Attack or Grab attempt. In such a case, one must also consider Super 
Blast potential at the point of "R2" Cancellation. However, one must also 
understand that the G2 Switch positions the player into rear position, 
regardless of whether the player will charge to Green, Red, Full or 
Cancellation.

To perform, one must be inside the Step-In Barrier; grounded and on the 
Defense. As the opponent begins to Charge his/her Melee Attack or attempt to 
Grab the player for a throw, the player must immediately press "R1" to Jump 
and consequently present potential for Grounded Will movement. Directly after 
the Jump, one must transition into the Neutral Dash, initiating the Enigma 
Dash. One would then immediately use "R2" Cancellation to initiate the Shift. 
As the Shift takes hold, the player must then use directional influence to 
maneuver past the opponent by pressing Left or Right. Once the player moves 
past the opponent, he/she must then hold forward to conclude the Shift for 
rear positioning. As the Shift is directionally influenced to the side, the 
opponent's attack will swing wildly at thin air or the opponent's attempt to 
grab will result with empty hands. While this technique may require more 
button commands than the Step-In or Defensive Teleport, one must consider the 
advantages: Defensive Teleports cannot be used against Grab attempts; G2 
Recoils are faster and allow quicker recovery for attack; G2 Recoils result 
with rear positioning which is an automatic combat advantage.


V-B-3. Swipers:
---------------
The Swiper is a Defensive maneuver that relates closely to the G2 Recoil. 
However, one must understand that while the G2 Recoil concept gains the same 
position without the inclusion of the opponent's attack, the Swiper works best 
if the opponent is in fact on the attack. In other words, the Swiper takes 
advantage of the opponent's offense as a means to gain rear position.


V-B-3-a. Side Swiper:

	(As explained above, the Swiper is closely related to the G2 Recoil in 
	the fact that the technique is based on using the Enigma Dash as a 
	means to reach the opponent's rear. However, unlike the G2 Recoil, the 
	Side Swiper requires the opponent's attack to reach proper rear 
	positioning. Such a concept is explained as follows:

	When the player is planted on the ground, positioned inside the Inner 
	Core of the Step-In Barrier and standing directly in front of the 
	opponent, one is given the option to use the Enigma Dash for free Dash 
	ability within the Step-In Barrier. However, instead of initiating the 
	Neutral Enigma Dash, the player will be using immediate directional 
	influence to direct the Enigma Dash to the Left or the Right. In other 
	words, the player will perform an Enigma Dash in the sided direction. 
	As the player is positioned inside the Inner Core of the Step-In 
	Barrier, Approximal Focal Adherence does not immediately take hold and 
	therefore allows the unaffected straight line Dash. As the player's 
	character reaches the limit beyond the Step-In Barrier, his/her next 
	step is to use "R2" Cancellation to initiate the Shift. When the Shift 
	is initiated, one must be holding Forward to influence the Shift toward 
	the opponent's position. As this technique alone will bring the 
	player's character to the opponent's side profile, this will leave a 
	50/50 chance that further offense would bring one to the opponent's 
	front or the opponent's rear due to Channeling. As this technique is 
	not full proof without the opponent's involvement, this concept 
	explains how the maneuver is used as a Defensive Technique; without the 
	Defensive purpose, the technique is a fail.

	As explained, the opponent must be involved in this Defensive technique 
	for proper performance. When the Shift of the Side Swiper brings the 
	player back to the opponent's side profile, the requirement of the 
	opponent's offensive is what allows rear positioning. The aggressive 
	projection of the opponent's Charged Melee Attack or Grab attempt will 
	propel him/her forward as the player Shifts into rear positioning. It 
	is in such an instance that the two coincide in harmony for the player 
	to effectively maneuver for the advantage.

	To perform, one must be inside the Inner Core of the Step-In Barrier; 
	grounded and on the Defense. As the opponent begins to Charge his/her 
	Melee Attack or attempt to Grab the player for a throw, the player must 
	immediately press "R1" to Jump and consequently present potential for 
	Grounded Will movement. Directly after the Jump, one must transition 
	into the sided Dash, initiating the Enigma Dash to the Left or the 
	Right. One would then immediately use "R2" Cancellation and 
	simultaneously press Forward to initiate the Forward Shift. As the 
	Shift takes hold, the player moves past the opponent due to the 
	opponent's propelled influence from to his/her own attack, reaching 
	rear positioning. Through such a technique, the opponent's attack will 
	swing wildly at thin air or the opponent's attempt to grab will result 
	with empty hands. While this technique may require more button commands 
	than the Step-In or Defensive Teleport, one must consider the 
	advantages: Defensive Teleports cannot be used against Grab attempts; 
	Side Swipers are faster and allow quicker recovery for attack; Side 
	Swipers result with rear positioning which is an automatic combat 
	advantage when performed correctly.)

V-B-3-b. Forward Swiper:

	(This follows the same guidelines of the Side Swiper, but instead of 
	using the Sided Enigma Dash, one would angle the Enigma Dash to the 
	frontal diagonal direction to enhance the chance of reaching the 
	opponent's rear in case the opponent decides to cancel his/her attack; 
	Channeling will guide the player to the opponent's rear much easier 
	when one positions him/herself closer to the rear. However, one must 
	take note that holding Forward while attempting a Dash when inside the 
	Step-In Barrier results with an attempt to Grab the opponent. Herein 
	lies a chance for error, so it is extremely important that one guides 
	his/her Enigma Dash with the utmost degree of control.)


V-B-4. G2 Absent Recoil:
------------------------
The concept of the G2 Absent Recoil is based similarly on the guidelines of 
the G2 Recoil, but without the initial presence of the opponent. While 
conducting a game of combat in a 3d environment, one must be able to perform 
and defend a variety of attacks as the opponent's abilities range beyond that 
of a two dimensional plane. When the opponent is at a distance, one must be 
able to comprehend the attacks the opponent has at his/her disposal. When 
regarding such attacks, one must also consider the many possible defensive 
techniques that one can perform as well as which defensive techniques the 
opponent will expect. While many of the defensive techniques explained 
previously in this document may be executed by the single to double button 
commands, the Recoil concepts require the player to judge the situation 
accordingly and perform techniques that require several sequenced buttons 
within a specific timeframe related to the judgment. 

The G2 Absent Recoil is a Defensive Technique that is directly related to that 
of the Dashing Attacker. Like the Rush Attack, one must judge the potential 
for defense on depth perception. However, while evading the Rush Attack is 
based on judging depth perception as the moving attacker reaches the fixed 
target, the G2 Absent Recoil is judged on the moving attacker while including 
a moving target, being the player's character. There are two concepts to 
consider when regarding the G2 Absent Recoil: Aerial and Grounded.

-Aerial G2 Absent Recoil:

	(When the player and the opponent are both airborne and distanced, one 
	must consider the possibility that the opponent possesses the potential 
	to initiate a Dashing Charged Melee Attack. While one may already 
	understand to have several defensive techniques available to deal with 
	such a technique, one must consider all possible defensive techniques 
	to ensure one's complete advancement. When the opponent begins to Dash 
	toward the player's character, one must initiate a Dash in any 
	direction excluding a direction that faces the enemy's location. In 
	other words, the opponent must approach the player, the player must be 
	moving in a direction that requires the opponent to catch him/her.

	Once the chase has been established, the player must always remember 
	that the Dash can be transitioned into Shift mode via "R2C". As long as 
	the opponent is in a normal Dash mode, Focal Adherence will lead the 
	opponent to his Focal Point, being the player's character. When the 
	opponent begins to Charge his/her Dash Melee, the attack will also base 
	itself upon Focal Adherence, bringing the opponent's attack toward the 
	target, being the player's character. However, the unleashing of a 
	Charged Dashing Melee includes a propelled projection of the opponent's 
	physical position. While such a propelled attack is based on Focal 
	Adhesion, the force stored into the player's Shift moves faster than 
	that of the opponent's unleashed attack. Therefore, while the Charged 
	Dashing Melee Attack may come close to making contact, an elite player 
	will be able to use the Shift to maneuver around the attack and place 
	oneself into rear positioning.

	To perform, one must bait the opponent to perform the Charged Dashing 
	Melee Attack. Once engaged, the player must Dash to the Side or 
	Backward. As the opponent's attack approaches the player, one must 
	judge the instant of impact accordingly. Once accurately judged, one 
	must hold a sided direction and initiate "R2" Cancellation to 
	transition into the directionally influenced Shift. As the opponent's 
	attack is unleashed into thin air, the player's character will be 
	directed around the opponent through the Shift. As the player moves 
	around the opponent, one must press Forward to conclude the Shift for 
	rear positioning.)

-Grounded G2 Absent Recoil:

	(While the Aerial G2 Absent Recoil is based on maneuvering the Shift 
	for a defensive means for the Charged Dashing Melee, one must also 
	consider that such a technique can be performed on the ground. However, 
	unlike the Aerial G2 Absent Recoil, the Grounded G2 Absent Recoil must 
	be initiated through Grounded Will. For trying to perform any "R2" 
	Cancellation may fall short of success when working on the ground. 
	Therefore, when the player is grounded, one must always be sure to 
	initiate the Enigma Dash to ensure "R2" Cancellation ability at all 
	times. While it may feel easier to perform normal Dashes during game-
	play, one will learn that the Enigma Dash allows far more potential for 
	Defense as well as Offense.

	Ultimately, one would perform the G2 Absent Recoil expressed in the 
	Aerial G2 Absent Recoil, but by means of performing the Enigma Dash 
	while on the ground. It is with the Enigma Dash that such maneuvering 
	is possible. Therefore, to perform the Grounded G2 Absent Recoil, one 
	must bait the opponent to perform the Charged Dashing Melee Attack. 
	Once engaged, the player must initiate the Enigma Dash to the Side or 
	Backward. As the opponent's attack approaches the player, one must 
	judge the instant of impact accordingly. Once accurately judged, one 
	must hold a sided direction and initiate "R2" Cancellation to 
	transition into the directionally influenced Shift. As the opponent's 
	attack is unleashed into thin air, the player's character will be 
	directed around the opponent through the Shift. As the player moves 
	around the opponent, one must press Forward to conclude the Shift for 
	rear positioning.)

Finally, one must also consider that not all Dashing Attacks are based on the 
opponent's Melee. The opponent may decide to unleash a flurry of Dashing Ki 
Blasts. However, one must also consider the fact that he/she always possesses 
the ability to cancel the Dash or Enigma Dash and maneuver to a position of 
Defense, whether it be a possible G2 Absent Recoil or simply a basis for Basic 
Defense.


V-B-5. Sling Shot Recoil:
-------------------------
As it is understood, the Sling Shot is engaged by the initiation of the Jump. 
While the Jumping Charged Melee is the deciding factor of how much power is 
stored in the Spring, one must also decide how such a technique can be used as 
a defensive manner for possible counter attack. This depends entirely on how 
the player incorporates his/her Sling Shot during the opponent's offense. When 
the opponent charges his/her Melee Attack or attempts a Grab, one must 
consider how much time he/she is allowed to perform such a technique. 
Typically, there are two reference points of the Sling Shot that can be linked 
to the opponent's attack for proper defense. In most cases, this technique 
will be used as a means of exhibition. However, there are variables to 
consider which can make such a technique very useful, such as Priority during 
the Charged Jumping Melee Attack included within the Sling Shot.

Regardless, one must understand the key points of defensive potential when the 
opponent presents a Charged Melee Attack or Grab attempt. The two reference 
points are the evading Jump and the evading Spring. When the opponent is 
unleashing his/her Charged Melee Attack or Grab, the player can Jump to evade 
the attack and then incorporate the remaining commands for the Sling Shot. 
However, one may also Jump preemptively as the opponent begins to charge 
his/her Melee Attack. As the player is Charging his/her Jumping Melee Attack 
at the instance the opponent is charging his/her Melee Attack, one would 
transition into the Spring at the instance of the opponent's unleashed attack 
or Grab. It is wise to consider Super Blast incorporation when dealing with 
the Sling Shot, for it is the key to punishing the opponent's poor offense.

As one understands that he/she can use the Sling Shot as a Defensive means for 
Recoil execution, one must also understand that the G2 Sling Shot can be used 
in the same regard for rear positioning. Therefore, it is always important to 
learn all techniques regarding such advancement, for they do find themselves 
working together to create synergetic movements, attacks and defensive means.


V-B-6. Challenging AKA Z-Motion:
--------------------------------
If one were to imagine a technique that baited the opponent's Melee from the 
Inner Core of the Step-In Barrier that allowed the player to maneuver 
evasively, remaining undamaged to then transition into a reflective approach 
that allowed the player to directly challenge the opponent's Charged Melee 
face to face, just to perform a Supplementary evasive maneuver by linking 
advanced techniques for final Super Blast potential, one would find the 
technique known as Challenging.

For one to fully understand how the Challenging Technique works, one must 
understand and be comfortable with the tactical offense of the opponent, the 
speed at which one may leave the Inner Core of the Step-In Barrier via Enigma 
Dash, the timeframe of the opponent's Combo Set, Mad Dash concepts, the Sling 
Shot concept, the opponent's Charge Rate for Charged Melee and performing the 
Super Blast at the tail of the Sling Shot while understanding the timeframe 
measured for Descending Sweeps. While such concepts are a must to perfect the 
technique, performing the technique on a technical basis is as follows:

	(To perform correctly, one must initially be positioned within the 
	Inner Core of the Step-In Barrier, placed directly in front of the 
	opponent and planted on the ground. One must be very reflexive and able 
	to judge when the opponent is about to begin his/her Combo Set. Just as 
	the opponent begins his/her Combo Set, one must initiate a Backward 
	Enigma Dash by pressing "R1" to Jump and immediately hold Back and 
	press "X". Once the player has evaded the opponent's initial flurry of 
	Melee Attacks, one must judge when the opponent is going to Charge 
	his/her Melee Attack while inside the Enigma Dash. As one begins to 
	accurately estimate the probability of the opponent's Charged Melee, 
	one must hold Forward and press "R1" a second time to initiate the 
	Forward Jump to execute the Sling Shot. This is possible as the Enigma 
	Dash allows the Jump due to the Mad Dash concept. As the Jump is then 
	transformed into a Charged Jumping Melee Attack by pressing and holding 
	"Square", one must ensure that his/her Charged Melee Attack is matching 
	the timing of the opponent's Charged Melee Attack. At this time, if 
	performed correctly, both players should be face to face, Charging 
	their Melee Attacks. However, as the player is working within the Sling 
	Shot technique, one would then initiate the Backward Spring as the 
	opponent unleashes his/her Charged Melee Attack by holding Backward and 
	pressing one of the remaining face buttons for Natural Cancellation. As 
	the Spring brings the player back out of the Step-In Barrier, one must 
	then judge the exact time needed to initiate a Super Blast instead of a 
	Descending Sweep while the opponent concludes his/her attack and before 
	his/her offensive recovery is complete. This is of course performed by 
	holding "L2" and pressing "Triangle" or holding "L2" and "Up" and 
	pressing "Triangle". Of course, that is unless one wanted to 
	incorporate the Ultimate Blast by holding "L2" and "Down" and pressing 
	"Triangle".)


V-B-7. IT Counter:
------------------
This technique is used as a defensive maneuver against the Instantaneous 
Transmission user. Up to this point, the player that chooses the Instantaneous 
Transmission has an advantage. Players of this level know the importance of 
gaining rear position as melee cannot be defended effectively when received 
from the rear. However, a player with a strong understanding of Focal 
Adherence should have no problem understanding the following.

Knowing the freedoms and limitations that dwell inside each level of Focal 
Adherence will allow the player to maneuver into optimal position against the 
Instantaneous Transmission user. This begins with understanding that when 
locked-on to the opponent and in close proximity, one cannot dash without 
incorporating Free Will or Grounded Will. As the Instantaneous Transmission 
automatically puts the opponent inside the Step-In Barrier, Approximal Focal 
Adherence limits the player's movement. Now before we move forward, let us 
reference a previous concept:

-When a player is de-locked from the opponent, he has no Focal Adherence. All 
movement is based on North, South, East and West in relation to his Radar. He 
can Dash, he can ascend, he can descend, etc. If on the other hand, both 
players reach close proximity to each other, they will automatically lock-on 
to each other without the need to search. This auto-lock takes place in any 
condition, including when the lift strike combo knocks the opponent to the 
ground de-locked. If the player were to approach the opponent again, even if 
from behind, the player will automatically lock on again. This also relates to 
the Instantaneous Transmission, for the IT will also cause the opponent to be 
de-locked for an instant, but close proximity will force the de-locked player 
to automatically lock back on to the IT user.

	(The IT Counter takes place within a very small window of opportunity. 
	This window is between when the IT using character (say SSJ3 Goku) 
	begins to appear behind the player and when the player automatically 
	locks on. During this small window of time, the player has zero Focal 
	Adhesion. This means that between the instant SSJ3 Goku appears and the 
	player automatically locks on to the opponent, he has free movement, 
	including the dash. The IT Counter is a means of using such free 
	movement to gain rear positioning to the IT user before movement 
	recovery is complete. Much like any movement including the dash that is 
	terminated by a supplementary X, the IT has movement recovery, which 
	includes the time it takes to get back into fighting stance. Though the 
	player has Dashing capability during this instant, the auto lock-on 
	aspect of the game is so fast, it will cause the player to lock on 
	before the player's dash can carry him a distance.

	Once understood, the player can now use this to his advantage. To 
	perform the IT Counter, one would wait until the player performs the 
	IT. As soon as the player re-appears behind him, the player will 
	immediately dash to the side. As lock-on will take place immediately 
	during this dash, the player will then quickly hold back and tap the R2 
	button for Dash cancellation and Shift transition. As the Shift can be 
	directionally manipulated, one would use this knowledge to Shift into 
	rear position. The technique must be performed quickly and to 
	perfection, for rear positioning must be gained during the time the 
	movement recovery is concluded by the IT user, which does not require a 
	lot of time at all.)


V (C) -Z Offense-
-----------------
As a player of advancement reaches the Z level of Offense, one is expected to 
understand all of the previous techniques explained throughout this document, 
for one must learn to walk before he/she learns to run. One must consider 
movement as the basis of all progression throughout combat, as one must also 
understand that one's Offense is based upon such movement. As a Dashing Melee 
is attached to the Dash itself, as such are advanced Offensive techniques 
attached to advanced maneuvering ability.


V-C-1. Ki Dash:
---------------
As explained in III-E-1, the Normal Ki Blast requires a greater deal of Ki in 
order to expel a single Ki Blast. Therefore, if a player were to consecutively 
press the "Triangle" button for successive Ki Blasts, it would deplete the Ki 
Meter fairly quickly. However, unlike the Normal Ki Blasts, the Dashing Ki 
Blasts are released by simply pressing the "Triangle" button once during a 
Dash for a flurry of successive Ki Blasts; All of which require a mere 
fraction of the Ki required for the same number of Normal Ki Blasts. When all 
Ki Blasts from the Dashing Ki Blast attack make contact upon the opponent, the 
damage inflicted can be quite significant, depending on the character. 
Therefore, unleashing a connection of the multiple Ki Blasts included within 
the Dashing Ki Blast attack will inflict far more damage than a single Normal 
Ki Blast, while requiring a fraction of the Ki. It is within this concept that 
the player will exploit the concepts previously discussed within this document 
to connect Dashing Ki Blasts to ensure maximum damage.

To perform for best quality, one would do well to reach the opponent's rear 
before engaging this technique. Like the G&P, if one were skilled enough, one 
could perform the Ki Dash as a means of an infinite attack, but without 
throwing a single attack. Ultimately, the player would unleash an endless 
supply of Ki Blasts that extend beyond the limitations of the Ki Blast Combo 
explained in III-E in order to perform a seemingly infinite Ki Blast Combo, as 
long as the Ki Meter is able to continually supply the Ki required. This is 
achieved by implementing the Free Will concept to allow Dashing Ki Blast 
ability within the Step-In Barrier.

	(To perform, one must first reach rear positioning by means of one's 
	chosen method. Once rear positioning has been established, one must 
	ensure that he/she is within the Step-In Barrier. It is at his point 
	that one must understand that in order to perform the Dashing Ki Blast, 
	one must use Free Will to engage any Dashing techniques within the 
	Step-In Barrier. Therefore, one must release the initial Ki Blast to 
	begin the technique by pressing "Triangle". One must immediately 
	perform the "DTN" by pressing "X" twice in immediate succession to 
	engage the FW Dash. As soon as the Dash is engaged, one would then 
	press "Triangle" to perform the Dashing Ki Blast. To engage a 
	continuation of the Ki Dash, one would simply repeat the process by 
	initiating the Supplementary Normal Ki Blast before the opponent can 
	defensively recover in respect to Approximal Focal Adherence.)

V-C-1-a. Energy Cloud:

	(The Energy Cloud is created when the player performs the Ki Dash. When 
	the Ki Blasts from the Ki Dash make contact, the remnants of the 
	technique creates a cloud of energy that reflects the same color as the 
	initial Ki Dash. It is within this cloud that one may continue to 
	attack the opponent without his/her visual expectancy of the player's 
	next attack. In essence, the Energy Cloud allows the player's next 
	technique of immediate succession to be performed in covertness.)


V-C-2. Beat Down:
-----------------
As explained in III-E-2, the Sonic Impact terminus is reached by performing 
the Dashing Melee Attack and then following up with "Triangle" and then 
concluding with "Square". However, one must understand that the final blow of 
the Sonic Impact knocks the opponent directly to the ground at their initial 
position. Typically, one would use this advantage to perform the Giant's Throw 
to continue one's assault. However, it is within the concepts of Z Offense 
that one finds new techniques to continue one's assault such as the Free Will 
or Grounded Will. Typically, one would find the Free Will concept most useful 
as the Ki Blast required keeps the opponent on his/her defensive recovery, 
allowing the player to perform his/her next technique with the highest impact 
rate.

In essence, the Beat Down is a sequence of performing the Sonic Impact 
explained above, and then using Free Will to perform the technique again as a 
means of working through Vortex application or manipulating the opponent's 
Defensive Recovery via attacking him/her through his/her "waking up" state. 
This allows the player to continuously knock the opponent to the ground over, 
and over unless the opponent is skilled enough to defensively teleport through 
such attacks.

	(To perform the Beat Down, one must engage the opponent with a Dashing 
	Melee by first pressing the Neutral "X" to approach the opponent and 
	then pressing "Square" to make physical, damaging contact. Once 
	applied, the player must immediately follow the "Square" with 
	"Triangle" and then conclude the Sonic Impact with "Square". As this 
	technique alone will result with the opponent laying on the ground at 
	the player's feet, one must then initiate Free Will by pressing 
	"Triangle" for the initial Ki Blast. As one must perform a Dash that 
	approaches the locally positioned opponent, one must perform the "DTN" 
	by pressing "X" two times in immediate succession. After the player 
	enters Dash mode via Free Will, one must perform the next incorporated 
	Sonic Impact based solely on which character he has chosen. Some 
	characters possess a Dashing Melee that picks the opponent straight off 
	of the ground from lying position while others do not. It is at this 
	point where one must be able to judge the opponent's recovery rate in 
	"Waking Up" to seize advantage of the opponent's vulnerable state for 
	further assault.)

V-C-2-a. Dust Cloud:

	(When the player knocks the opponent to the ground, such impact will 
	cause dust to scatter from the ground. This is completely dependent on 
	where the player is stationed on the stage, for some sections of the 
	selected stage or even the entirety of the stage holds no dust to 
	scatter. It is in the case that one finds him/herself in a dusted area 
	that the Sonic Impact will cause the Dust Cloud to appear. When dealing 
	with the Beat Down technique, one may consider such regard in 
	reflection to that of the Energy Cloud; a chance to conceal one's next 
	attack via covertness.)


V-C-3. FW Sweep:
----------------
The Sweep involved in any Dash is based upon performing the Descending Sweep 
by pressing "Triangle" at the very instance one plants his/her feet. This 
technique is very useful as it presents an attack that cannot be easily 
predicted from the opponent.

When regarding the FW Sweep, one must understand that the Sweep itself is 
build upon the Dash that feeds it. Therefore, one may perform the Sweep 
through the normal Dash through means of open combat and mind game application 
or one can establish the Descending Sweep through means of Free Will 
execution. While there are many advanced players that may choose to perform a 
variety of FW techniques, one must also understand that it is important to 
have every offensive technique at the ready at all times. Therefore, one may 
incorporate a FW Sweep directly from linked Ki Dashes. When the Ki Dash is 
performed, the impact of the Ki Blasts presents a cloud of energy, typically 
colored the same as the Ki Blast. Through such a cloud of energy, one may find 
him/herself in a state of covertness. It is within this state that one must 
understand that such techniques that the opponent may predict or even visually 
see coming in other circumstances, are now hidden; clouded from the opponent's 
sight. This is where the Free Will Sweep strives. It is also very important 
that the player understands that though this technique is flashy and is hard 
to detect within controlled Energy Clouded areas, the remaining termini of the 
technique can easily be defended by an experienced player via Defensive 
Teleportation.

	(To perform, one must unleash the initial Ki Blast to execute Free 
	Will. Once established, the player must engage the "DTN" by pressing 
	"X" in immediate succession. As the "DTN" will initiate the Neutral 
	Free Will Dash, one must immediately press "R2" to descend to the 
	ground while immediately pressing "Triangle" at the instance of 
	player's landing. If performed correctly, the player will Sweep the 
	opponent, allowing a possible Dragon Tornado Terminus.)


V-C-4. G2FW Sweep:
------------------
As explained in V-C-3, the Sweep involved in any Dash is based upon performing 
the Descending Sweep by pressing "Triangle" at the very instance one plants 
his/her feet. When regarding the FW Sweep, one must understand that the Sweep 
itself is build upon the Dash that feeds it. Therefore, one may perform the 
Sweep through the normal Dash through means of open combat and mind game 
application or one can establish the Descending Sweep through means of Free 
Will execution. However, unlike the Base FW Sweep, one must incorporate the 
Descending Sweep that rides the FW Dash by means of Free Will Switch 
incorporation.

While one may find the opportunity to perform FW Sweeping within the Energy 
Cloud of Ki Dash performance, one may find tricky ways to pull off the 
Descending Sweep by alternative Free Will concepts such as the FW Switch. 
While the FW Switch requires a good number of button commands to pull off 
effectively, the G2FW Sweep requires the same command execution, but with one 
additional button to incorporate the Descending Sweep.

	(To perform, one must be positioned inside the Inner Core of the Step-
	In Barrier while hovering just above ground level. In fact, the 
	distance from the player and the ground should be so short that one 
	could simply tap "R2" to plant his/her feet. This distance of elevation 
	is required for the inclusive "R2C" to take hold and the descending 
	Sweep to properly activate. Once properly positioned, one must execute 
	the initial Ki Blast that will activate Free Will. Once activated, one 
	must engage the "DTN" by pressing "X" in immediate succession. Once the 
	Neutral FW Dash has been activated, one must immediately press "R2" for 
	"R2" Cancellation to transition into the Shift. As one's Shift is still 
	considered to be at an elevated level through its journey to ground 
	level, one must incorporate directional influence by pressing "Right" 
	or "Left". As the momentum of the Shift pushes the player past the 
	opponent, one must then press "Forward" to conclude the Shift movement 
	for rear positioning. As this would be the button command for the FW 
	Switch, one must also understand that the "R2C" that allowed the Shift 
	to be activated also brings the player to the ground at the end of the 
	Shift. Therefore, one must judge the exact instant that the player's 
	character plants his/her feet. It is at this instance that the player 
	must press "Triangle" to incorporate the Descending Sweep.)


V-C-5. Taxing:
--------------
In order to understand the concept of Taxing, one must be fully comfortable 
with the concept of the Ground & Pound technique. One must understand that 
while performing the G&P technique, pressing "R2" to cancel the Combo Set does 
not necessarily result with the player's character visually planting his/her 
feet. In order for the player to ensure that his/her character plants his/her 
feet, one must present further control of the "R2C" to force the character to 
plant his/her feet. This concept is very important as one is to incorporate a 
transitional Jump for Taxing to succeed.

In essence, the Taxing technique incorporates the G&P while using the "R2" 
Cancellation to transition into the Jumping Ki Blast Flurry. In order for the 
Jumping Ki Blast Flurry to make proper impact upon the opponent's back, one 
must ensure that the timeframe between the initial Jump and Ki Blast execution 
must be very short, allowing the player to jump a mere foot off of the ground 
before unleashing the Jumping Ki Blast Flurry. As it is important to 
understand that when the player performs a Jumping Melee Attack or a Jumping 
Ki Blast Attack, one cannot incorporate any other attack until the Jump has 
concluded, with the exception of the Descending Sweep. However, one must 
understand that the potential of a Dash is presented through the entirety of 
the Jump, whether an attack was included or not. It is within such a concept 
that one must understand that post Jumping Ki Blast Flurry, one is allowed the 
ability to Dash. As this holds true, the next technique involved in Taxing is 
to follow the Jumping Ki Blast Flurry with a Neutral Dash, awarding the player 
the ability to initiate the Dashing Ki Blast. As the Dashing Ki Blast 
concludes, one is in position to continue a repeated Taxing set.

	(To perform, one must place oneself in rear positioning of the 
	opponent. Once established, one must begin a Combo Set by pressing 
	"Square" anywhere from one to four times. If the player presses the 
	Square button the fifth time, the opponent will be pushed into Initial 
	Aftermath, losing the ability to use "R2C". It is important that one 
	finds the comfort zone for "R2" Cancellation to take place as the 
	fluidity of the G&P is very important. After one has decided which 
	"Square" command one would use as a pinpoint for transition, one would 
	then press "R2" to cancel the Combo Set. In doing so, one must also 
	control the "R2" in order to ensure the player's character plants 
	his/her feet. Once established, one must then press "R1" and then 
	immediately press "Triangle" to initiate a Jumping Ki Blast Flurry of 
	low elevation. This is to ensure the Ki Blast make impact upon the 
	opponents back. As soon as the last Ki Blast is unleashed, one must 
	immediately press "X" to transition into the Neutral Dash. As one 
	begins his/her Dash, one must then press "Triangle" to incorporate the 
	Dashing Ki Blast Flurry. As one's last Ki Blast from the Dashing Ki 
	Blast Flurry concludes, one may begin the process again for continued 
	assault.)


V-C-6. GW Sweep:
----------------
The Sweep involved in any Dash is based upon performing the Descending Sweep 
by pressing "Triangle" at the very instance one plants his/her feet. This 
technique is very useful as it presents an attack that cannot be easily 
predicted from the opponent.

When regarding the GW Sweep, one must understand that the Sweep itself is 
build upon the Dash that feeds it, being the Enigma Dash. Therefore, one may 
perform the Sweep through the normal Dash through means of open combat and 
mind game application or one can establish the Descending Sweep through means 
of Grounded Will execution. While there are many advanced players that may 
choose to perform a variety of GW techniques, one must also understand that it 
is important to have every offensive technique at the ready at all times. As 
one requires the understanding that the Enigma Dash allows "R2" Cancellation, 
this also allows the player to incorporate the Descending Sweep within the 
maneuver. Therefore, one must always understand that no matter what direction 
the Enigma Dash is engaged, one always has the ability to Cancel Forward into 
a Descending Dash.

	(To perform, one must first initiate the Enigma Dash. The initial 
	position of the Dash is of no consequence, but one must understand the 
	length of the Shift that allows the Descending Sweep to take place. 
	Therefore, regardless of the initial position of the Enigma Dash, the 
	player must concentrate on the distance between the point of "R2" 
	Cancellation and the opponent. Once the player is positioned within the 
	distance of the average Sliding distance, one may then press "R2" for 
	"R2" Cancellation to transition into the Shift while pressing "Forward" 
	to direct the Shift toward the opponent. As the Shift brings itself to 
	a conclusion at the opponent's position, one must then press "Triangle" 
	to incorporate the Descending Sweep.)


V-C-7. G2GW Sweep:
------------------
As explained in V-C-3, the Sweep involved in any Dash is based upon performing 
the Descending Sweep by pressing "Triangle" at the very instant one plants 
his/her feet. When regarding the GW Sweep, one must understand that the Sweep 
itself is build upon the Dash that feeds it. Therefore, one may perform the 
Sweep through the normal Dash through means of open combat and mind game 
application or one can establish the Descending Sweep through means of 
Grounded Will execution. However, unlike the Base GW Sweep, one must 
incorporate the Descending Sweep that rides the Enigma Dash by means of 
Grounded Will Switch incorporation. While the GW Switch requires a good number 
of button commands to pull off effectively, the G2GW Sweep requires the same 
command execution, but with one additional button to incorporate the 
Descending Sweep.

	To perform, one must first place him/herself within the Inner Core of 
	the Step-In Barrier, standing directly in front of the opponent and 
	planted on the ground. To initiate the technique, one must first press 
	"R1" to Jump for Grounded Will initiation. Once initiated, one must 
	then press "X" for the Neutral Enigma Dash to be incorporated. As the 
	player's initial position was placed directly in front of the opponent, 
	such a Dash animation will not last long at all. The window of 
	opportunity is extremely small, so one must then use the directional 
	influenced Shift as soon as possible, before the Dash animation 
	concludes. To do so, one must press "R2" to initiate the Shift and then 
	"Left" or "Right" to directionally influence the movement. As the 
	momentum of the initial Dash and Shift moves Forward, the Left/Right 
	incorporation into directional influence will allow the player's 
	character to Shift past the opponent. The player must then immediately 
	press "Forward" to conclude the Shift movement as explained in the GW 
	Switch for rear positioning. However, as the GW Switch concludes with 
	complete descent, one must be sure to press "Triangle" as the player's 
	character makes ground contact to initiate the Descending Sweep at the 
	opponent's rear.

Once must understand that this Descending Sweep can also be included in the G2 
Recoil as a means of counter attack. Also, as this technique is based on 
Grounded Will concepts, one must also understand that one can link this 
technique to Ground & Pound exploitation. It is important that the player 
understands all of his/her options.


V-C-8. Absent Recoil Sweep:
---------------------------
As explained in V-C-6, as one requires the understanding that the Enigma Dash 
allows "R2" Cancellation, this also allows the player to incorporate the 
Descending Sweep within the maneuver. Therefore, one must always understand 
that no matter what direction the Enigma Dash is engaged, one always has the 
ability to Cancel Forward into a Descending Dash. It is within this concept 
that one must incorporate the same technical aspect into the Absent Recoil. 
However, in order to fully understand how the technique may be incorporated, 
one must only consider the Grounded Absent Recoil, for the Descending Sweep 
will only work when the Ground can be used as a basis for initiation.

With such consideration, one must be able to manipulate one's opponent into 
pressing his/her aggression. One must bait the opponent's approach in order to 
catch the opponent into the trap, being the Absent Recoil Sweep. As related to 
the G2 Absent Recoil, one must understand that the Dash involved is based upon 
the Enigma Dash, allowing "R2" Cancellation at any time. In essence, the 
concept of the Absent Recoil Sweep is to bait the opponent into approaching 
the player's character while performing the Enigma Dash. As the player reaches 
the proper proximity of the player's character, one would use the Forward 
Shift to initiate the Descending Sweep.

	(To perform the Absent Recoil Sweep, one must bait the opponent to Dash 
	toward the player's position. Once engaged, the player must initiate 
	the Enigma Dash to the Side or Backward, preferably the latter. As the 
	opponent's approach reaches twice the distance of a Shift from the 
	player, one must judge the distance accordingly for as the Shift is 
	initiated, it will cover half the distance between the player and the 
	opponent, while the opponent will cover the rest. in essence, the two 
	players will meet in the middle of the distance. Once accurately 
	judged, one must hold Forward and initiate "R2" Cancellation to 
	transition into the directionally influenced Shift. As the player 
	reaches the opponent's proximity of movement, one must press "Triangle" 
	to initiate the Descending Shift at the instance of convergence.)

One must also understand that though the technique is highly unpredictable, it 
does not mean the technique cannot be dodged through defensive teleportation. 
However, as the Descending Sweep is still a part of the technique, one must 
also understand that the follow-up Dragon Tornado terminus is still an option.


V-C-9. G2 Sling Shot Sweep:
---------------------------
While working through the explanation of V-A-3, one is referenced to IV-C-3 to 
explain that if a player were to Charge the Jumping Melee Attack, then hold a 
desired direction while cancelling the Charge with a Natural Cancellation, the 
Spring will be engaged. While the Spring is based upon the Charge Meter as a 
means of determining the distance of the maneuver, one can further manipulate 
the Spring into additional maneuvering exploitation through further 
cancellation. This exploitation is explained as cancelling the Spring through 
"R2" Cancelation to initiate the Sling Shot Shift which is described as being 
far more difficult to activate than previous Shifts stemming from the Dash 
concept. Like the Shift concepts previously discussed in this document, 
directional influence becomes a simple matter of holding the desired 
direction. Once the Spring is cancelled via "R2C", a very small window of 
opportunity will present itself for directional influence. To perform the G2 
Sling Shot, one must incorporate such directional influence into the Neutrally 
Cancelled Sling Shot Cancellation. As there are two cancellations being 
incorporated into the G2 Sling Shot, the first being Natural Cancellation, the 
second: "R2" Cancellation. One must wait until the second cancel has been 
activated before directional influence takes place. Once the Spring has been 
cancelled via "R2" Cancellation, one must consider the fact that such momentum 
is now stored in the neutral Shift. Therefore, one must treat such directional 
influence as one would with the G2 Switch.

Once the player performs the Sling Shot Switch correctly, one would simply 
incorporate the Descending Sweep at the tail end of the concluding Sling Shot 
Shift.

	(To perform, one would initiate a Jump by pressing "R1". One would 
	immediately begin to charge the Jumping Malee Attack by pressing and 
	holding "Square". Before the Charge Meter runs out, one must 
	immediately use Natural Cancellation to transition into the Neutral 
	Spring by pressing any of the remaining face buttons before the Charge 
	is concluded. As one has transitioned into the Neutral Spring, one must 
	understand that such animation will not last long as one is descending 
	through gravitational pull. Once the player's character lands, the 
	window of transitional opportunity ends. Therefore, one must then press 
	"R2" to use "R2" Cancellation before the player's character lands on 
	the ground. As the momentum build through the Spring is now stored in 
	the Sling Shot Shift, one must then use such momentum to incorporate 
	directional influence to maneuver around the opponent by pressing 
	"Left" or "Right". As one moves past the opponent through the 
	directionally manipulated Shift, one must hold "Forward" to conclude 
	the Shift momentum into rear positioning. As this would normally 
	conclude the G2 Sling Shot, in order to incorporate the Descending 
	Shift, one must press "Triangle" before the G2 Sling Shot meets its 
	final conclusion for grounded rear positioning.)

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VI. Accreditation
-----------------


I have found that as much time and effort that I have put into improving my 
abilities of Tenkaichi 2 game-play, my level of skill would not be where it is 
today if not for the great minds of other Tenkaichi 2 players. First and 
foremost, I would like to give proper accreditation to those who have 
contributed to the essence of this document, be it through direct contribution 
or mere inspiration.

-Arierure:

	(Inspiration through exhibitions of Tenkaichi 3's Flight Cancel)

-Auriele

	(Showing Grounded Will Tactics in Tenkaichi 3, inspiring the training 
	required that would eventually lead to the discovery of many Grounded 
	Will techniques in Tenkaichi 2 as well as Tenkaichi 3.

-DarqueAnjul:

	(Helped in the beginning to distinguish the difference between a Blast 
	1 and a Blast 2.)

-Golden_Gogeta:

	(Wrote the FAQ: "Blast 1, 2 and Ultimate" as a reference point for 
	Blast 1 description)

-Jey3149:

	(Exhibiting Free Will concepts, the Combo Breaker and the Lift Strike 
	Switch)

-KoolKev92:

	(Exhibiting the Ki Whoring technique)

-Matias:

	(Exhibiting the Rise Over Run concept)

-Nickeleye AKA Nick Kowal:

	(Pitching the name for the technique: Ground & Pound)

-RenegadeTX2001:

	(Originally exhibited the Super Explosive Wave Defense, exhibited Ki 
	Control and Last Chance Defense)

-ShoryuuReppe:

	(Exhibiting Videl's Chaining concept)

-TheDBZShadow:

	(Pitching the name for the technique: Tango)

-TheLastGogeta:

	(Pitching the name for the technique: Greening)

-UlqiorraSciffar:

	(Exhibiting a limited variation of the technique that eventually became 
	Ascension Evasion)

-Zoso9391:

	(Helping with further understanding the mechanics of Ground & Pound 
	ability. Explained Auto Teleportation. Exhibiting a variation of the 
	technique that eventually became the Free Will Tango. Helped scout for 
	other techniques to further the advancement of Tenkaichi 2. Invented 
	the Tenkaichi 3 version of the GW Switch AKA "Perfect Switching". 
	Informed the optimal option of using the Forward Swiper with the right 
	control. Explained various Mad Dash Switch based attack concepts.)

Zzzolapa:

	(Introduced the concepts of the Mad Dash)

The following names belong to those who have helped me advance as a player by 
means of continuous player vs player combat:

-Nickeleye
-IronX
-Eos
-BomberMan
-Sorideon
-Genocide
-Magnus
-Splice
-X Button

Those who have not been mentioned do not possess an online name or gamer tag. 
Without their permission, I am not at liberty to give their names.

The following sites are named and thanked for presenting at least one version 
of my FAQ:

GameFaqs.com
NeoSeeker.com
Gamespot.com
Supercheats.com
VGStrategies.About.com

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VII. Conclusion
---------------


	Congratulations! You finally made it to the end. Remember, these 
techniques may seem very difficult but if you find yourself having a difficult 
time, keep in mind that even the best players in the world had to struggle. I 
wish you all well on your journey of Tenkaichi 2 technical and mechanical 
exploration and I hope to see you soon on YouTube!

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VII. Legal/Contact Information
------------------------------


This document in its entirety was written by me, Lee Cook ("ZeroAnnihilated") 
on the website: GameFAQs.com. Everything that has been written here must not 
be used on any site without my permission. For possible consent, please 
contact me at LJCZero@hotmail.com.

This may not be reproduced under any circumstance except for personal private 
use. It may not be placed on any website or otherwise distributed without 
advanced written permission. Use of this guide on any other website or as a 
part of any public display is strictly prohibited, and a violation of 
copyright.

Copyright 2008: Lee Cook AKA ZeroAnnihilated

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End
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