The Super Game Boy Frequently Asked Questions list
                         v1.07, 12/30/00

Created and maintained by Jeff Bogumil (jbogumil@yahoo.com)

CONTRIBUTORS (both direct and indirect)
---------------------------------------
Michael Portuesi (drawing pen gameplay tips and game list additions)
Wesley Moody (Game Genie info)
Dominick Roman (foreign compatibility info)
FM2000 (Super Game Boy 2 info)
Utils (Game Boy Color compatibility info)
Bill Mayer (SGB with SNES2)
Anton Belenki (SGB enhanced games)
Dave Teney (SGB enhanced games)
Dan Rudolph (PAL/NTSC Super Game Boy info, Wideboy64 info)

For information concerning the original Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket 
(including game cheat codes, recommendations, and detailed 
Game Genie info), check out the Game Boy FAQ, www.gamefaqs.com.  
For web users, The Unoffical Nintendo Game Boy Home Page,
http://www.cs.umd.edu/users/fms/GameBoy/

The Game Boy Color FAQ, by Utils, is available at Gamefaqs.com;
www.gamefaqs.com

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------------------------------------------------------

Copyright (C) Jeff Bogumil.

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UPDATES SINCE 1.06
------------------
Super Game Boy compatibility with SNES2 confirmed.
Updated SGB enhanced game list.
New question: Are Super Game Boy games compatible with the Game 
Boy Advance?
New question: Are Game Boy Advance games compatible with the Super 
Game Boy?
PAL/NTSC info.
Wide-Boy64 info.

CONTENTS
--------
1.  What IS the Super Game Boy?
2.  What are the advantages and disadvantages of the Super
    Game Boy?
3.  What special functions are built into the Super Game Boy?
4.  How do I save my color selections and borders on the Super
    Game Boy?
5.  What do they mean by "Super Game Boy compatible?"
6.  Are Super Game Boy compatible games compatible with the
    Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket?
7.  What games are Super Game Boy compatible?
8.  Will my Game Boy Game Genie work with my Super Game Boy?
9.  Are there any secret codes or tricks built into the Super
    Game Boy?
10. My Super Game Boy has <fill in problem>.  How do I fix it?
11. Are there any Game Boy games that aren't compatible with the
    Super Game Boy?
12. What color schemes are recommended?
13. What are the predecessors to the Super Game Boy?
14. Are Game Boy Color games compatible with the Super Game Boy?
15. Are Super Game Boy games compatible with the Game Boy Color?
16. What's this about a Super Game Boy 2?
17. Is the Super Game Boy compatible with the SNES 2?
18. Are Super Game Boy games compatible with the Game Boy Advance?
19. Are Game Boy Advance games compatible with the Super Game Boy?

--------------------------------------------------------------------

[1]  WHAT _IS_ THE SUPER GAME BOY?
**********************************

The Super Game Boy is a device that -- when plugged into a Super
Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) -- will allow you to play
Game Boy games on your television screen, using the SNES
controllers and deck as an interface.  In effect, it negates the
primary function of the Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket/Game Boy Color
(a portable, handheld unit) but offers the convienience of a
larger viewing screen and limited color graphics.

When powered up, the Super Game Boy first displays the Super
Game Boy logo, checks the Game Boy cart for any Super Game Boy
features (which are then "loaded" if found), and then begins the
game as usual.  Game control is via the SNES controller plugged
into port #1, with the directional pad offering movement
(identical to the Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket/Game Boy Color), and
button B and A copying it's portable counterpart (customizable; 
see below).

The Super Game Boy displays the game play area using your
television.  It does not fill the entire screen -- instead,
perhaps half of the total area (a square located in the center of
the screen) displays the game play area -- the remainder (the
outside border) is optionally filled with artwork, either
designed by yourself using the Super Game Boy's limited art tools, 
via built-in Super Game Boy templates, or from borders stored in 
a game pak's memory.

The Super Game Boy is designed to accept color schemes (i.e.
the colors to be used in the game) that are designed by yourself
using the Super Game Boy's limited color tools, via built-in
Super Game Boy templates, or from color schemes stored in the
game pak's memory.  It can also use enhanced sound effects and music
built into game paks for the Super Game Boy, as well as other 
features (for example, a 16-bit SNES version of Space Invaders is 
included in the Space Invaders game pak, but can only be accessed 
via the Super Game Boy).

The Super Game Boy originally retailed for approx. $40-50, which 
includes the Super Game Boy unit, instruction manuals, and 
Super Game Boy Player's Guide.  No game pack-ins are included.  

Earlier packaging included the Super Game Boy unit and instruction
manuals.  Colorized Metroid II artwork was featured prominently 
on the box, though no game was included with the unit.  
Approx. retail price of $60.

Another package is the Super NES Super Game Boy Set, which
includes the Super Nintendo, Super Game Boy, Super Mario All
Stars game pak, Super Game Boy Player's Guide, necessary
hook-ups, one SNES controller, and instruction manuals.  No
Game Boy games are included.  Approx. retail price of $???.

[2]  WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF THE SUPER
     GAME BOY?
***********************************************************

Advantages include:

1.  Color.  Game Boy games played via the Super Game Boy can be
assigned different color schemes, with some game paks containing
pre-determined schemes, having the Super Game Boy in mind (i.e
Super Game Boy compatible).

2.  Larger viewing screen.  Though the Super Game Boy will not
take advantage of the entire television screen, it significantly
increases the viewing area.

3.  No blurring.  Nintendo seems relucant to hype this advantage,
as it would probably hurt their Game Boy sales, but the Super
Game Boy -- via your television -- sports absolutely no "blurring"
effect, as often seen on the Game Boy (and to a lesser degree,
Game Boy Pocket) due to the nature of it's LCD screen.

4.  No "backlit" problems.  Another problem with the Game Boy/Game
Boy Pocket/Game Boy Color is the lack of back-lighting with it's
screen.  Your television has no such problems, so neither does the
Super Game Boy.

5.  Adjustable gameplay.  Using the drawing and color tools of the 
Super Game Boy, it's possible to imaginatively increase or 
decrease the difficulty of some games on the Super Game 
Boy.  (See details below.)

6.  Game Boy games designed with Super Game Boy features.
Currently, many games released for the Game Boy/Game Boy
Pocket are being designed with the features and advantages of the
Super Game Boy in mind, including color, enhanced graphics and sound,
and multi-player capabilities that function only with the Super Game 
Boy.

7.  A large video game library already available.  Although
Game Boy games designed before the Super Game Boy lack any sort of
special Super Game Boy enhancements, they are compatible with the
unit.  The Super Game Boy is designed with this fact in mind,
offering the ability to adjust and tailor color schemes, as well
as offering other limited art and drawing functions.

Disadvantages include:

1.  A SNES is required for use.

2.  No portability.

3.  For Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket/Game Boy Color owners, you must
have the Super Game Boy in order to take advantage of any Super
Game Boy enhancements.

4.  The inability to play 2-or-more player games (i.e. no game
link cable available).  The Super Game Boy is one-player only,
unless the Game Boy game in question alternates players using the
SAME Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket/Game Boy Color (in which case,
Super Game Boy players would alternate the SNES controller) or is
multi-player compatible with the Super Game Boy in mind
(i.e. two SNES controllers are used).

5.  Incompability with Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket/Game Boy Color
accessories.  There's no need for screen magnifiers, lights,
stereo speakers, etc., but other accessories (4 player adapter,
keyboard, printer, etc.) are not compatible with the Super Game Boy,
resulting in disabled or limited gameplay.     

[3]  WHAT SPECIAL FUNCTIONS ARE BUILT INTO THE SUPER GAME BOY?
**************************************************************

Besides simply allowing Game Boy games to be played on your 
television, the Super Game Boy offers some special features 
that allow you to customize and enhance gameplay, using art, 
control, and color editors.  These features are divided into 
5 icons, which are accessed by pressing either both buttons 
on the SNES mouse (plugged into port #2), or the Left and 
Right buttons of the SNES controller (port #1).

They include (from left to right at the bottom of the screen):

1.  Color Palette Editor
2.  Border Editor
3.  Controller Set-Up Editor
4.  Custom Color Editor
5.  Graffiti Editor 

COLOR PALETTE EDITOR
--------------------
The Super Game Boy comes pre-loaded with 32 color schemes,
accessed via the Color Palette icon.

At the bottom of the screen, from left to right:

Color Palette icon -- click here to exit the Color Palette
editor.

Color Palette Group Switch icon -- labeled 1-4, click here to
display a selection of 8 color schemes.

Super Game Boy Enhanced Color icon -- click here to activate the
pre-determined color scheme for the Super Game Boy game (if any).
This color scheme is automatically loaded by the Super Game Boy if
a Super Game Boy compatible game is found in the game slot upon
boot up.  A sad, faded face will be displayed if Super Game Boy
incompability is found; a happy, clear face if compatible.

Color scheme icons -- 8 icons, each representing a separate color
scheme that can be applied to the Game Boy game (do so by clicking
on the color scheme you wish).  Only 8 color scheme icons are
displayed at any one time - click on the Color Palette Group
Switch icon to select the next 8.

Custom Color icon -- click here to activate the custom color
scheme you designed using the Custom Color editor.

BORDER EDITOR
-------------
The Super Game Boy comes pre-loaded with 9 borders, plus the
ability to import borders built into Super Game Boy games, and
limited art tools to create custom borders yourself.

At the bottom of the screen, from left to right:

Border Editor icon -- click here to exit the Border Editor.

Super Game Boy Enhanced Border icon -- click here to activate the
pre-determined border(s) for the Super Game Boy game (if any).
The border(s) is/are automatically loaded by the Super Game Boy if
a Super Game Boy compatible game is found in the game slot upon
boot up.  A sad, faded face will be displayed if Super Game Boy
incompability is found; a happy, clear face if compatible.

Game Boy icon -- click here for the Super Game Boy border, which looks
like the typical Game Boy screen area (with such details as the
power light), with the "Super" signature pasted near the regular
Game Boy logo.

Black border (no border) icon -- a black border area, giving the 
appearance of no border.

4 Windows icon -- an odd scenario, with 4 duplicate windows, one 
on each side of the screen, recessed into walls with light brown 
square/bright green diamond patterns.

Dirt icon -- click here for what looks like a rough brownish stone.  
Fills the entire area.

Scenic icon -- a rustic landscape, with small log cabin in the left 
corner of the screen, and trees in the distance.  The game play area 
appears on a billboard in the foreground.

Cinema icon -- a cinema border, complete with audience. The game play 
area represents the cinema screen.

Cats & Flowers icon -- a cutesy, flowered background, with kittens 
sleeping.

Desk icon -- a tiled desktop, complete with pencil holder.

Grey Steps icon -- a odd collection of "stairways" (reminds me of the 
game Marble Madness).  

Graffiti icon -- click here to load your own border, designed in
the Graffiti Editor.

CONTROLLER SET-UP EDITOR
------------------------
The Super Game Boy offers limited controller defining options,
"limited" being the key word here.

At the bottom of the screen, from left to right:

Controller Set-Up Editor icon -- click here to exit the
Controller Set-Up Editor.

Type A -- will set the controller to the "Type A" configuration,
which is the default set-up as labeled on your SNES controller.

Type B -- will set the controller to the "Type B" configuration,
which sets the following from Type A:  X=X, A=A, B=B, Y=B.

A button assignment diagram is in the lower right corner of the
screen.

CUSTOM COLOR EDITOR
-------------------
The Super Game Boy allows you to design your own custom color
schemes, via the Custom Color Editor.

At the top of the screen is your "password."  Use this to record
the color schemes you develop.

On the left side of the screen is the Shading Bar.  This
indicator tells you how light or dark you're making a particular
shade of color, while manipulating the Paintbox.

At the far bottom left of the screen is the Recovery icon.  Click
to undo your last color adjustment (effectively, the "Undo"
option).

Across the bottom of the game play area, from left to right:

The Paintbox, which consists of 4 small "paint bottle mixers."
By clicking any of the eight paint bottles (4 top, 4 bottom),
you can lighten or darken the color selected (each paint bottle
mixer is assigned to a particular shade of the game screen -- a
Game Boy game consists of 4 shades total).

The Color Palette icon -- click here to access another level of
Paintbox Colors.

Paintbox Colors -- consisting of 12 colors, the Paintbox Colors 
can be adjusted by clicking on the Color Palette icon.  Clicking 
on a PaintBox color, and then clicking on a paint bottle mixer, will
give the mixer the selected color.

The right of the screen, from top to bottom:

The Clear Button -- click here to reset all changes.

Still Button -- Click here to take a "snapshot" (hence, the
camera icon) of the screen.  This still is automatically captured
to the screen, allowing you to make color adjustments, comparing
them on one static shot.  Note:  The Still button does not pause
the game in progress.

Custom Color Editor icon -- click here to exit the Custom Color
Editor.

Some tips when using the Custom Color Editor:

1.  Make your colors light to dark, from left to right, when
    working with the paint bottle mixers.
2.  Vary the contrast between paint bottle mixers.  Similar
    colors will make the screen appear washed out.
3.  Not all color schemes are best for all games and situations.

Some tips for gameplay adjustments:

While the Super Game Boy can't internally make a game more
difficult or easier, you can edit it externally using the Custom
Color Editor.  For example:

1.  Change the colors so that some enemies or items are invisible
or difficult to see, or so that items usually differenated by
color can't be.

2.  Change the colors so that enemies or items stand out from the
background, making them easier to see.

GRAFFITI EDITOR
---------------
The Super Game Boy allows you to design your own borders and game
screen art with the Graffiti Editor.  A very limited art tool
(two pencil widths and 12 colors hardly constitute a full fledged
paint program), the Graffiti Editor is somewhat difficult to use,
and practice is required to produce anything significantly
worthwhile.  That, and once your work is completed, it's erased
when you turn off your Super Game Boy.

At the bottom of the screen, from right to left:

Clear button -- click this button to erase everything you've
done.

Paint Colors -- 12 colors to choose from.

Recover button -- click here to erase your latest edit; an "undo" 
button.

Pens -- two icons to choose from -- thin and thick width.

Eraser icon -- click the small hand with pointing finger, and
then erase the area you'd like.  You do so by drawing over the
soon-to-be-erased area (leaving behind a luminsent trail), and
then clicking on the bomb icon.  You can adjust the "eraser trail
width" by clicking on the thin or thick pen after choosing the
eraser icon.

Area settings -- Two settings to choose from.  The large box
allows you to edit the border only -- the game play area will
remain uneffected.  The small box icon allows you to draw over
the game play area as well as the border area.

Graffiti Editor icon -- click here to exit the Graffiti Editor.

Some tips for gameplay adjustments:

While the Super Game Boy can't internally make a game more
difficult or easier, you can edit it externally using the
Graffiti Editor.  For example:

1.  Cover part of the game play area with scribbles or drawing,
hiding important aspects of the game.  For example, you can hide
the life bars in such games as Kirby's Dream Land, or the timer
in Super Mario Land 2.  Hide the top part of the screen in Tetris
or Dr. Mario.

2.  Use the pens to "take notes" with such games as The Legend of
Zelda: Link's Awakening or Final Fantasy Legend.  Write important
tips and tricks in the border section, for later reference.  Use
the drawing pens to mark "safe points" and invisible traps with 
action games.

[4]  HOW DO I SAVE MY COLOR SELECTIONS AND BORDERS ON THE SUPER
     GAME BOY?
***************************************************************

Super Game Boy borders -- designed by yourself -- cannot be saved
by any means.  This is perhaps the most unfortunate aspect of the
Super Game Boy, as your border will have to be redrawn each time
you reboot your Super Game Boy, if you have the patience for
such things.  Why a battery save on par with that of Mario Paint 
was not included with the Super Game Boy, I have no idea.  (I can 
only guess that it would have increased the cost of manufacture 
and retail, beyond a point which Nintendo felt was reasonable.)

Customized color schemes cannot be saved via battery, but can be
easily recorded and re-entered via password.  Accessed using the
Custom Colors icon, you'll notice a password which changes as you
alter the color scheme.  Once you've found a scheme you like, jot
down the password for reference, and then punch it in whenever
you'd like to use it again.
 
[5]  WHAT DO THEY MEAN BY "SUPER GAME BOY COMPATIBLE?"
******************************************************

Super Game Boy Compatible game paks are designed with Super
Game Boy features, which usually include borders, color, and/or
other gameplay enhancements.  

[6]  ARE SUPER GAME BOY COMPATIBLE GAMES COMPATIBLE WITH THE
GAME BOY/GAME BOY POCKET?
*************************************************************

Super Game Boy compatible games are fully compatible 
with both the Game Boy and Game Boy Pocket, though the 
Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket cannot take advantage of any 
of the Super Game Boy enhancements.

[7]  WHAT GAMES ARE SUPER GAME BOY COMPATIBLE?
**********************************************

Following is a list of known Game Boy games sporting Super Game Boy
enhancements.  The actual enhancements are also defined, if known.
If you have any additions to this list, please send all
submissions to jbogumil@yahoo.com

Game List:
-----------------
Animaniacs
Asteriods/Missile Command
Bomber Man GB 3
Centipede/Millipede
Contra III: The Alien Wars
Daffy Duck: The Marvin Missions
Desert Strike
Donkey Kong
Donkey Kong Land
Donkey Kong Land 2
Donkey Kong Land 3
FIFA International Soccer
Game And Watch Gallery
Gameboy Gallery
GameBoy Wars Turbo
GB Genjin 2
GB Konami Classics Vol.1
GB Konami Classics Vol.2
GB Konami Classics Vol.3
GB Konami Classics Vol.4
Jurassic Park Part 2: The Chaos Continues
Killer Instinct
King Of Fighters '95
Kirby's Dreamland 2
Lion King, The
Madden '95
Madden '96
Mahoujing Guru Guru
Mario's Picross
Mega Man V
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie
Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon
Nettou Garou 2
NHL Hockey '95
Pac-In-Time
PGA European Tour
Pocket Bomber Man
Pokemon: Blue Version
Pokemon: Red Version
Seaquest DSV
Space Invaders
Street Fighter II
They Came From Outer Space
Wario Blast: Featuring Bomberman
World Heroes 2 Jet

ANIMANIACS
color throughout; character border; overall -- nice colors,
though not Donkey Kong quality; decent border, enhanced music
and sound effects.

ASTERIODS/MISSILE COMMAND
arcade machine borders; color and pre-determined shading
throughout; enhanced graphics mode (Asteriods only); enhanced
sound effects (both games); overall -- great use of Super Game Boy
enhancements.

CENTIPEDE/MILLIPEDE
arcade machine borders; color and pre-determined shading
throughout; 2-player Super Game Boy feature (both games); overall
-- good use of Super Game Boy, though pales in comparison to 
Asteriods/Missile Command.

CONTRA III: THE ALIEN WARS
no border (???), but with color and enhanced sound effects

DONKEY KONG
color throughout; arcade machine border; overall -- excellent
use of color, nostalgic border.

DONKEY KONG LAND            
color title screen; pre-determined shading; jungle folage border; 
overall -- not much use of color abilites and disappointing
border.

KILLER INSTINCT
pre-determined shading; character border; overall -- minimal
enhancements.

KIRBY'S DREAM LAND 2
color title screen; pre-determined shading; character border;
overall -- could have had more enhancements.

MADDEN '96
color throughout; helmet/logo border; overall -- nice use of
color, dull border.

MEGA MAN V                  
color title screen; pre-determined shading; hard hat border; some very 
limited color enhancements in final levels; overall -- Super Game Boy 
enhancements seem to be an afterthought, nice border

MIGHTY MORPHIN POWER RANGERS: THE MOVIE
rather abstract border; pre-determined shading with limited use
of color throughout; overall -- typical enhancements.

NHL HOCKEY '95
color enhancements; no 2-player Super Game Boy option, border?

PAC-IN-TIME
pre-determined shading; character border; overall -- looks to be
limited use of Super Game Boy capabilities.

PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
limited color throughout; logo border; no 2-player Super Game Boy
option; overall -- limited use of Super Game Boy.

SPACE INVADERS
color throughout; two borders (one hidden); 16-bit SNES version
of game built into Game Boy pak (!!!); overall -- excellent use
of Super Game Boy, with many options available.  Perhaps best
example of a Super Game Boy pak yet.

STREET FIGHTER II 
pre-determined shading; varying borders depending on game level;
two player Super Game Boy option; overall -- varying borders nice
feature, though just recycled screens from SNES version of game.
Two player option a major plus.  More color would be nice.

WARIO BLAST: FEATURING BOMBERMAN
pre-determined shading; Bomberman collage border; four player
capable with SNES 4-player adapter; overall -- nice border,
excellent idea of 4-player gameplay

WORLD HEROES 2 JET 
color title screen; pre-determined shading with limited use of
color; city background border; two player Super Game Boy option;
overall -- border doesn't really fit the game, but great
otherwise.  

[8]  WILL MY GAME BOY GAME GENIE WORK WITH MY SUPER GAME BOY?
*************************************************************

Yes, but only with an adapter or some physical reworking of the
Game Genie itself.  The adapter, called (oddly enough) "The Super 
Game Boy to Game Genie Adapter", is available from MicroSystems 
Development for a reasonable $12.95 (plus $3-$6 shipping).  For 
more information, call 1-408-296-4000.

The adapter is simply an extension, as the Game Genie's "skirt"
won't allow the enhancer to fit in the Super Game Boy's game
port.  Physically removing the skirt fixes the problem.  

DISCLAIMER:  This, of course, voids all warranties associated 
with your Game Genie, Super Game Boy, and I'm not responsible 
for any possible damages whatsoever.

[9]  ARE THERE ANY SECRET CODES OR TRICKS BUILT INTO THE SUPER
     GAME BOY?
**************************************************************

The Super Game Boy -- as a game system -- features quite a few
hidden tricks and codes.  They're listed below.

SLOW MOTION -- A SNES Game Genie is required for this trick.
Insert the Game Boy pak into your Super Game Boy.  Insert the Super 
Game Boy into the Game Genie.  Insert the combo into the SNES.  The 
Game Boy game will play in slow motion, with no sound.  Sounds more
like a hardware glitch/bug than a trick - be warned.

SCREEN SAVERS WITHOUT THE WAIT -- With this code, you won't have
to sit and wait for the Super Game Boy border screen savers to kick
in.  After choosing your border, press L, L, L, L, R and the screen 
saver animation should begin.

THE LITTLE JANITOR --  Choose the Graffiti icon and scribble
something on the screen using a pencil tool.  Sit and wait 30
seconds.  A janitor will appear, and begin cleaning up the mess.

CREDITS -- When the Super Game Boy screen appears, press
L,L,L,R,R,R,L,L,L,R,R,R,R,R,R,R.

BORDER "SCREEN SAVER" DESCRIPTIONS:  

After a period of inactivity, most Super Game Boy borders will 
display some sort of animation.

Game Boy -- no screen saver.

Black border (no border) -- no screen saver.

4 window -- Mario will jump up from the bottom window, stand
there for a while, and then fall asleep.  The Princess will
appear and send a small car speeding from the right to left window,
spinning Mario around.  He'll fall asleep again, and be stirred
awake by a small UFO.  Eventually, Luigi will appear (dangling
from a rope) from the top window and lift Mario off the screen.
Weird.

Brown Stone -- Shapes will rise and sink into the stone border; 
clouds, ducks, half moons, stars, etc...

Scenic view -- sunset, night, sunrise -- with touches such as
shooting stars and the lights being turned on/off in the cabin.
Very nice.

Cinema -- lots of action here:  one fellow jabbering in the right
corner, another falling asleep, the lights being turned on, a
woman putting on her make-up, a man reading a newspaper, two kids
playing Game Boy via gamelink cable.  :-)

Kittens & Flowers -- eventually, the sleeping kittens will wake 
up and run off the screen, one by one.

Desktop -- one of the tiles on the desk will rise, and grey suited
workers will exit.  They proceed to the other side of the screen
and push the pencils (the red next to the game screen, and the
blue in the red's previous position).  They return to their
elevator (almost forgetting one of their comrades) and exit the
screen.  Another elevator appears, white suited workers exit,
push the pencils back into place, return to their elevator, and
exit the screen.

Grey Stairways --  the game screen area will "tile" and morph into 
bird shapes.  The birds begin flying off the screen.

[10]  MY SUPER GAME BOY HAS <FILL IN PROBLEM>.  HOW DO I FIX IT?
****************************************************************

1.  The screen shows a Game Boy cart with an "X" over it?  What's
wrong?

Check to see if your Game Boy game pak is correctly inserted and
connected in your Super Game Boy (the game label should be facing 
out towards the front of the SNES).

2.  My controller/mouse won't respond.  What's wrong?

Check to see if the controller is correctly inserted and
connected in port #1.

Check to see if the mouse is correctly inserted and connected in
port #2.

Check to see if the controller/mouse you're using matches the
Service Icon (the icon displayed in the top left corner of the
screen -- it'll either be a controller or mouse).

If this doesn't solve your problem, make sure your SNES is
properly set up.  If the problem continues, call Nintendo at 
1-800-255-3700.

[11] ARE THERE ANY GAME BOY GAMES THAT AREN'T COMPATIBLE WITH THE
     SUPER GAME BOY?
*****************************************************************

Nintendo claims that all licensed Game Boy games are compatible
with the Super Game Boy, unless they need an accessory which the
Super Game Boy does not support.  I'd wager that foreign carts, 
illegal multicarts, and other unlicensed Game Boy games are chancy 
at best, and are certainly not guaranteed.

Game Boy Color games that REQUIRE the GBC are not
compatible with the Super Game Boy (as the GBC offers an increased
color pallete, processor enhancements, etc.).  No doubt
Game Boy Advance games will be incompatible for similar reasons.

Dominick Roman provides info concerning PAL (typically, Europe-
released games) with NTSC (North American released) Super Game 
Boys.  Apparently, through some educated guessing as
per a few tests, PAL Game Boy games designed with the 
SBG enhancements are not compatible with the NTSC Super 
Game Boy.  Pal games not designed with the Super Game 
Boy enhancements are compatible without any apparent problems.
As pointed out by Dan Rudolph, this makes reasonable sense
when you consider that the Game Boy itself is not limited by PAL
or NTSC standards, yet SGB enhancements are.

If anyone has further information concerning game compatibility,
please let me know (jbogumil@yahoo.com).  This includes
both domestic and foreign releases.  I'd like to develop a list
of incompatible domestic releases for a later update of this
FAQ.

[12] WHAT COLOR SCHEMES ARE RECOMMENDED?
****************************************

A list of recommended color schemes can be found on the Super
Game Boy web page, maintained by Michael Portuesi.  
http://reality.sgi.com/employees/portuesi/sgb.html  

NOTE:  This site appears to be permanently down.  Expect
more info in a future update.

[13] WHAT ARE THE PREDECESSORS TO THE SUPER GAME BOY?
******************************************************

Two are known to exist; the "WideBoy 2" (compatible with 
the Famicom) and the "GameBoy to NES" adapter, developed 
for Camerica.  Neither were commerically released to the 
gaming public.

The WideBoy 2 (nothing is known about any Wideboy 1 -- possibly a
first, failed or overly expensive attempt at this sort of thing, or
prototype model) is a bulky and unsightly device, with no casing 
to speak of (i.e. exposed circuit boards and such).  The device 
attachs to the Famicom (a Japanese NES) through the standard 
cartridge slot, effectively covering 1/4 of the top of the 
Famicom unit.  The Game Boy cartridge is then inserted into a 
slot located on the WideBoy 2.  The game is controlled by a 
standard NES (not Famicom) control pad, plugged into the Wideboy 2, 
and supposedly will not accept other, non-standard controllers, 
including the NES Advantage joystick, or any Beeshu (a popular
manufacturer of 8-bit joysticks and joypads) devices.

The WideBoy 2 displays the Game Boy screen using a television
set, "in a central frame that is slightly smaller and does not
quite extend to the boarders [sic]."  Color is applied via
colorized but transparent "filters" displayed over the game
screen area.  The unit comes equipped with "over a dozen" various
tints which are applied by cycling through the choices using the
control pad.

The WideBoy 2 is capable of linking with another unit via a
"Video Link port", though two televisions are required.

The most likely reason the adapter was not released to the public
-- it was (is) outrageously expensive, costing $500+ at the time,
limiting sales of the system to game magazines and game
developers.  The manufacturer of the WideBoy 2 is unknown (info,
anyone?).

Source:  Electronic Gaming Monthly #8.

The "GameBoy to NES" adapter, developed by Biederman Design
Labs for Camerica, is similar in appearance to a standard NES
cartridge, except for the inclusion of a game port recessed into
the top of the game pak, replacing the area usually sporting the
game sticker/logo.  Little is known about the device, though it
supposedly gave players "the chance to display small screen games
on the TV like magazines do with expensive items called
WideBoys."  It was not released, possibly due to legal action on
part of Nintendo, or an unreasonable consumer price point.

Source:  Electronic Gaming Monthly #23.

While not a predecessor to the SGB, another GB to TV adapter,
called the Wide-Boy64, is also available to video game developers
and the video game press.  Similar to the WideBoy 2, the Wide-Boy64
uses (you guessed it) the Nintendo 64 as it's platform, instead of
the Nintendo Famicom.  It's essentially a GBC in a custom N64 cart,
using the N64's controller and video/audio outputs.  For more information, 
visit: http://pocket.ign.com/hardware/107.html  (Thanks to Dan Rudolph for
this info.)

[14] ARE GAME BOY COLOR GAMES COMPATIBLE WITH THE SUPER GAME BOY?
*****************************************************************

Game Boy Color games are compatible with the Super Game Boy, 
but only in regular (Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket) mode or Super
Game Boy enhanced mode.  The Super Game Boy cannot emulate
any Game Boy Color enhancements.

Some games may be disabled or limited in regards to gameplay,
if the game in question uses accessories not
available/compatible with the Super Game Boy.

Those games which REQUIRE the Game Boy Color, and are not 
compatible with the original Game Boy/Game Boy Pocket, are not be 
compatible with the Super Game Boy either (as the Game Boy Color has 
a larger color pallete and increased processor capabilities, among other 
enhancements).

[15] ARE SUPER GAME BOY GAMES COMPATIBLE WITH THE GAME BOY COLOR?
*****************************************************************

Yes, but unfortunately, the Game Boy Color will ignore Super Game 
Boy enhancements (including color schemes).

[16] WHAT'S THIS ABOUT A SUPER GAME BOY 2?
******************************************

The Super Game Boy 2 has been released in Europe, Japan and the
United States (seen on the cable home shopping network, QVC).
Identical in features as the original Super Game Boy, but with
the addition of 1) a Game Link port, 2) a red Power LED, and 3)
a green Game Link LED.  No other info is available currently;
anyone?

[17] IS THE SUPER GAME BOY COMPATIBLE WITH THE SNES 2?
******************************************************

No problems have been reported, using the Super Game Boy with
the remodeled SNES.  (SGB 2 compatibility, anyone?)

[18] ARE SUPER GAME BOY GAMES COMPATIBLE WITH THE GAME BOY ADVANCE?
***************************************************************

Early reports indicate that the Game Boy Advance will be compatible 
with existing Game Boy and Game Boy Color games.  If this is the case, 
then the Game Boy Advance would most likely be similar to the GB, GBP 
and GBC in regards to SGB compatibility -- while the games will be supported, 
SGB enhancements will not.

[19] ARE GAME BOY ADVANCE GAMES COMPATIBLE WITH THE SUPER GAME BOY?
****************************************************************

With 99% certainity; no, GBA games will not be compatible with the SGB.  
Hardware-wise, the systems are too dis-similar, with the GBA having a definite 
advantage in processor capabilities, color schemes, etc.

[END OF FILE]