[VF2] Jeff guide, partial.

Well, I've come close to losing my entire Jeffry guide too often for
comfort, so I'm going to throw a certain part of it up here on r.g.v.a.
just to prove I actually *am* doing something with it. :P  Some of you
have already seen it, even though this particular secion still isn't
*quite*  complete, I just haven't had any time to edit it much lately.
I hope this helps a little for those who have recently picked up the big
man. :)

Shorthand guide:

XPD: Crucifix piledriver (d/f,d/f+P+K)
c-XPD: Crouch dash crucifix.
DE: Dashing elbow (f, f+P)
DE Upper: Dashing elbow, Uppercut (f, f+P,P)
PKG: aka Senbon punch, a punch without recovery time.
MC: Major Counter, in other words interrupting an attack.
BaB: Big ass Boot (f, f+K)
LUpper: Uppercut from crouch.
m-LUpper: LUpper done from a standing position. (d/f,d,d/f+P or variation)

Playing Jeffry
--------------

When I first played Jeffry, I thought that the key to winning with him
was to throw, and throw often.  After I played him for awhile and became
competent (and met Joji :)), I believed that Jeffry's strengths lie in
the fear of throws, and the execution of a lot of Uppercuts, knees, and
punches.  At the level I'm at now, I believe his throws are the key to
winning with Jeffry, and everything else is just a setup for a throw.

Forcing throws.
---------------

Learning when to throw is an essential part of playing a successful
Jeffry.  Good opponents will give you very few opportunities to throw, so
you must learn how to create your own throw opportunities.  Thankfully,
there are some very strong ways of doing this with Jeffry.

PKG (MC), throw.  If you execute a PKG and you get a major counter, you
have an automatic throw of your choice, XPD being my favorite.  An XPD is
good because it gives you a low punch if you only minor countered and
your opponent was able to shake the throw.  To get a feel for when you've
major countered the PKG, you can hear a squishy *bish* sound and your
opponent will kind of freeze in hit stun for a second.  This is your cue
to throw like crazy!

PKG (whiff over opponent's head), low throw.  Against crouch dashers and
autoduckers this is a very strong tactic.  The speed at which you can get
off the low throw after the PKG is amazing (gotta love no recovery!), and
you will always catch autoduckers.  You will also sometimes catch crouch
dashers, but only if they are coming in from *outside* of sidekick
range.  If they start from a closer distance, they will get in a high
throw before you can get the low throw off, assuming they have good
timing and an idea of their throw range.

low punch (MC), high throw.  If you MC a move that has a standing
recovery, your chances of throwing your opponent is very high.  It is
about as difficult as stagger/throwing, although you really don't need to
time it as carefully.  Just immediately input a throw after low punching,
preferably an XPD, and you should pick him/her up.  If you find yourself
only getting another low punch, try to delay the P+K slightly and see if
that works better.  If your opponent is getting off an attack first, try
doing it quicker.

low punch (MC), low throw.  A low punch that interrupts your opponent's low
attack will allow you to do a dash in, low throw.  I'm sure the computer
Jeff has done this to you before, so you might have some idea how it
works.  This is an automatic throw, so it's a very good idea to learn
this.  See the section on low throws for more details.

DE, (delay) Uppercut.  This is a great throw bait move that works on
everyone, but is harder against the lightweights.  As long as the DE
doesn't hit, and your Uppercut major counters your opponent, you will
be in the position of getting a free throw.  It will look like your
opponent has been PKG'd (they will be in stun), and you have a free
throw (again, XPD).  The throw needs to be inputted immediately after
the Uppercut comes out, while your opponent is still in stun.  If your
opponent is pushed backward in any way, or staggers, the throw is *not*
guarenteed.  He must be stunned and right in front of you.  A delayed
Upper can be interrupted by other moves, depending on how long you delay.
A PK from the fast characters (Sarah/Kage/etc) will interrupt all but
the most minute of delays.  Other than that, as long as you don't do a
huuuuuge delay, you will interrupt just about any move your opponent
will use, regardless of attack level.  Long delays can be interrupted by
kickflips, slower characters' PK's, and equivalent moves.  The use of a
long delay works only if you often change up your followups: i.e. delayed
Uppercuts, c-XPD's, crouch dash backward, etc.  Your opponent will delay
long enough to think that the Uppercut isn't coming out, and they'll try
a move to stop from being thrown.  This is where a long delay Uppercut
will grab him and you get your throw.

Standing Uppercut, Uppercut.  The second Uppercut in the Standing
Uppercut sequence will often stun enough for a throw as long as it
MC's your opponent, whether the first Uppercut was blocked or whiffed.
It does not need to be delayed, either, unlike the DE.  This is not as
strong of a throw bait as the DE, Uppercut, however, as low attacks
generally avoid the short range of the second Uppercut.  It is still
strong, however, as the first Uppercut has strong float potential and
opponents are generally wary of trying a throw in between Uppercuts.
Not to mention the Standing Uppers being uncounterable, while the DE,
Upper is counterable.  Once the second Uppercut stuns, however, the
continuation is identical to the continuation of the DE, Uppercut.
Whether the throw is *guarenteed*, like the DE Upper is, is still under
examination.

Throw traps.
------------

Unlike forcing throws, which are automatic if the specified conditions
are met, this section is on suckering your opponent into doing something
that will allow you to throw them.  This is a sketchy list, so feel free
to email me your pet traps, and I'll throw them into the next version of
this.

Headbutt (f+P+K), high/low throw.  This may take a little conditioning,
as people tend to try and attack after the headbutt.  After they've been
interrupted with a knee or PKG enough times, this trap becomes very
viable.  If your opponent ducks your headbutt, immediately input a low
throw (Powerbomb is best because of it's speed and range). If your opponent
blocks, go for a c-XPD.  If they block high or attack high they will get
thrown.  A strong throw is also the f+P bodyslam, as you get an elbow
stagger, PK (or any other followup) if they are ducking and a throw if not.
If your opponent likes to low punch after blocking the headbutt in order
to escape throws, wait and low throw their whiffed low punch.

Big ass Boot, throw.  The classic Jeffry trap.  It won't work much
any more, but it's still nice to know.  If your opponent blocks the Boot,
and then tries for a throw, yours will come out first (unless you're
playing against another Jeff or Wolf).  Any throw is good, but my
suggestion would be the triple headbutts.  Why?  Since many people are
aware of this trap, they will often attack with an elbow or punch combo
instead of trying to throw.  The headbutt has a chance of dodging the
attack and then whacking your opponent during his recovery.  Plus, the
headbutts look cool. :P  Another good throw is a c-XPD if you are
expecting a PK or PKG.  Gotta love the crouch dash/autoduck feature. :)

DE, throw.  This is dashing elbow, then a throw.  If the DE hits but
doesn't stagger or knock down, a throw is imminent unless your opponent
struggles (i.e. throws out a quick low or high punch).  If it is blocked,
a throw will work if your opponent is blocking in anticipation of an
Uppercut or other attack.  This is good after conditioning your opponent
with delayed Uppercuts.  Also, DE (stagger), dash forward, throw is very
strong bait, as your opponent is often struggling and blocking in
anticipation of an Uppercut float or PK.

Standing Uppercut, throw.  This is another conditioning throw, as your
opponent must be blocking in anticipation of another Uppercut for this
to work.  A c-XPD is probably your best bet, as your opponent is
generally a good distance away after blocking the first Uppercut.  It'll
also duck a PKG or PK, which is the standard way of defeating delayed
moves.

low punch, high throw.  The low punch will hit (not major counter), and
your opponent will most likely be waiting for an mid attack, like an
Uppercut.  This is your cue to do a low punch and buffer in an XPD or a
frontal backbreaker.  I personally like the frontal backbreaker, but
it's only because it's easier to time than the XPD.  The b, f, f motions
of the backbreaker take about the same time as it takes for your
opponent to get out of hit stun, so there is no tricky move timing
involved.  With the XPD, you have to delay the P+K a bit, and I often
only get a low punch even if I seem to time it right.  This may or may
not affect you, so do as you feel comfortable.  In all, this trap works
extremely often, especially combined with the attack traps (listed
below) that you can do from a low punch.

DE (blocked), dash in low throw.  If your opponent is good, he'll learn
to crouch dash backward after you do a DE.  This way he avoids both the
Uppercut followup (which he then can counter) and any high throw
threat.  If you think your opponent will do this, you can either do a
minute delay on the Uppercut, which will hit but not major counter, or
you can dash in and low throw.  If you can pull off the machinegun knee
in this manner, you are far too cool for words. :)

u/f+K Hopping jump thingy, XPD.  Well...this is better for Wolf, as he
can double the hop forward with a throw, but it sometimes works with
Jeffry.  Actually, I only do it when I screw up the controls and get a
jump.  The hopping kick is uncounterable, and the XPD will avoid any
throw attempt or high attack.  Not really useful, although it's okay for
okizeme (see Okizeme section).

There is one little anecdote I'd like to share about traps.  One of the
local players had been getting good at figuring out my traps, so I
planned and executed a nice long setup.  It went:

Big ass Boot (blocked), Headbutt (his PKG was dodged, but he recovered
in time to block it), DE (blocked), standing Uppercut (blocked), delayed
Uppercut (MC), XPD.  Each move was throw bait that I'd been using on him
all day, until he finally got fed up and attacked (thinking I had done a
m-LUpper instead of a standing Upper for a split second, and then howling
in agony as he realized what he had done. :P).

Attack traps.
-------------

Much of this will be obvious continuations of some of the throw bait
above, but I'll list them nonetheless.  Don't stick with just these,
though, invent your own stuff.

Big ass Boot, knee.  Many people have the habit of attacking with a mid
attack after they block the BaB, seeking to avoid the throw trap.  The
knee will more than likely MC for a huge interrupt float, so tag on your
worst. :)  Watch for PKG's, or any sort of high punch, as it will
interrupt your knee, but soften them from doing this by doing lots of
c-XPD tries.  If they get into the habit of backing off after the BaB,
then you now have a great positional weapon. :)

Big ass Boot, pretty much anything.  Hell stab, drop elbow, lunging
headbutt...anything you really want to throw on the end of a blocked BaB
will work.  Use your discretion, change it up often, and completely annoy
your opponent.  Heh.  Too bad the BaB sucks to get off.

PKG, Standing Uppercut.  I like this one a lot, as you will interrupt
anyone trying a low move or throw if your PKG whiffs, and it will
interrupt most anything else if the PKG is blocked.  The two moves are
almost seamless, and the added bonus of the Uppercut being one of those
delayed jobbers gives you some great initiative.  Watch out for reversal
types, because in that sense your attack is H, H, H.

PKG, Knee.  Not for everyday use, but it'll surprise your opponent when
done among a PKG, low punch style rush.  The knee will pretty much interrupt
everything if the PKG is blocked.  I would suggest you do this move as
PKG, d, f+K in case your opponent autoducks, in which case you knee 'em a
couple of times instead of once.  Heh.

PKG, toekick.  One of my personal favorites, I use this move in place of
the PKG sidekick that the faster characters seem to prefer.  With this
your will catch anyone crouch dashing in or trying to attack after the
PKG.  It *will* whiff against someone crouching in place after blocking
the PKG, but you still aren't vulnerable as you can continue with a
hammer if they flinch.  If the toekick hits...well, see the section on
the TKoD and variations.

Standing Upper, G, Standing Upper (delay) Upper.  Useful for those '2
Uppercut canny' people who will think they are safe to try and retaliate
after the second Uppercutt.  This works very well if you whiff the first
one, then whiff the next one.  They'll rush in only to be MC'd by your third
Uppercut, and it's welcome to throw city. :P

low punch, Uppercut.  Yeah, I know...the most mundane Jeffry routine, but
you have to admit it has power.  If you anticipate the Uppercut and
block high, you may be thrown instead.  If you try and attack, you could
be floated.  If you crouch dash back, you give Jeff better position, and
next time a DE may stagger you.

low punch, DE.  I've found this to be strong against the reversal types,
*especially* Kage.  In anticipation of the Uppercutt, they reverse high.
Kage especially feels safe doing this, as he also avoids any crouch dash,
throws when he performs his reversal.  Too bad for him, the DE staggers
and it's time to kiss his lifebar goodbye.  The DE also has a chance of
dodging under a high punch, which I think is stance related but at the
moment I'm not sure.  I also believe that in a closed stance Kage's low
punch will interrupt your DE, so use this only when in the appropriate
stance.  Low punch, knee is probably more certain, but has far worse
effects if you whiff it.

low punch, knee.  Great against Kage as well, as if he tries to reverse
an expected LUpper he'll get floated downtown for massive damage and
distance.  However, if Kage makes you whiff the knee, you'll get TFT'd
and things will go downhill from there.  Even if he only blocks it you'll
get hit by a PK, sweep, which is fairly signifacant damage.  Use with
caution, but use it nonetheless.  The payoff is extremely satisfying, and
it will make Kage more reluctant to try and reverse your Uppers and
punches.

Headbutt, PKG.  This is a very strong tactic, as many people try and
attack after blocking the headbutt.  If they try anything but a low
attack, they will be MC interrupted and then XPD'd.

================================================================================
From: dougc@umd.umich.edu (Douglas William Cole)
Subject: Re: [VF2] Jeff guide, partial.

Mason Wood (cons027@titan.oit.umass.edu) wrote:
: PKG (MC), throw.  If you execute a PKG and you get a major counter, you
: have an automatic throw of your choice, XPD being my favorite.  An XPD is
: good because it gives you a low punch if you only minor countered and
: your opponent was able to shake the throw.  To get a feel for when you've
: major countered the PKG, you can hear a squishy *bish* sound and your
: opponent will kind of freeze in hit stun for a second.  This is your cue
: to throw like crazy!

        All you aspiring PKG-throwers out there remember this:  It's very
easy to do the throw part TOO QUICKLY.  If you can't seem to get it to
work, slow it down.  If you try to do the throw while they're still in
hit-stun, a punch will come out.  A punch will also come out if you
didn't get a major counter so learn what each sounds like.

: low punch (MC), high throw.  If you MC a move that has a standing
: recovery, your chances of throwing your opponent is very high.  It is
: about as difficult as stagger/throwing, although you really don't need to
: time it as carefully.  Just immediately input a throw after low punching,
: preferably an XPD, and you should pick him/her up.  If you find yourself
: only getting another low punch, try to delay the P+K slightly and see if
: that works better.  If your opponent is getting off an attack first, try
: doing it quicker.

        Low punch/MC-throw is guaranteed.  It's not like stagger-throws.
It doesn't really work like how you said...  damn, I need to write a
guide too.  :)

: low punch (MC), low throw.  A low punch that interrupts your opponent's low
: attack will allow you to do a dash in, low throw.  I'm sure the computer
: Jeff has done this to you before, so you might have some idea how it
: works.  This is an automatic throw, so it's a very good idea to learn
: this.  See the section on low throws for more details.

        It works the exact same way as a low punch-high throw.

: Standing Uppercut, Uppercut.  The second Uppercut in the Standing
: Uppercut sequence will often stun enough for a throw as long as it
: MC's your opponent, whether the first Uppercut was blocked or whiffed.

        I'm almost posititive the throw is *guaranteed* in this case.

: Headbutt (f+P+K), high/low throw.  This may take a little conditioning,
: as people tend to try and attack after the headbutt.  After they've been
: interrupted with a knee or PKG enough times, this trap becomes very
: viable.  If your opponent ducks your headbutt, immediately input a low
: throw (Powerbomb is best because of it's speed and range). If your opponent
: blocks, go for a c-XPD.  If they block high or attack high they will get
: thrown.  A strong throw is also the f+P bodyslam, as you get an elbow
: stagger, PK (or any other followup) if they are ducking and a throw if not.
: If your opponent likes to low punch after blocking the headbutt in order
: to escape throws, wait and low throw their whiffed low punch.

        Okay, here's the way it works:  after a blocked headbutt (it
might have to  be a deep headbutt) a lowp unch will interrupt ANYTHING
that an opponent could try to do to you, even punches or low punches of
their own.  This is prime lowpunch-MC-throw material.  If they learn this
trick and don't flinch after a blocked headbutt, start doing a XPD right
ater they block the headbutt.  (in otherwords, mix up low punches and
XPDs after a blocked headbutt)
        A great sequence is low punch, uppercut, headbutt.  The power of
the lowpunch-uppercut is well known.  And, after a hit or blocked
uppercut, the headbutt will DODGE any elbows coming your way.  use this a
lot at close range and always make sure to play the lowpunch-or-XPD game
after a blocked headbutt and you'll wreack some serious havok.  It's a
Law Of Averages thing that is definately in Jeff's favor.  :)

: DE, throw.  This is dashing elbow, then a throw.  If the DE hits but
: doesn't stagger or knock down, a throw is imminent unless your opponent
: struggles (i.e. throws out a quick low or high punch).  If it is blocked,

        "Imminent?"  What do you mean by that?  The elbow(hit)-throw
timing is VERY hard and the opponent has to just stand there to get hit
bu it.  If he punches (or does ANYTHING, I think) you can't throw them.

: Big ass Boot, knee.  Many people have the habit of attacking with a mid
: attack after they block the BaB, seeking to avoid the throw trap.  The
: knee will more than likely MC for a huge interrupt float, so tag on your
: worst. :)  Watch for PKG's, or any sort of high punch, as it will
: interrupt your knee, but soften them from doing this by doing lots of
: c-XPD tries.  If they get into the habit of backing off after the BaB,
: then you now have a great positional weapon. :)

        Oh, and as documented by Darcy Brockbank, the knee has a chance
of tagging on IN A FLOAT if the BaB hits.  It looks pretty cool, you
wouldn't expect anything to tag onto that as a float.

: PKG, Knee.  Not for everyday use, but it'll surprise your opponent when
: done among a PKG, low punch style rush.  The knee will pretty much interrupt
: everything if the PKG is blocked.  I would suggest you do this move as
: PKG, d, f+K in case your opponent autoducks, in which case you knee 'em a
: couple of times instead of once.  Heh.

        This works very well because a lot of people will sqirm after a
PKG because they're worried about the PKG-throw.

================================================================================
From: cons027@titan.oit.umass.edu (Mason Wood)
Subject: Re: [VF2] Jeff guide, partial.

Douglas William Cole (dougc@umd.umich.edu) wrote:

:       All you aspiring PKG-throwers out there remember this:  It's very
: easy to do the throw part TOO QUICKLY.  If you can't seem to get it to
: work, slow it down.  If you try to do the throw while they're still in
: hit-stun, a punch will come out.  A punch will also come out if you
: didn't get a major counter so learn what each sounds like.

Yep, but with Jeffry it's a lot easier to time, thankfully.  If you
major counter with a PKG, then *c*-XPD you get the delay needed for your
opponent to get out of his throw-invulnerability time.  It's a built in
nicety that makes PKG, XPD very easy.

:       Low punch/MC-throw is guaranteed.  It's not like stagger-throws.
: It doesn't really work like how you said...  damn, I need to write a
: guide too.  :)

One, I said it was about as *difficult* as stagger throwing, not *like*
it.  Also, I'm pretty sure a low punch interrupt, high throw is not
guarenteed.  I have tried it under controlled circumstances, asked just
about everyone I could think of, and they all doubted it was true.  If
you really think about it, a low punch recovers in 6 frames.  Same with a
PG (G-cancelled high punch).  PG interrupt, XPD is certainly not
automatic, even though it's *likely*.  Thus, it should follow low punch
interrupt high throw follows the same rules.

: : low punch (MC), low throw.  A low punch that interrupts your opponent's low
: : attack will allow you to do a dash in, low throw.  I'm sure the computer
: : Jeff has done this to you before, so you might have some idea how it
: : works.  This is an automatic throw, so it's a very good idea to learn
: : this.  See the section on low throws for more details.
:
:       It works the exact same way as a low punch-high throw.

I also think that when you interrupt a low attack, it has different
properties than interrupting a high attack.  I'm not sure, it's just a
theory, but that may explain why low punch interrupt low attack is
automatic and low punch interrupt high attack is not.  And, if you really
think about it SuperDuck, wouldn't that be just a LITTLE unfair?  Low
punch interrupt, high throw AUTOMATIC?  Ummm...no.  The big guys would be
rated a bit higher on their list if that were true.  At least above Sarah.

: : Standing Uppercut, Uppercut.  The second Uppercut in the Standing
: : Uppercut sequence will often stun enough for a throw as long as it
: : MC's your opponent, whether the first Uppercut was blocked or whiffed.
:
:       I'm almost posititive the throw is *guaranteed* in this case.

So was I, but Joji told me this wasn't quite true.  I'm inclined to
believe him because the animation of MC'ing with the second Upper is
different than the DE Upper MC animation.  I've also had people low punch
out of it, but I wasn't sure if it was because it was only a minor
counter.  It's funny, I had 'guaranteed' down right until I posted
this...but I really am inclined to believe him. *shrug*
:
:       Okay, here's the way it works:  after a blocked headbutt (it
: might have to  be a deep headbutt) a lowp unch will interrupt ANYTHING
: that an opponent could try to do to you, even punches or low punches of
: their own.  This is prime lowpunch-MC-throw material.  If they learn this
: trick and don't flinch after a blocked headbutt, start doing a XPD right
: ater they block the headbutt.  (in otherwords, mix up low punches and
: XPDs after a blocked headbutt)

A blocked headbutt will always push too far out of the way for a low
punch to interrupt your opponent's following mid attack.  Another problem
is if you low punch vs. a big guy.  If they stand still after blocking
the headbutt they get a low throw.  Same goes with them...if they low
punch and you guard standing, you get the low throw.

:       A great sequence is low punch, uppercut, headbutt.  The power of
: the lowpunch-uppercut is well known.  And, after a hit or blocked
: uppercut, the headbutt will DODGE any elbows coming your way.  use this a
: lot at close range and always make sure to play the lowpunch-or-XPD game
: after a blocked headbutt and you'll wreack some serious havok.  It's a
: Law Of Averages thing that is definately in Jeff's favor.  :)

Unfortunately, Sarah's elbow knee will interrupt it and Akira's dashing
elbow will interrupt it.  The other REALLY unfortunate thing is that this
strategy doesn't work.  No one in North America that I have played has
*ever* elbowed after an Upper.  Dammit, and it's such a beautiful theory
too, and it DOES work.  No one ever reacts correctly, except maybe
Kages.  The worst thing is a punch will interrupt your Headbutt, as long
as they hold forward while doing it. *sigh*  However, I think that this
chain attack belongs in this section of the guide.  Thanks for reminding
me SuperDoug.  I think I mentioned this in another section (where I
describe each move), but it belongs here.

: : DE, throw.  This is dashing elbow, then a throw.  If the DE hits but
: : doesn't stagger or knock down, a throw is imminent unless your opponent
: : struggles (i.e. throws out a quick low or high punch).  If it is blocked,
:
:       "Imminent?"  What do you mean by that?  The elbow(hit)-throw
: timing is VERY hard and the opponent has to just stand there to get hit
: bu it.  If he punches (or does ANYTHING, I think) you can't throw them.

Well, it's a great chain.  I haven't yet had anyone break this chain if
my DE hit, but I think it is escapable.  It's VERY hard to escape though,
and I think only a fast low punch will escape it.  Even then, I'm not
entirely sure.  I've had opponents spazz when I hit a DE, and I still got
off the throw.  Check out the tape Jo did, I think examples are ont
here.  It looks really fluid, like a DE Upper (MC) throw.

:       Oh, and as documented by Darcy Brockbank, the knee has a chance
: of tagging on IN A FLOAT if the BaB hits.  It looks pretty cool, you
: wouldn't expect anything to tag onto that as a float.

Ack, you're right!  I should have mentioned that.  Ahh, well.  Thanks for
reminding me.

: : PKG, Knee.  Not for everyday use, but it'll surprise your opponent when
: : done among a PKG, low punch style rush.  The knee will pretty much interrupt
: : everything if the PKG is blocked.  I would suggest you do this move as
: : PKG, d, f+K in case your opponent autoducks, in which case you knee 'em a
: : couple of times instead of once.  Heh.
:
:       This works very well because a lot of people will sqirm after a
: PKG because they're worried about the PKG-throw.

Yeppers you are exactly right, and this is the the reason to use it.
Like I said, it was awhile since I've edited this, and I missed some
stuff.  Thanks for pointing it out, duck. :)

Mason