Briefing Script by Zevii_the_Rogue

Version 1.01, Last Updated 2010-06-19

Would you recommend this FAQ? Yes No You must register to leave a comment.
Submit Recommendation

Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker Briefing Script

WARNING: There are spoilers! ...obviously.

Version: 1.01

History:

V1.00: Completed text dump. Basic formatting.

V1.01: Missing title found. Reformatted.

Compiled by Zevilyn

Feel free to link to this guide and to republish this as well as long as you link back to the guide hosted on GameFAQs.

Please send any corrections or additions to zevfaqs@hotmail.com.

[SNAKE]

Kaz, what kind of shape is that plant the "professor" gave us in?

[MILLER]

First time I laid eyes on it, I thought it was some kind of joke. It was a giant birdhouse - seagulls everywhere. We eventually scraped off most of the rust and bird crap. The underlying structure's intact - a little elbow grease and we should be in business.

[SNAKE]

Who used to own it, anyway? Whatever shape it's in now, somebody sank some serious money into building it.

[MILLER]

From what I can tell, an American university built it as a research platform for ocean thermal energy conversion, "OTEC." The name's still on some of the rusty old power turbines. I'm guessing they must have had government and corporate assistance to build it, too. But they couldn't solve the thermal efficiency problem, and the project was canceled. Then after the university abandoned it, a KGB front company scooped it up for next to nothing... At least, that's my theory.

[SNAKE]

How'd the KGB manage to buy a plant built with American capital, front company or not?

[MILLER]

Yeah, that "professor" is quite the operator. One other thing the plant's set up so that it can join up with other plants of the same standard.

[SNAKE]

So they were originally planning on expanding the place, huh?

[MILLER]

Hey, let's give it a shot? We can get some more people together and build this place up into a proper home for MSF. You're with me on this, right, Boss?

[MILLER]

The new plant is a hex type. That gives it more surface area than previous types and also makes it easier to plan expansions. We're gonna make this place huge.

[SNAKE]

Hex, huh. Like a beehive.

[MILLER]

Nothing wrong with that. They say the honeycomb design is one of the strongest. I hear they're even thinking of using it in tank armor.

[SNAKE]

Good enough for me. I'll see about finding us some worker bees.

[MILLER]

Appreciate it, Boss.

[SNAKE]

By the way, Kaz, who do you think's our queen bee?

[MILLER]

Good question. I was thinking maybe Paz.

[SNAKE]

Hmm. I was thinking Strangelove...

[MILLER]

I can see that. Or maybe Cecile.

[SNAKE]

On second thought, I might go with Amanda.

[MILLER]

How about this, Snake. We'll have an army of queen bees.

[SNAKE]

Sure, why not.

[MILLER]

Snake, you can use the Fulton Surface-to-air Recovery System to send prisoners and unconscious mercenaries you encounter back to the Mother Base. I know you've used the Fulton before, but just to make sure I'm not missing anything, let's review the steps.

[SNAKE]

OK.

[MILLER]

First, attach a balloon to the unconscious enemy or captured prisoner.

[SNAKE]

Right. I hook a wire to the their waist, and on the other end of the wire there's a helium balloon.

[MILLER]

Right. Then we'll send over a chopper to catch the floating balloon with its recovery hook and reel it up into its cargo hold.

[SNAKE]

And that's it.

[MILLER]

And that's it. We finished installing the recovery hook on the Huey...

[SNAKE]

Wait, Kaz, something doesn't make sense about this whole process.

[MILLER]

Not this again...

[SNAKE]

Normally, Fulton recovery is for when you're using fixed-wing aircraft. With a helicopter, isn't it simpler to land and pick up directly?

[MILLER]

Listen, Snake, you're gonna be calling for recoveries repeatedly throughout your mission. We want to keep the risk of taking enemy fire to a minimum. The best way to get that done that is to do the recovery in a high-speed fly-by. That's what the Fulton Surface-to-air Recovery System is for.

[SNAKE]

Uh huh... what's the real reason?

[MILLER]

Helicopters are cheaper. And the repair bills will start adding up once the bullets start flying...

[SNAKE]

Thought so. Kaz, I know we need to keep costs down, but...

[MILLER]

Boss, you really need to get rid of this whole Army mentality. We're not the Pentagon. We don't have billions of taxpayer dollars to play with. And besides...

[SNAKE]

Fine, fine. Just pick a reason that makes sense.

[MILLER]

Helicopters have quicker response time. Sounds strange, yeah, but it works great, I promise. You'll get used to it before long.

[SNAKE]

Yeah, I hope so.

[MILLER]

Remember why we created MSF, Snake: to provide military force to whoever needs it, wherever they are, regardless of nation or ideology. Our beliefs aren't all that lofty...

[SNAKE]

We just won't be the tools of any one country.

[MILLER]

Exactly. We know only how to fight... but we refuse to live our lives at the whim of the state. The MSF seal is patterned after Pangaea, the supercontinent from 250 million years ago. Back then, the whole world was one landmass. One world. No gaps, no rifts.

[SNAKE]

Our strength will take us back there.

[SNAKE]

What about you, Kaz? Any interest in expanding MSF?

[MILLER]

You'd better believe it. I want to make us into an organization that doesn't take orders from any country - just like you were saying. We have to be strong, strong enough to defend ourselves. We need money, too - money to train soldiers to fight. The way I see it, we make MSF into something along the lines of a new kind of business. A contractor providing the full range of military services. Not just combat, but logistics, training, weapons, outfitting and R&D... Combining the small footprint and exceptional performance of Special Forces with the raw military might of a full regular army. Only with that kind of power can we break free of nation-states. What I need from you, Boss, is to go out and find guys we can bring back here using Fulton recovery. Then tell us what assignment to use them for. I'll take care of the rest.

[MILLER]

Your old mentor, The Boss... She was known in the West as the "Mother of Special Forces," right?

[SNAKE]

Nothing but propaganda.

[MILLER]

Actually, it's not all that far from the truth. I heard the KGB just set up a counter-sabotage cell. Alpha Group, I think they call it. There's even a rumor that West Germany created a counter-terrorist unit within its border police after the debacle at the Munich Olympics. Back home in the States, they've got the illustrious Green Berets, the SEALs, and your personal creation, FOXHOUND... The seeds sown by The Boss are beginning to sprout. Same goes for MSF, right? In creating it, you were carrying on the will of The Boss.

[SNAKE]

She taught me how to fight, the hard way - she beat it into me.

[MILLER]

And now thanks to her, we can take on missions other than just conventional combat. After all, we've got the same mother as the Army's Special Forces.

[MILLER]

You know, Snake, you're right. As long as we're "soldiers without borders," we're going to be a target. We need our own deterrent.

[SNAKE]

We're going to be stepping into a lot of different conflicts as we roam the world. Each one unique, and with its own set of geography, ideologies, and politics. If we're going to intervene in those kinds of situations, we need the threat of a Metal Gear.

[MILLER]

...Unless we want to end up like Che Guevara did in Bolivia.

[SNAKE]

Well said. Our army without borders doesn't have a land to call home. We're nomads. Wanderers. What we need now is a sheepdog to guard our flock.

[MILLER]

Right.

[SNAKE]

Maybe it's not the way The Boss would have gone about it... But there are places in this world that need us - and soldiers that need MSF. And as long as we're needed, we'll keep on moving. Ours is a journey that never ends. We're the real Peace Walkers.

[MILLER]

Still can't believe Professor Gálvez was KGB...

[SNAKE]

Well, like the "professor" said, Moscow's hell bent on communizing Latin America.

[MILLER]

Yeah, the Cuban intel services are all in the KGB's pocket. You don't think he's got some kind of ulterior motive?

[SNAKE]

If the CIA is up to something, it's only natural that the KGB wants to know about it. But I doubt they're showing us their full hand.

[MILLER]

We'd better watch our backs.

[SNAKE]

What do you think, Kaz? Why did Paz come all the way to Colombia herself?

[MILLER]

It is a long trip to make just to be Exhibit A in Gálvez's sales pitch... She's only 16 - still a kid. Maybe we should take her wish for peace at face value.

[MILLER]

Remember that habit Paz had, Snake? How she always had her index finger on her upper lip like this?

[SNAKE]

Yeah. It bugged me ever since we first met her... Never figured her for a snuff user.

[MILLER]

I can't believe we never noticed.

[SNAKE]

She used the kind where you keep a pouch of leaf in your upper jaw and let it absorb through your gums. She might not have been used to it. Probably used her finger to keep it in place.

[MILLER]

How could Paz... We were going to start a band together...

[SNAKE]

She was posing as a KGB agent, too?

[MILLER]

She must have put on the act to get close to Gálvez. Wonder how much Coldman knew... But the whole time she was working for some organization called "Cipher."

[SNAKE]

"Cipher"... Ring any bells, Kaz?

[MILLER]

Cipher... Cipher... it means "code." Or "zero" in Arabic numerals.

[SNAKE]

Zero...

[MILLER]

Does that mean something to you?

[SNAKE]

Not sure.

[MILLER]

Hmm. You know, "cipher" and "zero" were basically the same word. It's a linguistic redundancy. The word stems from the Sanskrit "shunya"... It corresponds to the Buddhist concept of emptiness.

[MILLER]

In Buddhism, "shunya" means hollow. It supposedly refers to something that's swollen and empty on the inside.

[SNAKE]

A big, swollen emptiness... just like outer space.

[MILLER]

Costa Rica isn't alone. All of Latin America is getting swept up in the superpowers' Cold War. The whole ideological split between East and West... In the end, it's just a greedy scramble for wealth by the ruling classes. The Western bourgeois stand to lose everything if their countries go communist. After all, the communists want to abolish private property altogether. So the capitalist rulers desperately tried to halt the global spread of communism. Hence the phenomenon of red-baiting. And the communists, for their part, didn't exactly stay true to their principles. They tried to escape class-based society, but between Stalin's autocracy and the rise of the nomenklatura, they ended up creating one anyway. Once people have power, they stop caring about equality. That's where communism - where society in general - reaches its limits. The rulers only care about their own gain. The opposing side becomes a risk factor that threatens that profit. And thus the ongoing struggle between capitalism and communism was born.

[SNAKE]

And now nuclear deterrence is part of the picture.

[MILLER]

Exactly.

[MILLER]

They say nuclear weapons are the reason we haven't seen conflict on a global scale since World War II. The thought that your opponent might launch nukes against you sort of makes it tough to start an armed conflict. Especially now that they've got inter-continental ballistic missiles. Nowhere is safe.

[SNAKE]

Of course, all that has caused military expenditures to skyrocket...

[MILLER]

Well, the only way to ward off a preemptive strike is to flaunt your own nuclear stockpile. And that's caused their numbers to increase exponentially. Not just with regards to destructive power, but in terms of targeting technology, too. Now they can hit a target halfway across the world with pinpoint accuracy. In a way, the space race was a demonstration of that technological progress.

[SNAKE]

And as a result of all that, we now have mutually assured destruction...

[MILLER]

It's the ultimate form of deterrence. No one's going to launch their nukes knowing they'll be obliterated in return.

[SNAKE]

...I dunno. The chance of somebody hitting the button by mistake is never zero.

[MILLER]

You're right - even with peace guaranteed by MAD, there's always the risk of an accident.

[SNAKE]

Nobody wants the world to end on account of some machine's malfunctioning.

[MILLER]

On the other hand, thanks to deterrence, we haven't had a world war since 1945. You've gotta admit, it has been pretty peaceful.

[SNAKE]

Not that it matters to us.

[MILLER]

People point at the nuclear arms and space races and call it a Cold War. I say if they're not shooting at each other, why not call it world peace?

[SNAKE]

Doesn't mean war is gone. Look at Korea. Look at Vietnam.

[MILLER]

Well, yeah, but I'm talking in relative terms here. Besides, if war died out completely we'd be SOL.

[SNAKE]

...We're not warmongers.

[MILLER]

And yet we can't survive in a world that's at peace.

[SNAKE]

You've got a point...

[MILLER]

So it's been more than ten years since the Cuban Missile Crisis, huh?

[SNAKE]

I don't think we'll ever forget it.

[MILLER]

No kidding. Those 13 days starting October 15, 1962 were probably the closest we ever came to all-out nuclear war. The Russians deployed nuclear missiles to Cuba. America responded with a naval blockade. Then Russia shot down an American spy plane... I was still a teenager back then. But I remember what it felt like to be one step away from nuclear war - the adults were freaking out.

[SNAKE]

If it wasn't for the Cuban Missile Crisis, there might never have been an Operation Snake Eater. And...

[MILLER]

What's the matter, Snake? It's not like you to get all hypothetical.

[SNAKE]

Hm... I guess not. It was the reassessment after the Missile Crisis that paved the way for the hotline between Moscow and Washington, and also for Détente. That's irony for you.

[MILLER]

The Treaty of Tlatelolco was enacted to make Latin America into a nuclear-free zone. It bans the testing, use, manufacture, production, acquisition, storage, and deployment of nuclear weapons. The impetus was pretty obvious: the series of crises triggered by the deployment of nukes in Cuba.

[SNAKE]

Not hard to imagine. Those 13 days had the whole world frozen in fear.

[MILLER]

Of course, the country that started it all - Cuba - hasn't actually ratified it yet.

[SNAKE]

Still, the treaty's backed by over 20 countries. Anyone flouting it risks becoming an international pariah.

[MILLER]

True. OPANAL would investigate, no doubt. I heard they used Japan's Three Non-Nuclear Principles as their model when they drew up the treaty. I think the Treaty of Tlatelolco might have been their way of asking nuclear powers not to use nukes against them. That's the biggest difference between the treaty and the Three Principles. I guess you could call it a fourth principle.

[SNAKE]

So Costa Rica abolished its army back in, what, 1949? Pretty gutsy move for a Central American nation at the time.

[MILLER]

Yeah, well, they'd just come out of a civil war. I'm sure they were driven by a desire to avoid another tragedy, like Paz said. But I think they had a more compelling reason. Army coups d'état are a way of life in so many Latin American countries. Imagine seeing that up close...

[SNAKE]

No army, no coups... Makes sense.

[MILLER]

Plus their economy was in ruins, so they honestly didn't have any money to spend on an army anyway.

[SNAKE]

Yeah, but weren't they on less-than-friendly terms with Nicaragua?

[MILLER]

Yeah, and in fact Nicaragua did end up invading. But the Civil Guard fought back, and the OAS (Organization of American States) brokered a cease-fire. The U.S. and the rest of OAS had their back, and they used it to full advantage. For a quarter century, they've survived in the powder keg of Central America. That must've taken some serious diplomacy. Even if the Civil Guard is pretty decked out for a police force.

[SNAKE]

Must be tough to be a country without an army.

[MILLER]

Hey Snake, mind if I ask you something?

[SNAKE]

Since when did you start asking permission?

[MILLER]

..Ha. So, you used to be part of a CIA paramilitary unit, right?

[SNAKE]

That's right.

[MILLER]

Ever do any ops in Central America?

[SNAKE]

No, not personally. But there were other units who did all kinds of stuff.

[MILLER]

I remember the Bay of Pigs invasion back in '61. The papers had a field day with it.

[SNAKE]

"Operation Zapata" - that was the CIA codename. The whole thing went south.

[MILLER]

Then there was Che Guevara being hunted down in Bolivia. I heard the CIA had a hand in that, too...

[SNAKE]

There were several units similar to mine. MSP, SOG...

[SNAKE]

They'd recruit former Special Forces, train them as intelligence agents, and send them on "deniable" covert paramilitary operations. One of those units trained the Bolivian Army in counter-guerilla tactics....

[MILLER]

...And then had them shoot El Che.

[SNAKE]

So the story goes.

[MILLER]

Around here, they say "La CIA", instead of "C-I-A," huh?

[SNAKE]

Nothing strange about it. That's how it's pronounced when you read it in Spanish.

[MILLER]

It has the feminine noun ending "a," so they use the article "la." Apparently some people have even taken to using the term UCLA.

[SNAKE]

That's a new one to me. What's it mean?

[MILLER]

It stands for "Unilaterally Controlled Latino Assets."

[SNAKE]

...Meaning their local agents?

[MILLER]

Yeah, that's the idea. Washington uses them like pawns, and nobody knows who they really are or what they're doing.

[MILLER]

Can you believe the CIA and the KGB were actually in cahoots?

[SNAKE]

Never thought I'd see that at the station chief level... But I've heard stories of operatives in the field being on friendly terms.

[MILLER]

Seriously?

[SNAKE]

Most espionage takes place in political hotspots, as you'd expect. But there aren't that many of those kinds of places. Especially in a small country. Hang around long enough, and you're bound to run into fellow spies, like it or not. You start saying hello, and soon enough you're eating dinner together...

[MILLER]

Strange bedfellows, huh?

[SNAKE]

I dunno about that. At any rate, this kind of fiasco is what happens when spies get too familiar. Hard to believe, but some people will betray anyone and anything if it suits their interests.

[MILLER]

The strength of HUMINT is in its appeal to human emotions, but its weakness is in its susceptibility to those same emotions. That's why the tide in the intelligence world is shifting toward SIGINT. A network of cold, digital data, where feelings are irrelevant.

[MILLER]

Snake, you got a sec?

[SNAKE]

What's up?

[MILLER]

Prime Minister Gairy of Grenada is asking the UN to set up an agency to study the "UFO problem."

[SNAKE]

Grenada... That island in the Caribbean?

[MILLER]

He gave the press a bunch of photos - says they prove the existence of UFOs. One of them caught my eye.

[SNAKE]

That's the...

[MILLER]

Yep... The weapon Huey called the Chrysalis.

[SNAKE]

...Kaz, this is the photo I gave to Chico. He said something about selling it off as a photo of a UFO...

[MILLER]

Looks like it found its way into the pages of a magazine.

[SNAKE]

But... why would the prime minister of a country believe tabloid trash like that?

[MILLER]

There's been reports all over the Americas of abductions and cattle mutilations, lately.

[SNAKE]

You think they're true?

[MILLER]

I think the CIA might be involved.

[SNAKE]

If they are, then Gairy could be...

[MILLER]

I know. If he digs too deep, he's gonna get himself into trouble.

[SNAKE]

But Grenada's right next door to Cuba.

[MILLER]

I guess that would make it tough for the CIA to intervene, in a sense.

[SNAKE]

Upsetting the domestic balance of power could cause it to go Red all of a sudden.

[MILLER]

True... Well, in any case it's not like we can do anything about it. Just wanted to let you know.

[SNAKE]

Gotcha. I'll be careful not to let any more photosleak.

[MILLER]

So I hear Amanda mistook you for Che Guevara, Snake. That's not too bad, huh?

[SNAKE]

Yeah, right. I'm not even worthy of polishing his boots.

[MILLER]

Don't be so modest. From where I'm standing, your men see you as a great man.

[SNAKE]

As great as "the century's most complete human being"?

[MILLER]

That's Sartre, right? Well, there's hardly been a more iconic figure of his times than Che.

[SNAKE]

He was more than that. He was a true revolutionary, and a great warrior.

[MILLER]

I'm with you there. Can you believe that when he first went to Cuba with Fidel, they only had 12 guys with them?

[SNAKE]

But they rallied. They brought in new recruits, won the support of the peasants, expanded their organization...

[MILLER]

And in the end, they overthrew the Batista regime...

[SNAKE]

People flocked to them because they were honest. They won because they were strong. Those are the qualities that make men great.

[MILLER]

You know, we're kind of in the same boat they were back then. Here we are, a handful of mercenaries taking on an army backed by the United States.

[SNAKE]

Yeah, we've got a long way to go.

[MILLER]

But we've got to keep on going. It's not just about winning in battle. You need to think about recruiting people and growing this operation.

[SNAKE]

Got it.

[MILLER]

Hey, Snake, I've been thinking... Maybe Che couldn't find a place for himself outside the battlefield, either.

[SNAKE]

How so?

[MILLER]

He led the Cuban Revolution to victory. That's quite an accomplishment. He could have called it quits there and nobody would have blamed him. But he left behind a loving family and a cabinet post to plunge back into the struggle. First in the Congo, then in Bolivia - where he met his end.

[SNAKE]

You're overthinking things. Che went back to the battlefield because he was needed there. Read his "Farewell Letter," then you'll understand.

[MILLER]

Some say he was too idealistic to fit in with a government.

[SNAKE]

Too many scruples, most likely.

[MILLER]

Maybe so... But I still can't help thinking the reason you look up to Che is because you see something of yourself in him... You left your country behind and plunged into battle. You wander from one battlefield to another, going wherever you're needed...

[SNAKE]

Che was a revolutionary as well as a warrior. He took up arms to fight for his beliefs. I don't do what I do for any ideology. I'm a warrior. Nothing more, nothing less.

[MILLER]

OK, Boss. You're right. Just wanted to see how we stacked up against a real hero.

[MILLER]

Boss, did you ever read Che Guevara's book "Guerrilla Warfare"?

[SNAKE]

I, uh... can't remember if I got to that one or not.

[MILLER]

You should have, that's why I lent it to you. A lot of the guerrilla tactics it covers apply to sneaking missions, too. Che was one of the first people to articulate the theory of guerrilla warfare. T.E. Lawrence - "Lawrence of Arabia" - was another one. And Mao Zedong and his "On Protracted War"... Theory aside, Nicaragua's General Sandino was one of the first to put guerrilla tactics into practice. Which explains why the Sandinistas named themselves after him.

[SNAKE]

If you think about it, guerrilla warfare itself has been around since ancient times. There's only so many ways a small group can upset a large army.

[MILLER]

There was a samurai in Japan who excelled in guerrilla warfare.

[SNAKE]

No kidding?

[MILLER]

Kusunoki Masashige. He was a warrior who lived in the medieval era. He used unconventional tactics to help overthrow the Kamakura Shogunate.

[SNAKE]

Like what?

[MILLER]

Trojan Horse-style maneuvers and decoys to confuse the enemy... The best one was when the enemy was climbing his castle walls - he dumped boiling water and human excrement on them...

[SNAKE]

Sounds great. Let's put it in the MSF playbook.

[MILLER]

...You're not serious, are you, Boss?

[SNAKE]

Why not? We've got plenty of crap to unload.

[MILLER]

Uh.... yeah. I'll think about it.

[SNAKE]

What's wrong, Kaz? You sound beat.

[MILLER]

Yeah, the problems never seem to end around here...

[SNAKE]

You should take a break. Share a cup of mate with the other guys. It'll give you a chance to connect with them.

[MILLER]

I wonder if Che and his men ever sat around drank mate.

[SNAKE]

I bet they did. Che was famous for his love of the stuff.

[MILLER]

Man, whoever thought of this was a genius. You can put it in a gourd and carry it around, and there's a special straw with a filter attached so you can drink it anytime.

[SNAKE]

That's not all. It's full of essential vitamins and minerals, too. Nice to have in a guerrilla war when food is short.

[MILLER]

Yeah, I wish I had a chance to share some with a blonde Parisienne when I was out hiking.

[SNAKE]

...How do you know about that?

[MILLER]

It takes a thief - or should I say it takes a snake - to know one, Snake.

[MILLER]

The year the Cuban Revolution was won, Che visited Japan as a member of an economic delegation. While he was there, he visited Hiroshima.

[SNAKE]

Hiroshima...

[MILLER]

Since he was there to discuss economic issues, Hiroshima wasn't part of the original itinerary. Some said the Ministry of Foreign Affairs didn't want to let him go. But he went anyway. He snuck out of his hotel and took an overnight train.

[SNAKE]

Traveling guerrilla-style - sounds like Che, all right.

[MILLER]

He visited the Peace Memorial Museum and the Atomic Bomb Survivors Hospital. Apparently it gave him quite a shock. As a doctor, it must have been painful for him to see how the victims suffered.

[SNAKE]

Nukes destroy everything...

[MILLER]

He was quoted as saying, "They put you through this, and still you do whatever America says?" ...Those words really hit me hard. Especially when I think of my mom. He said something else, too: "Let us all love Hiroshima, and its people."

[SNAKE]

I can believe it. Che never managed to numb himself to other people's pain. That's why people loved him. And why he died.

[MILLER]

That bandanna you're always wearing - that thing's a real antique. Ever think about getting a new one?

[SNAKE]

This one's fine.

[MILLER]

Come on, we can't have our Boss wearing a raggedy old thing like that...

[SNAKE]

It was a gift, OK? It wouldn't be right to get rid of it.

[MILLER]

It was? OK, then... Speaking of which, Che supposedly had a black scarf he used to take everywhere with him.

[SNAKE]

A scarf?

[MILLER]

One of his comrades gave it to him when he broke his arm in battle. Che used that silk scarf as a sling... and the comrade who gave it to him became his second wife.

[SNAKE]

Aleida, right?

[MILLER]

Even after his arm healed up, he never went anywhere without that scarf. What about you? You get that bandanna from someone special?

[SNAKE]

No, nothing like that. It's... important to me, that's all.

[SNAKE]

You were saying Japan has a peace constitution, too?

[MILLER]

Yep. Japan renounced war in Article 9 of its constitution. Aspiring sincerely to an international peace based on justice and order... ...the Japanese people forever renounce war as a sovereign right of the nation and the threat or use of force as means of settling international disputes. In order to accomplish the aim of the preceding paragraph, land, sea, and air forces, as well as other war potential, will never be maintained. The right of belligerency of the state will not be recognized.

[SNAKE]

You know it by heart?

[MILLER]

Some things you never forget.

[SNAKE]

Impressive. There were some parts I didn't quite get, though - like the whole "means of settling conflicts" thing.

[MILLER]

Yeah, that's been the subject of debate. Whether or not it forbids any and all use of force. The current constitution was originally drawn up under the Allied occupation. The first draft was even submitted by Allied GHQ. So naturally there are some who feel the constitution was imposed on Japan by foreigners.

[SNAKE]

Things like that are never simple. Same for every country, I guess...

[MILLER]

One thing's for sure, though - not having an army let Japan focus on economic recovery after the war. In that sense, it's the same as Costa Rica.

[SNAKE]

Kaz, you were in the Japanese Self-Defense Force, right? I thought that Article 9 you were talking about earlier prevented Japan from having an army...

[MILLER]

Yeah, and that's another subject of controversy. "The Self-Defense Force is an organization for the purpose of defense. Article 9 of the constitution does not deny Japan's right to self-defense. Therefore, the SDF is constitutional." That's Tokyo's official stance.

[SNAKE]

...Sounds complicated.

[MILLER]

Call it what you will, it's a distinctly Japanese way of interpreting things.

[SNAKE]

The U.S. has military forces stationed in Japan, right?

[MILLER]

Right. Even though the Allied occupation ended, American forces are still stationed there under the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty.

[SNAKE]

Unlike Costa Rica.

[MILLER]

Part of it stems from the occupation, but Japan also occupies a key strategic position from America's perspective. It's next door to the Soviet Union, and close to China and North Korea as well. It's integral to the security of Pacific Asia. For America, Japan represents a barrier against communism.

[SNAKE]

What about for Japan?

[MILLER]

As you might expect, there's deep-rooted opposition to the alliance. In 1960 and 1970, when the treaty was up for revision, there were mass protest movements against it. Especially in Okinawa. The U.S. only gave it back to Japan two years ago, and American bases are still concentrated there. It's a heavy burden for the Okinawans to bear.

[SNAKE]

Then why don't they scrap the treaty?

[MILLER]

Lots of reasons. There's the imbalance of power with the U.S., of course. And if Japan pulled out, they'd be losing the nuclear umbrella America provides. And as for whether the JSDF could defend the country after the Americans left... I really couldn't say. Costa Rica's in a similar situation. They depend on the Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance, the so-called Rio Pact.

[SNAKE]

So the countries with peace constitutions end up having to rely on other countries' armies... Kind of ironic.

[MILLER]

On the flip side, not everybody in America is satisfied with it, either. Some people argue Japan is freeloading off America's security guarantee. And you know how Japan's industrial exports are making inroads in the States.

[SNAKE]

Yeah. I've got a Japanese camera myself. Best damn camera around.

[MILLER]

Japan's low defense spending allows it to invest more in economic recovery and expand its share of the American market. That's a bitter pill for Americans to swallow.

[MILLER]

You know that today, Japan is under the American nuclear umbrella...

[SNAKE]

Right.

[MILLER]

The U.S. vowed to retaliate against any country that launches a nuclear strike against an allied country... That promise deters nuclear attacks against America's allies. Hence the term "nuclear umbrella." But suppose the Russians nuked Tokyo. Would America really nuke Moscow in return? If they did, the Soviet Union would undoubtedly retaliate. Would Washington really be willing to risk having a bomb dropped on itself in order to avenge Japan? ...I'm not so sure.

[SNAKE]

Don't tell me you're still worried about Japan. After all these years?

[MILLER]

It's not that. I just...

[SNAKE]

To be honest, I'm not convinced, either. But Moscow faces the same dilemma. Maybe Washington wouldn't retaliate on Japan's behalf. Then again, maybe it would.

[MILLER]

So you're saying Moscow wouldn't want to risk being attacked, either...

[SNAKE]

The whole concept of nuclear deterrence is entirely hypothetical to begin with. When you get down to it, it's all smoke and mirrors.

[MILLER]

"Japan shall not possess, manufacture, or allow the introduction of nuclear weapons into Japan"... Those are the Three Non-Nuclear Principles set forth by the Japanese government.

[SNAKE]

"Allow the introduction"...? That's funny. Some of the U.S. warships that visit Japanese ports are armed with nukes... Or are you gonna tell me they transfer them at sea onto other ships every time they visit?

[MILLER]

You raise a good point, Snake. But the Japanese government doesn't recognize it as such. The introduction of nuclear weapons into Japanese territory would need to be agreed upon in advance. America hasn't made any such agreements. Therefore, they aren't bringing nukes into Japan.... That's the official excuse.

[SNAKE]

...Doesn't sound like much of an excuse to me.

[MILLER]

I don't blame you. Keep in mind, though, Japan's suffered actual nuclear attacks. Anti-nuke sentiment there runs deeper than you think. I suppose the government's not really in a position to admit that sort of thing.

[SNAKE]

So tell me, Kaz, how's the Self-Defense Force you were in different from an army?

[MILLER]

The JSDF is set up for national defense. It's not configured for aggression against other countries. It's what you'd call exclusive defense.

[SNAKE]

Exclusive... defense?

[MILLER]

It's the fundamental strategic posture of the JSDF. No preemptive attacks. Only the minimum defensive action necessary after an enemy attacks.

[SNAKE]

Anything defined as self defense, then.

[MILLER]

The JSDF originated as the National Police Reserve. Back then, American forces stationed in Japan were being sent over to fight in the Korean War. So in a sense, the NPR was filling a gap.

[SNAKE]

Police, huh... Reminds me of the Costa Rican Civil Guard.

[MILLER]

Yeah, exactly. They're also dispatched to provide disaster relief. The year before I joined, they had a hell of a time trying to rescue some buses that got hit by landslides.

[SNAKE]

So why'd you quit the JSDF?

[MILLER]

Because I didn't have a reason to be in Japan anymore.

[SNAKE]

Reason?

[MILLER]

My mom had died three years earlier, so I didn't have to care for her anymore. With her gone, there was no point hanging around in Japan.

[SNAKE]

Yeah, but a man with your talents could have risen pretty high in the ranks, I imagine.

[MILLER]

I don't know what they made of me. Could be it actually alienated me from the brass. And personally, I could never get used to the idea of exclusive defense.

[SNAKE]

Meaning?

[MILLER]

On a strategic level, I can see how a country could go with the exclusive defense model used by the JSDF, and I've got nothing against my fellow soldiers who believe in it. On a tactical level, though, it just rubbed me the wrong way. To put it simply, I was itching for a real fight.

[SNAKE]

I figured....

[MILLER]

And I felt like as long as I was in the JSDF, I'd never be able to stand shoulder to shoulder with my father who was in the U.S. Army. Seeing Yukio Mishima's suicide didn't help, either.

[SNAKE]

Yukio Mishima... the guy who wrote "The Temple of the Golden Pavilion"?

[MILLER]

The way he questioned the status quo hit home with me. Not that I admired his vision or anything. But it did get me thinking, that's for sure.

[MILLER]

Don't forget to give the MSF staff assignments. Where you place people will determine how Mother Base grows..

[SNAKE]

Right.

[MILLER]

That goes for me, too. Assign me wherever you think is best.

[SNAKE]

You? I thought you were second-in-command.

[MILLER]

Don't worry, I've got that covered. But MSF is still small, and I don't have the leisure of sitting around on my butt all day.

[SNAKE]

I see your point, but...

[MILLER]

Not to brag or anything, but I'd kick ass at whatever job you gave me. Put me in the area you want to focus on developing most. I'll take real good care of the staff there.

[SNAKE]

Easy, Kaz.

[MILLER]

March 10, 1945. 381,300 cluster bombs were dropped on Tokyo. Japanese houses at the time were almost all made of wood. In that single day, a third of Tokyo burned to the ground. My mom lost her family and home in that raid. She had to move to Yokosuka and live with her cousin. The B-29s kept on coming, razing other major cities throughout Japan without mercy. Then, in August, they dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and Japan surrendered to the United States at last. After that, Yokosuka was flooded with American soldiers come to occupy the country. My mother was still in her mid-teens, and she learned from her cousin how to survive in that town - by servicing the troops. That's how she met my father. And how I was born. My father was an officer serving with the Government Section of Allied GHQ, under General Whitney. Whitney was known as MacArthur's shadow, and my father rode his coattails to a pretty high rank. While he was in Japan, he treated my mom like a wife. After he went back to the States, though, she never heard from him. I wasn't born until after he went back. My mom raised me as a single mother. She used the money my father left her to open a shop, selling cigarettes and stuff to occupation troops. It was a decent living. But I didn't have citizenship. They're working to change the law now, but back then, if your father was unknown, you couldn't get onto the Japanese family register - and in Japan, that means you can't be Japanese. So as I watched the American soldiers around town, I said to myself: I'm a son of America, the victor. My hair and eyes were different from the skinny, downtrodden Japanese around me. I told myself I'd leave this country someday and return to my true homeland.. When I was around 10 years old, my mom fell ill, pretty much leaving me to run the shop in her place. One day, I found a single picture of my father in the back of a drawer in the shop. I'd show it to the American soldiers who came in to the store. A few years went by before one of them told me who he was. "I know him. That's Miller." I started asking other guys. "Do you know where Miller is now?" "Can anybody tell me where Colonel Miller is now?" Turns out he'd left the service and was making a living as an instructor for soldiers in Virginia. It was one of his students who finally told me that. I wrote him a letter in English. "I'm your son. I want to go to the United States." Day after day, I waited. Then, just when I was about to give up, the post office delivered my future to the door. My father sent me some money. I thought my dream was going to come true. I was only thinking of myself. So I went to my bedridden mother and convinced her to let me go. My father arranged for a car to pick me up. It was jet-black. When the neighborhood kids who'd always made fun of my hair saw it, their jaws practically hit the ground. I put my mom in a hospital, and went on my own to America. When I met my father for the first time, he was living alone in a big house. He told me he'd lost his son... his American son... in Vietnam. He showed me a picture. A picture of my older brother. I guess that and his divorce left my father feeling lonely... which is probably why he finally took an interest in me. He'd retired from teaching. He was stooped over, could hardly walk. But he gave me two things: the name Miller, and money for school. I used it to learn English and then go to college. America was exhausted from years of fighting in Vietnam. They were waging war in a foreign land while at home people were screaming for peace. Right after I graduated, I went back to Japan. Alone. My father refused to see my mom. It was the first time I'd seen her in years, and she wouldn't even look at me. At first I thought she was mad at me. But that wasn't it. Disease had taken her mind... A disease she'd gotten when she was young and desperate. She didn't even know who I was. I said, "Mom, it's me, Kazuhira." As I spoke, the sound of my own voice rang in my ears. Kazuhira. The name my mom gave me. It means "peace" in Japanese. I was Japanese. At least, I was the son of this tiny Japanese woman. It was then, for the first time, that I understood the reason - the emotion - that inspired my mother to give me that name. She'd watched her hometown and family go up in flames. Her body and her mind were ravaged by war... And yet she chose to have a child named "peace," with a man who was once her enemy. Japan lost the war. But what good is war as a measure of a country? Since the war, and up until the oil shock last year, Japan's economy has grown every single year. It's on its way to becoming a stronger country than ever. I stayed in Japan and joined the JSDF. I was twenty-two at the time. I did it to pay our bills... but it wasn't just that. I could have found work anywhere. And I knew it. And still, I couldn't think of anything else to do with myself. Two years later, I didn't have to worry about mom's hospital bills anymore... I left the JSDF and went back to the States. My father was already dead and buried. I was told he'd shot himself in the head. America crushed Japan. But it also crushed my father. My American Dream was over. After that, I drifted around and... well, you know the rest. ...GHQ made women like my mother. It made Japan's peace constitution and the JSDF. And it made me. I was spawned by war. But I don't want to die in one. I won't die for a country, and I won't live like a pauper. I won't have my fate decided by some family register. So as long as I stick with you, Boss, I've got a good feeling none of that will happen.

[MILLER]

Life's funny sometimes, isn't it?

[SNAKE]

What brought that on?

[MILLER]

We first met as enemies on the battlefield, and now here we are fighting side by side.

[SNAKE]

You mean Colombia?

[MILLER]

Yeah. After I quit the JSDF, I made my way there and got myself a position as a drill sergeant for a band of revolutionaries, despite the fact that I'd never seen a day of combat.

[SNAKE]

I see you had the gift for talking business in Spanish even back then.

[MILLER]

C'mon, stop it, you're making me blush. Unlucky for me, though, you were in the service of the Colombian Army. I remember it like it was yesterday. It all happened in an instant. You guys ambushed us, and half my unit was taken out. My mind went totally blank. I couldn't keep it together... My whole unit was wiped out... and I was left half-dead from a bomb blast.

[SNAKE]

Then, as I was leaving, you yelled out at me... "I came all the way from Japan to be here. My place is on the battlefield." Then you asked for my help, saying, "I want to be the one to end it." I remember being surprised that there were still samurai in Japan.

[MILLER]

You guys came over to me. I had a grenade hidden under me. But even then you were too fast. The second I pulled the pin, you grabbed the hand I was using to hold the grenade with both palms.

[SNAKE]

I didn't want it to go off. I'd heard samurai were a proud bunch. I wanted to know why one of them would stoop so low as to try and take his opponent with him.

[MILLER]

And I said, "I'll never lose again... We'll never lose again."

[SNAKE]

Yeah. "We'll do whatever it takes, but we'll never be beaten again."

[MILLER]

Then I passed out from the blood loss. When I woke up, I was in your camp's infirmary, stuck full of tubes. Why'd you save me, your enemy, after I tried to kill you?

[SNAKE]

Because you swallowed your pride and fought with everything you had.

[MILLER]

I just didn't want to lose...

[SNAKE]

You found a way to fight back even in the face of death - even when you knew you were going to die. That's the mark of a true warrior. It's not about gain and loss, or victory and defeat. I looked at the way you lived your life and saw the path I needed to take. As a warrior.

[MILLER]

Wow. I never knew that. And that's why you...

[SNAKE]

I realized then that the battlefield doesn't only divide people into allies and enemies. Sometimes it tells you more than just who's an ally or who's an enemy. Sometimes it helps reveal your true comrades.

[MILLER]

Like you and me, huh?

[SNAKE]

That's right. And two years later, here we are...

[MILLER]

You've probably heard this a million times, Snake, but you should always avoid combat with the enemy when possible.

[SNAKE]

Right.

[MILLER]

We're outnumbered and in unfamiliar territory. We won't survive long in a straight fight, even with you on our side.

[SNAKE]

I know. Avoiding combat is rule number one in a sneaking mission.

[MILLER]

That's right. Don't let the enemy know where you are, and attack only when necessary, using hit-and-run tactics to cripple them... It's the essence of guerrilla warfare.

[MILLER]

Can I ask you a favor, Snake?

[SNAKE]

If you ask nicely.

[MILLER]

To make MSF bigger, we need to do some recruiting.

[SNAKE]

Yeah... What's your point?

[MILLER]

I want you to avoid killing enemy soldiers as much as possible and send them back using Fulton recovery. Not much we can do with a corpse except give it a funeral.

[SNAKE]

Obviously.

[MILLER]

Put 'em to sleep, knock 'em out...hold 'em up, even. And if you do have to fight, try to leave them near death instead of dead.

[SNAKE]

And then use the Fulton recovery system...sounds easy enough.

[MILLER]

You know what'd be really nice, though. If we had a way to Fulton recover anybody at anytime...

[MILLER]

You can steal items from soldiers by putting them to sleep or knocking them out and then doing a body check. Get close to the unconscious soldier and press the Action Button when you see the icon. Or you can sneak up on them from behind and do a hold-up. It also works if the soldier's near death. Keep in mind, though - if you wait too long, you'll have a dead soldier instead of a dying one. And you can't do a body check if you're holding the Fulton recovery device, either. So don't try.

[MILLER]

Don't carry any more gear than you need. If you try and stuff your entire arsenal into your backpack, it'll be too heavy and your mobility will be impaired. You'll only be hurting yourself.

[SNAKE]

I know. Take only what you need. Every rookie knows that.

[MILLER]

You can check the weight of your gear before heading out. So make sure you do.

[SNAKE]

Got it.

[MILLER]

Even a born warrior like you gets hand tremors, Snake. It happens even when you're full of stamina, and it only gets worse when you're tired - especially with larger, heavier weapons. Obviously, you'll get better aim crouching than you will standing. And when you use a scope, setting your sights on a single point will gradually give you a more precise aim. As we develop better weapons at Mother Base, though, you may gain access to new, low-tremor versions of the same guns. So if you expect the shakes to be a problem, you might want to put some resources into R&D.

[SNAKE]

I'll keep it in mind. Then again, the more you use a weapon, the more your hands get used to it. Sometimes it pays to be faithful to your gun.

[MILLER]

Choosing the right uniform is crucial. Pick one that matches the mission objective and your own combat style.

[MILLER]

Jungle fatigues are made for jungle combat. They provide decent protection and let you carry a fair number of weapons. Your standard uniform, basically. The distinguishing factor is that your camo index will vary - a lot - depending on the area. Wear a pattern that makes you blend in with your surroundings and your camo index goes up. Wear something that clashes and you'll stick out like a sore thumb.

[SNAKE]

Pick the right pattern for the occasion - Sigint used to lecture me on it all the time.

[MILLER]

The sneaking suit is a specialized uniform for stealth missions. It provides excellent camo in any stage. Even better, you won't make a sound when you walk.

[SNAKE]

So I won't need to tiptoe all the time.

[MILLER]

And, to top it off, it also makes your wounds heal faster. The fabric exerts just the right amount of pressure on your body to help stop bleeding.

[SNAKE]

Not a bad little trick.

[MILLER]

The battle dress uniform is the opposite of the sneaking suit in that it's specialized for combat. It lets you carry plenty of weapons and ammo, and provides excellent protection. Not the best choice for sneaking, but if you feel like playing one-man army, this is the uniform of choice.

[SNAKE]

Looks pretty damn heavy.

[MILLER]

It is. You won't be able to move as fast with it on, meaning it's not good for running away, either. Keep that in mind.

[MILLER]

Naked... That's exactly what you are with this uniform. The pants are the same as the jungle fatigues. Obviously, since you're exposing your bare skin, your defense and camo index are going to be low. On the plus side, it's so light you can move around quicker.

[SNAKE]

Good for showing off muscles, too.

[MILLER]

Hey, Snake. I heard they gave you your old code name because you used to run around with your shirt off. Is that true?

[SNAKE]

Don't believe everything you hear. They called me "Naked" because I went in without gear or food. I had to procure everything on site...

[MILLER]

You mean they sent you into the jungle without even a pair of pants?! On a HALO jump from 35,000 feet?! Sweet Jesus, you are a legend!!

[SNAKE]

...You're busting my balls, aren't you, Kaz?

[MILLER]

A little bit, yeah.

[SNAKE]

...Hilarious

[MILLER]

COoperative OPerationS, or CO-OPS for short, is the term for taking on missions in teams of two or more. The basic CO-OPS unit is a two-man cell.

[SNAKE]

Even a single teammate is great to have in enemy territory.

[MILLER]

And there are actually quite a few things you can't do by yourself. You can help each other climb walls, divide up mission roles... On the other hand, if one of you is spotted, the other one's screwed, too. And it's kind of tough for two people to hide in one small space.

[SNAKE]

Good point. But what's more important than anything is how close you are to your comrades.

[MILLER]

Well said. Working as a two-man cell can make the mission easier or harder depending on how well you work together. It's also good to note that if you've got a clear, specific objective, it can be to your advantage to use an even bigger team. That said, teams of three or more run a much greater risk of being spotted.

[SNAKE]

Yeah. In a sneaking mission, the fewer people you have, the easier it is to get around.

FAQ Display Options: View as Single Page | Printable Version