Ken Griffey Jr. Presents Major League Baseball
FAQ
Version 1.1
11/22/99
E-Mail: DreThug@hotmail.com

Sections:
1. Introduction 
2. Update History  
3. Controls
4. Game Genie Codes
5. Codes
6. Reviews
7. Frequently Asked Questions 
8. Credits 
9. Sites Who Host This FAQ 
10. My Other FAQs/Walkthroughs
11. Instruction Booklet
12. Legal Information 

---------------------------------
1. Introduction
---------------------------------
Welcome to my Ken Griffey Jr. FAQ for Super Nintendo.  I bet you are asking why 
I made this FAQ right now.  The game has been out for ages now, but I still play 
it.  I decided to make a FAQ on the game for two reasons.  The first reason is 
this is one of my favorite baseball games ever made.  The other reason is that 
no one else has made a FAQ on it so I decided to make one.  I am not expecting 
any e-mail because I bet no one will read it, but feel free to e-mail me at 
debuting@aol.com if you have any comments, suggestions, or questions.


---------------------------------
2. Update History
---------------------------------
November 21, 1999 - Yesterday's version had a rush feel to it.  I have fixed it 
up and added a lot of new stuff.  I really like updating this FAQ even though I 
get no e-mail on it.  I will probably be updating this FAQ every week.  I have 
switched my usual format and I am updating all my FAQs by .1 now.  

November 20, 1999 - Here's Version 1.0 of my FAQ.  This might be the only 
Version because there is nothing else to add after this.  Maybe not though.


---------------------------------
3. Controls
---------------------------------
Players

Offense

[B] Swing

[Y] Bunt

[X] Lead Off Base

[X] Steal

[L and R] Select Runner View

[Control Pad and A] Run to Previous Base

[Control Pad and B] Run to Next Base

[right  1st Base]
[up     2nd Base]
[left   3rd Base]
[down   Home Plate]


Players

Pitching

[Control Pad and B] Pitch Ball

[A] Pickoff Attempt

[down   Fast Ball]
[left   Curve Left]
[right  Curve Right]
[up     Change Up]


Players

Defense

[Control Pad and B] Throw Ball

[B] Dive

[B] Jump

[B (2x)] Climb Outfield Wall

[Control Pad and A] Run to Base

[right  1st Base]
[up     2nd Base]
[left   3rd Base]
[down   Home Plate]


Menu Screens

Roster

[left] Select Player

[B] Remove New Player/Pitcher (after selecting name)

[B] Insert New Player/Pitcher (after selecting name)


Manager Mode

Coach

[A] Hit and Run (offense)

[X] Steal (offense)

[Y] Bunt (offense)

[L and R] Select Runner (offense)

[X] Pitch Out (defense)

[Y] Bean Ball (defense)

[START] Pinch Hitter/Relief Pitcher


---------------------------------
4. Game Genie Codes
--------------------------------- 
World of Nintendo (http://www.world-of-nintendo.com) for supplying the Game 
Genie Codes.

DFC3 170F       1 ball and you walk
D4C3 170F       2 balls and you walk
CBB3 1D2D       Can't walk a player
DFCE 1F0F       1 strike and you're out
D4CE 1F0F       2 strikes and you're out
C2BE 179D       Can't strike out
DF27 CFA4       Invisible baserunners
D4C3 170F       2 outs and whole team is out
C2A2 4D94 + C2AA 47B4   No outs except strike outs
C28A-3FA7 + CBB0-4797 + C283-34D7       Computer can't score


---------------------------------
5. Codes
---------------------------------
Thanks to GameSages.com for supplying these codes.

Bean the Batter 
If you hold UP on the d-pad and aim towards the batter while throwing the pitch, 
you will bean the batter. 
Submitted by Jim Enforcer (jclare@sd69.bc.ca)

Pitches 
To throw different pitches; hold B and do the following:

To throw a fastball, hold down on the pad
To throw a change-up, hold up on the pad
To throw a curveball, press left or right

NOTE: You can pitch a curveball on three different settings: Fast, slow and 
normal. To do each one, throw a curve while holding down (fast), up (slow) or 
just left or right. 
Submitted by Ben Mihal (bendotkom@aol.com)

View Credits 
At the title screen, press B, A, Down, B, Up, B, B, A. 


---------------------------------
6. Reviews
--------------------------------- 
When I got this game it was a long long time ago.  Probably around 5 years at 
the earliest.  I don't remember much, but I am very happy I got this game.

Gameplay: 10/10 - The gameplay is solid.  The season mode is great and the two 
player mode is just as good.  You can play with every team.  The only thing bad 
is that the people are not real.  You can change the people though so you can 
have real teams.  The game is so fun I am still playing it.

Graphics - 1/10 - The graphics were average a long time ago and now they are 
really bad.  But as all games go, graphics are not the thing that makes the game 
good or bad.  

Sound - 10/10 - I love the backround midi or whatever it is that is playing 
while I'm playing the game.  There isn't that much more sound than that except 
the umpire and the bat hitting the ball.

Replay Value - 10/10 - I am still playing this game.  It came out in like 94 I 
think and its almost 2000.  What does this tell you?  This is the greatest 
baseball game ever.  It is so much fun.  If you don't have a SNES you should get 
one and get this game.  This is way better than the sequel in my opinion.

Overall - 10/10 - The best baseball game I have ever played.  If you have a SNES 
make sure you go buy this game for like 10 bucks.  It's will worth it.  I am so 
happy I bought this game for my SNES. 


---------------------------------
7. Frequently Asked Questions
--------------------------------- 
Question: What is the best team to use?
Answer  : I like the Seattle Mariners

Question: How old are you?
Answer  : Probably the same age as you.

Question: Is there anything wrong with this game?
Answer  : It's really outdated but its fun..

Question: How much is this game?
Answer  : Probably 10 bucks.

Question: Do you own this game?
Answer  : Yes, I got it close to when it came out.

Question: What games have better graphics than this?
Answer  : Almost every game.


That should answer all of your questions.  If you have anymore questions feel 
free to contact me.


---------------------------------
8. Credits
--------------------------------- 
This FAQ is made 99% by me.  I would like to thank:

GameFAQs (www.GameFAQs.com) for hosting all my reviews and FAQs.
http://members.xoom.com/nintendorep/snes/manuals/index.html for supplying the 
Instruction Booklet.
GameSages (www.GameSages.com) for supplying the codes.
World of Nintendo (http://www.world-of-nintendo.com) for supplying the Game 
Genie Codes.


---------------------------------
9. Sites Who Host This FAQ
-------------------------------- 
If you would like to use my FAQ on your site then you have to get permission 
from me.  Feel free to e-mail me asking if you can use this FAQ.  I will 
probably say yes.

GameFAQs.............(http://www.gamefaqs.com)


--------------------------------- 
10. My Other FAQs/Walkthroughs
--------------------------------- 
NBA 2K FAQ...........................Dreamcast
NFL 2K FAQ...........................Dreamcast
NFL Blitz 2000 FAQ...................Dreamcast
Toy Commander FAQ/Walkthrough........Dreamcast


--------------------------------- 
11. Instruction Booklet
--------------------------------- 
Here's the Instruction Booklet all typed out.  I would like to thank 
http://members.xoom.com/nintendorep/snes/manuals/index.html for supplying it for 
us.


SNS-JR-USA

Ken Griffey Jr.
PRESENTS
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL®

INSTRUCTION BOOKLET

SUPER NINTENDO® ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

WARNING: PLEASE CAREFULLY READ THE CONSUMER INFORMATION AND PRECAUTIONS
BOOKLET INCLUDED WITH THIS PRODUCT BEFORE USING YOUR NINTENDO® HARDWARE
SYSTEM, GAME PAK, OR ACCESSORY.

Thank you for selecting the Ken Griffey Jr. Presents Major League
Baseball® Game Pak for your Super Nintendo Entertainment System®.

Please read this instruction booklet thoroughly to ensure proper
handling of your new game.  Then save this booklet for future
reference.

This Game Pak contains a battery backup function to record the progress
of the game.

WARNING: If the POWER switch is switched ON and OFF repeatedly, the
accumulated contents may be deleted.  Avoid turning the POWER switch
OFF unnecessarily (before saving the game) or data may be lost.


Table of Contents

The Birth of the National Pastime........3
Major League Baseball--Then & Now........6
Getting Started..........................8
Icon Description........................10
Controller Function Overview............14
Pitcher/Batter Screen...................20
Fielder Screen..........................21
National League Team Histories..........22
American League Team Histories..........29
Biographies.............................36

™ and ® are trademarks of Nintendo of America Inc.
©1994 Nintendo of America Inc.
The Major League Club insignias depicted on this product are trademarks
which are exclusively property of the respective Major League Clubs and
may not be reproduced without their consent.  Major League Baseball is
a registered Baseball Properties, inc.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(3) the birth of the National Pastime

Baseball in the United States began modestly in the 19th century as a
variation of many games that made use of a ball and some sort of bat.
Throughout this time, baseball's growth mirrored the growth of the
United States.  By the turn of the century, the country had boomed
through the Industrial Revolution with cities growing at an alarming
rate.  Likewise, baseball had evolved into a professional sport where
spectators paid to watch skilled athletes play a child's game.

The popularity of amateur baseball clubs that played between 1845-1865,
led to the introduction of the first professional baseball club, the
Cincinnati Red Stockings.  The Red Stockings' success against the
amateur teams provided incentive to create America's first professional
baseball league, the National Association of Baseball Players in 1871.
Though the new league was not a complete success, it significantly
increased baseball's popularity across the land.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(4)

WILLIAM AMBROSE HUBERT, President of the Chicago club, and AL SPALDING,
a pitcher in Boston, believed that reforms were needed to protect
baseball from the corruption and instability that surrounded the
National Association.  At a meeting in Louisville in 1876, Hubert,
Spalding, and representatives of the St. Louis, Cincinnati, and
Louisville baseball clubs designed a set of guidelines for a new
league, named the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs.  The
National League contained eight charter clubs, however, between 1876
and 1900, only Chicago and Boston fielded a team each year.

During the first two decades of its existence, the National League
withstood threats of competition from newer professional leagues.  In
the 1890s, the National League's dominance weakened after growing to 12
teams, an unmanageable number for that period.  Although baseball
remained the country's favorite sport, it was gaining a reputation for
rowdiness and dirty play that didn't match the era.  This prompted
Byron Banford "Ban" Johnson and Charles Albert Comiskey to found a
league based on strong leadership and good virtue.  In the American
League, games were not played on Sunday

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(5)

and women were encouraged to attend ball games.  Johnson and Comiskey
set a goal to establish a new image for the game.  Recognizing that its
power had declined partially by managing too many teams, the National
League sold four clubs to the new league in 1900.

Following this transaction, National League officials still scoffed at
the new league when it began play in 1901.  However after luring many
premier National League players with higher salaries and running a
"kinder, gentler" league, American League attendance exceeded National
League attendance by 600,000 fans in 1902.  Early in 1903, the National
League granted the American League status as a Major League.  With
this, came a consistent scheduling system, player contract regulations,
and playing guidelines that the two leagues would share.  Another
product of this agreement was the World Series, which pitted the
American League Champion against the National League Champion in a nine
game series (later shortened to seven games) that would determine the
World Champion of Baseball.

In 1903, 16 franchises competed for the first World Series
Championship.  Though some of these teams have since moved to new
locations or changed their names, the modern era of baseball began in
1903 with the same goal that exists today.

                                                                   Shaw

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(6) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Then

1903

AMERICAN LEAGUE 1903
BOSTON RED SOX
CHICAGO WHITE SOX
CLEVELAND INDIANS
DETROIT TIGERS
NEW YORK YANKEES
ST. LOUIS BROWNS
PHILADELPHIA ATHLETICS
WASHINGTON SENATORS


NATIONAL LEAGUE 1903
BOSTON BRAVES
BROOKLYN DODGERS
CHICAGO CUBS
CINCINNATI REDS
NEW YORK GIANTS
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES
PITTSBURGH PIRATES
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(7) & NOW

1994

[AMERICAN LEAGUE 1994]
BOSTON RED SOX
CHICAGO WHITE SOX
CLEVELAND INDIANS
DETROIT TIGERS
NEW YORK YANKEES
BALTIMORE ORIOLES [*(1954)]
OAKLAND ATHLETICS [*Kansas City Athletics (1955-67)]
MINNESOTA TWINS [*(1960)]
TEXAS RANGERS [*New Washington Senators (1961-71)]
CALIFORNIA ANGELS [*Los Angeles Angels (1961-65)]
MILWAUKEE BREWERS [*Seattle Pilots (1969)]
KANSAS CITY ROYALS [*(1969)]
SEATTLE MARINERS [*(1977)]
TORONTO BLUE JAYS [*(1977)]

[NATIONAL LEAGUE 1994]
ATLANTA BRAVES [*Milwaukee (1953-65)]
LOS ANGELES DODGERS [*(1958)]
CHICAGO CUBS
CINCINNATI REDS
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS [*(1958)]
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES
PITTSBURGH PIRATES
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS
HOUSTON ASTROS [*(Houston Colt '45s (1962)]
NEW YORK METS [*(1962)]
MONTREAL EXPOS [*(1969)]
SAN DIEGO PADRES [*(1969)]
COLORADO ROCKIES [*(1993)]
FLORIDA MARLINS [*(1993)]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(8) GETTING STARTED

Play Ball!

Insert the Ken Griffey Jr. Presents: Major League Baseball Game Pak
into your Super Nintendo Entertainment System and move the POWER switch
to the "ON" position.

Once the title screen appears, press the START Button to advance to
make the game selection menu appear.

The game selection menu gives you the option of playing one of four
game modes: Exhibition, All-Star Game*, World Series*, or Season.

The Exhibition Game allows you to match any two teams in a single
contest with nothing but pride riding on the outcome.  Use this mode to
test your skills against the computer manager or a friend.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(9)

The All-Star Game is divided into two modes: the Home Run Derby and the
All-Star Classic.  The Home Run Derby lets you challenge Junior to a
power hitting contest.  In this game, each player tries to hit the most
home runs before making 10 outs.  The All-Star Classic features a
collection of top players from the American and National Leagues in an
exhibition game.

The World Series mode is a best-of-seven game series that can be played
by 1 or 2 players.  The first team to win 4 games, wins the World
Series Championship.

When beginning season play, you have several options available.  You
can play a season that consists of 26 games, 78 games, or the
traditional 162 game schedule.

You may also play under the 1969-93 divisional format (4 Divisions) or
the proposed 1994 divisional format (6 Divisions).  In the new
configuration 4 teams (3 division champions and 1 wildcard team) from
each league to qualify for the league playoffs and a possible trip to
the World Series.

The progress in your Season or World Series is saved automatically
after each game.  The game can also save and store 1 World Series and
one Season for play at a later time.

The team selection screen appears when you select the Exhibition, All-
Star Game, new Season, or new World Series modes.  Use the +Control Pad
and the B Button to select a team.  the X Button will cancel your
selection if you change your mind and want to pick a new team.

There are two Today's Game Screens that appear in the game.  The first
Today's Game Screen appears following the Team Selection Screen.  The
other Today's Game Screen is a pause screen that appears when you press
the START Button during a game.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(10) ICON DESCRIPTIONS

Ken Griffey Jr. Presents: Major League Baseball uses an icon system so
players can quickly and easily select various game options.

[MLB logo] Play Ball!

[OPTIONS] This icon allows you to enter the main Options Screen.

[1994] The schedule icon accesses a month at a glance calendar that
lets you check out upcoming matchups and results of previous contests.
You can only use this icon during season play.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(11)

[Cards icon] This icon lets you view your team's accumulated statistics
for the current season or World Series.

[STADIUM] During exhibition play, you may select this icon and choose
to play inside a different stadium.

[LINE UP] This icon lets you make changes to your lineup or defensive
positioning.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(12) ICON DESCRIPTIONS

[BULLPEN] The bullpen icon accesses the bullpen screen where you can
select a different starting pitcher before a game or a relief pitcher
during the game.

[TEAM EDIT] This icon lets you edit and save new names for all 700
players.

[NEWS] During season play, the newspaper icon displays current league
standings.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(13)

[* icon] This icon opens the Play Options screen.  On this screen, you
can select one of the following four options:

Designated Hitter: The game automatically selects the DH when the home
team is an American League team.  This function lets you decide to use
the DH or not.

Manage Only: This allows you to make managerial decisions like when to
steal and bunt.  The computer controls all pitchers, batters, and
fielders in this mode.

Auto Fielding: This option lets you pitch and hit without fielding.
You can use the auto fielder to give a novice player an advantage
against an experienced opponent.

Background Music: Select this mode to turn off the background music.

[EXIT] The exit icon returns you to the previous screen.  Pressing the
X Button performs the same action on all pregame screens.

[SAVE] Select this icon on the lineup, bullpen, and team edit screens
to save your data.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(14) FUNCTION OVERVIEW

[This page is a big pic of the SNES controller, and I trust you know
what that looks like.]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(15)

Players

Offense

[B] Swing

[Y] Bunt

[X] Lead Off Base

[X] Steal

[L and R] Select Runner View

[Control Pad and A] Run to Previous Base

[Control Pad and B] Run to Next Base

[right  1st Base]
[up     2nd Base]
[left   3rd Base]
[down   Home Plate]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(16)

Players

Pitching

[Control Pad and B] Pitch Ball

[A] Pickoff Attempt

[down   Fast Ball]
[left   Curve Left]
[right  Curve Right]
[up     Change Up]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(18)

Players

Defense

[Control Pad and B] Throw Ball

[B] Dive

[B] Jump

[B (2x)] Climb Outfield Wall

[Control Pad and A] Run to Base

[right  1st Base]
[up     2nd Base]
[left   3rd Base]
[down   Home Plate]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(18)

Menu Screens

Roster

[left] Select Player

[B] Remove New Player/Pitcher (after selecting name)

[B] Insert New Player/Pitcher (after selecting name)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(19)

Manager Mode

Coach

[A] Hit and Run (offense)

[X] Steal (offense)

[Y] Bunt (offense)

[L and R] Select Runner (offense)

[X] Pitch Out (defense)

[Y] Bean Ball (defense)

[START] Pinch Hitter/Relief Pitcher

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(20) PITCHER/BATTER

The pitcher/batter screen is the primary game screen and where the cat
and mouse game between the pitcher and the batter occurs.  While the
pitcher tries to keep the batter off balance with a variety of pitches,
the batter looks for a good pitch to drive into the gap or over the
fence.  This confrontation sometimes takes place as many as 150 times
in an actual Major League game.

During game play, the pitcher/batter screen appears until the batter
hits the ball or the pitcher steps off the mound to pick off a base
runner.  When either of these actions occur, the fielder screen will
appear.  Refer to page 15-16 for pitching and batting controller
functions.

The camera box in the upper right corner helps you see the base
runners.  Refer to page 15 for base runner controller functions.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(21) FIELD

The field screen is where all fielding and base running takes place.
When fielding fly balls, the radar screen in the lower right corner
will display the location where the ball will land (X) and the location
of the nearest fielder (blue dot).  The white dot on the radar screen
indicates the current location of the ball.  On ground balls, the ball
and the fielder are the only markers that appear on the radar.

On the field screen, a bull's-eye will appear at the same location as
the "X" on the radar.  This target acts like a magnet to help you catch
fly balls.  To catch a fly ball, move your fielder close to the "X" on
the radar and release the +Control Pad.  If the character is close
enough to the target, he'll automatically move to the spot and camp
under the ball before catching it.

Since the "X" and bull's-eye don't appear on ground balls or short line
drives into the outfield, you must line up the outfielder (blue dot)
with the ball (white dot) so the player can field the ball cleanly.
You don't need to use the radar for ground balls in the infield since
the fielder and the ball are usually visible on the screen at the same
time.  Also, on hot grounders through the infield, the computer will
automatically line up your outfielder while you're controlling the
infielder.  Keep this in mind so you don't accidentally overrun ground
balls in the outfield.

This game recognizes the Infield Fly Rule.  The ruling occurs when the
batter hits a fly ball in the infield with runners on first and second
base.  This rule prevents the infielder from intentionally dropping the
ball and turning a quick double play.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(22) NATIONAL LEAGUE

ATLANTA BRAVES (Boston 1876-52, Milwaukee 1953-1965, Atlanta 1966-)
World Championships (since 1903): 1914, 57
National League Championships: 1877, 78, 83, 91, 92, 93, 97, 98, 1914,
57, 58, 91, 92
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1969, 82, 91, 92,
93

For baseball fans across the country, the 1993 Brave season appeared to
be scripted in Hollywood rather than Atlanta.  Nearing the All-Star
break, the Braves trailed the Giants by 8 games and were surrounded by
talk regarding the team's failure to live up to high preseason
expectations.  The outlook didn't brighten until July 20, the day '92
home run champ, Fred McGriff was acquired from San Diego.  With the
Giants still playing outstanding baseball, the Braves methodically
stormed to a 2nd half record of 54-19 overtaking the Giants on the last
day of the season.  Though the Braves' finish of '93 was the stuff of
legends, it was not the best in team history.  In 1914, the Boston
Braves compiled an incredible 68-19 record from July 4 to steal the
pennant from the New York Giants, the National League powerhouse of
that time period.  Heading into '94, the Braves reload with the best
starting pitching staff in baseball, headed up by Cy Young Award
winners, Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine.

CHICAGO CUBS (1876-)
World Championships (since 1903): 1907, 08
National League Championships: 1876, 80, 81, 82, 85, 86, 1906, 07, 08,
10, 18, 29, 32, 35, 38, 45
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1984, 89

Though the Cubs haven't been to the World Series since 1945, there
isn't a team in the Major Leagues with fans as devoted as the ones who
flock to Wrigley Field.  Prior to the 1945 World Series, the Cubs
appeared in a respectable 10 World Series, however they lost 8
consecutive Series after winning in 1907-08.  For even the most loyal
Cub fan, the 1969 season was a difficult one to endure.  Throughout the
first half of the 1969 season, the Cubs sat atop the Eastern Division
and, by mid-August, their lead had grown to 8 1/2 games.  As the summer
came to a close, the Cubs began to fight two foes: pressure inflicted
on themselves and the Miracle Mets, a lowly expansion team that
finished 9th or 10th in each of their previous 7 seasons.  The Mets
made an incredible charge overtaking the Cubs eventually winning the
division by 8 games.  The significance of this event is that the Cub
fans stuck by their team following the flop.  Today, 25 years later,
fans in Chicago can buy "Forgiven but Not Forgotten" shirts referring
to the summer of '69.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(23) NATIONAL LEAGUE

CINCINNATI REDS (1869-)
World Championships (since 1903): 1919, 1940, 1975, 1976, 1990
National League Championships: 1919, 1939, 1940, 1961, 1970, 1972,
1975, 1976, 1990
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1970, 1972, 1973,
1975, 1976, 1979, 1990

In addition to being the first professional baseball team, the
Cincinnati Redlegs have been involved in many historical events that
are commonplace today.  These "firsts" include the first switch-hitter
to appear in a National League contest (1870), the first National
League home run (1876), the first night game (1935), and the first
televised game (1939).  Later the Big Red Machine of the '70s became
the top N.L. team of the decade by winning 6 division championships and
appearing in 4 World Series between '70-79.  This team is still
regarded as one of the best ever.  After a successful 1990 campaign,
the Reds entered the World Series as a big underdog to the powerful
Athletics, who had demolished the Giants in the '89 Fall Classic.
Though the underdog role was unfamiliar to the Big Red Machine of the
'70s, the 1990 Reds seemed to thrive on it and used great pitching and
scrappy play to sweep the A's in 4 games.

COLORADO ROCKIES (1993-)
World Championships: None
National League Championships: None
National League Division Championships: None

The Rockies had what can be described as a very successful inaugural
campaign in the National League.  They won 3 more games than their
expansion cousins, the Florida Marlins and set a Major League Baseball
attendance record with over 4 million fans passing through the Mile
High Stadium turnstiles.  In 1995, the Rockies will begin play in a new
park in Denver.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(24) NATIONAL LEAGUE

FLORIDA MARLINS (1993-)
World Championships: None
National League Championships: None
National League Division Championships: None

The expansion Marlins begin their second season in 1994.  The Marlins
early pursuit of top players through free agency and trades should
please fans in South Florida, and with a roster comprised of
experienced veterans and promising young players, the Marlins look to
continue building toward success in the near future.

HOUSTON ASTROS (Houston Colt 45s 1962-1965, Houston Astros 1966-)
World Championships: None
National League Championships: None
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1980, 86

The Astros came into the National League at the same time as the Mets,
and while they never were as bad as the worst Met teams, they never
achieved the success of the great Met teams either.  Historically, the
Colts-Astros have had stronger pitching than hitting.  This was true in
1962 and is still true today.  When the Astros won their two division
championships, they were led by the great pitching of J.R. Richard, Joe
Niekro, Nolan Ryan, and Mike Scott.  Today, the Astros are armed with
one of the best starting rotations in the National League and look to
former Phillie closer Mitch Williams to bolster the bullpen.  On the
offensive side of the plate, the Astros are looking for young stars
like Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, and Luis Gonzalez to return and lead
the team to postseason play in the '90s.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(25) NATIONAL LEAGUE

LOS ANGELES DODGERS (Brooklyn Dodgers 1890-1957, Los Angeles Dodgers
1958-)
World Championships (since 1903): 1955, 59, 63, 65, 81, 88
National League Championships: 1890, 99, 1900, 16, 20, 41, 47, 49, 52,
53, 55, 56, 59, 63, 65, 66, 77, 78, 81, 88
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1974, 77, 78, 81,
83, 85, 88

While the Giants/Dodgers rivalry has certainly been heated over the
years, Dodger fans from Brooklyn to Los Angeles must shudder at the
thought of playing the Yankees in the World Series.  The Dodgers were
arguably the best N.L. team during the '50s, appearing in the World
Series 5 times during the decade and 10 times between 1947-66.
However, the Dodgers only won 2 World Championships during the '50s and
held a 1-6 record against the Yankees in 7 Bronx/Brooklyn "Subway
Series" matchups.  It looked like old times in 1977 and 1978 when the
Bombers and the Los Angeles Dodgers clashed in consecutive years with
both championships going to the Yanks.  In 1981, the Dodgers won only
their third Series against the Yankees in 11 tries.  Ironically, the
Yankees won more championships, but became the team that fans loved to
hate while the Dodgers became one of the game's most popular teams.

MONTREAL EXPOS (1969-)
World Championships: None
National League Championships: None
National League Division Championships: 1981

During most of the '70s, the Expos were known across Canada as the
national team.  In the United States, the Expos, who for many years
wore hats that resembled multi-colored beanies, were more of a
curiosity that seemed out of place in tradition-rich National League.
Of course, traditional uniforms were becoming less common in the '70s
as buttons and belts were replaced by pullovers and elastic waistbands.
The Expo image improved as they began to shake the customary expansion
era blues.  In the late '70s the Expos compiled the best record in the
National League between 1979-1982, including a divisional championship
in 1981, and have enjoyed 12 winning seasons since 1979.  Today, the
Expos are building off 2 consecutive 2nd place finishes and setting
their sights on higher goals.

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26) NATIONAL LEAGUE

NEW YORK METS (1962-)
World Championships: 1969, 86
National League Championships: 1969, 73, 86
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1969, 73, 86, 88

The Mets' story can be described simply as the best of times and the
worst of times.  Born through expansion in 1962, the Mets were awful
during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations.  From 1962-68, they
finished 9th or 10th each season averaging a woeful 56 wins each
season.  The outlook became very rosy in 1969.  Not only did the Mets
finish over .500 that season, but they won 100 games and stormed past
the Cubs to win the division championship by 8 games.  The Miracle
Mets' incredible run continued in the '69 Series as they topped the
heavily favored Orioles in 5 games.  Ironically, Davey Johnson, who
made the final out in the '69 Series for the Orioles, returned to
manage the Mets in the '80s as the team returned to the top of the
National League after a decade of mediocrity.  During Johnson's tenure,
the Mets won 2 division championships and 1 World Championship in 7
seasons and were favored nearly every year to play in the World Series;
incredible pressure for any team, but even tougher in New York.  In
1993, the Mets reclaimed their role as baseball's worst team.

PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES (1883-)
World Championships (since 1903): 1980
National League Championships: 1915, 50, 80, 83, 93
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1976, 77, 78, 80,
83, 93

Of the eight original National League teams, the Philadelphia Phillies
have gloomiest history.  Recent successes, including a World
Championship in 1980 and three World Series appearances and six
division championships since 1976, have blurred the perception of
futility surrounding the Phillies.  But, the Phillies once endured 29
second division (5th, 6th, 7th, or 8th place) finishes in a 30 year
stretch and a 65 year period without a World Series win.  From 1901-
1960, the Phillies won 3893 games and dropped 5130 games with only 15
winning seasons, worst of the 8 National League teams in the pre-
expansion era.  Even when they were on top, the Phillies found a way to
lose.  For example, on September 21, 1964, the Phillies held a 6 1/2
game lead over the Cardinals.  After losing 10 of their last 12 games,
the Phillies found themselves in 2nd place on the last day of the
season.  The outlook was much brighter a decade later when led by Mike
Schmidt, the Phillies of the late '70s and early '80s became one of the
top teams in the National League.

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(27) NATIONAL LEAGUE

PITTSBURGH PIRATES (1900-)
World Championships (since 1903): 1909, 25, 60, 71, 79
National League Championships: 1901, 02, 03, 09, 25, 27, 60, 71, 79
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1970, 71, 72, 74,
75, 79, 90, 91, 92

Though they didn't get the attention the Reds enjoyed in the '70s, the
Pirates of the Disco Decade were nearly as talented.  During the '70s,
the Pirates, Dodgers, Phillies, and Reds won 18 of 20 division
championships.  Though the Pirates finished in 2nd place to the
Phillies from 1976-78, the Bucs were the stronger team winning 6
division championships and 2 World Championships from 1971-79.  Though
the '70s Pirates enjoyed success over a longer period of time, the 1960
Pirates had the most memorable finish to a season.  After winning the
1960 N.L. pennant by 7 games, the Pirates were still expected to be
steamrolled by the Yankees, who were appearing in their 26th Series
since 1921.  In Game 7, the Bucs trailed 7-4 in the 8th inning but
scored 5 runs to take a 2 run lead.  The Yanks followed with 2 runs to
tie the score at 9.  But, Bill Mazeroski, the Pirates 2nd baseman, led
off the bottom of the 9th and slammed the 2nd pitch over the left field
wall to break the tie and end one of the best World Series ever.

ST. LOUIS CARDINALS (1900-)
World Championships (since 1903): 1926, 31, 34, 42, 44, 46, 64, 67, 82
National League Championships: 1926, 28, 30, 31, 34, 42, 43, 44, 46,
64, 67, 68, 82, 85, 87
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1982, 1985, 1987

If Reggie Jackson is Mr. October, then the St. Louis Cardinals are the
National League's Boys of October with 9 World Championships in 15
World Series appearances.  This is particularly impressive since many
of the Cardinal titles came during the Yankees' incredible World Series
dominance from 1927-62.  Also, there are other N.L. teams with more
league pennants, but the Redbirds have won more World Championships
than any other National League team.  Factoring the Cardinals' three
National League Championship Series triumphs in with their World Series
victories increases the team's postseason series win percentage to an
impressive 67%.  Over the years, the Cardinals have been led by many
current and future hall-of-famers including Dizzy and Daffy Dean in the
'30s, Stan Musial in the '40s and '50s, Bob Gibson in the '60s, Lou
Brock in the '70s, and Ozzie Smith in the '80s.

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(28) NATIONAL LEAGUE

SAN DIEGO PADRES (1969-)
World Championships: None
National League Championships: 1984
National League Division Championships: 1984

After joining the National League in 1969, the Padres experienced 10
seasons of mediocrity before making a move toward the top of the
division with the help of several key player acquisitions.  In 1984,
the Padres won their only division championship with Dick Williams at
the helm.  The Padres plan was to sign players who had experienced
winning with other clubs.  Williams, a former Brooklyn Dodger, knew a
lot about winning as well.  In 1967, Williams won an A.L. pennant with
the Red Sox.  Williams also managed the A's during their championship
years in the early '70s.  The 1984 N.L. Championship Series may be one
of the most interesting matchups in recent memory with the expansion
Padres and Cubs, a team that hadn't experienced postseason play in
nearly 40 years.  Led by NLCS MVP Steve Garvey, the Padres topped the
Cubs in 5 games and prepared for the awesome Tigers, who won 104 games
during the season.  Although the Tigers easily handled the Padres in
the World Series, the experience of playing in the fall classic gave
the Padres the lasting respectability that surrounds a winning
franchise.

SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS (New York Giants 1883-1957, San Francisco Giants
1958-)
World Championships (since 1903): 1905, 21, 22, 33, 54
National League Championships: 1888, 89, 1904, 05, 11, 12, 13, 17, 21,
22, 23, 24, 33, 36, 37, 51, 54, 62, 89
National League Division Championships (since 1969): 1971, 87, 89

The New York Giants were arguably the best team in the National League
during the 30 years following the merger in 1903.  In later years,
fireside stories about the Giants often included their rivals from
Brooklyn.  One of the most famous Giant/Dodger confrontations occurred
in 1951 when the Giants rallied from 13 games behind on August 11 to
catch Brooklyn and force a playoff.  In the deciding game of the three
game playoff, Bobby Thomson came to the plate in the 9th with two men
on base and the Giants trailing 4-2.  Thomson heroic homer is still
known as the "Shot Heard 'Round the World" thanks to the emotional
radio call by Russ Hodges, the Giants' announcer, who could only manage
to repeat that famous phrase "THE GIANTS WIN THE PENNANT!  THE GIANTS
WIN THE PENNANT!"  Since 1951, the Giants and Dodgers have clashed in
several season ending confrontations including 1993 when the Dodgers
beat the Giants on the season's last day to keep the Giants out of a 
possible playoff against the Braves.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(29) AMERICAN LEAGUE

BALTIMORE ORIOLES (St. Louis Browns 1901-53, Baltimore Orioles, 1954-)
World Championships: 1966, 70, 83
American League Championships: 1944, 66, 69, 70, 71, 79, 83
American League Division Championships (since 1969): 1969, 70, 71, 73,
74, 79, 83

It's a little known fact that the Baltimore Orioles were once the
Milwaukee Brewers--the original Brewers, that is.  A charter member of
the American League in 1901, the team moved from Milwaukee to St. Louis
and changed its name to the Browns prior to the 1902 season.  The
purpose of the move was to give the new American League a team in St.
Louis, the fourth largest city in the nation at the time.  The Browns
never enjoyed the popularity of their cross-town rivals, the Cardinals.
Of course, bad play didn't help.  From 1901-1953, the Browns winning
percentage was a anemic .433 with only one World Series appearance,
which the Browns lost to the Cardinals.  As bad as the Browns were, the
Orioles of Baltimore have been absolutely stellar by comparison.  Since
1969, the Orioles have the best winning percentage in baseball
including the incredible 1969-71 O's that averaged 106 wins per season
during that 3-year span.

BOSTON RED SOX (1901-)
World Championships: 1903, 12, 15, 16, 18
American League Championships: 1903, 04, 12, 15, 16, 18, 46, 67, 75, 86
American League Division Championships (since 1969): 1975, 86, 88, 90

Known as one of the best sports towns in the country, Boston and its
people have enjoyed a very special love affair with their Red Sox.
Fans from Beantown have also endured a great deal of frustration from a
team that since 1918 has often challenged and occasionally won the
American League pennant without bringing home a World Championship.
Cynical followers have blamed the "Curse of the Bambino" for the
drought.  The curse refers to the fateful December day in 1919 when the
Red Sox sold Babe Ruth to their arch-rivals, the Yankees.  Prior to the
sale, the Red Sox were arguably the best team in baseball with 5 World
Series championships between 1903-18.  Conversely, the sale of the
greatest player of all time helped transform the Yankees, a mediocre
team without a World Series appearance, into the most dominant team in
professional sports.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(30) AMERICAN LEAGUE

CALIFORNIA ANGELS (Los Angeles Angels 1961-1965, California Angels
1966-)
World Championships: None
American League Championships: None
American League Division Championships (since 1969): 1979, 82, 86

Responding to the Dodgers' immediate fan appeal in Los Angeles, the
American League expanded in 1961, adding their own team in L.A.  Walter
O'Malley, the Dodgers' owner, wasn't pleased about the prospect of
another team moving into his recently chartered territory and would
only agree to deal if the Angels leased the use of Dodger Stadium for
four seasons.  Though the team played well for an expansion team during
those early years, the Angels were never able to overshadow the
mystique of the Dodgers in the Los Angeles area.  In 1966, the Angels
moved into Anaheim Stadium following the expiration of the Dodger
Stadium lease and changed their name.  Today, the Angels are using a
new philosophy toward winning emphasizing youth rather than the use of
older players.  Traditionally, the Angels have ignored their farm
system and tried to win using veteran who paid their dues with other
clubs.  While this strategy landed the Angels in post-season three
times, it didn't help them win any American League or World
Championship.

CHICAGO WHITE SOX (1900-)
World Championships: 1906, 17
American League Championships: 1900, 01, 06, 17, 19, 59
American League Division Championships (since 1969): 1983, 93

For nearly 100 years, the White Sox have been Chicago's southside team.
Sharing the Windy City's fan base with the Cubs, who play on the North
side of town.  During this time, the White Sox have fielded some great
teams including the Shoeless Joe Jackson led teams of the 1910s and the
Go-Go Sox of the 1950s, which was one of only two American League teams
other than the Yankees to appear in the World Series from 1949-60.  Led
by one of the best young pitching staffs in baseball, the White Sox won
a division championship, in 1993, and experienced post season play for
only the 2nd time since 1959.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(31) AMERICAN LEAGUE

CLEVELAND INDIANS (1901-)
World Championships: 1920, 48
American League Championships: 1920, 48, 54
American League Division Championships (since 1969): None

Though the Indians have become the butt of many jokes due to their lack
of postseason play in the last four decades, the Tribe of the late '40s
and early '50s ranks among the best in American League history.  The
Indian teams of the post-World War II era averaged 94 wins each season
between 1948 and 1956, and although they won a World Championship in
1948, the Indian team that lost the 1954 World Series was actually
better, winning an amazing 111 games, which was 8 more wins that the
2nd place Yankees.  In fact, the 103 wins by the Yankees in 1954 marked
the highest total amassed by any of Casey Stengel's dominant Yankee
teams of the 50s.  Today, there is a new feeling of enthusiasm in
Cleveland.  With the opening of a new stadium in 1994 and several young
All-Stars on their roster, the Indians are counting on re-kindling the
glory of their past.

DETROIT TIGERS (1901)
World Championships: 1935, 45, 68, 84
American League Championships: 1907, 08, 09, 34, 35, 40, 45, 68, 84
American League Division Championships (since 1969): 1972, 84, 87

The most prominent Tiger teams from a historical perspective come from
4 different eras.  The first of the great Motown teams were led by Ty
Cobb, one of the most competitive and talented players of all time.
The teams of the 1930s featured the powerful Hank Greenberg, who
clouted 58 home runs in 1938, still #3 on the all time list.  The 1968
World Series featured a pair of pitchers (Detroit's Denny McLain 31-6,
1.96 ERA and St. Louis' Bob Gibson 22-9, 1.12 ERA) who posted seasons
that are still regarded as being among the most dominating of all time.
Led by Jack Morris, Kirk Gibson, and Lance Parrish, the 1984 Motor City
Kitties jumped out to a 35-5 record to start the season and never
looked back as they overpowered opponents and finished with a 104-58
record and a World Series victory over the Padres.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(32) AMERICAN LEAGUE

KANSAS CITY ROYALS (1969-)
World Championships: 1985
American League Championships: 1980, 85
American League Division Championships: 1976, 77, 78, 80, 84, 85

The Royals are an example of the perfect expansion team.  The team has
never finished in last place and won their first division championship
in their 7th season.  By building a strong minor league system, the
Royals were able to call up extremely talented young players like
George Brett, Frank White, and Hal McRae and let the players mature
together on the field.  This set up a reload, not rebuild formula for
success in Kansas City.  In fact, if it weren't for the Oakland A's of
the early '70s and the New York Yankees of the late '70s, the Royals
may have received more recognition as one of the best teams of the
decade.  The Royals, however, did get to the World Series twice in the
'80s, winning the Big Show in 1985 over the Cardinals in a dramatic
I-70 series.  That season reaffirmed the Royal tradition when 21-year
old Bret Saberhagen won 20 games, the Cy Young award, and World Series
MVP award.  Recently, the Royals haven't won as many games, but the
wheels haven't completely fallen off either as the young Royals of the
'90s are poised to make another run to the top.

MILWAUKEE BREWERS (1969-)
World Championships: None
American League Championships: 1982
American League Division Championships: 1982

After joining the American League in 1969 as the Seattle Pilots, the
team changed its name and moved to the midwest in 1970.  The Brewers,
who celebrate their 25th season in Milwaukee in 1994, have had several
fine teams and many outstanding players throughout the last quarter
century.  Led by managers George Bamberger and Harvey Kuenn, the power-
hitting Brewers of the late '70s and early '80s became affectionately
known as "Bambi's Bombers" and "Harvey's Wall Bangers".  To date, the
1982 season is remembered as the Brewers shining moment.  Future Hall
of Famers Robin Yount and Paul Molitor led the charge as the Brew Crew
topped the Orioles on the last day of the season to capture their first
divisional championship.  In the American League Championship Series,
the Brewers overcame a 0-2 deficit to top the California Angels and win
a trip to the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(33) AMERICAN LEAGUE

MINNESOTA TWINS (Washington Senators 1901-1960, Minnesota Twins 1961-)
World Championships: 1924, 87, 91
American League Championships: 1924, 25, 33, 65, 87, 91
American League Division Championships (since 1969): 1969, 70, 87, 91

Of the 8 American League teams that started play in 1901, the Senators/
Twins have the fewest World Series appearances.  In fact, for years a
popular phrase in Washington was "first in war, first in peace, last in
the American League".  The Senators didn't always have the best teams,
but they did have the game's best and most popular pitcher in Walter
Johnson.  The "Big Train" was the game's first power pitcher, compiling
3508 strikeouts in an era lacking in the free swingers that many
pitchers feast on today.  Following 60 seasons of mediocre baseball in
Washington, the Senators moved to Minnesota and became the Twins.
Though the Twins won a pennant in 1965 and division championships in
1969 and 1970, they usually fielded teams that were competitive, but
unable to challenge for the pennant.  This was demonstrated by 9
consecutive 3th or 4th place finishes between 1972-80.  Recently, the
Twins have enjoyed the most success in franchise history winning two
World Championships since 1987.

NEW YORK YANKEES (1903)
World Championships: 1923, 27, 28, 32, 36, 37, 38, 39, 41, 43, 47, 49,
50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 61, 62, 77, 78
American League Championships: 1921, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 32, 36, 37,
38, 39, 41, 42, 43, 47, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 60, 61, 62,
63, 64, 76, 77, 78, 81
American League Division Championships (since 1969): 1976, 77, 78, 80,
81

If the number of championships is your yardstick for success, then the
Yankees are the most dominant Major League Baseball team of all time.
In addition to collecting 33 World Series Championships, Yankee rosters
have featured Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, and Mickey Mantle,
four unique players who transcended baseball stardom to become icons of
20th Century American culture.  In fact, Yankee lore reads like a Who's
Who of Baseball with 28 former pin-stripers already elected to the
baseball hall of fame.  Though the 1927 Yankees, led by Ruth and
Gehrig, are often regarded as the best team of all time, the Bronx
Bombers of the 1950s, led by the legendary Casey Stengal, were more
dominant, winning 5 consecutive World Championships from 1949-1953 and
appearing in 10 World Series between 1949-60.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(34) AMERICAN LEAGUE

OAKLAND ATHLETICS (Philadelphia 1901-1954, Kansas City (1955-1967,
Oakland 1968-)
World Championships: 1910, 11, 13, 29, 30, 72, 73, 74, 89
American League Championships: 1902, 05, 10, 11, 13, 14, 29, 30, 31,
72, 73, 74, 88, 89, 90
American League Division Championships (since 1969): 1971, 72, 73, 74,
75, 81, 88, 89, 90, 92

After passing through Kansas City on their way from Philadelphia, the
Athletics settled in Oakland and established a personality and style of
play that has made them one of the most successful franchises in the
last 25 years.  But, winning hasn't always been associated with the
A's.  While they won 5 championships during Connie Mack's 50 year
tenure as manager, his teams finished 7th or 8th place in the eight
team American League 20 times.  After moving to Kansas City in 1955,
the Athletics' struggle continued to the point where the team moved to
Oakland in 1968, after 13 consecutive 2nd division seasons in K.C.
After the move, the A's quickly picked up a winning tradition.  Led by
a cast of characters that included Reggie Jackson, Catfish Hunter, and
Rollie Fingers, the A's won five consecutive division titles from 1971-
75 and three consecutive World Championships from 1972-74.  After
rebuilding the team, the A's returned to form in the late '80s and
appeared in three straight World Series from 1988-1990.

SEATTLE MARINERS (1977)
World Championships: None
American League Championships: None
American League Division Championships: None

Since entering the league in 1977, the history of the Seattle Mariners
has consisted of more downs that ups.  In fact, early Mariner
highlights often centered around strange give-aways like "Funny Nose
Glasses Night" more than great play on the field.  But, in recent
years, the attitude in Seattle has changed with a greater emphasis on
winning.  This has been demonstrated by the hiring of a proven manager
(Lou Piniella) who is still in the prime of his managing career and the
active pursuit of top players through trades and free agency.  After 14
seasons of sub-.500% baseball, the Mariners finished over .500 in 1991
and again in 1993 and now strike fear in opponents with Randy Johnson's
power pitching, Jay Buhner's cannon arm, and Ken Griffey Jr.'s exciting
all-around play.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(35) AMERICAN LEAGUE

TEXAS RANGERS (Washington Senators 1961-1971, Texas Rangers 1972-)
World Championships: None
American League Championships: None
American League Division Championships (since 1969): None

Born through expansion to pacify Washington citizens following the
original Senators' move to the Twin Cities, the new Senators never took
flight enduring 10 losing seasons before moving to Arlington, Texas in
1972.  Like the Seattle Mariners in the 1980s, the Rangers struggled to
shake their expansion image of the 1970s.  Throughout the '70s, the
Rangers made a habit of acquiring veterans who were past their prime.
Many of these transactions backfired leaving the Rangers with a
depleted farm system and a high payroll.  Although the Rangers haven't
won a division championship since moving to Texas, many experts
consider the Rangers to be the team of the '90s with players like 24-
year old Juan Gonzalez, who has already won 2 home run titles and Will
Clark, a perennial all-star during his 8 seasons with the Giants.

TORONTO BLUE JAYS (1977)
World Championships: 1992, 93
American League Championships: 1992, 93
American League Division Championships (since 1969): 1985, 89, 91, 92,
93

Joining the Seattle Mariners as an expansion team in 1977, the Toronto
Blue Jays didn't exactly set the league on fire during the team's first
few years.  In fact, it took the Blue Jays six seasons to finish higher
than last place in their division.  However, behind a philosophy
centered around nurturing bright, young talent that would grow within
the organization, the Blue Jays quickly became a powerful force in the
American League in the mid-1980s and have not finished lower than 3rd
place since 1987.  Most recently, the Blue Jays became the first team
to win back-to-back World Series titles since the 1977-78 Yankees.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(36) BIOGRAPHIES

Seattle Mariners
KEN GRIFFEY JR.

As a kid, Ken Griffey Jr., the son of a Major Leaguer, was fortunate to
have the opportunity to shag fly balls and take batting practice with
the game's best players.  This experience paved the way for a smooth
and early beginning of his own big league career.  In 1989, at age 19,
Junior's lively bat and dazzling defense helped him make the Mariner
opening day lineup.  In his Major League debut, he showed the poise of
a veteran doubling off Oakland ace Dave Stewart in his first at bat.
Throughout his first season, Ken's stellar defense achievements drew
immediate comparisons to the original Kid, Willie Mays.

In 1990, Junior and his father, Ken Sr., made Major League history as
the first father and son to play together on the same team.  Later that
season, the Griffey duo smashed back-to-back home runs in the first
inning of a game against the California Angels.  Following the 1990
season, Junior won his first Gold Glove to become the youngest American
League player to receive that honor.

Not satisfied with being described as a potential star, Ken stepped
forward in a big way in 1991 and 1992.  In 1991, the 21-year old set a
team record by hitting .327 and in 1992, Junior led the Mariners with
27 homers.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(37)

He also drove in 203 runs during that two season stretch and was named
the MVP of the 1992 All-Star Game in San Diego.

The 1993 season was the year that transformed Griffey Jr. from a star
on the horizon to a legitimate League MVP candidate.  En route to
clouting a career high 45 home runs (2nd highest in Major League
Baseball), Junior tied a MLB record by hitting at least one home run in
eight consecutive games.  Now five years into an already brilliant
career, many baseball experts consider Ken Griffey Jr. to be the most
dynamic and talented player in the game.


Steve Palermo #14

The voice you hear in Ken Griffey Jr. Presents: Major League Baseball
belongs to American League Umpire Steve Palermo.  Since breaking into
the league in 1977, Steve has received many accolades and been involved
in hundreds of big games.  Throughout his career, Steve has appeared in
5 American League Championship Series (1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1989), 1
All-Star Game (1986), and 1 World Series (1983).  Other historical
events include the 1978 playoff between the Red Sox and the Yankees
featuring Bucky Dent's unlikely, but timely, home run and working home
plate during Dave Righetti's no-hitter in 1983.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(38) BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bjarkman, Peter C., Encyclopedia of Major League Baseball: National
League, New York: Carroll and Graf, 1991

Bjarkman, Peter C., Encyclopedia of Major League Baseball: American
League, New York: Carroll and Graf, 1991

Zoss, Joel and John S. Bowman, The History of Major League Baseball,
New York: Brompton Books, 1992


Photo Credits [Trust me, they did a fine job.]
Photographs used on page 4 are courtesy of the National Baseball
Library, Cooperstown, New York.

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(39)

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(40)

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(41)

Memo

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(42) WARNING

It is a serious crime to copy video games.  18 USC 2319 Nintendo games
are strictly protected by copyright rights worldwide.  Back-up copies
are not authorized and are not necessary to protect your Nintendo Game
Pak.  Please destroy any illegal copies that may come into your
possession.  Violators will be prosecuted.

If your Game Pak ceases to operate and it is not a copy and your
Nintendo Control Deck has no alteration or backup device attached to
it.  please call the Nintendo Consumer Assistance Hotline at 1-800-255-
3700 (U.S. and Canada) or your local authorized Nintendo distributor
for assistance.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

(It's outta here!) WARRANTY AND SERVICE INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

NEED HELP WITH INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, OR SERVICE?
CALL 1-800-255-3700.

Nintendo®
Nintendo of America Inc.
P.O. Box 957, Redmond, WA 98073-0957 U.S.A.

PRINTED IN JAPAN

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

[Ken Griffey Jr. Presents: Major League Baseball included a Collector
Baseball Card that regurgitated some of the "Biography" portion of the
manual.  Additionally, it featured some vital stats:

KEN GRIFFEY JR.
Born: Donora, PA 11/21/69
Bats: Left    Height 6' 3"
Throws: Left  Weight: 205 lbs.

1993 STATS
AVG..309  H.....180  RBI..109
G....156  2B.....38  SB....17
AB...582  3B......3
R....113  HR.....45

SNS-JR-USA
_______________________________________________________________________
"Ken Griffey Jr. Presents Major League Baseball Instruction Manual"
Converted to ASCII text by Gregory Bishop
gregorybishop@hotmail.com


---------------------------------
12. Legal Information
--------------------------------- 
This FAQ is for private use only.  It may not be sold nor used in anyway to earn 
a profit.  You may not use this on 
your website without my written permission. Copyright 1999.