/--\   /     /--/ /    / /---- ----- /--/ ----- -----  /----/ /\    / -----/
 / --/  /     /--/ /----/  \---\  /   /--/   /     /    /    / /  \  /  ----/
/      /---- /  /    /     ----/ /   /  /   /    ----- / ---/ /    \/  ----/

Sony PlayStation 3 Hardware FAQ
Version 2.4 (3/19/2014)

By Nick Zitzmann
E-Mail: ten.tsacmoc@uyries (spell that backwards for an E-Mail address)

For best results, please set your text editor/Web browser to use the ISO Latin
1 text encoding while reading this FAQ.


* LEGAL STUFF *
***************

Copyright 2007-2014 Nick Zitzmann.

This is a hardware FAQ for the Sony PlayStation 3. It does not cover PS3
software. If you need help with PS3 software, then you ought to visit a site
that carries software FAQs and walkthroughs, such as <http://faqs.ign.com/> or
<http://www.gamefaqs.com/>.

The author and contributors are solely responsible for the content of this FAQ.
Sony Computer Entertainment was not involved in any way, shape, or form.

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the
terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version
published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no
Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts.

To summarize the above paragraph, I don't particularly care if you want to
re-publish this FAQ elsewhere, or create your own derivative of this FAQ (e.g.
a localized version). However, I **do** care if you plagiarize this FAQ, or
re-publish it under a different license. Also, there are no warranties at all
on the information in this FAQ.

The entire license is available online at the following URL:
<http://www.gnu.org/licenses/fdl.html>

That said, the latest version of this FAQ published by the original author will
always be published first on GameFAQs:
<http://www.gamefaqs.com/console/ps3/game/927750.html>


* VERSION HISTORY *
*******************

Version 1.0 (9/27/2007):
First release.

Version 1.1 (10/6/2007):
Added the 40 GB PS3 and Dual Shock 3. Corrected a few answers.

Version 1.1.1 (10/10/2007):
More 40 GB PS3 updates.

Version 1.2 (10/19/2007):
More 40 GB PS3 updates. Added new sections for the controllers and online play.

Version 1.3 (11/4/2007):
Added a section for backing up. Expanded the section for online play.

Version 1.3.1 (12/6/2007):
Some minor clarifications on various topics.

Version 1.4 (12/26/2007):
Changed the license to the GNU Free Documentation License. Answered a few more
questions people have asked.

Version 1.4.1 (1/7/2008):
Made some corrections and answered even more questions.

Version 1.4.2 (1/10/2008):
Covered the discontinuation of some PS3 models in Japan.

Version 1.4.3 (1/31/2008):
Elaborated a bit on supported audio formats. Answered more questions.

Version 1.4.4 (2/12/2008):
Some minor edits. Answered more questions.

Version 1.4.5 (2/18/2008):
Some more minor edits. Answered more questions.

Version 1.4.6 (2/25/2008):
Answered more questions. Noted which PS3 models support SACD.

Version 1.5 (3/2/2008):
Added some details on upcoming bundles. Answered more questions.

Version 1.5.1 (3/18/2008):
Corrected some answers.

Version 1.5.2 (3/30/2008):
More corrections. Answered more questions.

Version 1.6 (4/11/2008):
More corrections. Updated many questions about controllers now that the Dual
Shock 3 is officially available outside of Japan. Added some info. on DTS-HD.

Version 1.6.1 (5/1/2008):
Various updates here and there.

Version 1.6.2 (5/23/2008):
Clarified a few answers. Answered more questions.

Version 1.6.3 (6/12/2008):
Updated the PS3 bundle configurations. Answered more questions.

Version 1.6.4 (6/30/2008):
Trophies are coming! Answered more questions.

Version 1.6.5 (7/8/2008):
Answered more questions.

Version 1.7 (7/14/2008):
Added a new section for video playback. Answered more questions.

Version 1.7.1 (7/17/2008):
Added all I know about the "new" 80 GB PS3 that was just announced.

Version 1.7.2 (8/8/2008):
Made several clarifications. Answered more questions.

Version 1.7.3 (8/20/2008):
Added the new 160 GB PS3 that was just announced.

Version 1.7.4 (9/22/2008):
Made a few clarifications in the backup FAQs.

Version 1.7.5 (10/29/2008):
Minor editing changes.

Version 1.7.6 (12/15/2008):
Editing changes. Answered another question.

Version 1.7.7 (2/9/2009):
Same old, same old...

Version 1.7.8 (3/14/2009):
As times have changed, some of the answers have changed as well.

Version 1.7.9 (6/1/2009):
A few more answers changed.

Version 1.8 (8/18/2009):
More answers changed, more questions answered.

Version 1.8.1 (9/7/2009):
Updated some GNU/Linux things because of Sony's decision to drop it from the
new slim PS3s.

Version 1.8.2 (9/25/2009):
Another TGS, another new batch of PS3s.

Version 1.8.3 (2/21/2010):
Minor edits, particularly to the video section.

Version 1.8.4 (3/2/2010):
What an interesting 24 hours it has been... Added FAQs on the big blackout that
happened yesterday.

Version 1.9 (4/3/2010):
Now that Sony has discontinued GNU/Linux support, all of the homebrew content
has been gutted.

Version 1.9.1 (4/13/2010):
Corrected some information about DisplayPort.

Version 1.9.2 (4/22/2010):
Rewrote 1.2 and 8.6.

Version 2.0 (6/19/2010):
Made a number of editorial changes, particularly to the backup and technical
answers to questions. Answered several more questions.

Version 2.0.1 (8/25/2010):
Updated the PS3 model list yet again. Answered one more question and made minor
edits elsewhere.

Version 2.1 (12/29/2010):
Added a new section for the PlayStation Move. Updated the homebrew section.

Version 2.1.1 (3/10/2011):
Made several corrections here and there.

Version 2.1.2 (11/14/2011):
Removed the question about the PlayStation 2 Classics after Sony had a change
of heart over the matter.

Version 2.1.3 (9/19/2012):
Added information about the new super-slim PS3s.

Version 2.2 (10/4/2013):
Removed mentions of Life with PlayStation because Sony discontinued that
service, and replaced them with answers to more questions.

Version 2.3 (2/13/2014):
Revised a question about games that run in 720p, and answered a question about
playing games across platforms.

Version 2.4 (3/19/2014):
Noted that the Dual Shock 4 does indeed work on the PS3 as a wired controller.

* TABLE OF CONTENTS *
*********************

To skip ahead to a specific part of the FAQ, then use your browser/text
editor's find feature, usually activated by pressing Cmd-F on Mac OS X or
Ctrl-F on Windows or GNU/Linux.

* 1.0 - General PS3 Info.
* 1.1 - What is the PlayStation 3?
* 1.2 - What are the differences between the PS3 and PS2?
* 1.3 - Why should I buy a PS3 anyway?
* 1.4 - What kind of PS3s have been released?
* 1.5 - Does the PS3 have a regional lockout?
* 1.6 - Does the PS3 have parental controls?
* 1.7 - What are the hardware specs of the PS3?
* 1.8 - What I/O ports come with the PS3?
* 1.9 - Does the PS3 have the "jaggies" problem that plagued the PS2?
* 1.10 - What PS3 model should I buy?
* 1.11 - What kind of discs can the PS3 play?
* 1.12 - What comes bundled with the PS3?
* 1.13 - Hold on. Did you just call the PS3 a 64-bit console?
* 1.14 - I've heard the PS3 is difficult to develop for; is that true?
* 1.15 - Why did peoples' PS3s quit working on March 1, 2010?
* 1.16 - Has the PS3 regressed since its launch?

* 2.0 - Video displays and the PS3
* 2.1 - What are all these video acronyms?
* 2.2 - What video cables are supported by the PS3?
* 2.3 - Can I use my PS1 or PS2 video cable(s) with my PS3?
* 2.4 - Why does my TV image bounce when I connect my PS3 to it?
* 2.5 - Why is my video scrambled while watching a DVD?
* 2.6 - What should I look for when choosing a display for my PS3?
* 2.7 - Can I play "PAL" games on an "NTSC" PS3/TV, or vice versa?
* 2.8 - Why does my game that supposedly supports 1080i/p always start up using
720p?

* 3.0 - Audio speakers and the PS3
* 3.1 - What audio types are supported by the PS3?
* 3.2 - What should I look for when choosing a stereo for my PS3?

* 4.0 - Backward compatibility
* 4.1 - Is the PS3 backward compatible with the PS1 or PS2?
* 4.2 - What PS1 and PS2 games work in the PS3?
* 4.3 - What PS1 and PS2 peripherals work in the PS3?
* 4.4 - Why doesn't my SIXAXIS controller work in my PS1 game?
* 4.5 - Does the PS3 support PS2 games that used the network adapter or HDD?
* 4.6 - How can I import my PS1/PS2 saved data into my PS3?
* 4.7 - How can I export my PS1/PS2 software memory cards to real memory cards?
* 4.8 - How do advanced video modes work when playing PS1 or PS2 games?
* 4.9 - How do advanced audio modes work when playing PS1 or PS2 games?
* 4.10 - Why did my PS1 game suddenly become a lot less random?
* 4.11 - Why doesn't force feedback work on my Dual Shock 3 in my PS1 game?
* 4.12 - Can I store PS1 or PS2 game discs on my PS3 hard disk?
* 4.13 - When will PS1 game XYZ be released as a PlayStation Classic?
* 4.14 - Is the rumor that PS1/PS2 games look terrible on the PS3 true?
* 4.15 - What do you mean by "software" backward compatibility?
* 4.16 - Why did Sony remove PS2 backward compatibility from some PS3s?
* 4.17 - Will the "PS2 classics" on the PlayStation Store work on my
non-backward compatible PS3?
* 4.18 - Why can't I reach the XMB in a PS1 or PS2 game (or video)?
* 4.19 - Will Sony ever make PS3s that have PS2 compatibility in the future?
* 4.20 - Why does PS1 and PS2 software use territorial lockouts?
* 4.21 - What is the function of the "PS2 system data" file on the PS Store?
* 4.22 - Are saves created by PS1 disc-based games and their downloadable
classics equivalents compatible with one another?

* 5.0 - Homebrew development and GNU/Linux on the PS3
* 5.1 - Does the PS3 support homebrew game development?
* 5.2 - Will homebrew software be able to bring back PS2 backward compatibility
on newer PS3s?

* 6.0 - The SIXAXIS and Dual Shock 3 controllers
* 6.1 - What is the SIXAXIS controller?
* 6.2 - What is the Dual Shock 3 controller?
* 6.3 - Can I use my controller as a computer game pad?
* 6.4 - Whatever happened to the banana controller?
* 6.5 - Why don't the motion-sensitive controls work in my game that supports
motion-sensitive controls?
* 6.6 - Why do the controls randomly quit responding for several seconds?
* 6.7 - Are the SIXAXIS and Dual Shock 3 compatible with the PS1 or PS2?
* 6.8 - Is the Dual Shock 4 compatible with the PS3?

* 7.0 - The PlayStation Move controller
* 7.1 - What is the PlayStation Move controller?
* 7.2 - How does the Move controller compare to other motion-based controllers?
* 7.3 - Does the Move work in all PS3 games?
* 7.4 - What do I need to play Move-enabled games?

* 8.0 - Going online with the PS3
* 8.1 - What do I need to go online with the PS3?
* 8.2 - Can I go online using a dial-up connection?
* 8.3 - Can I go online using a USB modem or router?
* 8.4 - How do I play PS1 games online?
* 8.5 - How do I play PS2 games online?
* 8.6 - Do I need a headset to play online games?
* 8.7 - Are online games segregated by region?
* 8.8 - How much do online games cost to play online?
* 8.9 - Does everyone have to own their own copy of a game to play online?
* 8.10 - My PS3 connects but still cannot go online, can you help me?
* 8.11 - Can I play PS3 games online with PC or X360 users?

* 9.0 - Backing up the PS3
* 9.1 - Why should I back up my PS3?
* 9.2 - What gets backed up when I back up the PS3?
* 9.3 - What do I need to have to perform a backup?
* 9.4 - Why can't I make a partition larger than 32 GB?
* 9.5 - Should I use only Sony memory cards with my PS3?
* 9.6 - Can I directly back up one hard disk to another?
* 9.7 - How can I back up when my destination doesn't have much capacity?
* 9.8 - Does the PS3 work with any USB storage device (hard disks, thumb
drives, memory card readers, etc.)?

* 10.0 - Motion Pictures and the PS3
* 10.1 - Will Blu-ray movie disc XYZ work in my PS3?
* 10.2 - Will the PlayTV accessory work in North America?
* 10.3 - I forgot my parental controls password; is there a back door?
* 10.4 - Is the rumor that the Blu-ray disc player is really slow true?

* 11.0 - Misc. questions
* 11.1 - Can I install disc-based PS3 games to the hard drive?
* 11.2 - Should the PS3 be placed flat or on its side?
* 11.3 - Are Xbox 360 controllers compatible with the PS3?
* 11.4 - Are Wii controllers compatible with the PS3?
* 11.5 - Are the instrument controllers for "Band Hero," "Guitar Hero," and 
         "Rock Band" interchangeable between games?
* 11.6 - How do I install a new hard drive in the PS3?
* 11.7 - What is the maximum size of the PS3's hard drive?
* 11.8 - Why does the PS3 report that my blank hard disk has considerably less
space available for it than the hard disk was advertised as having?
* 11.9 - My PS3 keeps freezing. Why?
* 11.10 - Can I use any hard drive brand in my PS3?


* 1.0 - GENERAL PS3 INFO. *
***************************


* 1.1 - WHAT IS THE PLAYSTATION 3? *
************************************

The PlayStation 3 (PS3) is the third major console release in Sony's
PlayStation line of game consoles.

The original PlayStation (PS1, or "PSX" for a while until Sony released a
different console with that abbreviation), was a state-of-the-art game console
when it was released back in 1995. It featured a 32-bit MIPS CPU, a 3D-capable
GPU, and a 300 kB/s (double-speed) CD-ROM drive. It was very popular with
developers, and many third-parties released games exclusively for the console.

The PlayStation 2 (PS2), released in 2000 in Japan and North America, and 2001
elsewhere, was a massive improvement over the original console. With the
addition of a DVD drive and a better CPU and GPU, and many blockbuster
exclusive games, the PS2 is the highest selling game console ever. However, it
was the most underpowered console of its generation, with the worst graphic and
sound processors, and Sony was rather late with adding network capabilities.

The PlayStation X (PSX) was a PS2 that also had DVR capabilities. It was only
released in Japan, and sold poorly. It used a new UI called the "Cross-Media
Bar", or XMB, that would later appear in the PS3 and other Sony products.

The PlayStation Portable (PSP) is essentially a shrunk-down PS2 using UMD
instead of DVD.

The PS3 was superseded by the PlayStation 4 (PS4), which launched in the fall
of 2013 in North America, and the winter of 2014 in Japan.


* 1.2 - WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE PS3 AND PS2? *
***********************************************************

Here are the things the PS3 has that the PS2 does not:
* Blu-ray disc support, including Blu-ray movies
* Trendy slot-loading drive rather than the PS2's late-'90s-style
  tray-loading drive
* Far superior CPU and GPU, and one less vector unit
* Universal progressive scan and HD video support (many PS2 games did not
  support progressive scan, and only one game, "Gran Turismo 4", supported
  HD video)
* Universal HD audio support (only a few PS2 games had HD audio support, and
  many of them only used pre-compressed Dolby Digital audio)
* Built-in Bluetooth and Wi-Fi support
* Digital video support via HDMI output
* USB 2 support (the PS2 supported USB 1 only)
* Support for card readers and USB drives (only a few PS3s have built-in card
  readers, but all PS3s support USB-based card readers)
* Support for separation of multiple users using profiles
* New and improved UI, the Cross-Media Bar (XMB), with customizable themes
* New wireless controller that is motion-sensitive
* Parental controls for games
* Standard built-in hard disk that uses Serial ATA
* PlayStation Network support
* PlayStation Store with downloadable games
* Games & system that can auto-update over the network
* Built-in social networking game, "Home"
* Trophy achievements system
* Built-in Web browser
* Streaming media from networked computers using UPnP, with support for most
  MPEG formats as well as DivX
* Photo browser
* SACD support (only on very early model PS3s)
* PlayStation Move controller

There have been a few other improvements to existing features:
* The DVD player is overall much better on the PS3
* The PS3 supports upscan video conversion of PS1 and PS2 games

There were a few features on the PS2 that were taken out of the PS3, with
generally little consequence:
* FireWire support (Sony calls FireWire "i.LINK", and this was also removed
  from the slim PS2s)
* Fast disc reading in PS1 games (which often didn't work)
* PCMCIA support (which was only present in the Japanese launch PS2s)
* Ports for PS1 and PS2 controllers
* Ports for PS1 and PS2 memory cards (there is a USB-based card reader that
  adds this feature back)
* GNU/Linux support (this, too, was not possible in the slim PS2s)
* Dial-up modem support (which can be added back using connection sharing)
* The back-door code that circumvented parental controls for DVDs


* 1.3 - WHY SHOULD I BUY A PS3 ANYWAY? *
****************************************

Since the PS3 was released, the #1 complaint about the console has been its
cost. But the price of the PS3 isn't really a bad deal when you realize what
you're getting. The most comparable console of the PS3's generation is the
"Elite" model Xbox 360 (the model with HDMI ports and a large hard disk), and
it still lacks an HD-capable video player and Wi-Fi support (the PS3 has both
in the box). Also, the PS3 has less long-term costs, since online gaming on the
PS3 is free, unlike Microsoft's Xbox Live service.

Here's a brief comparison of the PS3 vs. the Xbox 360:
(PS3 advantages are marked with a +, and disadvantages are marked with a -)
+ Better value for what you get
+ Motion sensitive controls
+ No regional lockout (except for PS1/PS2 games)
+ Blu-ray support (for movies and games)
+ Online gaming is free
+ Standard memory card support (on most models)
+ No need to download "profiles" for backward compatibility
+ Wireless controllers have built-in rechargeable batteries
+ Supports more than just streaming media
+ Supports flash cards and USB drives with no partitioning restrictions
+ Many multi-disc games for the X360 are available on one disc for the PS3
+ The PS3 uses SATA to interface with the hard drive; the X360 uses a
  proprietary interface & requires proprietary drives
+ Bluetooth support
- Xbox Live accounts can be used interchangeably with Windows Live accounts
- Both consoles have an achievements system, but the X360's has been around
  for longer, and so it's supported in more games
- Some X360 games are not available in PS3 versions
- Unlike the X360, the PS3 does not support upscan-converting 720p to 1080i
- The PS3 does not support the rival HD-DVD disc format (which no longer
  matters much now that HD-DVD has been discontinued)
- All X360 games can be installed to the hard drive
- The X360 has official homebrew support (XNA)

And the PS3 vs. the Wii:
+ Support for DVD videos, audio CDs, Blu-ray discs
+ No regional lockout (except for PS1/PS2 games)
+ Existant online gaming network
+ HD video support (and HDMI, too)
+ Digital audio support (AC-3, DTS, TrueHD, etc.)
+ No need for legacy controllers to play retro games
+ Wireless controllers have built-in rechargeable batteries
+ PS1 classics can be played on a PSP; Wii virtual console games can't be
  played on a DS
- More expensive up front than the cheapest Wii model
- Both consoles have avatars (the Wii has Miis, the PS3 has Home avatars),
  but only the Wii's avatars are actually used in games
- Both systems have motion-sensitive controllers, but the Wii's controllers
  have a better implementation of motion-sensitivity
- Some Wii games are not available in PS3 versions (but a surprising amount
  are available in PS2 versions)
- The Wii consumes far less power than the PS3 (which doesn't affect the
  TCO that much, because of the controller batteries issue)


* 1.4 - WHAT KIND OF PS3s HAVE BEEN RELEASED? *
***********************************************

Previous PlayStations displayed their hardware version number on the outside of
the box; it always started with the prefix "SCPH". Typically, PS3s are
identified by the size of the hard drive that originally came with the system,
but they can also be identified by the last few characters of the console
serial number, which are noted in parentheses below.

Here are the PS3s that have been released as of January 2010, in the order in
which they were released:

* 20 GB (CECHBxx)
Availability:               Japan (discontinued in January 2008),
                            North America (discontinued in April 2007)
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      None
USB Ports:                  4
PS2 Backward Compatibility: Hardware
SACD Support:               Yes
GNU/Linux Support:          Not anymore

This PS3 model was available at launch in Japan and North America. Contrary to
early media reports, this model did have an HDMI port, but it did not have any
card readers or Wi-Fi support. Not too surprisingly, no one bought it.

* 60 GB (CECHAxx)
Availability:               Japan (discontinued in January 2008),
                            North America (discontinued in July 2007)
Card Readers:               CompactFlash, SD, Memory Stick
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  4
PS2 Backward Compatibility: Hardware
SACD Support:               Yes
GNU/Linux Support:          Not anymore

This PS3 model was also available at the Japanese and North American launch; a
slightly different version of this console was available at the European launch
(see below). Unlike the 20 GB model, the 60 GB model had Wi-Fi and card readers
for SD and Sony Memory Stick cards. A lot of hardcore PS3 fans consider this
model to be the best one Sony has released to date, since it had ports for
everything as well as hardware PS2 backward compatibility. It was discontinued
in North America in July 2007, and existing models had their price slashed by
$100. It has since been discontinued elsewhere.

* 60 GB-E (CECHCxx)
Availability:               Europe (discontinued in October 2007),
                            Australia (discontinued in October 2007),
                            New Zealand (discontinued in October 2007),
                            Middle East (discontinued in October 2007),
                            India (discontinued in October 2007),
                            Pakistan (discontinued in October 2007)
Card Readers:               CompactFlash, SD, Memory Stick
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  4
PS2 Backward Compatibility: Software
SACD Support:               Yes
GNU/Linux Support:          Not anymore

This model was the only console available at the European launch. It was the
same as the regular 60 GB PS3, except that Sony removed the "Emotion Engine"
MIPS CPU and included a software EE emulator. Although PS1 backward
compatibility was not touched by this change, the change meant that PS2 games
were no longer 100% backward compatible.

* 80 GB Revision A (CECHExx)
Availability:               South Korea (discontinued in July 2008),
                            North America (discontinued in July 2008)
Card Readers:               CompactFlash, SD, Memory Stick
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  4
PS2 Backward Compatibility: Software
SACD Support:               Yes
GNU/Linux Support:          Not anymore

Originally released in South Korea, this model was also made available in North
America for a while. Other than the larger hard drive, the only changes Sony
made to the hardware is they added IPTV compatibility, and removed hardware PS2
backward compatibility from the Japanese and North American versions of the
console. (The console will still run most PS2 games, but only in software
emulation.)

Originally the game "MotorStorm" was bundled in with this version of the
console, but later consoles came bundled with the game "Metal Gear Solid 4".

* 40 GB (CECHGxx, CECHHxx, CECHJxx)
Availability:               Europe (discontinued in July 2008),
                            Australia (discontinued in July 2008),
                            New Zealand (discontinued in July 2008),
                            Japan (discontinued at some point),
                            North America (discontinued in July 2008)
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          Not anymore

The 40 GB PS3, announced in October 2007, had several hardware components cut
in order to reduce the cost of the model. Although this PS3 still supports more
than 2 player gaming, only 2 USB ports were included. The removal of the memory
card readers means that USB drives are the only means of transferring files
to/from the hard disk.

However, the most notable (and controversial) change was the complete removal
of PS2 backward compatibility, since this PS3 model does not have the PS2's
"Graphics Synthesizer" GPU on board. PS1 games will still work as expected.

THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT: There is a rumor floating around out there that Sony
will add PS2 backward compatibility to this model via a future software update.
THIS RUMOR IS FALSE. Sony has stated that they have no plans to add backward
compatibility to this console **ever**. The PS3 simply does not have the power
to emulate both the PS2's CPU and GPU in software and give users a good game
experience.

The Asian version of this console is available in black and ceramic white.
Rumor has it that the ceramic white version will be released outside of Asia,
but when this was written, there was nothing concrete about this.

The North American version of this console came with the Blu-ray movie
"Spider-Man 3".

The European version of this console had two different bundles available. One
of which (which was not be available in the UK for some reason) contained the
movies "300", "Casino Royale", and "Spider-Man 3", while the other contained
the game "Gran Turismo 5 Prologue".

* 80 GB Revision B (CECHKxx, CECHLxx, CECHMxx)
Availability:               North America (discontinued in September 2009),
                            Europe (discontinued in September 2009),
                            Australia (discontinued in September 2009),
                            New Zealand (discontinued in September 2009),
                            Middle East (discontinued in September 2009),
                            India (discontinued in September 2009),
                            Pakistan (discontinued in September 2009),
                            Japan (discontinued in September 2009)
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          Not anymore

This PS3, first announced at E3 2008, is based on the 40 GB hardware, and just
has a larger hard disk. It's also much cheaper than the previous 80 GB PS3 due
to the amount of features they have removed from the console (mainly PS2
backward compatibility, card readers, and SACD support).

As was the case with the 40 GB model, this model will never have PS2 backward
compatibility added to it, so don't get your hopes up.

The Asian version of this console is available in black, ceramic white, and
silver. All Asian versions of the console come bundled with "Gran Turismo 5
Prologue".

* 160 GB (CECHPxx, CECHQxx)
Availability:               North America (discontinued in September 2009),
                            Europe (discontinued in September 2009)
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          Not anymore

First announced at GC 2008, the 160 GB PS3 is identical to the earlier 40 GB
and 80 GB Rev. B PS3s, except for the size of the hard disk, the bundle-in
software, and the price.

The North American version of this console comes with the games "Uncharted:
Drake's Fortune" and "PAIN".

* 120 GB Slim (CECH-20xxA)
Availability:               North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand,
                            Middle East, India, Pakistan, Japan (discontinued
                            July 2010)
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          No

This model is the first of the "slim" PS3s that has a lower price and uses less
power than earlier PS3 models. Sorry, there's still no PS2 backward
compatibility. Also, Sony removed GNU/Linux support from this model to save
money.

* 250 GB Slim (CECH-20xxB)
Availability:               Japan, North America, Europe, Australia, New
                            Zealand
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          No

This model is the same as the earlier slim model, except for the hard disk size
and the bundle-ins. The European version either comes with the game "Uncharted
2: Among Thieves", or the BDs "The Dark Knight" and "X-Men Origins: Wolverine".

* 250 GB Slim (Final Fantasy XIII Lighting Edition) (CECH-20xxB)
Availability:               Japan
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          No

This model is the same as the regular 250 GB model, except that it comes only
in ceramic white with a graphic of "Final Fantasy XIII" main character
Lightning. Also, the game "Final Fantasy XIII" is bundled with the console.

* 160 GB Slim (CECH-25xxA)
Availability:               Japan, North America, Europe, Australia, New
                            Zealand
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          No

This model is pretty much the same as the 120 GB model above, except for the
larger hard drive, and the availability of white & blue case colors in addition
to the charcoal black color.

* 320 GB Slim (CECH-25xxB)
Availability:               Japan, North America, Europe, Australia, New
                            Zealand
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          No

This model is pretty much the same as the 120 GB model above, except for the
much larger hard drive. The Playstation Move & Eye were bundled with this
console in North America.

* 320 GB Slim Revision B (CECH-3xxxB)
Availability:               Japan
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          No

Same as the 320 GB model, except that it is slightly lighter, and it consumes
slightly less power. Some consoles come bundled with the game "Tales of Xillia
X."

* 250/500/12 GB Super Slim (CECH-4xxxA/B/C)
Availability:               Japan, North America, Europe, Australia, New
                            Zealand
Card Readers:               None
Wi-Fi:                      802.11b/g
USB Ports:                  2
PS2 Backward Compatibility: None
SACD Support:               No
GNU/Linux Support:          No

This model is even smaller than the previous slim PS3s, and other than the
size, the only other hardware difference was the slot-loading Blu-ray drive was
replaced with a tray-loading drive. In Japan only, this console is available
with a white case instead of the usual black case. The 12 GB model has a flash
drive instead of a traditional magnetic hard drive, and is not sold in North
America or Japan.

Some of the North American consoles come bundled with the games "Uncharted 3:
Drake's Deception," "Assassin's Creed III," or "Dust 514."


* 1.5 - DOES THE PS3 HAVE A REGIONAL LOCKOUT? *
***********************************************

It depends on the media.

All PS1 and PS2 games have a regional lockout, and will not play on PS3
consoles released outside of their regions. This means that, for example,
Japanese versions of PS2 games will not run in a North American PS3.

To date, all PS3 disc-based games have no regional lockout. Every now and then,
software will show up on the PlayStation Store that has a regional lockout, but
it is usually there by accident (this happened to the demo version of
"Uncharted: Drake's Fortune").

DVD and Blu-ray discs use a separate regional lockout and may not play in PS3s
released outside of their regions. To date, very few Blu-ray discs use the
regional lockout feature. DVDs are another story...


* 1.6 - DOES THE PS3 HAVE PARENTAL CONTROLS? *
**********************************************

The PS3 has parental controls for DVD and Blu-ray movies, PS1 classics (but
_not_ disc-based games), PS3 games, and downloaded movies & trailers. It does
not have parental controls for PS2 games, or PS1 disc-based games, since both
platforms predate the addition of parental controls to Sony consoles.


* 1.7 - WHAT ARE THE HARDWARE SPECS ON THE PS3? *
*************************************************

CPU:        IBM PowerPC "Cell (Broadband Engine)", 3.2 GHz, 64-bit, 8 cores
            (however, one is disabled in order to increase chip yields &
            reduce marketing costs, and another is reserved by the PS3 OS,
            so 6 cores are available for games, Folding, etc.)
GPU/SPU:    nVidia RSX "Reality Synthesizer", 550 MHz
System RAM: 256 MB

The hard disk, USB, etc. vary from model to model. See 1.4 above for details.


* 1.8 - WHAT I/O PORTS COME WITH THE PS3? *
*******************************************

On the front of the PS3, there are 2-4 USB ports depending on the PS3 model.
All of these ports support USB 2.x ("high-speed USB") and are hot-pluggable.

On the 60 GB and 80 GB Revision A models of the PS3, there are slots on the
front for SD, Memory Stick, and CompactFlash cards. These are used for backing
up and restoring data, as well as importing/exporting pictures, video, etc.
They are hot-pluggable, but it is important to only remove them when they are
not being accessed (their light is blinking).

On the back of the PS3 are ports for HDMI, A/V out, Ethernet, and optical
audio. The HDMI and Ethernet ports are hot-pluggable; the A/V port is not. The
optical port is "hot-pluggable", but since it's fiber-optic instead of
electric, it's not really hot.

There's also a bay for the hard disk on the back. Unlike the PS2, the PS3 will
work with any serial ATA hard disk for laptops (including serial ATA drives
taken from other PS3 consoles!), in addition to the one bundled with the
console. Technically, serial ATA is hot-pluggable, but you should never unplug
a computer's boot volume while it's running, so treat this like it's not
hot-pluggable.

The PS3 also supports Bluetooth (in all models) and Wi-Fi (in all models except
the 20 GB model); obviously there are no ports for them.


* 1.9 - DOES THE PS3 HAVE THE "JAGGIES" PROBLEM THAT PLAGUED THE PS2? *
***********************************************************************

Short answer: No, and "plagued" is too strong a word to describe the problem.

Long answer:

NTSC, PAL, and SECAM all use "interlaced" video frames. That means that,
instead of a display receiving single frames to draw to the screen, it receives
two fields that make up a single frame, and has to lace the two frames
together. (See below for more details about interlaced vs. progressive scan
video.)

The PS2 "jaggies" problem, which was most noticeable in some very early PS2
games, was caused by the console generating a small delay when sending each
field to the screen. Due to the delay, the fields were drawn out of sync, and
the picture had noticeable artifacting, even on low-quality video connections.

The whole thing is water under the bridge now. The problem was corrected by
Sony and third parties on the PS2 side of things years ago. To date, there
haven't been any PS3 games that have had "jaggies" problems, and if you're
seeing any, then the problem is most likely your display, not the PS3.


* 1.10 - WHAT PS3 MODEL SHOULD I BUY? *
***************************************

The only person who has the answer to this question is you. It all really
depends on a few things:

1. Your budget (the PS3s with smaller hard drives and less features are
   cheaper)
2. The importance of PS2 backward compatibility to you
3. The importance of the presence of card readers to you
4. Whether or not you need Wi-Fi support

All PS3 models come with Bluetooth, USB, HDMI, PS1 backward compatibility, and
optical audio support, so you don't need to worry about those features.

Extra hard disk space sounds nice on paper, but don't buy a super large hard
disk if you are not prepared to be able to back up all of the data on the disk.
It is very important that you perform regular backups on your data, because
catastrophic things happen to hard disks all the time without warning. See 8.0
below for details.

If all you care about is the price, then you should get any of the currently
shipping PS3s. Older PS3s can actually be more expensive to buy second-hand,
because they have some hardware features that Sony removed from newer consoles,
most notably PS2 backward compatibility.


* 1.11 - WHAT KIND OF DISCS CAN THE PS3 PLAY? *
***********************************************

All PS3 models can play (though some may be subject to territorial lockouts):
* PS1 games
* PS3 games
* Compact Disc Digital Audio (CD-DA, or "Red Book Audio")
* Video DVDs
* Video Blu-ray discs

Some PS3 models can play (see 1.4 above):
* PS2 games
* Super Audio Compact Discs (SACD)

No PS3 models can play:
* Games for non-Sony consoles (Xbox, X360, Wii, etc.)
* Computer games (for Windows or Mac OS X)
* Video HD-DVDs or CH-DVDs


* 1.12 - WHAT COMES BUNDLED WITH THE PS3? *
*******************************************

All PS3s come with:
* The console itself (of course)
* 1 controller (currently Dual Shock 3; some older console bundles may include
  a SIXAXIS controller instead)
* 1 composite video cable (see 2.2 below for details)
* 1 USB regular size to mini size cable (for the controller)
* 1 AC Adapter cable
* Instruction manuals

Some PS3s come with:
* 1 Ethernet cable
* Bundle-in games
* Bundle-in movies
* 1 HDMI cable
* 1 PlayStation Move controller & PlayStation Eye


* 1.13 - HOLD ON. DID YOU JUST CALL THE PS3 A 64-BIT CONSOLE? *
***************************************************************

Yes, I did. The PS3 has a 64-bit CPU. Actually, the "bit-ness" of a console is
an obsolete method of rating its overall power, and has been since at least
1995, but some old habits are hard to extinguish, so let me explain.

Almost every game console from the last several generations, such as the PS1,
PS2, Xbox, GameCube, Dreamcast, and 3DO Platform, were 32-bit consoles. The
Saturn and Jaguar were 32-bit consoles with two 32-bit CPUs, which did _not_
make them 64-bit consoles. The Nintendo 64 actually did have a 64-bit CPU, but
its inclusion was something of a curiosity, since almost every game made for it
ran in 32-bit mode for performance reasons.

64-bit CPUs have the advantage of supporting very large amounts of memory (16
EB, vs. 4 GB on 32-bit CPUs) and can natively handle integers as large as
2^64-1, but 64-bit software tends to take a performance hit and uses more
memory than if it was running under 32-bit mode. There are CPUs where software
can run faster in 64-bit mode, but the PS3's PowerPC CPU is not one of them.


* 1.14 - I'VE HEARD THE PS3 IS DIFFICULT TO DEVELOP FOR; IS THAT TRUE? *
************************************************************************

This is not a developer-oriented FAQ, but I'm going to bite on this anyway.
Yes, it is difficult, but it's a very different "difficult" than the PS2. Let
me explain.

(DISCLAIMER: I am a developer, but I am not a game developer. I once owned a
PS2 GNU/Linux Kit, however.)

In the world of hardware graphics programming, there are two dominant APIs
(Application Programming Interfaces) for developers to use: DirectX, which is
made and backed by Microsoft, and OpenGL, which is made and backed by everyone
in the industry except for Microsoft.

The PS2 was difficult to develop for because Sony decided to use neither
DirectX or OpenGL, and instead created their own 3D graphics library that
nobody ever used except for Sony. (There was a port of OpenGL available for the
PS2, called "ps2gl", but only a small handful of games used it, since its
performance was worse than Sony's API).

In addition, the PS2 had two vector units, and they were not symmetric (meaning
the software could only command one at a time), and to confuse things further,
one had a direct pipeline to the Graphics Synthesizer GPU and the other didn't.
The PS2 also had some other curious design "features", such as its complete
lack of support for double-precision floating point math in hardware.

In contrast, the PS3 supports OpenGL for graphics, and has only a single vector
unit. All problems solved, right? Right?

Wrong. The PS3 has an astounding 6 CPU cores (called "Synergistic Processing
Elements" or SPEs on the Cell) available to developers, plus one master CPU
core (called the "Power Processing Element" or PPE on the Cell). By contrast,
unless you are using a very high end computer, your computer has only one or
two cores. In order to use more than one of them at the time, the software has
to open up several threads of execution, and have the OS schedule them
accordingly.

Threaded programming is difficult enough on traditional CPUs, where data
structures called "locks" must be used to prevent two threads from modifying
the same region of memory at once. And those locks take a lot of time and
effort to implement. But Cell takes this to a whole new level, because each SPE
cannot access the PS3's main memory, only a small slice of memory that is set
by the PPE. And SPEs cannot schedule tasks on other SPEs; only the PPE can do
that. So the SPEs are mainly used by programmers to do one-off calculations,
similar to the use of the PS2's vector units.

The X360 also has a multi-core CPU, but the X360's CPU uses a more traditional
three-core architecture where every core can access the main memory and
schedule tasks on other cores. This makes programming on the X360 somewhat
easier, although multi-threading is still necessary in order to get the most
out of the CPU. Also, the X360 uses DirectX instead of OpenGL, and DirectX is
the dominant API in the world of Windows gaming, so many game developers are
more familiar with it than OpenGL.

Then there are the other little "features" of the PowerPC CPU that developers
have to code around. For example, the PowerPC has no built-in instructions for
converting between fixed-point and floating-point numbers, so this has to be
done in software by the compiler, which impacts performance somewhat.


* 1.15 - WHY DID PEOPLES' PS3s QUIT WORKING ON MARCH 1, 2010? *
***************************************************************

The PS3 uses a real-time clock controller that is always running, even if the
PS3 is off or unplugged. Unfortunately, almost all of the non-slim PS3s that
have been shipped have a buggy controller chip that thinks that 2010 is a leap
year. (Of course, it is not.) As a result, the real-time clock clashed with the
rest of the system, which knew that 2010 is not a leap year, and the system
clock failed. The lack of a functioning system clock caused many systems that
depend on a working clock to fail, such as trophies, the PlayStation Network,
parental controls, and rental movies.

Since the PS3's system clock internally uses GMT/UTC, this bug can trigger
between February 28 and March 2, depending on where you live.

The problem was fixed in a firmware update that came out after the incident, so
if you have the latest firmware installed, it should never happen again.

Note that this problem does not affect the slim PS3s that have been on sale
since 2009, and that the PS3 does not make a habit out of screwing up its
internal clock, so this is _not_ a good reason to avoid buying a PS3. Don't be
a hater, don't believe the haters.


* 1.16 - HAS THE PS3 REGRESSED SINCE ITS LAUNCH? *
**************************************************

Yes. For cost-control and sometimes security reasons (read onward into this FAQ
for details), Sony has removed several features of the PS3 since the launch.
However, at the same time, they have added several features that were not
present at launch.

Here are some of the PS3 features that have been added since launch:
+ Force feedback support
+ Trophies
+ PlayStation Home, a small built-in MMO game
+ Video downloads and rentals
+ PlayStation Move
+ Ability to access the XMB in-game
+ DTS-HD support
+ Many new Blu-ray profiles
+ Less power consumption (at the hardware level, starting with slim models)
+ Better power management

And here are the features Sony has removed:
- PS2 backward compatibilty (at the hardware level, so it's still supported
  if the hardware necessary to play PS2 games is present)
- Built-in memory card readers (also at the hardware level)
- Extra USB ports
- GNU/Linux support
- SACD support
- Firmware on a flash drive (slim models boot off the hard drive instead)

Except for PS2 backward compatibility and GNU/Linux support, most of the above
regressions are not very big deals. After all, when was the last time you ever
played an SACD?


* 2.0 - VIDEO DISPLAYS AND THE PS3 *
************************************


* 2.1 - WHAT ARE ALL OF THESE VIDEO ACRONYMS? *
***********************************************

Here's a brief explanation of all the videophile terminology that will be used
in the FAQ up ahead.

SDTV:
SDTV stands for "Standard Definition Television" and it refers to legacy TV
standards. There were three competing SDTV picture standards, which also
doubled as SD broadcast standards: NTSC (used in most of the Americas and in
some places in Asia), SECAM (used in France, Russia, and former colonies of
both), and PAL (used just about everywhere else in the world).

NTSC:
NTSC stands for "National Television Standard Committee" and is the original
television standard. NTSC ran at a resolution of 640x480 interlaced pixels with
a refresh rate of 60 Hz. Originally NTSC only supported black and white images,
but color support was later retro-fitted into the standard.

PAL:
PAL stands for "Phase Altering Line" and was created after color support was
added to the NTSC standard. PAL ran at a resolution of 640x576 interlaced
pixels with a refresh rate of 50 Hz, and its main advantage over NTSC was the
tint of the picture never needed to be adjusted.

SECAM:
SECAM stands for "SÉquentiel Couleur À Mémoire" and was a superior broadcasting
format to NTSC and PAL. Since most TV sets that support SECAM also support PAL
(and some also support NTSC), very few (if any) games were made for this
format.

HDTV:
HDTV stands for "High Definition Television" and replaces the old NTSC, PAL,
and SECAM picture standards. On broadcast HDTV signals (which have nothing to
do with the PS3), the audio is compressed using AC-3 compression (more on audio
later), and video is compressed using one of the MPEG codecs. The main
advantages HDTV has over SDTV is it supports progressive-scan video in addition
to interlaced video, and it supports much higher resolutions and different
aspect ratios.

Interlaced Video:
In order to conserve bandwidth over a limited-bandwidth connection, an
interlaced video scheme sends two images containing a single frame of video to
the display, one after the other, with one image containing half of the
vertical lines of video, and the second image containing the other half. The
display then puts them back together before displaying the full frame. Although
this reduces the bandwidth used, the picture is not as good, because sometimes
the frames come out of sync, giving the picture noticeable video artifacting.
(PS2 owners know the effect as "the jaggies".) The maximum frame rate of
interlaced video is 60 frames/second.

Progressive Scan Video:
Progressive scan video schemes send a single image containing the frame to the
display. It takes twice the bandwidth of interlaced video, but the image is
much sharper and does not suffer from any artifacts brought about by
interlacing frames. The maximum frame rate of progressive scan video is 30
frames/second.

4:3:
4:3 is the standard aspect ratio used by NTSC TV, and is also the standard
aspect ratio on non-widescreen computer monitors. (An aspect ratio refers to
the number of number of horizontal pixels per vertical pixel.)

16:9:
16:9 is the most common widescreen aspect ratio used in HDTV sets. (Most
widescreen computer monitors are actually 16:10; see below for details.) Most
of the time, when a game or DVD says it supports "widescreen", it really means
16:9 support.

16:10:
16:10 is the second most common widescreen aspect ratio. It is very rarely seen
on TV sets, but is very common in widescreen computer monitors, mainly because
16:10 resolutions are more backward-compatible with 4:3 aspect content. Also,
16:10 is very close to the Inverse Golden Ratio (about 1.618:1), much closer
than any other display aspect ratio. Many 16:10 displays support letterboxing
16:9 video so it doesn't look stretched.

XXXXi/p:
This refers to the resolution of the picture. The XXXX refers to the number of
vertical lines in the picture, while "i" stands for interlaced and "p" stands
for progressive scan. Typical resolutions are 480i/p, 576i/p, 720p, and
1080i/p.

CRT:
CRT stands for "Cathode Ray Tube" and is the original TV display technology.
CRT technology is time-tested and cheap, but CRT-based TV sets are big and
heavy, susceptible to radio interference, and their image quality tends to
degrade over time. CRTs are also susceptible to permanent burn-in, which occurs
when an image is displayed on the monitor for long periods of time, causing a
"ghost" of that image to be permanently burned into the screen.

LCD:
LCD stands for "Liquid Crystal Display" and is the original alternative to the
CRT for displaying images on a screen. LCDs were once expensive, but their
prices have dropped dramatically, and their capabilities have increased equally
dramatically, since they were introduced in the 1970s. LCDs are digital, and
although they are susceptible to burn-in, the burn-in is temporary and will go
away shortly after it occurs. The problem with LCDs is they cannot display the
color black correctly.

Plasma:
Plasma TVs are similar to LCDs, except that they are far better at displaying
black and other dark colors. However, they are more expensive than other TV
types, and use far more power. Also, unlike LCDs, they are susceptible to
permanent burn-in.

RPD:
RPD stands for "Rear Projection Display". These displays give the best possible
image size, but they're expensive, and they're the most susceptible to burn-in.

OLED:
OLED is a next-generation LCD-like display technology that attempts to solve
the biggest problem with LCD, which is their inability to display black
correctly. Right now OLED screens are rare and expensive, though this will most
likely change in the future.

Anamorphic Widescreen:
An "anamorphic" film is a film that was shot on standard 35mm film, with a lens
that compressed the picture horizontally, so that the photography fit a
widescreen aspect ratio (typically 1.86:1). (Movies shot on 70mm film can be
anamorphic as well, but to date, only one Hollywood movie, "Ben-Hur", was
filmed this way.) Anamorphism is a motion picture thing that does not affect
in-game graphics.


* 2.2 - WHAT VIDEO CABLES ARE SUPPORTED BY THE PS3? *
*****************************************************

Here they are, listed in rough order of video quality:

* RFU
Supported Resolutions: 480i (NTSC), 576i (PAL/SECAM)
Supported Audio Types: Mono
Picture Quality:       Worst

RFU, or coaxial video, is the one universal method of getting video into a TV
set. It is also the worst, because the limited bandwidth being used to display
a full picture as well as audio severely degrades the quality of both, and it
is very susceptible to radio interference. Although many TVs only support RFU
input, I strongly recommend against playing PS3 games on RFU-only TVs.
Seriously, a lot of the video will be unrecognizable, and even if you can see
things on the screen, you're missing out on a lot of the experience.

If you must use an RFU adapter, do pay attention to the channel used by the
adapter. Most people will want to use channel 3, but for some, channel 4 will
provide a better picture. Your mileage may vary.


* Composite
Supported Resolutions: 480i (NTSC), 576i (PAL/SECAM)
Supported Audio Types: Mono, Stereo, DPL1, DPL2
Picture Quality:       Bad

Composite video, also sometimes known as RCA video because RCA (now General
Electric) developed the plug type used by composite video, is a step up from
RFU video. It is nearly universal in SDTV sets, although a number of low-end
and cheap SDTVs don't support it. Composite video provides better quality audio
and video than RFU, since it splits the audio and video into separate channels,
allowing more bandwidth for video. Also, composite video is not as susceptible
to interference as RFU. However, since it delivers all of the video in a single
bandwidth-limited channel, the quality is not that great.

The PS3 comes with a composite video cable. Still, I would not recommend this
video type if you have access to a display with better input types.


* S-Video
Supported Resolutions: 480i (NTSC), 576i (PAL/SECAM)
Supported Audio Types: Mono, Stereo, DPL1, DPL2
Picture Quality:       OK

S-Video is a huge step up in video quality over composite video. Like composite
video, S-Video puts the video signal into a single cable, but that cable splits
the chroma (color) and luma (brightness) into two separate pins, which greatly
increases the picture quality due to the higher bandwidth availability.

S-Video is universally supported by all PS1, PS2, and PS3 games. However, some
PS1 games, particularly "Wipeout", look ugly in S-Video (or better connections)
because they include video artifacts that the developers thought no one would
notice, since in the early days of the PS1 almost everyone used RFU or
composite video.

Note that S-Video support is rapidly disappearing from modern displays, because
it is not as ubiquitous as composite video and nowhere near as good as
component or digital video. Still, S-Video is the minimum recommended (by me)
video cable type for playing PS2 and PS3 games.


* Component (Y/Pr/Pb)
Supported Resolutions: 480i/p, 576i/p, 720p, 1080i/p
                       (support varies by display; not all displays support
                       720p or 1080p)
                       (also note: some newer games will not run at 1080p over
                       component video even if your display supports it)
Supported Audio Types: Mono, Stereo, DPL1, DPL2
Picture Quality:       Great

Component video is a big step up over S-Video, since it separates the chroma
into two separate video color components - luma (Y), the difference between
blue and luma (Pb), and the difference between red and luma (Pr) - and provides
a big bandwidth boost for one of the sharpest-looking analog video types
around. In addition, component video supports multiple resolutions as well as
progressive scan video. Its biggest problem is it only synchronizes vertically
with the display, so the horizontal aspect ratio of the picture has to be set
on the display (unless you don't mind the compressed or stretched picture).

Component (Y/Pb/Pr) video ports are universal on HDTV sets that were made in
the 1990s and 2000s. Also, a handful of computer monitors made during the same
time period have component video ports, usually in addition to VGA or DVI
ports. Starting in 2011, component video ports will become increasingly rare,
because the content companies consider component video to be a security hole
because the signal is not encrypted, making video piracy somewhat easier.


* D-Terminal
Supported Resolutions: 480i/p, 720p, 1080i/p
                       (support varies by display)
Supported Audio Types: Mono, Stereo, DPL1, DPL2
Picture Quality:       Great

D-Terminal is a type of video connector that is used exclusively in Japan. It
carries a component video signal in a single cable, but is otherwise no
different than the three cable connectors used in the rest of the world.


* SCART
Supported Resolutions: Varies
Supported Audio Types: Mono, Stereo, DPL1, DPL2
Picture Quality:       Varies

SCART is a European standard for analog video that originated in France, and is
rarely spotted outside Europe. A SCART connection can carry either Composite,
S-Video, or Component video, so the quality really depends on what the display
supports.

IMPORTANT: DVD and Blu-ray playback may not be possible on SCART connections
because SCART traditionally defeats the Macrovision encoding of video signals
intended to defeat casual piracy.


* VGA (RGBHV)
Supported Resolutions: 480p, 576p, 720p, 1080p (support varies by display)
Supported Audio Types: Mono, Stereo, DPL1, DPL2
Picture Quality:       Excellent

VGA stands for "Video Graphics Array" and is a slight step up from component
video. It is very common on computer monitors, and is present on some HDTV sets
as well. Like component video, VGA splits the video signal into separate
components. Unlike component video, VGA uses only a single video cable, it
supports both vertical and horizontal synchronization (so the user doesn't have
to manually adjust the monitor's aspect ratio), and it only supports
progressive scan signals.

VGA ports are sometimes identified as "RGB" on some displays.

VGA cables for the PS3 are quite rare. Sony once made an official VGA cable for
the PS2, but it was only bundled with the Linux Kit, it only supported monitors
that supported "sync on green" synchronization (the majority of which are,
surprise surprise, Sony monitors), and it only really worked with Linux (it
unofficially worked with other games that supported progressive scan). Most
"VGA boxes" for the PlayStation consoles are nothing more than upscan
converters, that take S-Video or some other video type, and convert it to VGA.
Blaze Gear was the only company that made a true VGA cable for the PS2 that
actually worked. I have no idea how well it works with the PS3.


* DVI
Supported Resolutions: 480p, 576p, 720p, 1080p (support varies by display)
Supported Audio Types: None
Picture Quality:       Perfect

DVI stands for "Digital Visual Interface" and is a common digital video
standard. It is similar to HDMI, the PS3's native digital output type, except
that its bandwidth is limited, and it can't carry audio at all.

The PS3 can output DVI if you use a HDMI-to-DVI adapter, but if you do this,
you won't get any sound unless you use a separate optical audio cable. This is
because DVI does not support carrying audio signals at all.

DVI can carry both digital and analog signals. Some DVI displays only accept
one or the other. Since the only way to get the PS3 to use DVI is to use an
HDMI-to-DVI adapter, the signal will only be digital, so this will not work
with older DVI monitors that only supported analog signals.

IMPORTANT: The PS3 may not work with DVI monitors that do not support HDCP
("High Definition Content Protection"). No DVI monitors made prior to 2004
support HDCP.


* DisplayPort
Supported Resolutions: 480p, 576p, 720p, 1080p (support varies by display)
Supported Audio Types: Mono, Stereo, DPL1, DPL2, AC-3, DTS, TrueHD, DTS-HD
Picture Quality:       Perfect

DisplayPort is similar to DVI, except that it carries only digital signals, and
it has much higher bandwidth, allowing DisplayPort to support displays that are
taller than 30". DisplayPort support is rare to nonexistent on TV sets, but it
is becoming increasingly popular among computer monitor makers, because they
can support it royalty-free, whereas HDMI compliance costs money.

Like DVI, the PS3 does not support DisplayPort natively, but you should be able
to use an HDMI-to-DisplayPort adapter to connect the PS3 to a display using
DisplayPort. Your adapter and cables _must_ be compliant with DisplayPort 1.1a
or later, or you won't be able to get audio or video. Also, your monitor must
support HDCP as well. (A few older DisplayPort monitors didn't support HDCP.)


* HDMI
Supported Resolutions: 480p, 576p, 720p, 1080p (support varies by display)
Supported Audio Types: Mono, Stereo, DPL1, DPL2, AC-3, DTS, TrueHD, DTS-HD
Picture Quality:       Perfect

HDMI stands for "High Definition Multimedia Interface" and is, for better or
for worse, the future of digital video, alongside rival technology DisplayPort.
HDMI's main advantages over DVI is HDMI has much greater bandwidth (DVI doesn't
provide very much bandwidth), carries up to 7.1 channel audio (DVI doesn't
carry audio signals), and is able to drive displays that are taller than about
30" (due to the higher bandwidth). Like VGA and DVI, HDMI supports multiple
resolutions, and synchronizes both horizontally and vertically. HDMI replaces
the older DVI standard and the analog video types.

HDMI controversially uses HDCP to encrypt the data between the console and the
display, but this is less problematic than it is with DVI, since pretty much
every display that supports HDMI also supports HDCP.

Since HDMI is digital, its picture quality is just as good as the display.
Having a more expensive cable will _not_ affect picture quality. The reason is
because digital signals cannot degrade; you either get everything or you get
nothing.


* 2.3 - CAN I USE MY PS1 OR PS2 VIDEO CABLE(S) WITH THE PS3? *
**************************************************************

Yes. The PS3 uses the same video plug as the PS1 and PS2, so you can bring over
your video cables from your old console if you have any.


* 2.4 - WHY DOES MY TV IMAGE BOUNCE WHEN I CONNECT MY PS3 TO IT? *
******************************************************************

You must have an older Zenith TV. Earlier Sony consoles would output video in a
way that was incompatible with Zenith TVs, which caused the TV to freak out and
start bouncing the image around the screen. Later Zenith TVs fixed the problem,
and Sony would modify affected users' consoles to correct the problem. It is
not clear as to whether this still occurs with the PS3, but if you see this
behavior, then now you know... Anyway, contact Sony and explain the situation;
your PS3 may require a slight tweak.


* 2.5 - WHY IS MY VIDEO SCRAMBLED WHILE WATCHING A DVD? *
*********************************************************

You've most likely stumbled upon the Macrovision encoding that is present in
almost all commercial DVDs. Macrovision is designed to scramble a picture if
you have a DVD player connected to a VCR.

The solution is to never connect a PS3 to a VCR; always connect it either
directly to a TV or to a video switch box.


* 2.6 - WHAT SHOULD I LOOK FOR WHEN CHOOSING A DISPLAY FOR MY PS3? *
********************************************************************

While it is possible to connect a PS3 to an SDTV set, you're missing out on
half of the fun of owning a PS3 if you do that. The PS3 was built from the
ground up for HDTV. Still, if you absolutely must play the PS3 on an SDTV set,
then at the least, make sure it supports S-Video. PS3 games look terrible on
composite and RFU displays.

If you do have an HDTV set, then make sure it supports a wide variety of
resolutions. Some PS3 games only support 720p, such as "Resistance: Fall of
Man", and some older HDTV sets don't support 720p, meaning the game will only
run at 480i/p on those sets. Unlike the Xbox 360, the PS3 does not support
upscan-converting 720p to 1080i within PS3 games.

You most certainly can hook your PS3 up to a computer monitor if you'd like.
Computer monitors tend to be smaller than many peoples' TV sets, but they have
much better resolution at those smaller sizes. Usually you'd connect the PS3 to
the monitor using either an HDMI->DVI or VGA cable, although some monitors also
support HDMI or component video. The one caveat about using a monitor for a
display is most widescreen computer monitors have a 16:10 aspect ratio, while
widescreen games typically use a 16:9 ratio, so you want to make sure you set
your monitor's ratio correctly or else you'll get a stretched picture.

CRT, LCD, Plasma, or RPD? There is no best answer to this; it is more of a
personal preference decision. But if you are going to use any display type
other than LCD, then make sure you turn on the PS3's built-in screen saver.
Also, if you are going to use an RPD, then I would strongly recommend avoiding
playing marathon-length games that display static image(s) on the screen for
hours at a time.


* 2.7 - CAN I PLAY "PAL" GAMES ON AN "NTSC" PS3/TV, OR VICE VERSA? *
********************************************************************

Yes, as long as you're using an HDTV and a component cable or better video
connection. As mentioned in 1.5 above, PS3 games do not have territorial
lockouts. And PAL/NTSC conversions of games, which were once necessary back in
the days when screen resolutions and refresh rates were hard-coded into
software, are now things of the past. However, not many games support both 480i
and 576i on the same disc, so if you're not using HD, then you'll have
considerably less luck.

Note that this doesn't apply to PS1 or PS2 games, which do have a territorial
lockout and often did have to be converted to one format or the other.


* 2.8 - WHY DOES MY GAME THAT SUPPOSEDLY SUPPORTS 1080i/p ALWAYS START *
*       UP USING 720p?                                                 *
************************************************************************

Let me let you in on a dirty little secret of the PS3: Almost all PS3 games
that advertise 1080p support on the back of the box actually run at 720p
internally and are upscan-converted to 1080p as the rendered picture is sent to
the display. Only a small handful of PS3 games actually run internally and
externally at full 1080p. The games that upscan 720p to 1080p do it for
performance reasons.

A number of older PS3 games, such as "Resistance: Fall of Man," were brutally
honest about their resolution support, and didn't support 1080p at all. Others,
like "Grand Theft Auto IV," preferred running at their native 720p resolution
and wouldn't upscan to 1080p unless 720p resolution was disabled in the system
settings.

Although you could always disable 720p support to force games to upscan, it's
probably best not to do this, since it'll make games that don't support 1080p
fall back on SD resolution. Anyway, the PS4 mostly solves this problem, as the
more powerful GPU allows developers to make games that run at native 1080p.


* 3.0 - AUDIO SPEAKERS AND THE PS3 *
************************************


* 3.1 - WHAT AUDIO TYPES ARE SUPPORTED BY THE PS3? *
****************************************************

* Monaural, aka Mono
Supported Video Cables: All except DVI
Optical Cable:          Yes
Channels:               1
PS1:                    Universal but not recommended
PS2:                    Universal but not recommended
PS3:                    Universal but not recommended
DVD:                    Universal
Blu-ray:                Universal

If you're using an RFU adapter to connect your PS3 to a TV, then this is the
audio type you're getting. All audio is placed into a single audio channel. All
PS1, PS2, and PS3 games support mono sound, but a lot of games deliver a much
better experience with more audio channels.


* Stereo
Supported Video Cables: All except RFU and DVI
Optical Cable:          Yes
Channels:               2
PS1:                    Universal
PS2:                    Universal
PS3:                    Universal
DVD:                    Universal
Blu-ray:                Universal

Stereo sound splits the audio channels into left and right channels, for a
somewhat better game experience than mono audio. Stereo sound is supported by
all PS1, PS2, and PS3 games.


* Dolby Surround, aka Dolby Pro Logic 1
Supported Video Cables: All except RFU and DVI
Optical Cable:          Yes
Channels:               4
PS1:                    Supported by some games
PS2:                    No
PS3:                    No
DVD:                    No
Blu-ray:                No

Dolby Pro Logic 1 (DPL1) is the original analog surround sound codec. Using the
same two analog audio cables used by stereo sound connections, DPL1 has four
distinct channels - front left, front center, front right, and surround (rear).
The main problem with DPL1 is there is a small amount of "bleeding" between two
channels. However, except for audiophiles with very high quality stereo
systems, most users won't notice it.

Just about every PS1 game made by Electronic Arts, and some other PS1 games,
support DPL1. Also, DPL2 is backward-compatible with DPL1, so if you have a
surround sound stereo that only supports one or the other, then don't fret (too
much).


* Dolby Pro Logic 2
Supported Video Cables: All except RFU and DVI
Optical Cable:          Yes
Channels:               5.1
PS1:                    No (but DPL1 games will work in DPL2 mode)
PS2:                    Supported by some games
PS3:                    Not sure?
DVD:                    No
Blu-ray:                No

Dolby Pro Logic 2 (DPL2) is similar to DPL1, except that it adds a subwoofer
channel and a second rear channel. Dolby Labs made this codec specifically for
the PS2 generation of video game consoles, so many PS2 games that support
surround sound use DPL2.


* AC-3, aka Dolby Digital 5.1
Supported Video Cables: HDMI and DisplayPort
Optical Cable:          Yes
Channels:               1-5.1 (usually 1, 2, 2.1, or 5.1)
PS1:                    No
PS2:                    See note below (448 Kb/s)
PS3:                    Universal
DVD:                    Universal (448 Kb/s)
Blu-ray:                Universal (640 Kb/s)

AC-3 is the world's most common digital audio codec. It works by compressing
modulated audio blocks and sending the compressed audio over a digital link to
a digital receiver, which decodes and plays the audio. AC-3 supports 5.1
channel audio - front left, front center, front right, rear left, rear right,
and subwoofer. Since it is digital, there is no bleeding between speakers.

Other than HDMI, AC-3 audio is generally supported over the PS3's optical audio
cable. (In other words, the analog audio cables cannot carry AC-3 audio.) The
PS3 uses a standard S/PDIF ("Sony/Phillips Digital InterFace") optical cable,
which is the most common type of digital audio cable.

No PS1 games support AC-3 audio. A small handful of PS2 games support AC-3
audio, such as "Metal Gear Solid 2" and "Xenosaga II", but most PS2 games that
support AC-3 audio only play AC-3 audio clips during cutscenes, since the PS2
did not have the horsepower to do on-the-fly AC-3 compression.

The PS3 has full hardware AC-3 audio compression support, so all PS3 games will
use AC-3 audio at a minimum when either an HDMI or optical audio cable is
plugged into the console.

On the DVD and Blu-ray side of things, AC-3 support is universal in commercial
videos, since it is required by the standard.

AC-3 support is also universal in commercial digital stereos.


* DTS, aka DTS Coherent Acoustics
Supported Video Cables: HDMI and DisplayPort
Optical Cable:          Yes
Channels:               1-5.1 (usually 5.1)
PS1:                    No
PS2:                    Supported by a handful of games (1.5 Mb/s)
PS3:                    Supported by a handful of games (1.5 Mb/s)
DVD:                    Supported by some movies (1.5 Mb/s)
Blu-ray:                Universal, supposedly (1.5 Mb/s)

DTS stands for "Digital Theater System" and it is a direct competitor to AC-3.
DTS uses a less aggressive compression algorithm, and some audiophiles prefer
the sound of DTS audio over AC-3.

No PS1 games support DTS audio. Since DTS is less CPU-intensive to compress
than AC-3, a small handful of PS2 games support real-time DTS compression, such
as "Grand Theft Auto: Vice City" and many EA Sports titles.

Also, some PS3 games, mainly (surprise) Electronic Arts games, support
real-time DTS compression in addition to AC-3 compression, and will prefer DTS
over AC-3 if you turned on DTS in your audio settings.

On the DVD side of things, some DVD video discs support DTS, while most don't.
On the Blu-ray side of things, all Blu-ray discs are required to have a DTS
audio track.

Support for DTS in commercial digital stereos is a bit of a toss-up. Roughly
half of them out there support it, and half of them only support AC-3. DTS-only
digital stereos are exceedingly rare (do they even exist?).

VERY IMPORTANT: DO NOT enable DTS audio in a video game unless you are 100%
sure that your digital stereo supports DTS. Since many digital stereo systems
do not support DTS, it is possible to damage the stereo (not to mention your
ears!) if you enable DTS support in a game on a non-supporting stereo.


* Dolby TrueHD 7.1
Supported Video Cables: HDMI and DisplayPort
Optical Cable:          No
Channels:               1-7.1
PS1:                    No
PS2:                    No
PS3:                    Universal?
DVD:                    No
Blu-ray:                Supported by some movies

TrueHD is the same as AC-3, except that it is lossless, and it has two more
channels - left center and right center. This is the best possible audio type,
but it requires an HDMI cable, since optical cables don't have the bandwidth to
support TrueHD.

To get TrueHD (or DTS-HD) output, you need an HDMI 1.3 or later cable that
specifically supports HD audio. All older cables, and some newer cables, cannot
carry HD audio signals.

Obviously no PS1 or PS2 games support TrueHD. DVDs also do not use TrueHD; only
some Blu-ray movies use it.


* DTS-HD
Supported Video Cables: HDMI and DisplayPort
Optical Cable:          No
Channels:               1-7.1
PS1:                    No
PS2:                    No
PS3:                    Are there any yet?
DVD:                    No
Blu-ray:                Supported by some movies

DTS-HD is a 7.1 channel, lossless version of DTS Coherent Acoustics. From an
end-user's perspective, it is more or less the same as TrueHD, including how it
requires an HDMI cable to work.

DTS-HD support had to be added in a firmware update, so if you don't see a menu
option to turn it on, then you need to update your PS3's firmware.


* 3.2 - WHAT SHOULD I LOOK FOR WHEN CHOOSING A STEREO FOR MY PS3? *
*******************************************************************

If you don't have a lot to spend, then at the bare minimum, any 2.1 speaker
sound system ought to be enough. Many popular PS2 and PS3 games make strategic
use of multi-channel sound effects, such as "Metal Gear Solid 3", so playing
the game with mono sound actually puts you at a big disadvantage.

If you have a little more to spend, then you ought to consider a 5.1 channel
system. You'll want AC-3/Dolby Digital support with at least one S/PDIF input
port. DTS support is nice but not necessary unless you're a true audiophile or
you regularly play the handful of PS2/PS3 games with DTS support.

And if you're a **true** audiophile, then you probably already have a 7.1
channel HDMI-equipped sound system, so why are you reading this? :)

When buying a digital audio cable, you do not need to spend much money. Because
the quality of the cable will have no effect on the quality of the audio,
unlike the situation with analog audio cables, a $5 cable will sound just as
good as a $30 cable.


* 4.0 - BACKWARD COMPATIBILITY *
********************************


* 4.1 - IS THE PS3 BACKWARD COMPATIBLE WITH THE PS1 OR PS2? *
**************************************************************

All PS3 models have software-based backward compatibility with the PS1. That
includes both the "PlayStation Classics" games sold on the PS Store, and
disc-based games.

The PS3's backward compatibility with the PS2 varies a bit. Some models have
full hardware backward compatibility with the PS2, some have software backward
compatibility, and most don't have it at all. See 1.4 above for details on
which models have it and which don't.

The models that don't have PS2 backward compatibility will **not** be updated
to have it at any point in the future, since the PS3 does not have the power to
emulate both the PS2's CPU and GPU in software.

The difference between software and hardware PS2 backward compatibility can be
significant. PS3 models that feature hardware backward compatibility have full
support for every PS2 game that met Sony's technical requirements for PS2
games. Software emulation PS3s are considerably less compatible with PS2 games.
If you have such a PS3, then do not be too surprised if the PS2 games you play
on it are glitchy.

Additionally, many PS1 games that had backward compatibility problems on the
PS2 will have backward compatibility problems on the PS3.

The PS3 supports graphic smoothing in PS1 games, much like the PS2 did, but it
does **not** support the faster PS1 disc loading feature that the PS2 had,
since it broke compatibility with many games. Many PS1 games were heavily
optimized for the slow (300 KB/s) disc read speed of the PS1's CD drive, and
tended to freak out if the drive loads faster than expected.


* 4.2 - WHAT PS1 AND PS2 GAMES WORK IN THE PS3? *
*************************************************

Almost all of them, although a few have glitches when played on a PS3. Sony has
an online form where you can check for games' backward compatibility status
here:

North America:
<http://www.us.playstation.com/Support/CompatibleStatus>

Europe:
<http://faq.eu.playstation.com/bc/>


* 4.3 - WHAT PS1 AND PS2 PERIPHERALS WORK IN THE PS3? *
*******************************************************

The PS3 is not backward compatible with PS1 peripherals at all, except for
video connectors.

The PS3 is only backward compatible with PS2 peripherals that used the PS2's
USB connectors. All other PS2 peripherals (except, of course, for video
connectors and the optical cable) will not work in the PS3. This means that
non-USB peripheral-based PS2 games, such as "Guitar Hero", won't work that well
on the PS3.

Any standard USB "web camera", as well as Sony's PlayStation Eye, will work
with PS2 EyeToy games. Also, any Bluetooth headset will work with
headset-enabled PS2 games.


* 4.4 - WHY DOESN'T MY SIXAXIS/DUAL SHOCK 3 CONTROLLER WORK IN MY PS1 GAME? *
*****************************************************************************

Many PS1 games made prior to 1998, including such blockbusters as "Tomb Raider"
and "Final Fantasy VII", did not support the analog controller, and would
behave as if a controller was unplugged if an analog controller was plugged in
and the joysticks were turned on.

The PS1 and PS2 dealt with this situation by including an "analog" button on
the controller that enabled or disabled the analog joysticks in games.

The PS3 is smart enough to figure out whether a game needs analog support
turned on or off per game, but every once in a while, it gets things wrong. If
this happens, then you'll need to press the PS button on the controller, and
manually disable (or enable) analog controls in your game.


* 4.5 - DOES THE PS3 SUPPORT PS2 GAMES THAT USED THE NETWORK ADAPTER OR HDD? *
******************************************************************************

As of the latest firmware version, it supports both. Previous firmware versions
didn't support PS2 games that used the hard disk.


* 4.6 - HOW CAN I IMPORT MY PS1/PS2 SAVED DATA INTO MY PS3? *
*************************************************************

Sony makes a USB-based memory card reader for the PS3. With it, you can either
copy the memory cards onto the PS3's hard disk, or if you wish (and you've got
a recent firmware version), you can have your games directly read from and
write to PS1/PS2 memory cards.


* 4.7 - HOW CAN I EXPORT MY PS1/PS2 SOFTWARE MEMORY CARDS TO REAL MEMORY *
*       CARDS?                                                           *
**************************************************************************

As of the latest firmware version, you can use the XMB to transfer PS1 or PS2
saved data back to PS1 or PS2 memory cards if you have the memory card reader
described above. If you don't get the option to do this, then you need to
update the firmware.


* 4.8 - HOW DO ADVANCED VIDEO MODES WORK WHEN PLAYING PS1 OR PS2 GAMES? *
*************************************************************************

As of the latest firmware version, if you have a component, VGA, or HDMI cable
plugged into your PS3, and you have turned on video modes other than 480i in
the XMB video settings, then PS1 and PS2 games will be upscan-converted to the
highest video mode supported by your monitor.

The PS1 predates support for progressive scan and high definition video modes.
However, some PS2 games support progressive scan, such as "Shadow of the
Colossus" and "God of War", and a few even supported high definition video,
such as "Gran Turismo 4". If progressive scan or HD support is turned on in one
of these games, then that video mode will override the PS3's upscan converter.


* 4.9 - HOW DO ADVANCED AUDIO MODES WORK WHEN PLAYING PS1 OR PS2 GAMES? *
*************************************************************************

The PS1 predated the addition of digital audio. Despite this, all PS1 games
played over a digital audio cable or HDMI will work as if they were played over
analog cables.

Advanced audio modes are exactly the same on the PS2 as they are on the PS3.
Games that support AC-3 or DTS will work with AC-3 or DTS, etc. However, PS2
games had to be explicitly written to use the digital audio output port. With
the exception of "Gradius III & IV", all shipping PS2 games support the digital
audio output port.


* 4.10 - WHY DID MY PS1 GAME SUDDENLY BECOME A LOT LESS RANDOM? *
*****************************************************************

The basic answer is because the PS1 didn't have a system clock, so it depended
on other means of seeding a random number generator.

In order for computer software to properly generate random numbers, the random
number generator must be "seeded" with a number that will always be different
each time it is seeded. Traditionally, this is done by getting the system time.

But since the PS1 didn't have a system clock, and PS1 games cannot read the
PS3's system clock, many PS1 games seeded the random number generator by using
some other pseudo-different number, which was usually the amount of time spent
playing the game. Unfortunately, a lot of PS1 games tended to top out at
99:99:99 on the clock. So if, for example, you're playing "Final Fantasy VII"
and you suddenly cannot breed gold chocobos after maximizing the game clock,
then now you know why...

PS2 games don't have this problem, since the PS2 had a system clock.


* 4.11 - WHY DOESN'T FORCE FEEDBACK WORK ON MY DUAL SHOCK 3 IN MY PS1 GAME? *
*****************************************************************************

A small handful of PS1 games, such as "Lunar: Silver Star Story Complete", only
enable force feedback if the controller's analog mode is turned on, even if
force feedback is on in the game's preferences. Try turning on analog mode in
the PS menu and see what happens.


* 4.12 - CAN I STORE PS1 OR PS2 GAME DISCS ON MY PS3 HARD DISK? *
*****************************************************************

No, for obvious copyright reasons. The exceptions are the "PlayStation
Classics" games that are sold at the PS Store. But it is not possible to make
your own.


* 4.13 - WHEN WILL PS1 GAME XYZ BE RELEASED AS A PLAYSTATION CLASSIC? *
***********************************************************************

The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind (thank you Bob Dylan).

Sony can only publish games that it has the legal right to make available on
the PlayStation Store. Unlike Nintendo, they have never announced the imminent
release of any of their back-catalog of games, so it's anyone's guess as to
what they do make available & when they decide to publish it.

Also, for games that were not published by SCE in one way or another (which is
the majority of PS1 games), Sony has to acquire the rights to publish the game
online. So far, there have been third-party PS1 games published, but they've
been quite rare in North America (they have been far more common in Japan, and
more common in Europe, for some reason). I would not recommend holding your
breath for third-party games such as "Persona" to show up.

It's also highly unlikely that Sony will ever make outdated team sports games
available online, so if you really wanted to get "NFL Gameday '98" online,
well, sorry.

The bottom line is, if you're looking for old PS1 games, and the games aren't
available as PlayStation Classics, then your best bet is to go to eBay, or a
pawn shop, or some other marketplace for used stuff. Good luck.


* 4.14 - IS THE RUMOR THAT PS1/PS2 GAMES LOOK TERRIBLE ON THE PS3 TRUE? *
*************************************************************************

It was, in 2006. Sony fixed the graphics problems with the backward
compatibility environments through firmware updates a long time ago. The rumor
hasn't been true since then, but that hasn't stopped some people from
continuing to spread it.


* 4.15 - WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY "SOFTWARE" BACKWARD COMPATIBILITY? *
*****************************************************************

The PS3s with hardware backward compatibility include a MIPS-EL CPU on the
motherboard, which is the same "Emotion Engine" CPU used by the PS2. During PS2
emulation, PS3s with hardware backward compatibility will use the on-board PS2
CPU to run PS2 software, as if the software was running on a real PS2. Sony's
PS3 Emotion Engine CPU also includes the PS2's Graphics Synthesizer GPU and
both vector units in the same chip.

The PS3s with software backward compatibility don't have the MIPS-EL CPU, or
the vector units, but they do have Sony's Graphics Synthesizer GPU. So they run
PS2 software by running a software "virtual machine" on the PS3's PowerPC CPU.
This virtual machine dynamically translates MIPS CPU & vector unit instructions
into PowerPC instructions. The problem is software CPU emulators are not always
cycle-accurate to their hardware equivalents, usually for performance reasons,
which is the cause of compatibility problems. The PS3's emulator is not
cycle-accurate and never will be. The PS3 is a powerful console, but it's not
**that** powerful.

Let me put this another way: Nintendo's Famicom/NES game console used a very
simple MOS 6502 CPU. NES emulators that did dynamic translation of 6502
instructions started to appear in the early 1990s, but NES emulators that did
cycle-accurate 6502 emulation did not appear until ten years later, because
only then did the high-end of computers at the time have the power to run them
at an acceptable speed.

So what about PS1 software? Well, around 1999 or so, a company called Connectix
made the first PS1 emulator, called "Virtual Game Station", for the Macintosh.
Sony tried to sue the product out of existence but failed, since reverse
engineering is legal in the United States, but they ended up buying the product
from Connectix. The product lives on as the PS1 emulator in the PS3, and its
software compatibility has improved considerably.


* 4.16 - WHY DID SONY REMOVE PS2 BACKWARD COMPATIBILITY FROM SOME PS3s? *
*************************************************************************

The short answer: They did it for two reasons:

1. To cut the cost of production, saving money.
2. Because it was cannibalizing PS3 software sales.

The long answer:

The PS3 models with PS2 backward compatibility included one Sony Graphics
Synthesizer GPU, and the models with hardware compatibility included Sony's
integrated CPU/GPU/vector units chip. The latter chip was more expensive than
the former, which is why Sony switched to software emulation in later PS3
models. Removing the chip entirely saved a lot of money.

And that was a lot of money Sony needed to save, because at least in North
America and Europe, consumer technology spending trends have changed
dramatically since the PS2 was first released. Back in the '90s, many consumers
had the money to spend on the latest and greatest technology, and the PS2
quickly replaced the PS1.

Then the dot-com meltdown occurred, and 9/11 occurred, and more recently the
sub-prime meltdown occurred. As a result, most consumers have been worse off
than they used to be, and have opted for cheaper technology over better
technology. In the PS3's first year of existence, it was outsold by the PS2 by
a large margin, mainly because it was much more expensive.

A number of third party game makers noticed this trend, and thought "why should
we make a PS3 game that we can sell to only a handful of people, when we can
make a PS2 game that we can sell to everyone that has either a PS2 or PS3?",
and as a result, it took several years for developers to phase out PS2 game
production and move to the PS3. (By comparison, the Xbox and GameCube scenes
pretty much dried up the moment the X360 and Wii were released.) PS3
development really ramped up after PS2 backward compatibility was discontinued.


* 4.17 - WILL THE "PS2 CLASSICS" ON THE PLAYSTATION STORE WORK ON MY *
*        NON-BACKWARD COMPATIBLE PS3?                                *
**********************************************************************

I'm going to need a third-party developer to confirm this, but as I understand
it, the "PS2 Classics" that Sony sells on the PlayStation Store are
quick-and-dirty ports of PS2 games to the PS3's architecture, so they don't
require a virtual machine in order to run. So yes, they will work in all PS3s.


* 4.18 - WHY CAN'T I REACH THE XMB IN A PS1 OR PS2 GAME (OR VIDEO)? *
*********************************************************************

It's because it's programmed that way. In recent firmware versions, Sony added
the ability to go back to the XMB within PS3 games, but didn't add that feature
to the PS1, PS2, or video environments. This solves the problem where it was
impossible to invite your online friends to PS3 games while in a game, or
connect to a Bluetooth headset while in a game. However, it does create some
confusion because it wasn't applied consistently. And I definitely understand
that it would be useful to have this feature in the PS2 environment as well.

If you want the XMB to be accessible everywhere, you're going to have to write
to Sony. Good luck.


* 4.19 - WILL SONY EVER MAKE PS3s THAT HAVE PS2 COMPATIBILITY IN THE FUTURE? *
******************************************************************************

Only Sony knows, but between you and me, this is highly, highly, highly
unlikely to ever happen again. The reason is because adding this feature
increases the expense of the hardware, which would not be a very wise thing to
do right now, considering that Sony has lost billions (yes, billions) of US
dollars in the current (as of 2009) recession. This recession has forced
hardware makers to enter a race to make things cheaper, not better.

If you really need PS2 backward compatibility in a PS3, then you will have to
buy a pre-owned model.


* 4.20 - WHY DOES PS1 AND PS2 SOFTWARE USE TERRITORIAL LOCKOUTS? *
******************************************************************

They did it so they could practice price discrimination based upon regions of
the world, and make more money by discriminating. See
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Price_discrimination> for more details.


* 4.21 - WHAT IS THE FUNCTION OF THE "PS2 SYSTEM DATA" FILE ON THE PS STORE? *
******************************************************************************

That download enables use of the hard disk in the very small handful of PS2
games that used the optional hard disk accessory, such as "Final Fantasy XI",
"Resident Evil: Outbreak", and the Japanese version of "Final Fantasy X". It
has no use on PS3s that lack PS2 backward compatibility, and also has no use on
PS3s that will never run those PS2 games.


* 4.22 - ARE SAVES CREATED BY PS1 DISC-BASED GAMES AND THEIR DOWNLOADABLE *
*        CLASSICS EQUIVALENTS COMPATIBLE WITH ONE ANOTHER?                *
***************************************************************************

Yes, both ways. PS1 classics are almost exactly identical to their disc-based
equivalents, with the exception being the removal of swapping for multi-disc
games.


* 5.0 - HOMEBREW DEVELOPMENT AND GNU/LINUX ON THE PS3 *
*******************************************************


* 5.1 - DOES THE PS3 SUPPORT HOMEBREW GAME DEVELOPMENT? *
*********************************************************

Short answer: Yes, but only in an unofficial and unauthorized way, and
jailbreaking your console could void your PS3's warranty at the least and get
your PS3 banned from the PSN at the most. If you're a homebrew enthusiast, and
banishment scares you, then you should consider an X360 or Wii instead.

Long answer:

The PS3 used to have a homebrew environment called "Other OS" that allowed
users to run GNU/Linux in a hypervisor environment. In this environment, all of
the CPU's cores, and all but two of the CPU's SPEs, were available for
developers. However, the GPU was off-limits. The feature was removed from the
slim PS3s for no good reason.

Then, in February 2010 an exploit was released that allowed GNU/Linux to be run
outside of the hypervisor, allowing full access to the console hardware. So
what did Sony do? In firmware version 3.21, they completely removed the
feature. Although it came out on an April Fools' Day, it was not a joke.

There was one other reason why GNU/Linux was removed from the PS3. Sony sells
the PS3 at a loss, so every person who bought a PS3 only to use it for running
GNU/Linux was costing Sony money. So why did they include it in the first
place? Because in some countries, the import tax is lower on personal computers
than it is on video game consoles, so several console makers have tried to
weasel around this in the past by making their game consoles programmable.

Of course, hackers don't like being told what they can and can't do with their
hardware, so several security vulnerabilities were discovered in the PS3
firmware. Sony quickly patched them in firmware versions 3.42 and 3.55, but in
December 2010, the private keys used to sign applications were
reverse-engineered. This development creates the possibility of running
homebrew software.

I'm not going to go into details in this FAQ on how to run homebrew
applications on your PS3. I will leave this up to you to figure out. Please
don't E-Mail me about jailbreaks.


* 5.2 - WILL HOMEBREW SOFTWARE BE ABLE TO BRING BACK PS2 BACKWARD *
*       COMPATIBILITY ON NEWER PS3s?                              *
*******************************************************************

This is a rumor based on wishful thinking that I keep hearing. The answer is
no, unless something truly stupendous happens.

As I explained in 4.15 and 4.16 above, PS3s that are not backward compatible
with PS2 games simply lack the hardware to run PS2 games. Without that
hardware, such an emulator would have to emulate the PS2's CPU, GPU, and vector
units in software while being perfectly responsive and not dropping frames,
skipping audio, or causing glitches. And the PS3's CPU just isn't powerful
enough to do all of that.


* 6.0 - THE SIXAXIS AND DUAL SHOCK 3 CONTROLLERS *
**************************************************


* 6.1 - WHAT IS THE SIXAXIS CONTROLLER? *
*****************************************

The SIXAXIS controller is the fifth major revision of the traditional
PlayStation controller since the PS1 was released. It is identical to the
earlier Dual Shock 2 that shipped with the PS2, including the use of
pressure-sensitive buttons and the L3 and R3 buttons, with the following
changes:

1. The Dual Shock 2 used the PS2's controller plug. The SIXAXIS is wireless,
   with a USB cable for plugging it in and charging it.
2. The Dual Shock 2 had an "analog" button that enabled and disabled the analog
   joysticks. The SIXAXIS removes the button and adds a PS button, which is
   used in-game to turn on the controller, and then bring up the system menu
   once the controller is turned on.
3. The SIXAXIS is motion-sensitive. Like the Wii controller, the SIXAXIS
   detects yaw, pitch, and roll in addition to forward/backward, left/right,
   and up/down.
4. The SIXAXIS has slightly redesigned L2 and R2 buttons that resemble analog
   triggers, similar to the Dreamcast and Xbox shoulder triggers.
5. The most controversial change to the SIXAXIS controller was the removal of
   force feedback motors from the Dual Shock 2. This was caused by a patent
   dispute that has since been resolved. The Dual Shock 3 includes force
   feedback support.

As of April 2008, the SIXAXIS controller is no longer being produced, having
been replaced by the Dual Shock 3.


* 6.2 - WHAT IS THE DUAL SHOCK 3 CONTROLLER? *
**********************************************

The Dual Shock 3 is identical to the SIXAXIS, except that it has force feedback
support. The addition of the force feedback motors means the Dual Shock 3 is
around 40% heavier than the SIXAXIS.


* 6.3 - CAN I USE MY CONTROLLER AS A COMPUTER GAME PAD? *
*********************************************************

Yes, although unless you're using GNU/Linux with the latest version of Linux,
you'll need to download a driver in order to get it to work. The SIXAXIS and
Dual Shock 3 controllers are actually USB and Bluetooth HID devices, but they
use HID in a weird, non-standard way that Windows and Mac OS X don't
understand.

There are several drivers for 32-bit Windows (XP, Vista, etc.). Some of them
work fine, while others don't. Libusb-win32-based drivers, such as
<http://www.iraqigeek.com/winsixaxis/>, ought to work.

Mac OS X users can download a driver from
<http://tattiebogle.net/index.php/ProjectRoot/Ps3Controller>.

Unfortunately I can't find any drivers for 64-bit Windows. Anyone?

IMPORTANT: As with all USB-based controllers, the controllers will most likely
not work with games written for MS-DOS, since DOS predated USB, and Microsoft
didn't really support USB until Windows 98. If there are any old DOS games that
you must play with a PS3 controller, then you might have better luck playing
them in an emulator such as DOSBox.


* 6.4 - WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE BANANA CONTROLLER? *
*****************************************************

The "banana controller", a banana-shaped controller that was shown with early
PS3 prototypes, was only a concept controller and never went into production.
It wouldn't have been practical as a controller design.


* 6.5 - WHY DON'T THE MOTION-SENSITIVE CONTROLS WORK IN MY GAME THAT SUPPORTS *
*       MOTION-SENSITIVE CONTROLS?                                            *
*******************************************************************************

If you're having this problem, then chances are you're using an older version
of the PS3 firmware. There was an earlier version that had the unfortunate side
effect of breaking the support for motion-sensitive controls, which made games
like "Lair" unplayable.

Fortunately, if this is the case, then you should only need to update your
PS3's firmware to solve the issue.

If that doesn't resolve the issue, then make sure that they are turned on in
your game's options menu if applicable.

If that still doesn't work, then maybe the game you're playing does not use
motion-sensitive controls in the context that you're trying to use them.


* 6.6 - WHY DO THE CONTROLS RANDOMLY QUIT RESPONDING FOR SEVERAL SECONDS? *
***************************************************************************

This has been a pretty widely reported problem with the SIXAXIS controller. I
am pretty sure that it was quietly corrected by Sony in the Dual Shock 3.

Anyway, if you're having this problem, then the workaround is to plug the
controller directly into the console using a USB cable, in which case the
wireless controls will no longer be used, and the problem will no longer occur.


* 6.7 - ARE THE SIXAXIS AND DUAL SHOCK 3 COMPATIBLE WITH THE PS1 OR PS2? *
**************************************************************************

They are incompatible with the hardware of both consoles (but _not_ in PS1/PS2
games running on the PS3; see 4.x above). The PS1 hardware predated USB and
Bluetooth, and Sony used a proprietary plug type for PS1 controllers. The PS2
had USB support, but it used the proprietary plugs from the PS1 as the main
controller interface for backward compatibility reasons. PS2 games had to be
specifically programmed to use USB controllers, and as a result, few games did.

In any case, if you have an original Dual Shock (PS1) or Dual Shock 2 (PS2)
controller, then you're not missing that much, since the motion-sensitive
controls of the SIXAXIS and Dual Shock 3 won't work in PS1 or PS2 games anyway.
Also, the lack of an Analog button on the Dual Shock 3 would make most PS1
games unplayable.


* 6.8 - IS THE DUAL SHOCK 4 COMPATIBLE WITH THE PS3? *
******************************************************

Surprisingly, yes. However, it only works if you plug it into a USB port. It
does not work as a wireless controller.


* 7.0 - THE PLAYSTATION MOVE CONTROLLER *
*****************************************

* 7.1 - WHAT IS THE PLAYSTATION MOVE CONTROLLER? *
**************************************************

The PlayStation Move (which will henceforth be called the "Move") is a
motion-based control system for the PS3 that works very similarly to the
Wiimote Plus (or Wiimote with MotionPlus) controller on the Wii. Like the
Wiimote Plus, the Move allows games to track your hand movements using all nine
axes (roll, pitch, and yaw moving horizontally, vertically, and
fowards/backwards).


* 7.2 - HOW DOES THE MOVE CONTROLLER COMPARE TO OTHER MOTION- BASED *
*       CONTROLLERS?                                                *
*********************************************************************

Here's how it sizes up to its competition. A + means the Move has the
advantage, where a - means the other controller has the advantage.

vs. the Xbox 360 Kinect:
+ No processing lag
+ Four players can play simultaneously (if the navigation controller is unused)
+ The Kinect cannot be used to navigate the entire dashboard
+ If you're out of the camera's range, the controller will let you know
- Battery must be charged before using
- Can only track your hands and not your full body
- No voice recognition in the XMB

vs. the Wiimote (original)
+ Full motion tracking, not just in a single dimension
+ No batteries required = lower TCO
- Requires calibration before each use
- Only supports 2 player simultaneous play in games that require navigation
- No speaker on the controller

vs. the Wiimote (WiiMote Plus or WiiMote w/MotionPlus):
+ No batteries or add-ons required = much lower TCO
- Only supports 2 player simultaneous play in games that require navigation
- No speaker on the controller

Basically, the Move and Wiimote Plus/MotionPlus both work best in games that
require precise timing with the controls, such as baseball or cricket games.
The Kinect, OTOH, works best with games where the timing doesn't need to be
precise but the gameplay benefits from full body tracking, such as bowling or
dancing games. So no one system is truly superior to the others, although the
original Wiimote is showing its age.


* 7.3 - DOES THE MOVE WORK IN ALL PS3 GAMES? *
**********************************************

No; it only works in games made specifically for the Move, as well as system
menus including the XMB. However, a few games that predated the Move, such as
"Heavy Rain" and "Resident Evil 5 Gold Edition", were patched post-release to
support the Move. In order to use the Move with those games, you'll need to
connect your PS3 to the Internet prior to starting the game to get the patch if
you haven't already downloaded the patch.

And no, it will not work in PS1 or PS2 games at all, though the PlayStation Eye
camera will work in EyeToy-enabled PS2 games.


* 7.4 - WHAT DO I NEED TO PLAY MOVE-ENABLED GAMES? *
****************************************************

Here's what you must have:
* PlayStation Move motion controller
* Any USB videoconferencing camera (the Move bundle includes the PlayStation
  Eye, which fulfills this requirement)

Here's what some games might require:
* PlayStation Move navigation controller
- or -
* SIXAXIS or Dual Shock 3

If you are left-handed, and you play a Move-enabled game that uses navigation,
then you must use the navigation controller. If you are right-handed, then you
can use a SIXAXIS or Dual Shock 3 in your left hand in lieu of a navigation
controller in those games.


* 8.0 - GOING ONLINE WITH THE PS3 *
***********************************


* 8.1 - WHAT DO I NEED TO GO ONLINE WITH MY PS3? *
**************************************************

If your PS3 is located in a place where the Internet is available over Ethernet
(e.g. many university residence hall rooms), or in a place where you have
access to Wi-Fi (and you have a PS3 that supports Wi-Fi, see 1.4 above), then
you've got what you need.

If you don't have Ethernet or Wi-Fi available, then you need to buy access from
a broadband ISP. The type doesn't matter, as long as the speed is 1
megabit/second or faster. Typically, most people will use cable or DSL modems.


* 8.2 - CAN I GO ONLINE USING A DIAL-UP CONNECTION? *
*****************************************************

Sort of. The PS3 does not have a modem, unlike the PS2 network adapter. But if
you have a computer that has a spare Ethernet port, and you are using Windows
2000 or later or Mac OS X 10.2 or later, then you can enable their Internet
connection sharing features to share your dial-up connection over the Ethernet
port.

Then you can run an Ethernet cable from your computer to your PS3, and set up
your PS3 to connect over Ethernet. If you're using a relatively recent computer
("recent" being after 2003 or so), then any old Ethernet cable will do. If
you're using an older computer, then you need what is called a "crossover"
cable to make the connection.

For some reason, the PS3 does not like Mac OS X's DHCP server. If DHCP isn't
working for you, and your computer is running Mac OS X, then you need to
configure your PS3 to use the IP address 192.168.2.2, subnet 255.255.255.0, and
gateway 192.168.2.1.

Keep in mind that this is really the last resort option to getting online.
Modems just don't have the bandwidth to play PS3 games, and many PS2 games,
online. You can use it to download files from the PS Store, but the downloads
will take a while. The best uses for modems are downloading firmware updates
and game patches.


* 8.3 - CAN I GO ONLINE USING A USB MODEM OR ROUTER? *
******************************************************

Not unless the router also supports Ethernet or Wi-Fi. Modems or routers that
only support USB will not work with the PS3. Fortunately such beasts are quite
rare.


* 8.4 - HOW DO I PLAY PS1 GAMES ONLINE? *
*****************************************

You can't. The PS1 predates online gaming support. The PS3 does not have PS1
online play grafted onto it XBAND-style, and knowing Sony, they probably won't
add such a feature.

Some PS1 games, such as "Twisted Metal 3", supported "networking" consoles
together through the serial port. This is different from online play; the
"networking" capabilities of the PS1 worked more like the link cable used by
Nintendo's Game Boys. Sony ended up dropping the serial port from later PS1s,
and this feature was phased out. Obviously it is not supported on the PS3.


* 8.5 - HOW DO I PLAY PS2 GAMES ONLINE? *
*****************************************

To play PS2 games online, you'll need to create a PS2 network configuration.
Unfortunately this cannot be done in the PS3 XMB. The software to do this is
sold separately. When Sony shipped the PS2 network adapter, they included a
configuration disc with the adapter. You can either use that, or use one of the
PS2 games that came with configuration software, such as "SOCOM: US Navy
SEALs".

In the software, just use the default broadband network configuration. If
you're asked to choose an ISP, then always choose "other". Even if you're on
Wi-Fi (the PS2 didn't support Wi-Fi), it'll just work and adapt to your PS3
network settings.


* 8.6 - DO I NEED A HEADSET TO PLAY ONLINE GAMES? *
***************************************************

You do not. However, having one is strongly recommended, because without one,
you will not be able to communicate with other players. Any Bluetooth-enabled
headset will do.


* 8.7 - ARE ONLINE GAMES SEGREGATED BY REGION? *
************************************************

The answer varies from game to game, but generally you don't need to worry
about this. **Very** few games segregate their user base by region or platform
online, since history has shown that the online games that segregate their user
bases, such as "Everquest", tend to flop in every segment save for the one
dominant segment.

(In the Everquest example, Sony Online segregated the Mac OS X, PS2, and
Windows versions. The Mac and PS2 users wanted to play with Windows users, who
vastly outnumbered Mac and PS2 users. But since Sony wouldn't let them, they
largely abandoned the game.)

In any case, this doesn't matter too much for PS3 games, since PS3 games are
not region locked and work in multiple resolutions, so if there is a
region-segregated game out there that you'd like to play, then you can buy an
import from that region and it will just work.


* 8.8 - HOW MUCH DO ONLINE GAMES COST TO PLAY ONLINE? *
*******************************************************

The answer varies from game to game. Always read the fine print before buying
an online game. If there is no fine print, then you can assume the game is free
to play online.

The PS3's "native" online games network, the PlayStation Network, is free, both
to get an account and play PSN games (such as "Warhawk") online.

However, third parties are allowed by Sony to run their own proprietary gaming
networks. These networks may cost money to join, or require a monthly fee to
retain membership. For example, Square Enix charges a monthly fee to people who
play "Final Fantasy XI" online through their PlayOnline network (which is
actually the only way to play the game). You will most likely need to have a
PlayStation Network account just to sign into your account on the other system,
though.


* 8.9 - DOES EVERYONE HAVE TO OWN THEIR OWN COPY OF A GAME TO PLAY ONLINE? *
****************************************************************************

Yes. Unlike, for example, the Nintendo Game Boy Advance, if you want to play a
multiplayer game online with others, then everyone who wants to play must own a
copy of the game.

(NOTE: Several people have E-Mailed me saying that they think I meant the
Nintendo DS when I mentioned the GBA above. Yes, the DS has shareable
multiplayer games, but the GBA had that feature first, although only a handful
of games used it, and an even smaller percentage of games used it well. So I
meant what I said.)


* 8.10 - MY PS3 CONNECTS BUT STILL CANNOT GO ONLINE, CAN YOU HELP ME? *
***********************************************************************

This could be caused by anything. Some ideas:

* Are you getting a valid IP address (and not something in the 16x.x.x.x
  range)?
* Are you getting a valid DNS configuration from the router?
* Is the gateway set correctly?
* Are you sure your ISP has your router set up on their end?
* If you're using Wi-fi, have you tried changing the encryption method?
* Are you sure you're connecting to the correct router?
* Are you connecting your PS3 to a computer running Mac OS X? (For some reason,
  the PS3 does not work with Mac OS X's DHCP server. You can still get this to
  work, but you'll have to assign the IP address manually.)
* Are you sure everything is plugged in and turned on?

You might have to ask your ISP's technical support for help beyond what this
FAQ can offer.


* 8.11 - CAN I PLAY PS3 GAMES ONLINE WITH PC OR X360 USERS? *
*************************************************************

It depends on the game, but some games, such as "Portal 2" and "Final Fantasy
XIV", do allow you to play with computer users. You can't play online with your
X360-using friends, however.

The reason is because Sony is cool with developers making games that interface
with third-party online services, such as Steam or PlayOnline, as long as the
PSN acts as the gateway to these services. Microsoft, however, refuses to allow
Xbox Live to act as a gateway to third-party services.


* 9.0 - BACKING UP THE PS3 *
****************************


* 9.1 - WHY SHOULD I BACK UP MY PS3? *
**************************************

Short answer: Because any destructible object that exists in only one place is
dust in the wind (thank you Kerry Livgren).

Long answer: Your PS3's hard disk could crash, or your PS3 could be lost or
stolen, or you could make a mistake and have to restore an old saved game... In
any of these cases, having a backup of your PS3 data will prove highly
valuable.


* 9.2 - WHAT GETS BACKED UP WHEN I BACK UP THE PS3? *
*****************************************************

Here's what gets backed up, if they exist:

* All user profiles
* All installed games/patches
* PS1 software memory cards
* PS2 software memory cards
* PS3 saved games
* All media files that are **not** protected by DRM
* All system settings

Here's what does _not_ get backed up, if they exist:

* The PS3 firmware (which is unnecessary to backup)
* All media files that are protected by DRM
* Trophies (the only way to backup your trophy collection is to sync them with
  the PSN, which requires a PSN account and a network connection)


* 9.3 - WHAT DO I NEED TO HAVE TO PERFORM A BACKUP? *
*****************************************************

You need a USB storage device, such as a thumb drive. Alternately, if you have
a PS3 that has card readers, you may use a CompactFlash, Memory Stick, or SD
card, to perform the backup. If you don't have a PS3 that has card readers,
then USB card readers will also work.

USB hard disks are also supported by the PS3. The PS3 supports both the
old-school MBR (Master Boot Record) partition mapping scheme that is used by
computers that start up using BIOS (and was required by Windows XP & earlier),
as well as the newer GUID scheme that is used by computers that use EFI instead
of BIOS for starting up. However, if the disk is partitioned, the PS3 will only
detect the last FAT32-formatted partition on the disk.

Be warned that the PS3 will not be able to see any partitions beyond the fourth
partition, even if the drive is using the GUID scheme. (The MBR scheme is
limited to four partitions; the GUID scheme has no such limit.)

Whatever media type you use, the media must be formatted using the FAT32
(sometimes also called "MS-DOS") file system. The PS3 does not support the NTFS
(used by Windows), HFS+ (used by Mac OS X), or EXT3 (used by GNU/Linux) file
systems.

That does not mean that you can't use your Windows USB thumb drive to back up
your PS3. All it means is you can't reformat your USB thumb drive using a file
system other than FAT32 and expect it to work in the PS3. Normally you don't
need to worry about this, because most devices out there use FAT32 by default.
One notable exception is the Apple iPod, which uses HFS+ by default if paired
with a computer running Mac OS X.


* 9.4 - WHY CAN'T I MAKE A PARTITION LARGER THAN 32 GB? *
*********************************************************

For some reason, probably because the size of each disk block gets ridiculously
large at >32 GB partition sizes, Windows XP and Vista only allow a maximum of
32 GB for each FAT partition. If you need anything larger than that, then
you'll need to make the partition using Mac OS X or GNU/Linux, both of which do
not have this limitation. If you have to stick with Windows, then there are
some third-party disk tools out there that don't have this limitation.


* 9.5 - SHOULD I USE ONLY SONY MEMORY CARDS WITH MY PS3? *
**********************************************************

No. On the PS1 and PS2, you were playing with fire if you plugged in any memory
cards not made by Sony. This is no longer the case with the PS3's memory card
readers & USB ports. Feel free to plug in any brand of memory card.


* 9.6 - CAN I DIRECTLY BACK UP ONE HARD DISK TO ANOTHER? *
**********************************************************

Yes, if you have two PS3s that are connected to each other via Ethernet. As of
the latest firmware update, you can clone a PS3's hard disk onto another PS3's
hard disk that way. But you still cannot clone a PS3's hard disk directly onto
a USB drive; you can only have the backup utility create an image of the PS3's
disk onto a USB drive.


* 9.7 - HOW CAN I BACK UP WHEN MY DESTINATION DOESN'T HAVE MUCH CAPACITY? *
***************************************************************************

If you don't have a large capacity destination volume (and this is
understandable if you're using SD cards or Memory Sticks as backup
destinations), then it's pretty easy to prioritize what gets backed up and what
doesn't.

You _cannot_ choose which files get backed up and which do not. You _can_,
however, throw away files that are not critical to backup before performing the
backup, and just install those files again at a later time.

By far the most critical files to back up are your PS1 memory cards, PS2 memory
cards, and PS3 save files. Unless you only use your PS3 as a DVD/Blu-ray
player, you probably have hundreds of hours' worth of saved games to back up.

This means that you can throw away PS3 game data, which is located in the top
folder of the "game" XMB item. (Be **very** careful not to confuse this with
the save data folder!) These files are installed games and patches; you can
always re-install and re-patch them later, so they are usually safe to throw
out if you need the room.

Also, you can safely throw out games purchased from the PlayStation Store. If
you want them back, you can always go back to the store and download them again
for free.

THERE IS ONE VERY IMPORTANT EXCEPTION TO THE ABOVE: If you have ever purchased
a movie from the PlayStation Store, then you'll need to pay for it again if you
ever delete it. If there's any chance that you'll ever watch the movie again,
and you don't want to pay for it another time, then you shouldn't delete it.


* 9.8 - DOES THE PS3 WORK WITH ANY USB STORAGE DEVICE (HARD DISKS, THUMB *
*       DRIVES, MEMORY CARD READERS, ETC.)?                              *
**************************************************************************

Yes, if the following two conditions are met:

1. At least one partition of the drive _must_ be formatted using the FAT32 file
   system; not NTFS or HFS+ or anything else. See 8.3 above.

2. The volume _must_ be 100% compliant with the USB standard for storage
   devices. In other words, it must not require some sort of driver in order to
   be mountable on a PC. The majority of the non-compliant devices are either
   "secure" devices that need some sort of authentication, or portable music
   players such as the Apple iPod.

3. If the drive is partitioned, then you must have not done something silly to
   the partition map, e.g. used the obsolete Apple partition map (an option
   given to you if you used Mac OS X to partition the drive) when you initially
   formatted the drive. You should always use GUID partition mapping, unless
   you are using Windows XP on your computer and want to use the drive on it,
   in which case you must use MBR mapping instead.


* 10.0 - MOTION PICTURES AND THE PS3 *
**************************************


* 10.1 - WILL BLU-RAY MOVIE DISC XYZ WORK IN MY PS3? *
******************************************************

As long as you have the latest PS3 firmware, and the disc is not region-locked
to a region outside your PS3's Blu-ray region (and such discs are in the
minority of releases), then the answer is yes.

One of the biggest problems Blu-ray has had is it is a "living format", unlike
the set-in-stone HD-DVD and DVD formats. So the standard has had several
upgrades, and these upgrades have largely required firmware updates. Also, some
player makers out there (I'm looking at you, Samsung) have released defective
players that don't implement certain features correctly, meaning that they
won't play certain discs at all. Since the PS3 is one of the only Blu-ray
players with updatable firmware, and defects can be quickly fixed, then it will
play all past, present, and future Blu-ray releases.

Also, since PAL/NTSC conversions are not necessary with Blu-ray discs, then you
do not need to worry about titles supporting the wrong format.


* 10.2 - WILL THE PLAYTV ACCESSORY WORK IN NORTH AMERICA? *
***********************************************************

No, and there is no way to get it to work in North America. The reason is
because the PlayTV only supports the DVB-T digital TV broadcasting standard,
whereas broadcasters in North America use ATSC instead. Although the two
standards have a few things in common, they're not cross-compatible with one
another.


* 10.3 - I FORGOT MY PARENTAL CONTROLS PASSWORD; IS THERE A BACK DOOR? *
************************************************************************

No. Unfortunately it is self-defeating to forget the parental controls password
on the PS3, so make sure you have it stored somewhere safe.

There was a back door on the PS2, but it completely defeated the purpose of
having locked parental controls, since anyone who knew the back door could
circumvent the controls every time, making them practically useless.

So if this happens to you, then I'm afraid you'll have to contact Sony's
customer support department.


* 10.4 - IS THE RUMOR THAT THE BLU-RAY DISC PLAYER IS REALLY SLOW TRUE? *
*************************************************************************

Not on the PS3, it isn't. In order to save money on production, a lot of
stand-alone third-party Blu-ray disc players rely on very cheap CPUs that would
have been blazing fast in 1992, but are super-slow today. As a result, they
sometimes take several minutes to load Blu-ray discs that heavily rely on Java
bytecode.

The PS3 doesn't have this problem, since its 3.2 GHz PPC64 CPU is insanely fast
compared to the CPUs used in many stand-alone Blu-ray players. Thankfully,
since this question was first answered years ago, the situation on stand-alone
players has improved, and now even the cheap ones aren't so slow anymore.


* 11.0 - MISC QUESTIONS *
*************************


* 11.1 - CAN I INSTALL DISC-BASED PS3 GAMES TO THE HARD DRIVE? *
****************************************************************

Unlike the X360, the PS3 does not allow users to arbitrarily install disc-based
games to the hard drive, but Sony does not ban third-parties from installing
all or part of the disc onto the hard drive, so each game has a different
policy here. Some PS3 games, such as "BioShock", have a mandatory hard drive
installation. Others give players the option to install to the hard drive,
while others run strictly off of the disc (except for game patches and other
downloaded content).

Of the games that do install themselves to the hard drive, all but one of them
require that the disc be inserted in order to play the game. "Final Fantasy
XIV" is the one and only exception so far; the disc version of the game does
not require that the disc be inserted in order to play it.


* 11.2 - SHOULD THE PS3 BE PLACED FLAT OR ON ITS SIDE? *
********************************************************

Like the PS2, the PS3 can be placed either way. However, if you want to place
it on its side, then you should either place it in a stand, or have it lean
against something sturdy so it won't fall.


* 11.3 - ARE XBOX 360 CONTROLLERS COMPATIBLE WITH THE PS3? *
************************************************************

No. Wireless controllers are incompatible because the PS3 uses Bluetooth for
wireless, while the Xbox 360 uses 2.4 GHz RF for wireless, and the two are not
even remotely compatible. Wired controllers are incompatible, even though both
consoles use USB, because PS3 wired controllers use USB HID (Human Interface
Device) standards wherever possible, while Xbox 360 controllers don't.

Sorry, but that means that, among other things, "Rock Band" instruments made
for the X360 will not work on the PS3, and vice versa.


* 11.4 - ARE WII CONTROLLERS COMPATIBLE WITH THE PS3? *
*******************************************************

No. The PS3 cannot be paired with Wiimotes.


* 11.5 - ARE THE INSTRUMENT CONTROLLERS FOR "BAND HERO," "GUITAR HERO," AND *
*        "ROCK BAND" INTERCHANGEABLE BETWEEN GAMES?                         *
*****************************************************************************

Assuming they are for the PS3 edition of the games, the answer might surprise
you: Yes, they'll generally work, but you need to be running the latest version
of the game you're playing. Older versions of "Rock Band", for instance, didn't
support "Guitar Hero III" controllers, and vice versa.

If your PS3 is connected to the Internet, then it will automatically check for
updates online when you start the game. If no update message is displayed, then
you are using the latest version of the game. If your PS3 is not connected to
the Internet, well, sorry. The only way to get the patch is over the Internet.

The dongles used by some wireless instruments are a different story; they
cannot be paired with instruments intended for a different game, so you cannot
pair your "Guitar Hero" controller with a "Rock Band" dongle, or vice versa.
Dongles also aren't backward compatible with controllers made for older games.

You can find more details on compatibility from the manufacturer's sites:

Band/Guitar Hero: <http://cdn.guitarhero.com/ghhub/gh_compatibility.pdf>
Rock Band: <http://www.rockband.com/compatibility>


* 11.6 - HOW DO I INSTALL A NEW HARD DRIVE IN THE PS3? *
********************************************************

CNet has a full guide to this posted here:
<http://asia.cnet.com/digitalliving/tips/0,3800004921,62032875,00.htm>


* 11.7 - WHAT IS THE MAXIMUM SIZE OF THE PS3'S HARD DRIVE? *
************************************************************

The PS3 tops out at 2 terabytes of hard disk space. If you insert a larger hard
drive, then only the first 2 terabytes will be recognized. This is also the
maximum size of USB drives attached to the PS3.


* 11.8 - WHY DOES THE PS3 REPORT THAT MY BLANK HARD DISK HAS CONSIDERABLY *
*        LESS SPACE AVAILABLE FOR IT THAN THE HARD DISK WAS ADVERTISED    *
*        AS HAVING?                                                       *
***************************************************************************

Because computer marketers intentionally overstate the capacity of hard drives.
One true gigabyte is 1,073,741,824 bytes, but hard disk sizes are marked as if
a gigabyte was 1,000,000,000 bytes, which is not true. That's why your "80 GB"
PS3 hard disk actually has 74 GB available.

Pretty much everyone in the computer industry, not just Sony, markets computers
and hard disks this way. And before you ask, yes, they do point this out in the
fine print in order to avoid lawsuits.


* 11.9 - MY PS3 KEEPS FREEZING. WHY? *
**************************************

This is almost always caused by either a media or thermal issue:

1. If a game attempts to play a video clip, and the game freezes in the middle
   of the clip while the PS button still works, then your game media is most
   likely bad. This happens more often than not on PS1 games with scratched
   CDs or bad CD presses. Either way, you're probably going to need to
   replace the disc.

2. If the game freezes and the PS button doesn't do anything, then it's
   possible that either the CPU or GPU overheated and shut down. Always make
   sure that the PS3 is in a cool, well-ventilated area. Try moving the PS3
   away from anything that might be obstructing the vents. Alternately, try
   stacking the PS3 on its side if you're not doing that already. Heat always
   travels upwards.

3. If all else fails, then you might need to clean out the insides of the PS3,
   particularly the CPU fan. This will require a can of compressed air and a
   screwdriver. If you do this, don't forget to ground yourself first so you
   can't damage the PS3 with static. And if you use a vacuum, you **must**
   always use a shop vac and not a handheld sweeper, since the latter can
   generate static.


* 11.10 - CAN I USE ANY HARD DRIVE BRAND IN MY PS3? *
*****************************************************

Yes. As long as it's a laptop-size serial ATA drive, it will work in the PS3.
The PS2 only worked with special Sony-branded hard drives; the PS3 no longer
has this restriction.


* SPECIAL THANKS *
******************

Thanks to:

* CJayC and SBAllen (for hosting this FAQ)
* Zac (component video correction)
* Someone whose name I've lost (Xbox headset correction)
* Connor Newton (Cell CPU correction)
* Chaos Energy (Ethernet cable correction)
* nWo 4 Life (console comparison additions)
* Justin Smythe (parental controls correction)
* Marcelo Ellmann Clemente (PSX XMB correction)
* Joseph (PS2 release correction)
* Felix Bernier (some more information about HDMI audio cables)

Fin!