NOTE: This is an information guide, not a guide on how to beat the game.  If 
you ask me how to beat or find or unlock something, I will ignore you.

NOTE #2: If you wish to submit information that I'm missing, feel free to do 
so.  In particular, I might need some gap-filling in the F-Zero, Pokémon, 
Animal Crossing, and Mother series.

NOTE #3: As a less important bit, I'd ask that if you're going to help, 
please try to be as specific as possible.  For instance, don't just tell me 
that Snake's alternate costumes are his camo, tell me which specific ones.  
Or for music, tell me not only what a song is, but when it's heard.

******************************************************************************
Super Smash Bros. Brawl
Nostalgia FAQ
An In-Depth FAQ by CyricZ
Version 1.0
E-mail: cyricz42 at yahoo.com
******************************************************************************

1. Introduction
2. FAQ
3. Character Bios and Histories
   3A. Mario
   3B. Donkey Kong
   3C. Link
   3D. Samus
   3E. Yoshi
   3F. Kirby
   3G. Fox
   3H. Pikachu
   3I. Bowser
   3J. Peach
   3K. Zelda/Sheik
   3L. Ice Climbers
   3M. Meta Knight
   3N. Pit
   3O. Wario
   3P. Ike
   3Q. Pokémon Trainer
   3R. Diddy Kong
   3S. Lucas
   3T. King Dedede
   3U. Olimar
   3V. Ness
   3W. Marth
   3X. Luigi
   3Y. Falco
   3Z. Captain Falcon
   3AA. Lucario
   3BB. R.O.B.
   3CC. Mr. Game & Watch
   3DD. Ganondorf
   3EE. Jigglypuff
   3FF. Toon Link
   3GG. Wolf
   3HH. Snake
   3II. Sonic
   3JJ. Notes on the Animal Crossing Series
4. Characters in Game
   4A. Mario
   4B. Donkey Kong
   4C. Link
   4D. Samus
   4E. Yoshi
   4F. Kirby
   4G. Fox
   4H. Pikachu
   4I. Bowser
   4J. Peach
   4K. Zelda/Sheik
   4L. Ice Climbers
   4M. Meta Knight
   4N. Pit
   4O. Wario
   4P. Ike
   4Q. Pokémon Trainer
   4R. Diddy Kong
   4S. Lucas
   4T. King Dedede
   4U. Olimar
   4V. Ness
   4W. Marth
   4X. Luigi
   4Y. Falco
   4Z. Captain Falcon
   4AA. Lucario
   4BB. R.O.B.
   4CC. Mr. Game & Watch
   4DD. Ganondorf
   4EE. Jigglypuff
   4FF. Toon Link
   4GG. Wolf
   4HH. Snake
   4II. Sonic
5. Subspace Emissary
6. Stages
   6A. Brawl Stages
   6B. Melee Stages
7. Items
   7A. Regular Items
   7B. Pokéballs
   7C. Assist Trophies
8. Music Analysis
   8A. Super Smash Bros. Brawl
   8B. Super Smash Bros.
   8C. Super Mario Bros.
   8D. Mario Kart
   8E. Donkey Kong
   8F. The Legend of Zelda
   8G. Metroid
   8H. Yoshi's Island
   8I. Kirby
   8J. Star Fox
   8K. Pokémon
   8L. F-Zero
   8M. EarthBound (Mother)
   8N. Fire Emblem
   8O. Kid Icarus
   8P. WarioWare, Inc.
   8Q. Pikmin
   8R. Animal Crossing
   8S. Nintendo
   8T. Metal Gear
   8U. Sonic the Hedgehog
   8V. Fanfare
9. Standard Guide Stuff
   9A. Legal
   9B. E-mail Guidelines
   9C. Credits
   9D. Version Updates
   9E. The Final Word

******************************************************************************
1. INTRODUCTION
******************************************************************************

Welcome to my Nostalgia FAQ for the third game in the venerable Smash Bros. 
franchise, Super Smash Bros. Brawl, for the Nintendo Wii!  Like Melee before 
it, this game is a treasure trove of nostalgia for the Nintendo fan, dating 
back all the way to Nintendo's earliest days as a game company.  In this 
guide, you'll find complete bios for all playable characters, as well 
examinations on how the characters act in game.  Additionally, there are 
sections for the stages, items, and all the wonderful music, as well.  Enjoy!

******************************************************************************
2. FAQ
******************************************************************************

Q: What is the "Smash" Emblem?

A: Well, for those of you who don't know at all, the Smash Emblem is that 
 circle with the perpendicular lines cut out of it that serves as the 
 insignia for the Smash Bros. series, used as the Emblem for guys such as the 
 Fighting Polygons and Wireframes, and pasted over Crates and Barrels.  Its 
 origin goes back to the original Super Smash Bros., where the setting was 
 a child's room, and the characters were action figures.  The emblem 
 represents the sun (or perhaps the moon) shining through the window and 
 being partially obscured by the window's frame.

Q: What do you mean by "Roles"?  I've seen Mario in lots of different games 
 as a cameo appearance.

A: I tend to define "roles" as either a starring role, a major supporting role 
 (ie. in Super Princess Peach for Mario), or part of an ensemble cast (ie. 
 Mario Party or Smash Bros.).  Cameos will not count.  Remakes will count.  
 Ports may not count if I feel they lack signficance.  Also games that have a 
 larger story but feature (Mario) games inside them will not count, such as 
 the WarioWare series, all of which have Mario microgames in them, but I'm not 
 including them.  Also, all dates, unless referenced to being Japan only, are 
 American release dates.

Q: Did you know you're missing some games from the Character list?

A: I'm sure I am, particularly for the Mario characters.  HOWEVER, don't 
 bother telling me about games that were released after 2008.  Since SSBB came 
 out in early 2008, we're only concerning games released or announced at that 
 time, and I've chosen 2008 as a cutoff date.

******************************************************************************
3. CHARACTER BIOS AND HISTORIES
******************************************************************************

Info contained here can be considered entirely independent of the Super 
Smash Bros. series.  What you're getting here doesn't relate to the game, but 
is useful in knowing where each character comes from, and what they're known 
for.  This may not be as useful for folks like, say, Mario, but perhaps for 
the more obscure ones.

===========
3A. Mario =
===========

Culture: 
 Ask anyone (gamer or not) the first thing that comes into their mind when you 
 say "video game", and chances are greater than not that they'll respond 
 "Mario".  Following the video game crash of the mid-80's, Mario represented 
 to the whole world the shining beacon of the Nintendo Entertainment System, 
 and began the over-twenty-year reign of the culture of video games.  Today, 
 he remains the mascot of Nintendo.  Originally conceived as the character 
 "Jumpman" to be Donkey Kong's nemesis, Mario earned his name from Nintendo of 
 America's landlord, Mario Segale.  

 Mario's voice is provided by Charles Martinet, who has been doing so widely 
 since Super Mario 64 (although his first role was actually Mario's Game 
 Gallery, released in 1995), and he has been portrayed live in television by 
 "Captain Lou" Albano, and by Bob Hoskins in the Super Mario Bros. movie.  
 Other actors that have provided Mario's voice in animation include Walker 
 Boone and even the great Peter Cullen (voice of Optimus Prime) in the old 
 Saturday Supercade cartoons.

 As a bit of counterculture, Mario has also become synonymous among certain 
 circles of being the icon of the "kid-friendly" nature of Nintendo, as his 
 personality tends to be optimistic and happy-go-lucky.

Character: 
 I swear, one of these days, we'll get to do some actual plumbing in a Mario 
 game.  Although it's mostly an informed attribute, Mario is a plumber by 
 trade from Brooklyn, NY.  An accident involving a pipe transported him and 
 his brother Luigi into the fantasy world: the Mushroom Kingdom.  Throughout 
 his life there, Mario has served as the kingdom's official "adventurer", and 
 stands as the first (and let's face it, last) line of defense against the 
 forces of Bowser Koopa.  He maintains a solid, yet forever platonic, 
 working relationship with the Mushroom Kingdom's ruler, Princess Peach.

 The preceding established canon is actually conflicted when it's learned 
 that Mario and Luigi have been in the Mushroom Kingdom since being babies 
 delivered by the stork.  Arguments surrounding this are usually academic, 
 as the series has never been one to hold a serious continuous storyline.

 Apparently, the only true ability he has attributed to his own nature is an 
 incredible jumping ability, but the magical Mushroom Kingdom (and surrounding 
 lands) often provide him with an opportunity to invoke many abilities.  
 Recent games in the series also tie him to the hammer as his weapon of 
 choice, which dates back to the original Donkey Kong.

Appearance: 
 Mario is a slightly portly, and not very tall Italian fellow.  He has brown 
 hair, but a darker colored mustache.  His traditional outfit consists of a 
 red shirt and blue jean overalls, a red painter's cap with his initial "M" 
 on the front, brown boots, and white gloves.  Being the mascot of Nintendo, 
 and a character that appears often in varying games, Mario has adopted 
 different costumes over the years, including a doctor's outfit, various 
 sporting outfits, as well as in-universe costumes for different games (such 
 as the Tanooki suit).

Series:
 The Mario franchise is a bit of a whirlwind of styles.  Being Nintendo's 
 mascot character, whenever a new IP comes out of the developing houses, 
 there's a good chance the plumber's likeness will be slapped onto it to 
 move merchandise.

 That said, the "Mario series" as people tend to know it has roots in what's 
 known as "platforming".  In a platform series, areas are presented to the 
 player, and they must run, jump, and use their skills to reach the goal.  
 They're usually action-oriented, and often involve "platforms" suspended over 
 a bottomless pit, hence the name of the genre.  Specifically, the Mario 
 series puts Mario (and sometimes his brother Luigi) in a series of areas 
 and has him reach the end of each area.

Roles:
1981 -- Donkey Kong (Arcade)
1982 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade) 
1982 -- Donkey Kong (G&W)
1982 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (G&W)
1983 -- Mario Bros. (Arcade)
1983 -- Mario's Cement Factory (G&W)
1983 -- Mario Bros. (G&W)
1983 -- Mario's Bombs Away (G&W)
1984 -- Mario Bros. Special (NEC-PC) Japan Only
1984 -- Punch Ball Mario Bros. (NEC-PC) Japan Only
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)  
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. 2  (Famicom Disk System)  
1985 -- Wrecking Crew (NES)
1986 -- Donkey Kong (NES) 
1986 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (NES)
1986 -- Mario Bros. (NES) 
1986 -- All Night Nippon Super Mario Bros. (Famicom Disk System) Japan Only
1986 -- Super Mario Bros. Special (NEC-PC) Japan Only
1987 -- Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES)
1988 -- Super Mario Bros. (G&W)
1988 -- I am a Teacher: Super Mario Sweater (NES) Japan Only
1988 -- Donkey Kong Classics (NES)
1988 -- Kaettekita Mario Bros. (Famicom Disk System) Japan Only 
1989 -- Super Mario Land (GB)
1990 -- Dr. Mario (NES/GB)  
1990 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)  
1991 -- Super Mario World (SNES)  
1991 -- Mario Open Golf  (NES)  
1991 -- Mario the Juggler (G&W)
1991 -- Super Mario Bros. & Friends: When I Grow Up (SNES/PC)
1991 -- Yoshi (NES/GB)
1992 -- Mario Paint (SNES) 
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1992 -- Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins (GB)
1992 -- Mario Teaches Typing (PC)
1993 -- Super Mario All-Stars (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario & Wario (SNES) Japan Only
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (NES/SNES/PC)  
1993 -- Mario's Time Machine (SNES)
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Preschool Fun (SNES)
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Numbers (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Letters (SNES)
1993 -- Yoshi's Safari (SNES)
1993 -- Yoshi's Cookie (NES/SNES) 
1994 -- Mario's Time Machine (NES)
1994 -- Donkey Kong (GB)  
1994 -- Tetris & Dr. Mario (SNES)
1994 -- Hotel Mario (CD-i)
1994 -- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (SNES)
1994 -- Yoshi's Cookie - Kuruppon Oven de Cookie (SNES) Japan Only
1995 -- Mario's Picross (GB)
1995 -- Mario's Game Gallery (PC) 
1995 -- Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy)
1995 -- Mario Clash (Virtual Boy)
1995 -- Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (SNES)  
1995 -- Undake30 Same Game (SNES) Japan Only
1995 -- Mario’s Super Picross (SNES) Japan Only
1996 -- Super Mario RPG (SNES)  
1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)  
1996 -- Mario’s Picross 2 (GB) Japan Only
1997 -- Game & Watch Gallery (GB)
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Mario Teaches Typing 2 (PC)
1998 -- Game & Watch Gallery 2 (GBC)
1998 -- Wrecking Crew '98 (SNES) Japan Only
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)
1999 -- Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (GBC)  
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64/GBC)  
1999 -- Mario Artist: Paint Studio (N64) Japan Only 
1999 -- Game & Watch Gallery 3 (GBC)
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Artist: Talent Studio (N64) Japan Only 
2000 -- Mario Artist: Communication Kit (N64) Japan Only 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2000 -- Mario Artist: Polygon Studio (N64) Japan Only 
2000 -- Mario no Photopi (N64) Japan Only
2001 -- Mario Tennis (GBC)
2001 -- Paper Mario (N64)  
2001 -- Dr. Mario 64 (N64)
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Super Mario Advance (GBA)
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Luigi's Mansion (GCN) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) 
2002 -- Super Mario World: Super Mario Advance 2 (GBA) 
2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
2002 -- Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (GBA)
2002 -- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (GBA)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)   
2003 -- Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (GCN)
2003 -- Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (GBA)
2003 -- Mario Party 5 (GCN) 
2003 -- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (GCN)
2003 -- Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga (GBA)
2003 -- Nintendo Puzzle Collection (GCN) Japan Only
2004 -- Mario vs. Donkey Kong (GBA)
2004 -- Mario Golf: Advance Tour (GBA) 
2004 -- Mario Pinball Land (GBA) 
2004 -- Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (GCN) 
2004 -- Mario Power Tennis (GCN)
2004 -- Super Mario 64 DS (DS) 
2004 -- Mario Party 6 (GCN) 
2004 -- Super Mario Fushigi no Korokoro Party (Arcade) Japan Only
2005 -- Yoshi Touch & Go (DS) 
2005 -- Mario Party Advance (GBA) 
2005 -- Mario Superstar Baseball (GCN) 
2005 -- Dance Dance Revolution: Mario Mix (GCN) 
2005 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP (Arcade)
2005 -- Mario Party 7 (GCN) 
2005 -- Mario Kart DS (DS) 
2005 -- Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time (DS) 
2005 -- Mario Tennis: Power Tour (GBA) 
2005 -- NBA Street V3 (GCN)
2005 -- SSX On Tour (GCN)
2005 -- Super Mario Strikers (GCN) 
2006 -- Super Princess Peach (DS)
2006 -- New Super Mario Bros. (DS)
2006 -- Mario Hoops 3-on-3 (DS)
2006 -- Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis (DS)
2006 -- Yoshi's Island DS (DS)
2006 -- Game & Watch Collection (DS) Japan Only
2007 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP 2 (Arcade)
2007 -- Super Paper Mario (Wii) 
2007 -- Mario Party 8 (Wii) 
2007 -- Itadaki Street DS (DS) Japan Only 
2007 -- Mario Strikers Charged (Wii)
2007 -- Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games (Wii/DS) 
2007 -- Super Mario Galaxy (Wii)
2007 -- Mario Party DS (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Mario Kart Wii (Wii)
2008 -- Dr. Mario Online Rx (Wii)

=================
3B. Donkey Kong =
=================

Culture:
 DK was created to be one of the first true gaming antagonists with a 
 personality.  Shigeru Miyamoto, under the general impression that he equated 
 "Donkey" with "stubborn", created DK to be a "stubborn monkey".  Since his 
 creation alongside Mario, he became an icon of monkey-related characters.  
 
 With Mario's popularity skyrocketing away from DK all the way into the 90's, 
 DK needed a revival, and he got it from Nintendo's then-second-party, Rare.  
 Rare created a new 3D model for Donkey Kong, which represents him to this 
 day, and created an all-new storyline for him, with him as the hero, thus 
 re-establishing his popularity.

Character:
 Originally, Donkey Kong was Mario's enemy, kidnapping his girlfriend, Pauline, 
 and spiriting her to the top of a construction site, from where he flung 
 barrels and other objects at Mario.

 Once Rare took the reins, however, Donkey Kong became a character of his 
 own world, DK Island, and surrounding areas.  He formed a posse of fellow 
 ape/monkey folk (including Diddy, Dixie, and Kiddy, among others) and 
 protected his island and famous banana horde against the reptilian Kremlings.  
 
 There's also a slight bit of discrepancy about who is the real Donkey Kong.  
 As a fourth-wall breaking joke, Rare created the character "Cranky Kong" who 
 claims to be the original DK that Mario tangled with back in 1981.  Of 
 course, this could mean that the current DK was once Donkey Kong Jr., but 
 this has never been fully explored.

Appearance:
 Donkey Kong is a gorilla, and weighs about 800 pounds.  He has brown hair 
 covering most of his body, except for his chest, mouth, hands, and feet, 
 which are bare-skinned.  Starting in the 1994 Game Boy version of Donkey 
 Kong, DK adopted a red tie with his initials in yellow emblazoned on it, 
 as a meager costume.

Series:
 For many years following his creation, Donkey Kong existed as little but a 
 foil to Mario.  He didn't get his own proper series until the creation of 
 Donkey Kong Country.  At that point, he joined the platforming genre.  He, 
 his buddy Diddy Kong, and the extended Kong clan went through a series of 
 games that required them to run, jump, and throw barrels.  He has continued 
 to participate in games related to the jungle of his birth, as well as 
 feature in Mario-related ensemble games, such as Mario Party and Mario Kart.

Roles:
1981 -- Donkey Kong (Arcade) 
1982 -- Donkey Kong (Atari 2600)
1982 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade) 
1982 -- Donkey Kong (G&W)
1982 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (G&W)
1983 -- Donkey Kong (NES) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (NES) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong 3 (Arcade) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong Jr. Math (NES) 
1983 -- Donkey Kong Classics (NES) 
1984 -- Donkey Kong 3 (NES) 
1984 -- Donkey Kong Circus (G&W)
1984 -- Donkey Kong 3 (G&W)
1984 -- Donkey Kong Hockey (G&W)
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES) (assuming you count DK Jr.)
1994 -- Donkey Kong (GB)  
1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)  
1995 -- Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (SNES)  
1995 -- Donkey Kong Land (GB)  
1995 -- Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble (SNES)  
1996 -- Donkey Kong Land 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (GB)
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)
1997 -- Donkey Kong Land 3 (GB)
1998 -- Game & Watch Gallery 2 (GBC)
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64) 
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
1999 -- Donkey Kong 64 (N64) 
1999 -- Game & Watch Gallery 3 (GBC)
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2000 -- Donkey Kong Country (GBC)
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2002 -- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (GBA)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)   
2003 -- Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (GCN)
2003 -- Mario Party 5 (GCN) 
2003 -- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (GCN)
2004 -- Mario vs. Donkey Kong (GBA)
2004 -- Donkey Konga (GCN)
2004 -- Mario Pinball Land (GBA) 
2004 -- Mario Power Tennis (GCN)
2004 -- Mario Party 6 (GCN) 
2004 -- Super Mario Fushigi no Korokoro Party (Arcade) Japan Only
2005 -- Donkey Kong Jungle Beat (GCN)
2005 -- Donkey Konga 2 (GCN)
2005 -- Donkey Konga 3 (GCN) Japan Only
2005 -- Mario Superstar Baseball (GCN) 
2005 -- DK: King of Swing (GBA)
2005 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP (Arcade)
2005 -- Mario Party 7 (GCN)
2005 -- Mario Kart DS (DS) 
2005 -- Mario Tennis: Power Tour (GBA) 
2005 -- Super Mario Strikers (GCN) 
2006 -- Mario Hoops 3-on-3 (DS)
2006 -- Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis (DS)
2006 -- Yoshi's Island DS (DS)
2007 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP 2 (Arcade)
2007 -- Mario Party 8 (Wii)
2007 -- Itadaki Street DS (DS) Japan Only 
2007 -- Mario Strikers Charged (Wii)
2007 -- DK Jungle Climber (DS)
2007 -- Donkey Kong Barrel Blast (Wii)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Mario Kart Wii (Wii)

==========
3C. Link =
==========

Culture:
 Shigeru Miyamoto has described his envisioning of Link as an avatar of 
 himself when he explored the woods in his hometown.  He also states that 
 he wanted Link to be the conceptual silent protagonist, and for the player 
 to connect as much as possible with the boy.  The dramatic yang to Mario's 
 happy-go-lucky yin, Link has been considered the "more mature" side of 
 Nintendo's greatest franchises, with his adventures tending to be more 
 serious, and the stakes being higher.

 Over the years, and particularly since the N64 days, when Eiji Aonuma took 
 over the directorial reins for the Legend of Zelda series, the series seems 
 to be taking on a form of continuity, and this is one of the most hotly 
 debated subjects among video game theorists.  The inherent difficulties in 
 this continuity discussion stem from vague references between games in the 
 series, as well as inconsistencies between games that are supposedly 
 closely releated.

 Link has been "voiced" by Noboyuki Hiyama, Fujiko Takimoto, Sachi 
 Matsumoto, and Akira Sasanuma in the various games.  "Voiced" is in quotes 
 due to the fact that Link is a silent protagonist, and only speaking 
 through grunts, yells, and some minor vocalizations.

 However, an animated series produced in the late 80's made his character a 
 cocky, lovestruck teenager with a full personality and voice (provided by 
 Jonathan Potts), his catchphrase being "Well excuuuuse me, Princess!" which 
 he directed at Princess Zelda when she grew annoyed with him.

Character:
 In actuality, "Link" has been portrayed as several different characters 
 throughout the history of the archaic fantasy world of Hyrule.  The major 
 thread (or link, HA!) connecting all of them is the concept of a young 
 man or boy starting from humble beginnings and rising to become one of the 
 greatest heroes the land has ever seen (ironically, the only other heroes 
 on par with Link tend to be other Links).  Sometimes, Link will save the 
 kingdom of Hyrule directly, usually by combating the evil Ganon/Ganondorf.  
 Other times, he'll travel to a neighboring country in some manner and aid 
 them.  There's really very little else to say about Link's character, 
 since he's meant to be established as an extension of the player.

Appearance:
 The appearance common with all Links in the series is a young man or boy 
 of the Hylian race of humans (yes, it's an offshoot of humans, this is 
 official).  The most distinguishing characteristic of this people is pointed 
 elfin ears.  As for dress, Link is nearly always in a green thigh-length 
 tunic, with a green floppy cap completing the ensemble.  Various iterations 
 of Link have added accessories such as belts and straps, leggings or 
 stockings, or leather gauntlets and earrings on older Links.  Link has taken 
 other costumes at times, however, which include a blue island outfit with a 
 crawfish design in Wind Waker, and a simple peasant wrangler's garb in 
 Twilight Princess.

Series:
 The Legend of Zelda series follows a traditional action-adventure format.  
 Viewed from either a top-down or behind-the-hero perspective, the player 
 starts with a relatively weak Link and proceeds through an "overworld" of 
 sorts.  Eventually, he'll come upon one of a series of dungeons, which he'll 
 have to conquer, defeating the major enemy at the end, and usually recovering 
 some sort of item.  As he progresses, he acquires new tools and weapons, and 
 becomes stronger.  Eventually, he'll find all the requisite items necessary 
 to access the final dungeon to complete the game.

Roles:
1987 -- The Legend of Zelda (NES) 
1988 -- Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES) 
1989 -- Zelda (G&W)
1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) 
1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (GB) 
1993 -- Link: The Faces of Evil (CD-i) 
1993 -- Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon (CD-i) 
1994 -- Zelda's Adventure (CD-i) 
1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (N64) 
1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (GBC) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
2000 -- The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64) 
2001 -- The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) 
2001 -- The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2002 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past & Four Swords (GBA)
2002 -- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (GBA)
2003 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GCN)
2003 -- Soul Calibur II (GCN)
2004 -- The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GCN)
2005 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap (GBA)
2006 -- The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (GCN/Wii)
2007 -- The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass (DS)
2007 -- Link's Crossbow Training (Wii)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

===========
3D. Samus =
===========

Culture:
 The first players of Metroid, having blasted through the game in a record 
 time, destroyed the Mother Brain, and escaped the Zebes base before it 
 self-destructed, could best be described as slack-jawed when they learned 
 that the hardcore bounty hunter they controlled throughout the game was, in 
 fact, a woman.  Not the first female role in a video game by any stretch, 
 but definitely the most important.  Samus screw-attacked through the glass 
 ceiling of video game heroes, and has since taken her rightful place as 
 one of the most respected heroines in the gaming universe.

 The popularity of the Metroid series has been far greater in the West than 
 in Japan.  This was one of the many reasons that American developer Retro 
 Studios took the reins of the series several years after Super Metroid to 
 revive the franchise with their Metroid Prime series.

 Samus also has a spiritual sibling in Link, as both heroes are billed as 
 silent protagonists.  In truth, Samus hasn't truly been as silent as Link.  
 In Metroid Fusion, she held a conversation with a computer, which, although 
 simple text, was actual in-game speech.  However, she has yet to speak in 
 any of her 3D outings, although actress Jennifer Hale supplies her voice 
 for grunts and yells.

 Also a point of interest in the Metroid series is that it's one of the 
 few Nintendo series to have a well-established and concrete continuity.

Character:
 Samus was reportedly born on a Terran colony on the planet K-2L.  In a 
 Space Pirate attack, her colony was wiped out, including her parents.  
 Following the destruction, members of the peaceful bird-like Chozo species 
 found the toddler Samus amongst the wreckage.  Taking her in as an orphan, 
 they raised her as a warrior, a role which had long been absent from their 
 society.  When she came of age, she was given a special cybernetic battle 
 suit that connected with her on far more than a mere physical level.  After 
 leaving the Chozo, she found her qualities suited to that of a bounty 
 hunter.  Often working with the Galactic Federation, she has taken it upon 
 herself to combat the Space Pirates and the Metroid menace.

Appearance:
 Samus is most often publically seen in her full-body Chozo cybernetic 
 battle suit, a mechanical affair colored predominantly red and yellow.  
 Notable features of the suit include spherical shoulder pads and a beam 
 cannon mounted straight on to the right arm, as opposed to being a 
 separate weapon.

 Without the suit, Samus' "official" appearance is that of a slim blonde 
 human woman in her twenties.  She wears a blue skin-tight jumpsuit, which 
 sheathes her entire body below the neck.

 Throughout the series, Samus' appearance has slightly changed.  Her original 
 look was that of a brunette wearing a purple leotard, for example.  Also, 
 her modular battle suit has been known to change as she acquires upgrades 
 to augment its abilities, particularly in the Prime trilogy.

Series:
 The Metroid series involves adventuring and shooting.  Samus is often placed 
 on a planet, usually in a cavernous situation, and is required to travel 
 through a series of rooms, blasting enemies.  The series is known for being 
 non-linear, in that Samus generally can go in one of several directions to 
 explore her surroundings, perhaps finding objects which can power up her 
 abilities.  Also trademark to the series is the feeling of solitude, as Samus 
 is generally the only friendly force in the game, set alone against a planet 
 full of enemies.  There are two perspectives common to the Metroid series.  
 The original Metroid and the early console releases viewed Samus as a side-
 scrolling adventure, while the Prime series put players behind Samus' visor 
 as a first-person perspective.

Roles:
1986 -- Metroid (NES) 
1991 -- Metroid II: Return of Samus (GB) 
1994 -- Super Metroid (SNES) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2002 -- Metroid Fusion (GBA) 
2002 -- Metroid Prime (GCN) 
2004 -- Metroid: Zero Mission (GBA)
2004 -- Metroid Prime 2: Echoes (GCN)
2005 -- Metroid Prime Pinball (DS)
2006 -- Metroid Prime: Hunters (DS)
2007 -- Metroid Prime 3: Corruption (Wii)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

===========
3E. Yoshi =
===========

Culture:
 The character of Yoshi was conceived by designer Shigefumi Hino, not long 
 after the completion of Super Mario Bros., when series creator Shigeru 
 Miyamoto suggested the idea of Mario riding a dinosaur.  It wouldn't be 
 until Super Mario World was released on the Super Nintendo that he finally 
 took full form.  Fans fell in love with the happy-go-lucky dinosaur and 
 his wacky prehensile tongue, and Yoshi soon began appearing in several 
 spin-off games, eventually becoming part of the standard Mario "cast".

 When Yoshi earned a voice in Yoshi's Story, his usual "zip" was replaced 
 with the voice of Kazumi Totaka, Nintendo musician speaking in sounds, such 
 as "bum" or "hup".  

Character:
 The Yoshis are a species of dinosaurs native to the eponymous Dinosaur 
 Land.  Mario first found a Yoshi on the island that bears their name.  
 Intelligent from a very young age, all Yoshis serve as mounts for Mario and 
 Luigi.  Their main skill is a prehensile tongue that can grab many kinds of 
 enemies and either swallow them or spit them out.  Certain Koopa shells could 
 also give Yoshis specific powers when held in their mouths.  

 Later (or earlier, continuity-wise), Yoshis would be able to have a minimal 
 flying ability by beating their legs hard, as well as the ability to create 
 and throw eggs.  They used these skills to help Baby Mario find Baby Luigi 
 and defeat Kamek and Baby Bowser.

 In 1998, the Yoshis were redesigned as infants.  This gave them their new 
 voice and a new look, but their abilities largely remained the same.  In this 
 incarnation, they took on the forces of Baby Bowser alone, without support 
 from Mario & co.

 Since that time, Yoshis have continued to serve roles as part of the Mario 
 series cast, routinely appearing in the sports series', as well as continued 
 games based on the Yoshi's Island storyline.

Appearance:
 A Yoshi is a dinosaur that stands about six feet tall at full height and 
 maturity.  It walks on its hind legs, and has largely inoperable forearms.  
 Its hind legs are encased in boots, and Yoshis (conveniently) have evolved 
 with a saddle on their backs.  Yoshis come in vastly different colors, but 
 the "official" Yoshi color is green.  One of the Yoshi's more distinguishing 
 features is the unique-shaped head, with a rounded and rather large nose/beak, 
 which houses a prehensile tongue which can extend its full body length, or 
 more, depending on the situation.

 At the release of Yoshi's Story, the Yoshis were slightly redesigned to be 
 more anthropomorphic (human-shaped).  Their arms became fingered and operable, 
 their saddles less prominent, and their feet larger.  Following this change, 
 future incarnations of Yoshi would look like an amalagmation of the two 
 concepts.

Series:
 Being an extension of the Mario franchise, games that specifically feature 
 Yoshi often end up as platformers, as well.  More information is in "Mario".

Roles: 
1991 -- Super Mario World (SNES)
1991 -- Yoshi (NES/GB)  
1992 -- Yoshi's Cookie (NES/GB/SNES)  
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (SNES) 
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Preschool Fun (SNES)
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Numbers (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Letters (SNES)  
1993 -- Yoshi's Safari (SNES)  
1995 -- Yoshi's Island (Super Mario World 2) (SNES) 
1995 -- Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy) 
1996 -- Super Mario RPG (SNES)  
1996 -- Tetris Attack [Yoshi's Panepon] (GB)  
1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Game & Watch Gallery (GB)
1998 -- Yoshi's Story (N64)  
1998 -- Game & Watch Gallery 2 (GBC)
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64) 
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
1999 -- Game & Watch Gallery 3 (GBC)
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Tennis (GBC)
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) 
2002 -- Super Mario World: Super Mario Advance 2 (GBA) 
2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
2002 -- Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (GBA)
2002 -- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (GBA)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)
2003 -- Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (GCN)
2003 -- Mario Party 5 (GCN) 
2003 -- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (GCN)
2004 -- Mario Power Tennis (GCN)
2004 -- Super Mario 64 DS (DS) 
2004 -- Mario Party 6 (GCN) 
2004 -- Super Mario Fushigi no Korokoro Party (Arcade) Japan Only
2005 -- Yoshi Touch & Go (DS) 
2005 -- Mario Party Advance (GBA) 
2005 -- Yoshi Topsy-Turvy (GBA)
2005 -- Mario Superstar Baseball (GCN)
2005 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP (Arcade)
2005 -- Mario Party 7 (GCN) 
2005 -- Mario Kart DS (DS) 
2005 -- Super Mario Strikers (GCN) 
2006 -- Mario Hoops 3-on-3 (DS)
2006 -- Yoshi's Island DS (DS)
2007 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP 2 (Arcade)
2007 -- Mario Party 8 (Wii) 
2007 -- Itadaki Street DS (DS) Japan Only 
2007 -- Mario Strikers Charged (Wii)
2007 -- Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games (Wii/DS) 
2007 -- Mario Party DS (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Mario Kart Wii (Wii)

===========
3F. Kirby =
===========

Culture:
 A strong contender for the definition of "cute", Kirby was envisioned as 
 a cute character for a beginner's game.  It's unknown how Kirby got his 
 name, and even series creator Masahiro Sakurai admits he has forgotten 
 how.  Rumors speculate that he was either named after vaccuum cleaner 
 manufacturers "Kirby Corporation", or perhaps attorney John Kirby, who 
 fought for Nintendo when Universal studios filed a lawsuit against them 
 for the use of the Donkey Kong character.  The mystery will forever remain.

 What's not a mystery is Kirby's appeal.  A perfectly optimistic series 
 based on light, happy music, with a bouncy, fluffy protagonist, Kirby has 
 captured many gamers' hearts in Japan and in other countries.

 While Kirby tends not to form coherent words (except for "Hi!"), he is 
 voiced by actress Makiko Oumoto, and his speech in games and anime is 
 mostly "reactionary", despite the diction of any characters around him.

Character:
 Kirby is a cheerful and innocent fellow from the planet Popstar.  Little 
 is known about his background or heritage.  What is known is that he has a 
 positive outlook on life, loves to eat, and loves to sleep.  His unique 
 physique allows him to inhale very forcefully.  Once he sucks up his 
 quarry, he can usually spit it back out as a weapon, or sometimes swallow 
 what he's eaten, and perhaps copy the ability of whatever he ate.  Also, 
 he can inhale air, giving him the ability to float through the sky.  With 
 these powers, he's always on hand to save Popstar, or even the known 
 galaxy, against anything it can throw at him.

Appearance:
 Kirby has remained basically unchanged throughout his games.  He appears 
 as a small, pink ball, with small floppy arms, a small face on the front 
 of his body, and two red feet.  In certain games, he's given the 
 opportunity to copy the abilities of his enemies, which is usually noted 
 by a brief costume to reflect his ability (a floppy cap for the Sword 
 ability, or a backwards baseball cap for the Wheel ability).

Series:
 Kirby's main series is platforming, similar to the Mario series.  Differences 
 come with Kirby's control scheme, with his ability to float, inhale, and copy 
 enemy powers.  The Kirby series as a whole is known for being particularly 
 cute and cuddly, even by Nintendo standards.

Roles:
1992 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB)  
1993 -- Kirby's Pinball Land (GB)  
1993 -- Kirby's Adventure (NES)  
1995 -- Kirby's Dream Land 2 (GB)  
1995 -- Kirby's Dream Course (SNES)  
1995 -- Kirby's Avalanche (SNES)  
1995 -- Kirby's Blockball (GB)  
1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES)  
1996 -- Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SNES)  
1997 -- Kirby's Star Stacker (GB)  
1997 -- Kirby's Super Star Stacker (Super Famicom) Japan Only
1998 -- Kirby Baseball (Super Famicom) Japan Only
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
2000 -- Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards (N64)  
2001 -- Kirby's Tilt 'n' Tumble (GBC)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2002 -- Kirby: Nightmare in Dream Land (GBA)
2003 -- Kirby Air Ride (GCN)
2004 -- Kirby & The Amazing Mirror (GBA)
2005 -- Kirby: Canvas Curse (DS)
2006 -- Kirby: Squeak Squad (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Kirby Super Star Ultra (DS)

==========
3G. Fox  =
==========

Culture:
 Designed by Shigeru Miyamoto and Takaya Imamura, Fox was designed around 
 the Star Fox series of video games.  While Fox alone has had little 
 cultural impact, he was at the forefront of Nintendo's technological 
 battles for a time as his game heralded the dawn of the Super Nintendo's 
 Super FX chip.  Fox's model is based off of the mythical Japanese foxes 
 of Inari, known as kitsune.  The red scarf he traditionally wears is an 
 homage to the custom of adorning kitsune statues with red neckwear.

Character:
 The son of venerable pilot, James McCloud, Fox followed in his father's 
 footsteps, proving himself just as hot in a fighter as his father.  His 
 skills led him to become the leader of the Star Fox mercenary squadron 
 after the death of his father.  He roams the Lylat system in the battle 
 cruiser: Great Fox, protecting the planet Corneria and surrounding planets 
 against the forces of Emperor Andross of Venom.

 Fox's character has evolved much over recent years, particularly with the 
 addition of his love interest, Krystal, to the story.  While it seemed at 
 first that their relationship was almost too smooth, recent events have 
 shaken their future, with no clear path in sight.

Appearance:
 Fox is an anthropomorphic fox, in that he has a basic human skeletal 
 structure and build, but his head is clearly that of a fox.  He also has 
 the fur and tail of a fox.  He's most commonly seen wearing a simple and 
 rustic flight suit, although the exact costume has varied from game to 
 game.

Series:
 The Star Fox series is largely a sci-fi flight simulator.  Taking place in the 
 Lylat System, the majority of the games in the series focus on flying your 
 spacecraft (usually an "Arwing") in one of two ways: the first being down a 
 "corridor" in which you can reorient yourself, but not change direction (also 
 known as being "on rails"), and the second being freely flying around in a 
 smaller area.  In either situation, you shoot down enemy spacecraft and 
 weapons, either on the surface of a planet or in space.

Roles:
1993 -- Star Fox (SNES)  
1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)  
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2002 -- Star Fox Adventures: Dinosaur Planet (GCN)
2005 -- Star Fox: Assault (GCN)
2006 -- Star Fox Command (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

=============
3H. Pikachu =
=============

Culture:
 Adorable, yes, but parents tend to loathe the appearance of this yellow 
 mouse-like creature known as Pikachu, as his coming foretells a sagging 
 on their wallets.  Pikachu is the flagship creature of Nintendo and Game 
 Freak's cash cow, "Pokémon", short for "Pocket Monsters".  The origins are 
 traced back to series executive director, Satoshi Tajiri, and his love of 
 insect collecting.  Envisioned as a simple game where your trainer would 
 capture cute monsters to battle against other trainers' monsters, this 
 concept exploded across Japan, and then the world, into a massive frenzy, 
 spurred on by the tagline, "Gotta catch 'em all!"  Most Pokémon games are 
 released in sets of two, encouraging trading between owners of each set.  
 Another common release tactic is to release a third game some time later of 
 the same "generation", with a new story.

 Pikachu sits on top of the Pokémon heap as the reigning most popular 
 Pokémon.  Much like the other Pokémon, he was simply imagined into 
 existence as part of the other 150 original species.  His name is derived 
 from two Japanese onomatopoeia: "pika", the sound an electric spark makes, 
 and "chuu", the sound a squeaking mouse makes.

 In all versions of voices heard, through games and anime, Pikachu is 
 voiced by Ikue Otani, even though Pikachu has no real language, except for 
 repeatedly saying the syllables of its own name to communicate.

Character:
 There are two ways to characterize Pikachu.  First is as the Pokémon type. 
 Pokédex Entry #25 (according to the National Pokédex) is an electric mouse.  
 It tends to live in grassy or lightly-forested areas.  It tends to store 
 electrical energy in pouches in its cheeks, and when agitated, it will 
 release this energy.  It can evolve into a Raichu by being exposed to a 
 Thunder Stone.

 The second way to characterize Pikachu is as Ash Ketchum's famous friend in 
 the Pokémon anime.  Given to him by Professor Oak when the "starter three" 
 were unavailable, Pikachu and Ash started off rocky at first in their 
 relationship, but soon became the best of friends.  Pikachu tends not to 
 hang out in his Pokéball, but instead simply tags along with Ash, or rests 
 on his shoulder.  He and Ash remain inseparable throughout the series.

Appearance:
 All Pikachu appear as predominantly yellow mice, with brown stripes on 
 their back, red circular cheeks, and black-tipped pointy ears.  They 
 walk on their hind legs, and have a tail shaped like a lightning bolt.

Series:
 The main Pokémon series is an RPG focused around your character as being a 
 Pokémon Trainer.  While your character alone doesn't fight, you command a 
 team of the eponymous Pokémon, who you can command to fight for you.  You 
 progress through the game, from town to town, battling both wild Pokémon and 
 other trainers, in the hopes of improving your own Pokémon as well as 
 capturing new ones to create a bigger and better team.

Roles:
1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB) (introduced in Japan as Red/Green, then Blue)
1998 -- Pokémon Pikachu (LCD Unit)  
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
1999 -- Pokémon Pinball (GB)  
1999 -- Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition (GBC)  
1999 -- Pokémon Snap (N64)  
2000 -- Pokémon Stadium (N64)  
2000 -- Pokémon Trading Card Game (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokémon Puzzle League (N64)  
2000 -- Pokémon Gold/Silver (GBC)  
2000 -- Hey You, Pikachu! (N64)  
2000 -- Pokémon Puzzle Challenge (GBC)  
2001 -- Pokémon Stadium 2 (N64)  
2001 -- Pokémon Crystal (GBC)  
2001 -- Pokémon Card GB 2 (GBC) Japan Only
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2003 -- Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire (GBA)
2003 -- Pokémon Pinball Ruby & Sapphire (GBA)
2003 -- Pokémon Channel (GCN)
2004 -- Pokémon FireRed/LeafGreen (GBA)
2004 -- Pokémon Colosseum (GCN)
2005 -- Pokémon Emerald (GBA)
2005 -- Pokémon Dash (DS)
2005 -- Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness (GCN)
2006 -- Pokémon Trozei! (DS)
2006 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon Red Rescue Team (GBA)
2006 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon Blue Rescue Team (DS)
2006 -- Pokémon Ranger (DS)
2007 -- Pokémon Diamond/Pearl (DS)
2007 -- Pokémon Battle Revolution (Wii)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Darkness (DS)
2008 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time (DS)

============
3I. Bowser =
============

Culture:
 The eternal bad guy of the Mario series, Bowser began his days as a direct 
 opponent to Mario and all he stood for.  His original conception was based 
 as a turtle with dragon elements.  It's possible he was modeled off a 
 kappa, a water sprite from Japanese folklore.  This follows with his name 
 in Japan: Koopa.  The name "Bowser" was given to him in the American version 
 of Super Mario Bros.

 Bowser has been voiced by several actors throughout the years.  In animated 
 Mario TV series', Harvey Atkin provided the voice.  In the video games, he 
 has been voiced by Isaac Marshall, Scott Burns, and Eric Newsome.  In the 
 Super Mario Bros. movie, "King Koopa" was portrayed as a human by Dennis 
 Hopper.  However, Bowser's not a particularly vocal character (outside of 
 text) and tends to communicate more often with roars and growls.

 One of the largest inconsistencies surrounding Bowser is his actual size, 
 which seems to vary greatly depending on the game.  He's almost always 
 portrayed as being larger than Mario.  In most games, Bowser is about seven 
 to ten feet tall (scale), but in Super Mario 64 and Super Mario Sunshine, 
 he's considerably larger, and would be quite tall if he stretched up to his 
 full height.

Character:
 The king of the Koopa army, Bowser rules over his fiery and mountainous 
 kingdom with an iron fist.  He continually has his sights set on ruling the 
 Mushroom Kingdom, as well, although his aim in that goal is unclear.  Towards 
 that end, he routinely kidnaps the Mushroom Kingdom's Princess Peach.  There 
 are rumors that he has a romantic interest towards her, but those are largely 
 unsubstantiated.

 Early in his career (and in straight Mario games thereafter), Bowser is 
 specifically bent on his goal of conquering the Mushroom Kingdom.  However, 
 in recent times, he has become sort of simply a diabolical character, simply 
 acting mean and nasty because it fits his character, as opposed to having a 
 specific goal in mind.  This has also led to him becoming a somewhat 
 sympathetic evil character, in that his plans are foiled by incompetence or 
 bad luck.

 Such sympathies have also led to him being a playable character in storylines, 
 particularly in the RPG/Paper series, which often see him as a bad guy 
 overshadowed by a far greater evil, requiring him to ally with Mario to 
 respond to the threat.

 Also of note is Bowser's family.  Introduced in Super Mario Bros. 3 were the 
 Koopalings, or Koopa Kids.  Each having a distinct amoral personality and 
 many sporting odd hairstyles, they served as world-ending villains for Mario 
 to tangle with.  Beyond that, an "eighth" Koopaling, known as Bowser Jr., 
 was featured prominently in Super Mario Sunshine.  These appearances are 
 independent of the other Koopalings, suggesting perhaps that they exist in 
 different universes, or that the original seven have been retconned.

Appearance:
 Bowser's official appearance is that of dinosaur-like turtle with a touch of 
 dragon.  His main body is covered in yellow scales, except on his chest, 
 which is colored a lighter yellow.  He has four fingers and three toes on 
 his limbs, each ending in claws.  He has a green-and-white-skinned grinning 
 dragon-face with two horns, sharp teeth, and a shock of red hair and 
 eyebrows.  He has a shell on his back that's fully green and covered in large 
 spikes.  To round off his ensemble, he wears bands on his arms and neck 
 studded with spikes.

 This appearance has largely remained the same throughout his tenure, with the 
 exception of his hair in the original Super Mario Bros., which apparently 
 could not be implemented due to graphical limitations.  Also, in the TV 
 animated series, Bowser was fully green and looked more akin to a crocodile.

Series:
 See Mario.

Roles:
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)  
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. 2 (Famicom Disk System) Japan Only
1988 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)  
1990 -- Super Mario World (SNES)  
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1993 -- Super Mario All-Stars (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (NES/SNES/PC)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Preschool Fun (SNES)
1993 -- Yoshi's Safari (SNES)
1993 -- Yoshi's Cookie (NES/SNES) 
1994 -- Hotel Mario (CD-i)
1994 -- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (SNES)
1994 -- Yoshi's Cookie - Kuruppon Oven de Cookie (SNES) Japan Only
1995 -- Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (SNES)  
1996 -- Super Mario RPG (SNES)  
1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Game & Watch Gallery (GB)
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
1999 -- Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (GBC)  
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Tennis (GBC)
2001 -- Paper Mario (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Luigi's Mansion (GCN)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2002 -- Super Mario World: Super Mario Advance 2 (GBA) 
2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
2002 -- Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (GBA)
2002 -- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (GBA)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)   
2003 -- Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (GCN)
2003 -- Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (GBA)
2003 -- Mario Party 5 (GCN) 
2003 -- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (GCN)
2003 -- Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga (GBA)
2003 -- Nintendo Puzzle Collection (GCN) Japan Only
2004 -- Mario Pinball Land (GBA) 
2004 -- Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (GCN) 
2004 -- Mario Power Tennis (GCN)
2004 -- Super Mario 64 DS (DS) 
2004 -- Mario Party 6 (GCN) 
2004 -- Super Mario Fushigi no Korokoro Party (Arcade) Japan Only
2005 -- Yoshi Touch & Go (DS) 
2005 -- Mario Party Advance (GBA) 
2005 -- Mario Superstar Baseball (GCN) 
2005 -- Dance Dance Revolution: Mario Mix (GCN) 
2005 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP (Arcade)
2005 -- Mario Party 7 (GCN) 
2005 -- Mario Kart DS (DS) 
2005 -- Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time (DS) 
2005 -- Mario Tennis: Power Tour (GBA) 
2005 -- Super Mario Strikers (GCN) 
2006 -- Super Princess Peach (DS)
2006 -- New Super Mario Bros. (DS)
2006 -- Mario Hoops 3-on-3 (DS)
2006 -- Yoshi's Island DS (DS)
2007 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP 2 (Arcade)
2007 -- Super Paper Mario (Wii) 
2007 -- Mario Party 8 (Wii) 
2007 -- Itadaki Street DS (DS) Japan Only 
2007 -- Mario Strikers Charged (Wii)
2007 -- Super Mario Galaxy (Wii)
2007 -- Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games (Wii/DS) 
2007 -- Mario Party DS (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Mario Kart Wii (Wii)

===========
3J. Peach =
===========

Culture:
 One of Nintendo's two "damsels in distress", Peach has the dubious 
 distinction of representing the argument of sexism in video games.  In her 
 first appearance, and in several thereafter, Peach plays the role of 
 nothing more than the reward at the end of the game.  This has become less 
 of a habit in recent years, as Peach has played a more active role in the 
 latest adventures, even being playable in certain games, and the main 
 character in her recent starring debut: Super Princess Peach.

 One of the controversies about the Princess of the Mushroom Kingdom was her 
 name.  In Japan, she has been called "Peach" from day one, but in North 
 America, she was referred to as "Princess Toadstool" or simply "Princess" 
 for a long time.  The reason for this is largely unknown, and with the 
 release of Super Mario 64, her name was "retconned" to Peach through the 
 opening letter to Mario.  This has led to belief that her "full name" is 
 Princess Peach Toadstool, or perhaps that Peach is a nickname.  Regardless, 
 she has been known simply as Peach in North America ever since.  I should 
 point out that Super Mario 64 isn't exactly the first game where she was 
 called Peach in America (that would be Yoshi's Safari), but it is the first 
 EAD-made game to do so, making it official, then.

 Across video games and animations, Peach has been voiced by several 
 actresses: Mami Yamase, Jeannie Elias, Tracey Moore, Jocelyn Benford, Leslie 
 Swan, Asako Kozuki, Jen Taylor, and Nicole Mills.

Character:
 Princess Peach is the de facto ruler of the Mushroom Kingdom.  She serves 
 her people with kindness and grace.  Despite her proper attitude, though, 
 she sometimes shows a bit of a wild streak, with a thirst for adventure that 
 can rival Mario's.

 Her talents, outside of royalty-related duties, aren't as pronounced as 
 others, but one that has stood by her ever since her playable debut in 
 Super Mario Bros. 2 is her ability to float for a short amount of time.  It 
 is unknown whether this is accomplished by using her gown as a sort of 
 lift device, or if this is an inherent ability.  She has also accomplished 
 this feat with the use of a parasol.

 While it is often implied that she has had relatives that also serve as 
 royalty, none have ever been seen in any game.  Despite her solitude on the 
 throne of the Mushroom Kingdom, she has a large and dedicated staff, including 
 Toadsworth, her chancellor, and Toad, her personal retainer.

 Like most other prominent members of the Mario universe, Peach has found a 
 regular calling among ensemble cast roles in sports and party games.  Often, 
 Peach is the one to provide the feminine touch to a largely masculine cast.

Appearance:
 Peach is a human woman in her late teens or early twenties.  She has blonde 
 hair that reaches down her back and is usually styled in a feathery hairdo.  
 She's most commonly seen wearing a pink royal gown, a sapphire brooch and 
 earrings, arm-length white gloves, red high-heel shoes, and a small golden 
 crown decorated with sapphires and rubies.

 Past iterations have interpreted Peach has having darker hair, and the gloves 
 weren't added until Super Mario World.  Furthermore, Peach's gown has 
 received an overhaul in recent years.  Formerly, her gown was belted with a 
 darker sash that was held tight around her waist, but currently, that has been 
 replaced with looser frills that drape to either side of her.

 Furthermore, Peach's outfit has changed based on the game she appears in.  
 For example, in sports games, Peach's full-length gown would be a liability, 
 so she often dresses in shorter skirts and more sensible shoes to 
 accommodate.  She does have the distinction of having the largest variation 
 in costume of any Mario universe character.

Series:
 See Mario.

Roles:
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)  
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. 2 (Famicom Disk System) Japan Only
1987 -- Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) 
1988 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)  
1990 -- Super Mario World (SNES)  
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1993 -- Super Mario All-Stars (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (NES/SNES/PC)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Preschool Fun (SNES)
1993 -- Yoshi's Safari (SNES)
1993 -- Yoshi's Cookie (NES/SNES) 
1994 -- Hotel Mario (CD-i)
1994 -- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (SNES)
1994 -- Yoshi's Cookie - Kuruppon Oven de Cookie (SNES) Japan Only
1996 -- Super Mario RPG (SNES)  
1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Game & Watch Gallery (GB)
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1998 -- Game & Watch Gallery 2 (GBC)
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
1999 -- Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (GBC)  
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)  
1999 -- Game & Watch Gallery 3 (GBC)
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Tennis (GBC)
2001 -- Paper Mario (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64)
2001 -- Super Mario Advance (GBA)
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Luigi's Mansion (GCN)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2002 -- Super Mario World: Super Mario Advance 2 (GBA) 
2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
2002 -- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (GBA)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)   
2003 -- Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (GCN)
2003 -- Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (GBA)
2003 -- Mario Party 5 (GCN) 
2003 -- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (GCN)
2003 -- Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga (GBA)
2003 -- Nintendo Puzzle Collection (GCN) Japan Only
2004 -- Mario Pinball Land (GBA) 
2004 -- Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (GCN) 
2004 -- Mario Power Tennis (GCN)
2004 -- Super Mario 64 DS (DS) 
2004 -- Mario Party 6 (GCN) 
2004 -- Super Mario Fushigi no Korokoro Party (Arcade) Japan Only
2005 -- Mario Party Advance (GBA) 
2005 -- Mario Superstar Baseball (GCN) 
2005 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP (Arcade)
2005 -- Mario Party 7 (GCN) 
2005 -- Mario Kart DS (DS) 
2005 -- Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time (DS) 
2005 -- Mario Tennis: Power Tour (GBA) 
2005 -- NBA Street V3 (GCN)
2005 -- SSX On Tour (GCN)
2005 -- Super Mario Strikers (GCN) 
2006 -- Super Princess Peach (DS)
2006 -- New Super Mario Bros. (DS)
2006 -- Mario Hoops 3-on-3 (DS)
2006 -- Yoshi's Island DS (DS)
2007 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP 2 (Arcade)
2007 -- Super Paper Mario (Wii) 
2007 -- Mario Party 8 (Wii) 
2007 -- Itadaki Street DS (DS) Japan Only 
2007 -- Mario Strikers Charged (Wii)
2007 -- Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games (Wii/DS) 
2007 -- Super Mario Galaxy (Wii)
2007 -- Mario Party DS (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Mario Kart Wii (Wii)

=================
3K. Zelda/Sheik =
=================

Culture:
 The other of Nintendo's two "damsels in distress", Zelda has often found 
 herself in the role of captive, in the Legend of Zelda series, requiring the 
 heroic Link to come and rescue her.  She was created by Shigeru Miyamoto to 
 simply be the object of Link's quest, thus the naming of the game, "The 
 Legend of Zelda".  This becomes a bit misleading in the end, considering that 
 the entire series shares the name, despite the fact that Zelda is not only 
 unplayable, but sometimes doesn't even appear in certain games in the series.  
 Her name is said to come from Zelda Fitzgerald, wife of F. Scott.

 Naturally, Zelda's repeated state of distress, particularly in early years 
 caused a bit of upheaval, particularly in the West.  Accordingly, recent 
 roles that the character of Zelda has filled put her in a more active and 
 powerful role, but she still has yet to be playable in any official Nintendo 
 game besides the Smash Bros. series.

 Zelda's alter-ego, Sheik, became a hot topic once Ocarina of Time was 
 released.  A particularly sticky point of discussion is whether "Sheik" is 
 male or female.  Allow me to weigh in on the topic.  First of all, arguing 
 this point is entirely moot, as a person named "Sheik" never existed, and 
 it was always Zelda under that disguise.  That said, I believe that, in 
 Ocarina of Time, the intention was to portray Zelda as disguising herself 
 as a male.  Now, before you start throwing obvious physical attributes of 
 "Sheik" at me, I ALSO believe that, once Melee rolled around, "Sheik" 
 BECAME female, not only to settle the argument, but also to simplify the 
 convention of pronouns when switching between Zelda and Sheik.

 Much like Link, Zelda has not been vocalized outside of accents and yells, 
 but in the animated series of the late 80's, she was voiced by Cyndy Preston, 
 who portrayed her as a more warrior-like and tomboyish princess, who often 
 rebuffed the brash Link's advances.

Character:
 Like Link, the character of "Zelda" has been portrayed by several different 
 women in Hyrule's history.  It is assumed that all are vaguely related to 
 one another, given their connection to the royal blood of Hyrule.  Most 
 serve as the active Princess of Hyrule during the time their game takes place, 
 either being the de facto ruler of Hyrule, or the daughter of its King.

 As has been said earlier, Zelda typically is one to be abducted or otherwise 
 subdued throughout the course of the game.  The reasons for these attacks 
 usually refer to both Zelda's latent magical abilities, which tend to be 
 quite powerful, and quite simply her standing as a member of the Hyrule 
 ruling class.

 As most Zeldas carry the Triforce of Wisdom within them, their powers do not 
 tend to be particularly active or overt, but generally more of a passive 
 nature.  However, there are times when Zelda is forced to fight, and a couple 
 have proved themselves competent archers.

 The Sheik persona is one adopted by Zelda in Ocarina of Time.  With Link 
 being held in stasis by the Master Sword and Ganondorf taking over Hyrule, 
 Zelda needed to go into hiding to prevent capture and eventually guide Link.  
 She did this by disguising herself as a Sheikah, not revealing her identity 
 even to Link until all the sages in Hyrule were awakened.

Appearance:
 Zelda is a slender woman of elegant stature.  She is generally blonde-haired, 
 and has the pointed ears common to the Hylian race.  She is typically 
 dressed in a royal gown, bedecked with Hyrule motif, including the Triforce 
 symbol.  She is sometimes found in a simpler dress, and has even been in 
 disguise on occasion.

 Zelda's "accepted" royal gown is largely white, with a purple upper half.  
 This is accented in gold on the shoulders and in other trim locations.  She 
 also typically wears a tiara of some sort.

 Sheik is an androgynous looking costume.  It's a dark form-fitting leotard-
 like garment, wrapped in bandages on joints, and with the head almost 
 completely covered in a white cloth wrap.  The "eye" emblem of the Sheikah 
 is emblazoned on the front.

Series:
 See Link.

Roles:
1987 -- The Legend of Zelda (NES) 
1988 -- Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES) 
1989 -- Zelda (G&W)
1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) 
1993 -- Link: The Faces of Evil (CD-i) 
1993 -- Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon (CD-i) 
1994 -- Zelda's Adventure (CD-i) 
1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time (N64) (Sheik appearance)
2001 -- The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) 
2001 -- The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) (Sheik appearance)
2002 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past & Four Swords (GBA)
2002 -- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (GBA)
2003 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GCN)
2004 -- The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GCN)
2005 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap (GBA)
2006 -- The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (GCN/Wii)
2007 -- The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii) (Sheik appearance)

==================
3L. Ice Climbers =
==================

Culture: 
 I think the poignant thing about the Ice Climbers is their almost complete 
 LACK of cultural impact.  When characters for Melee were announced, these two 
 snowy kids came out of nowhere, not having been in a game for well over a 
 decade.

Character:
 Popo (in the blue) and Nana (in the pink) are two parka-wearing kids who 
 love to climb mountains.  There isn't much to them besides that.

Appearance: 
 Popo is a young boy wearing a blue eskimo parka with the hood pulled up.  He 
 also wears mittens and boots.  Nana is similar to Popo, except that she wears 
 pink as her dominant color.  Both kids are armed with large wooden mallets 
 as a primary weapon.

Series:
 The Ice Climbers only have one game to their name.  Ice Climber is a 
 vertically-scrolling game which can be played by two players simultaneously 
 or one alone.  The mountain consists of vertically stacked platforms, which 
 the player must break through to reach the next level, all the while avoiding 
 enemies, or bopping them with one's hammer.

Roles:
1984 -- Ice Climber (Arcade)  
1985 -- Ice Climber (NES)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

=================
3M. Meta Knight =
=================

Culture:
 While Meta Knight has had little cultural effect, he is believed to be the 
 second most-liked character in the Kirby series, after Kirby.

Character:
 Meta Knight has had many different roles throughout the series: enemy, 
 anti-hero, ally, and secret playable character.  He is considered one of 
 the most honorable characters in the Kirby series, despite his ruthlessness.  
 He is the leader of a gang called the "Meta-Knights", which consist of 
 armored characters wielding different weapons, and he commands a floating 
 battleship known as the Halberd.  
 
Appearance:
 Meta Knight's basic body is spherical and blue, and quite similar to Kirby's.  
 He wears purple armored shoes, white gloves, and a grand purple cape.  He 
 also wears a mask with a slit for his eyes.  He tends to carry a golden 
 sword, which he's incredibly skilled with.  Also, in some iterations, his 
 cape can become wings, which he uses to float, similar to Kirby.

Series:
 See Kirby.

Roles:
1993 -- Kirby's Adventure (NES)
1995 -- Kirby's Avalanche (SNES)
1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES)
1997 -- Kirby's Super Star Stacker (Super Famicom) Japan Only
2002 -- Kirby: Nightmare in Dream Land (GBA)
2003 -- Kirby Air Ride (GCN)
2004 -- Kirby & The Amazing Mirror (GBA)
2005 -- Kirby Canvas Curse (DS)
2006 -- Kirby Squeak Squad (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Kirby Super Star Ultra (DS)

=========
3N. Pit =
=========

Culture:
 Well, there really isn't much of a cultural impact from this fellow.  He 
 was largely known as Kid Icarus throughout history, despite being clearly 
 named "Pit" even during the first game.  It is worth noting that, among 
 fans, Pit has been a long-time holdout to appear in a Smash Bros. game.

 Pit appeared (named "Kid Icarus") in the cartoon "Captain N: The Game 
 Master" as one of the plucky sidekicks to Captain N.

Character:
 Pit is the leader of Lady Paletuna's bodyguard.  As the protector of the 
 Goddess of Light, it was his task to traverse the underworld and retrieve 
 the Three Sacred Treasures in order to defeat Medusa and save Angel Land.

Appearance:
 Pit's standard appearance, while generally low-pixel, was defined as 
 being a young man dressed in ancient garb, specifically a chiton and 
 sandals, as well as a golden laurel adorning his head.  He also has a 
 small pair of white-feathered wings growing out of his back.

Series:
 The two-game series of Kid Icarus is a side-scrolling platform affair.  Pit 
 must jump up and across platforms to reach the end of each area, all while 
 fending off enemies with his bow.

Roles:
1987 -- Kid Icarus (NES)
1991 -- Kid Icarus: Of Myths and Monsters (GB)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

===========
3O. Wario =
===========

Culture:
 Wario was created by Hirofumi Matsuoka as an antithesis to Mario.  His name 
 is meant to combine the name "Mario", and the adjective "warui" (bad).  
 The more obvious (at least to Westerners) suggestion is that it's simply an 
 inversion of the "M" on Mario's cap to create Wario.

 Like most of Nintendo's mustachioed crew, Wario is voiced by Charles 
 Martinet.

Character:
 Wario's first appearance was meant to be a straight nemesis of Mario, greedy 
 and manipulative compared to Mario's virtues.  Soon afterwards, Wario 
 developed into a character of his own, away from Mario.  He became more 
 of an anti-hero than a villain, still focusing on greed and mischief, but 
 being less truly diabolical.  In addition to roles that concern him looking 
 for treasure, he's also moved on to making games through his company:  
 WarioWare Inc., as a source of income, which has attracted a colorful cast 
 of characters.

Appearance:
 Wario is a larger and more muscular fellow than Mario.  He has a jagged 
 mustache, mad-looking eyes, and a large pink nose.

 Wario has two popular costumes.  The first is a spoof of Mario's overalls, 
 only with a yellow hat and shirt, and purple overalls.  Also, his gloves 
 have a W on them, and he wears green pointed boots.

 Wario's second costume is based on his WarioWare appearances: He wears a 
 yellow cycling helmet with his W emblem, a blue shirt, purple pants, a 
 light blue cutoff vest, and yellow fingerless gloves.

Series:
 Despite being a character spawned of Mario, Wario has also developed his 
 own pair of series.  The first is a platforming series that involves Wario 
 collecting treasures to satisfy his greed.  His signature move in this series 
 is a running shoulder charge.

 The second series attributed to Wario is the "Warioware, Inc." series.  In 
 these games, the player is challenged by a series of "microgames".  A 
 microgame is a quick game (usually five seconds) where the player is usually 
 given a one or two-word command about what to do, and it's the player's job 
 to figure out how to beat the game in the short amount of time allotted.  
 These games are presented to the player one after the other, with increasing 
 speed and difficulty.  Each game in the series features a cast of colorful 
 characters, and the microgames for each character tend to focus on a specific 
 theme.

Roles:
1992 -- Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins (GB)
1993 -- Wario Land: Super Mario Land 3 (GB)
1993 -- Mario & Wario (SNES) Japan Only
1994 -- Wario's Woods (NES/SNES)
1994 -- Wario Blast: Featuring Bomberman! (GB)
1995 -- Virtual Boy Wario Land (Virtual Boy)
1995 -- Mario’s Super Picross (SNES) Japan Only
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)
1998 -- Wario Land II (GB/GBC)
1998 -- Game & Watch Gallery 2 (GBC)
1999 -- Mario Party
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64/GBC)
2000 -- Wario Land 3 (GBC)
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64)
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)
2001 -- Mario Tennis (GBC)
2001 -- Dr. Mario 64 (N64)
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64)
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)
2001 -- Wario Land 4 (GBA)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)
2003 -- Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (GCN)
2003 -- Wario World (GCN)
2003 -- WarioWare, Inc: Mega Microgame$ (GBA)
2003 -- Mario Party 5 (GCN)
2003 -- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (GCN)
2004 -- WarioWare, Inc: Mega Party Game$ (GCN)
2004 -- Mario Golf: Advance Tour (GBA)
2004 -- Mario Power Tennis (GCN)
2004 -- Super Mario 64 DS (DS)
2004 -- Mario Party 6 (GCN)
2005 -- WarioWare: Touched! (DS)
2005 -- WarioWare: Twisted! (GBA)
2005 -- Mario Superstar Baseball (GCN)
2005 -- Dance Dance Revolution: Mario Mix (GCN)
2005 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP (Arcade)
2005 -- Mario Party 7 (GCN)
2005 -- Mario Kart DS (DS)
2005 -- Super Mario Strikers (GCN)
2006 -- Mario Hoops 3-on-3 (DS)
2007 -- WarioWare: Smooth Moves (Wii)
2007 -- Wario: Master of Disguise (DS)
2007 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP 2 (Arcade)
2007 -- Mario Party 8 (Wii)
2007 -- Itadaki Street DS (DS) Japan Only 
2007 -- Mario Strikers Charged (Wii)
2007 -- Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games (Wii/DS)
2007 -- Mario Party DS (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Mario Kart Wii (Wii)

=========
3P. Ike =
=========

Culture:
 There's not much to say here for Ike except that he represents the long-
 vaunted Fire Emblem series, which for many years was exclusive to Japan.  
 Only in 2003 was the seventh game released in North America, and every 
 game since.

Character:
 The main character of Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance, Ike is the son of 
 Commander Greil, leader of the Greil mercenaries.  He inherits the 
 mercenaries from his father soon after his last day of training and leads 
 them across the continent of Tellius, intent on restoring peace and defeating 
 the Daein Army, for the hope of restoring Crimea, installing Princess 
 Elincia on the throne, and uniting the human beorc and the half-beast laguz.  

 He also plays an important role in the sequel, Radiant Dawn, which takes 
 place three years later.  Resuming command of the Greil Mercenaries after 
 the war, Ike is hired halfway through the game to back up the Laguz Alliance 
 as they lead a war against Begnion oppression.

Appearance:
 Ike is a young man with blue hair (gotta have blue hair).  He wears a red 
 tunic under a blue jacket, with white leggings and boots.  He also wears 
 light gauntlets, sports a red cape, and a greenish-black headband.  His 
 main weapon is a sword.

Series:
 The Fire Emblem series is a tactical turn-based strategy game in a fantasy 
 setting.  Characters in an army or battalion are pitted against opposing enemy 
 forces, where the armies take turns moving and attacking with their weapons 
 or magic.  Unlike some other series that involve creating or hiring faceless 
 soldiers to battle with, Fire Emblem has you take from a cast of individual 
 people, all with a story behind them.  Also distinctive to the game is that 
 there is no way to revive comrades who have fallen in battle.

Roles:
2005 -- Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance (GCN)
2007 -- Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn (Wii) 
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

=====================
3Q. Pokémon Trainer =
=====================

Culture:
 The stars of the Pokémon series have always been the cute little monsters 
 themselves, so it's easy to forget that behind most great Pokémon, you'll 
 find a talented and determined Pokémon Trainer.  Serving as the human 
 connection to the world, the PT represents the player as he explores the 
 world of Pokémon. 
 
Character:
 Since each trainer is meant to be an avatar of the player him/herself, 
 there really is very little established character to attribute to the PT.  
 He starts from humble beginnings in his hometown, receiving his first 
 Pokémon and setting out to explore the world, meeting all kinds of different 
 trainers and battling their Pokémon teams.  If you wish to know the identity 
 of each Trainer "costume", head over to the corresponding section in the 
 "Character in Game" section.

 However, the Pokémon he uses are quite distinctive.  Specifically, they're 
 all the original three Pokémon available in the first game, in various 
 states of evolution.

 Ivysaur is National Pokédex #2.  It is known in Japan as "Fushigi Sou" 
 (strange grass).  It is the second stage of evolution, preceded by Bulbasaur 
 and succeeded by Venusaur.  It is a grass/poison-type Seed Pokémon, with 
 common traits of both plants and animals.

 Charizard is National Pokédex #6.  It is known in Japan as "Lizardon", most 
 likely a portmanteau of "Lizard" and the suffix "-don", used for certain 
 dinosaurs.  It is a fire/flying-type Flame Pokémon.  It is the final stage 
 of its evolution, preceded by Charmander and Charmeleon.  Its flame is said 
 to be hot enough to melt rock.

 Squirtle is National Pokédex #7.  It is known in Japan as "Zenigame" (pond 
 turtle).  It is the first stage of evolution, followed by Wartortle and 
 Blastoise.  It is a water-type Tiny Turtle Pokémon, with the ability to 
 shoot water out of its mouth, and to hide inside its shell.

Appearance:
 The appearance of the PT is variable in nature, since people from all walks 
 of life find a calling to be Trainers.  The "default" playable trainer from 
 the very first game (and the default costume for the Brawl character) is a 
 ten-year-old boy who wears a shirt, jeans, vest jacket, and a hat based off 
 the concept of a Poké Ball.

 The Ivysaur is a squat blue-colored lizard with pointy ears and a fanged 
 maw.  Its most distinctive feature is the plant that grows out of its back.  
 In this stage of evolution, the plant has begun to blossom, with the leaves 
 fanning out, exposing the pink bud.

 The Charizard is a larger red western-type dragon.  It walks on its hind 
 legs, has forearms, large wings, and a tail whose tip is always on fire.

 The Squirtle is a blue turtle with a brown shell that walks on its hind 
 legs.  It has a generally pleasant look on its face.

Series:
 See Pikachu.

Roles:
1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB) (introduced in Japan as Red/Green, then Blue)
1999 -- Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokémon Stadium (N64)  
2000 -- Pokémon Gold/Silver (GBC)  
2001 -- Pokémon Stadium 2 (N64)  
2001 -- Pokémon Crystal (GBC)  
2003 -- Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire (GBA)
2004 -- Pokémon FireRed/LeafGreen (GBA)
2004 -- Pokémon Colosseum (GCN)
2005 -- Pokémon Emerald (GBA)
2005 -- Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness (GCN)
2006 -- Pokémon Ranger (DS)
2007 -- Pokémon Diamond/Pearl (DS)
2007 -- Pokémon Battle Revolution (Wii)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

Note: Of course, it's difficult to determine what constitutes a PT being 
 in a Pokémon game.  One could make the case that every game has a "trainer" 
 that is represented by the player interacting, but I chose to include only 
 those games where a trainer is physically represented in the game in the 
 pictoral sense.  If someone wants to argue that a game does, in fact, feature 
 a trainer, you're more than welcome to.

================
3R. Diddy Kong =
================

Culture:
 Possibly one of the first Nintendo characters created outside of Japan, 
 Diddy Kong was created by English company Rare to give Donkey Kong a 
 partner as he struck out on his own in the Donkey Kong Country series.  
 Following the character's success in that role, Diddy was continually 
 used in the further Donkey Kong series games, even starring in some on his 
 own, as well as becoming a supporting character in the Mario sports games.

Character: 
 Diddy Kong is Donkey Kong's "little buddy".  It's unknown how they first 
 met, but it is generally assumed that the young chimp started tagging along 
 with the more venerable DK to bask in his fame.  They developed into 
 friends, with Diddy's first active role occurring at a time when the Kremlings 
 stole DK's banana hoard.  Since then, Diddy has been ever-present in the 
 fight against the Kremlings.

Appearance:
 Diddy is a chimp with brown hair covering most of his body, except for his 
 hands and feet, his face, and his stomach.  He generally wears a red 
 baseball cap and a red sleeveless t-shirt, which may or may not have yellow 
 stars on it.

Series:
 See Donkey Kong.

Roles:
1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)  
1995 -- Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (SNES)  
1995 -- Donkey Kong Land (GB)  
1995 -- Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble (SNES)  
1996 -- Donkey Kong Land 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (GB)
1997 -- Donkey Kong Land 3 (GB)
1997 -- Diddy Kong Racing (N64)
1999 -- Donkey Kong 64 (N64) 
2000 -- Donkey Kong Country (GBC)
2003 -- Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (GCN)
2003 -- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (GCN)
2004 -- Donkey Konga (GCN)
2004 -- Mario Power Tennis (GCN)
2005 -- Donkey Konga 2 (GCN)
2005 -- Donkey Konga 3 (GCN) Japan Only
2005 -- Mario Superstar Baseball (GCN) 
2005 -- DK: King of Swing (GBA)
2006 -- Mario Hoops 3-on-3 (DS)
2007 -- Diddy Kong Racing DS (DS)
2007 -- Mario Strikers Charged (Wii)
2007 -- DK Jungle Climber (DS)
2007 -- Donkey Kong Barrel Blast (Wii)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Mario Kart Wii (Wii)

===========
3S. Lucas =
===========

Culture:
 Outside of Japan, there's almost no culture impact of the new Mother 
 protagonist.  The only pull that Lucas gets in this country is from die-hard 
 Mother/EarthBound fans (like me) seriously praying for a North America 
 release of Mother 3.

Character:
 Lucas is a young boy living in Tazmily Village in Nowhere Islands, a village 
 that's rustic and idyllic until the introduction of the Pig Army.  He's 
 considered something of a crybaby by his twin brother Claus, who is more 
 adventurous.  His father, Flint, is also quite an adventurer.  Lucas is 
 somewhat reluctant to fight against the Pig Army, but through the course of 
 events, the burden is thrust upon him, as his psychic powers flourish.

Appearance:
 Lucas is a chubby boy with solid black eyes, and swirly blonde hair.  He 
 wears a striped shirt, blue jean shorts, and sneakers.

Series:
 The Mother series is an RPG set in modern times.  The characters wander around 
 small towns, cities, as well as stranger areas, all populated with regular-
 looking people.  Combat is similar to the Dragon Quest series, in that the 
 monsters appear facing the screen, which gives the perpsective of the team.  
 The Mother series is known for its quirky humor and odd enemies.

Roles:
2006 -- Mother 3 (GBA) Japan Only
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

=================
3T. King Dedede =
=================

Culture:
 Dedede has little cultural significance, apart from his standing as a 
 member of the Kirby cast.  It's of note to say that Dedede was originally 
 intended to be in the original Super Smash Bros., but was cut from the 
 cast before the end, so he only existed as a background character in Kirby's 
 stage.

 The voice of Dedede has been provided by actors Ted Lewis and Kenichi Ogata, 
 in the Kirby anime (known in the US as Kirby: Right Back at Ya!)

Character:
 Appearing as the main antagonist in the first Kirby game, Dedede has been 
 an everpresent thorn in the side of justice on Popstar.  He declares himself 
 the planet's de facto king, but as they say, no one voted for him.  His 
 evildoings tend to run on the side of mischief, gluttony, or selfishness, 
 as opposed to outright malicious schemes.  On occasions, he and Kirby have 
 teamed up to take down a common foe.

 Despite their differences in appearance, Kirby and Dedede have much the same 
 abilities.  Dedede can inhale and exhale forcefully, as well as inflate 
 himself to float.  Other attributes include the ability to leap in the air 
 and bodyslam to the ground, and the use of his weapon of choice: a large 
 wooden mallet.

Appearance:
 Dedede is a large penguin-type character.  His "feathers" are predominantly 
 blue, except for a tan belly, and he has an orange beak and feet.  His outfit 
 consists mainly of a red fur-lined robe (with his "DDD" insignia on the back), 
 and a red bobble hat that looks somewhat like a crown.  Also, he wears a red 
 and yellow belt, and sometimes is seen wearing a robe underneath that.  Also, 
 he's sometimes seen with yellow gloves, or just bare blue flippers.

Series:
 See Kirby.

Roles: 
1992 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB)  
1993 -- Kirby's Pinball Land (GB)  
1993 -- Kirby's Adventure (NES)  
1993 -- Kirby's Dream Land 2 (GB)  
1995 -- Kirby's Dream Course (SNES)  
1995 -- Kirby's Avalanche (SNES)  
1995 -- Kirby's Blockball (GB)  
1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES)  
1996 -- Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SNES)  
1997 -- Kirby's Star Stacker (GB)  
1997 -- Kirby's Super Star Stacker (Super Famicom) Japan Only
1998 -- Kirby Baseball (Super Famicom) Japan Only
2000 -- Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards (N64)  
2001 -- Kirby's Tilt 'n' Tumble (GBC)  
2002 -- Kirby: Nightmare in Dream Land (GBA)
2003 -- Kirby Air Ride (GCN)
2005 -- Kirby: Canvas Curse (DS)
2006 -- Kirby: Squeak Squad (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Kirby Super Star Ultra (DS)

============
3U. Olimar =
============

Culture: 
 Captain Olimar was introduced as the protagonist of the Pikmin series, when 
 it was released in 2001 on the GameCube.  Nintendo designer Shigeru Miyamoto 
 has said he conceived of the concept while working in his garden, watching 
 his plants grow, and conceiving the little Pikmin creatures as a result.

Character: 
 Olimar is a space freighter captain from the planet Hocotate.  He first 
 lands on the planet of the Pikmin (which is in reality, Earth), after being 
 struck by a meteor.  After landing, he finds that his ship has partially 
 broken apart and he needs to enlist the help of the Pikmin in order to find 
 all the parts and put the ship back together so he can leave the planet 
 before his air supply runs out.

 The Pikmin themselves are plant-animal hybrids.  They live in structures 
 called Onions.  They tend to be a rather timid race, but they can band 
 together in the presence of a strong leader in order to defend themselves 
 or accomplish a task.

Appearance:
 Olimar is a very small humanoid, most commonly seen in his space suit.  
 He stands at approximately one inch tall.  His non-human characteristics are 
 centered around his head, which is much larger in proportion to the rest of 
 his body than a human's.  He also has a rather large nose, pointed ears, a 
 small tuft of brown hair, and sleepy-looking eyes.  His space suit is a 
 simple white suit with a bubble-like helmet.  The helmet is topped off with 
 an antenna that ends in a red bulb.

 The Pikmin are small and vaguely humanoid, in that they have two arms, two 
 legs, and an obvious head.  They stand at half an inch tall.  They are 
 predominantly a single color, one of five.  Pikmin have a stem-like antenna 
 on top of their head that ends in a plant-like object: either a leaf, a bud, 
 or a flower.  Red Pikmin have a pointed nose.  Yellow Pikmin have large 
 pointed ears.  Blue Pikmin have obvious gills.  Purple Pikmin are larger and 
 more bulbous, and White Pikmin are thinner and have segmented pink eyes.

Series:
 The two Pikmin games are action games with elements of growth simulation 
 games.  The objective is to use Olimar to guide his group of Pikmin.  Since 
 Olimar can't do much on his own, he relies on the abilities of the Pikmin to 
 carry items, fight, and create new paths to travel.  The main focus of the 
 games are to find ship parts or treasures and bring them back to the ship, 
 all while avoiding death by the game's large predators.

Roles:
2001 - Pikmin (GCN)
2004 - Pikmin 2 (GCN)
2008 - Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

==========
3V. Ness =
==========

Culture:
 Ness' cultural impact has been very slight, except among American EarthBound 
 fans desperately clamoring for a localization of the third game.  He was 
 created by "Mother" series creator Shigesato Itoi simply as a small boy from 
 humble beginnings who ends up saving the world.

 He was also considered one of the oddest of inclusions in the original Super 
 Smash Bros., as he was the only character in the game to only have been 
 featured in one game at that time.

 Of note is the fact that EarthBound (Mother 2) is the ONLY game that features 
 Ness.  The first Mother features a boy named Ninten, who looks admittedly 
 simliar to Ness.  Mother 3 doesn't feature Ness specifically, but there 
 are a few references made to him.

Character:
 Ness is a small boy from the town of Onett in the country of Eagleland.  
 When a meteor crashes in his town, he investigates and begins a world-saving 
 adventure.  With his friends Paula, Jeff, and Poo, and his amazing psychic 
 abilities, Ness protects the world against the infestation of the alien, 
 Giygas.

Appearance: 
 Ness is a small boy with a round head.  He's dressed in a striped shirt, 
 jean shorts, sneakers, and wears a red cap on his head, turned sideways.  He 
 also sports a yellow backpack.

Series:
 See Lucas.

Roles:
1994 -- Mother 2/EarthBound (SNES)
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

===========
3W. Marth =
===========

Culture:
 As the banner character of the Fire Emblem series, Marth was assured a spot 
 in this roster, despite the fact that American folk still don't know him 
 outside of a Smash Bros. game.  Still, we'll get that chance when the DS Fire 
 Emblem drops next year.

Character:
 Marth is the prince of the kingdom of Altea and a direct descendant of the 
 legendary hero, Anri, who slew the dark dragon Medeus.  When his father is 
 killed by a priest who follows Medeus, he sets out to reclaim his throne 
 and save his captured sister, using the treasure known as the Fire Emblem 
 and the legendary sword, Falchion, the Sword of Light.

Appearance:
 Marth is a thin, noble-looking young man in his late teens/early twenties.  
 He has blue hair, and wears a diadem on his head.  His main outfit is 
 predominantly blue, with a tunic, breeches, boots, gloves, and a long 
 flowing cape, which has an inner red trim.  His main weapon, the Falchion, 
 is a relatively slim-looking sword, with a size that belies its true power.

Series:
 See Ike.

Roles: 
1990 -- Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi (Famicom) Japan Only
1994 -- Fire Emblem: Monshou no Nazo (Super Famicom) Japan Only
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2009 -- Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon (DS)

===========
3X. Luigi =
===========

Culture:
 The absolute definition of "2P", Luigi was created to be Mario's brother, 
 a second-player character in the game Mario Bros.  The name came from a 
 pizza parlor near Redmond, WA named "Mario & Luigi's".

 Ever playing second fiddle to his brother, Luigi has nonetheless developed 
 into a character all his own, particularly in Super Mario Bros. 2, where 
 all four characters had different abilities.  Also, there have been games 
 that have put Luigi in the driver's seat, such as Mario is Missing and Luigi's 
 Mansion.

 Luigi, like all of the plumbers, is voiced by Charles Martinet.  His tone 
 of voice differs from game to game.  In certain games, such as Mario Party 
 and Super Smash Bros., his voice is higher-pitched than Mario's.  In other 
 games, such as Mario Kart 64, he has a noticably deeper voice.  This deeper 
 voice has appeared in far more recent games, and is more than likely the 
 proper tone.

 In live action, Luigi is portrayed by Danny Wells in the Super Mario Bros. 
 Super Show, and is played by John Leguizamo in the Super Mario Bros. movie.  
 In other animation, he has been voiced by Tony Rosato.

Character:
 Mario's younger, yet taller brother has been portrayed as being more timid 
 than his sibling.  Not as used to the concept of adventure, Luigi seems to 
 prefer to stay at home while Mario goes out on adventures.  Of course, 
 Luigi has been put into action many times, most often by his brother's side.

 Once his distinct ablities developed, it had been revealed that Luigi can 
 jump quite a bit higher than his brother, but he tends to have worse 
 traction.

 In addition to travelling with Mario on his adventures, Luigi has also 
 become a regular in the "Mario cast" that frequents sports and party games.

Appearance:
 Luigi's current appearance shows a taller and thinner Italian guy, with 
 brown hair and a darker mustache.  He generally wears a green shirt and 
 painter's cap with an "L" on it.  He wears blue jean overalls, white gloves, 
 and brown boots, much like his brother.

Series:
 See Mario.

Roles:
1983 -- Mario Bros. (Arcade/NES)
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)  
1985 -- Super Mario Bros. 2  (Famicom Disk System)  
1985 -- Wrecking Crew (NES)
1987 -- Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES) 
1990 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)  
1991 -- Super Mario World (SNES)  
1991 -- Mario Open Golf  (NES)  
1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)  
1993 -- Super Mario All-Stars (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario & Wario (SNES) Japan Only
1993 -- Mario is Missing! (NES/SNES/PC)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Numbers (SNES)  
1993 -- Mario's Early Years: Fun With Letters (SNES)  
1994 -- Hotel Mario (CD-i)
1994 -- Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World (SNES)
1995 -- Mario's Tennis (Virtual Boy)
1995 -- Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (SNES) (as Baby Mario)  
1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)  
1997 -- Game & Watch Gallery (GB)
1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)  
1999 -- Mario Party (N64) 
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)
1999 -- Super Mario Bros. Deluxe (GBC)  
1999 -- Mario Golf (N64/GBC)  
1999 -- Game & Watch Gallery 3 (GBC)
2000 -- Mario Party 2 (N64) 
2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Tennis (GBC)
2001 -- Paper Mario (N64)  
2001 -- Mario Party 3 (N64) 
2001 -- Super Mario Advance (GBA)
2001 -- Mario Kart Super Circuit (GBA)  
2001 -- Luigi's Mansion (GCN) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN) 
2002 -- Super Mario World: Super Mario Advance 2 (GBA) 
2002 -- Yoshi's Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (GBA)
2002 -- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (GBA)
2002 -- Mario Party 4 (GCN)   
2003 -- Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour (GCN)
2003 -- Super Mario Advance 4: Super Mario Bros. 3 (GBA)
2003 -- Mario Party 5 (GCN) 
2003 -- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (GCN)
2003 -- Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga (GBA)
2004 -- Mario Golf: Advance Tour (GBA) 
2004 -- Mario Pinball Land (GBA) 
2004 -- Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (GCN) 
2004 -- Mario Power Tennis (GCN)
2004 -- Super Mario 64 DS (DS) 
2004 -- Mario Party 6 (GCN) 
2004 -- Super Mario Fushigi no Korokoro Party (Arcade) Japan Only
2005 -- Yoshi Touch & Go (DS) 
2005 -- Mario Party Advance (GBA) 
2005 -- Mario Superstar Baseball (GCN) 
2005 -- Dance Dance Revolution: Mario Mix (GCN) 
2005 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP (Arcade)
2005 -- Mario Party 7 (GCN) 
2005 -- Mario Kart DS (DS) 
2005 -- Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time (DS) 
2005 -- Mario Tennis: Power Tour (GBA) 
2005 -- NBA Street V3 (GCN)
2005 -- SSX On Tour (GCN)
2005 -- Super Mario Strikers (GCN) 
2006 -- Super Princess Peach (DS)
2006 -- New Super Mario Bros. (DS)
2006 -- Mario Hoops 3-on-3 (DS)
2006 -- Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis (DS)
2006 -- Yoshi's Island DS (DS)
2007 -- Mario Kart Arcade GP 2 (Arcade)
2007 -- Super Paper Mario (Wii) 
2007 -- Mario Party 8 (Wii) 
2007 -- Itadaki Street DS (DS) Japan Only 
2007 -- Mario Strikers Charged (Wii)
2007 -- Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games (Wii/DS) 
2007 -- Super Mario Galaxy (Wii)
2007 -- Mario Party DS (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Mario Kart Wii (Wii)

===========
3Y. Falco =
===========

Culture:
 Although not nearly as culturally important as Fox to the Star Fox series, 
 Falco has earned a proper fan following as a result of his appearance and 
 attitude.

Character:
 Falco Lombardi is an expert pilot from the Lylat system.  He's a long-time 
 friend of Fox McCloud, even though the two don't always see eye-to-eye.  He 
 often acts arrogant and overconfident, which can sometimes land him in a 
 mess, but he's usually skilled enough to get out of them.  There has been 
 more than occasion where Falco has actually left the Star Fox team to pursue 
 his own goals, but in the end, he always seems to come back to the team, 
 often when they need the help the most.

Appearance:
 Falco is an anthropomorphic bird.  He is similar to Fox and the rest of the 
 Star Fox cast in that he has a basic humanoid shape, but he has an obviously 
 avian head.  His feathers are almost entirely blue, except for a ridge around 
 his eyes that is colored red.  His beak is yellow, and he has tail-feathers 
 that stick out his rear.  He's most often seen in a rugged-looking flight 
 suit, similar to Fox's, but has adopted different costumes based on the game.

Series:
 See Fox.

Roles:
1993 -- Star Fox (SNES)  
1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)  
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)  
2002 -- Star Fox Adventures: Dinosaur Planet (GCN)
2005 -- Star Fox: Assault (GCN)
2006 -- Star Fox Command (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

====================
3Z. Captain Falcon =
====================

Culture:
 In the "real world", Falcon has had little impact, except for his roles as 
 the poster boy of the F-Zero series and his resurgence as a member of the 
 Smash Bros. series.  He was created by Takaya Imamura and Shigeru Miyamoto 
 along with the other original four racers as simply to prove that there 
 were beings in those racers.

Character:
 Captain Douglas Jay Falcon is the pilot of the Blue Falcon in the F-Zero 
 Grand Prix.  His origins are mysterious, and tend to change from game to 
 game.  Currently, it has been established that he has worked on the Internova 
 Police Force, and as a bounty hunter prior to becoming an F-Zero star.

 The F-Zero anime fleshed out his character a bit more, placing him as the 
 reluctant hero on the trail of Black Shadow, while avoiding his clone, Blood 
 Hawk.

Appearance: 
 Falcon wears a combination flight suit and body armor.  The suit itself is 
 predominantly blue (or bluish-purple, depending on the game).  He wears 
 yellow and red gloves, gold metallic boots, a yellow scarf, a gray metallic 
 shoulder pad on his right shoulder, and his trademark red racing helmet, 
 with black visor, and golden falcon emblazoned on the front.  Under the 
 helmet, Falcon appears to be an unremarkable brown-haired man in his 
 thirties.

Series:
 The F-Zero series is a high-speed racing game series, set in the distant 
 future where wheel-less floating craft race on fast-moving sci-fi tracks.  
 Known for its breakneck speeds and dangerous tracks, the series tends to focus 
 more on the racing than the story of its characters, which explains why 
 Captain Falcon had to be built from the ground up for the Smash series.

Roles:
1990 -- F-Zero (SNES) 
1998 -- F-Zero X (N64)
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2003 -- F-Zero GX (GCN)
2003 -- F-Zero AX (Arcade)
2004 -- F-Zero: GP Legend (GBA)
2004 -- F-Zero Climax (GBA) Japan Only
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

==============
3AA. Lucario =
==============

Culture:
 One of the more popular Pokémon to come out of the latest generation, 
 Lucario earned its popularity as a result of its appearance and style, as 
 well as its use as a Pokémon.  It has also starred in its own Pokémon movie, 
 Lucario and the Mystery of Mew, where it was voiced by Sean Schemmel and 
 Daisuke Namikawa, in the respective English and Japanese dubs.

Character:
 National Pokédex #448 is a Fighting/Steel Aura Pokémon.  It evolves from 
 a baby form, Riolu, after achieving a certain amount of Happiness.  One of 
 its trademarks is its ability to sense something called "Aura", which it will 
 use to track the movements of its opponents.  It is apparently also able to 
 understand human speech.

Appearance:
 Lucario appears as an anthropomorphic jackal.  It is colored a combination of 
 black and blue on its fur, with a cream-colored midsection.  It has pointed 
 ears, black flaps that stretch behind its head, and a blue tail.  It also 
 has a spike on the back of each hand, and one in the center of its chest.

Series:
 See Pikachu.

Roles:
2007 -- Pokémon Diamond/Pearl (DS)
2007 -- Pokémon Battle Revolution (Wii)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Darkness (DS)
2008 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time (DS)

=============
3BB. R.O.B. =
=============

Culture:
 One of the first most recognizable faces of Nintendo, R.O.B., known simply as 
 the Famicom Robot in Japan, gained quite a bit of notoriety in Nintendo's 
 early days despite his relative lack of use.  He was designed as a robot that 
 the player could operate and interact with through the Nintendo Entertainment 
 System and specialized games, but was eventually shelved due to his relative 
 lack of use.  In the decades since, he has earned an underground fanbase who 
 adore his old-school charm, and has had several cameo appearances in certain 
 Nintendo games.

Character:
 As R.O.B. is just a Robotic Operating Buddy, he doesn't truly have a character 
 attached to him.  His lot in life is to be used as an accessory to the games 
 he was created for.

 However, he has had a small revival in the Star Fox series, as the android 
 caretaker of the Great Fox was named "ROB 64", and looked somewhat similar to 
 his accessory of origin.

Appearance:
 R.O.B. is a squat robot about 24 cm tall.  He has a flat rectangular head with 
 two optical sensors which detect flashes from the TV screen.  His upper 
 body is also rectangular and he sports two gray arms that he uses for 
 grasping.  He has no legs; just a hexagonal base to perch on.

Series:
 Well, there's not much to say about the two games that star R.O.B., since he's
 meant to be more of an accessory than a standing series.  Games involving 
 R.O.B. were rather dependant on his own abilities, and tended to operate on 
 an honor system.

Roles:
1985 -- Gyromite (NES)
1985 -- Stack-Up (NES)
2005 -- Mario Kart DS (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

=======================
3CC. Mr. Game & Watch =
=======================

Culture:
 The very first Nintendo "character" was this rather indistinct looking 
 black fellow.  Representing the protagonist's character in the myriad 
 Game & Watch library, Mr. G&W has known several different jobs.  The entire 
 Game & Watch series was reportedly developed by Gunpei Yokoi after he sat 
 on a train and observed a bored businessman pressing the buttons on his 
 LCD calculator.  The rest was history, and these LCD games flew off the 
 shelves, being the first truly successful portable systems of their time.

Character:
 Uh, there's not much to say.  He's certainly an industrious fellow, but 
 he's hardly a character outside of being an output for the system.  He was 
 apparently known fondly as "Hideo", until SSBM, where he became an official 
 character with a style all his own.

Appearance:
 Mr. G&W is a completely black humanoid seen from profile.  He has a bulbous 
 body, spindly legs with fat feet, and thin arms that end in balled fists.  
 His nose is about a quarter the size of his large oval-shaped head, which 
 is always seen in profile, and his mouth often opens, but he has no other 
 visible facial features.

Series:
 The Game & Watch games, being some of the earliest portable games, were 
 designed to be simple tasks, generally not involving much besides one thing 
 to do, such as juggling, or catching something.  They were simple LCD games, 
 so their range was rather limited, even as the series progressed through the 
 80's.

Roles:
1980 -- Ball (G&W)
1980 -- Flagman (G&W)
1980 -- Vermin (G&W)
1980 -- Fire (G&W)
1980 -- Judge (G&W)
1981 -- Manhole (G&W)
1981 -- Helmet (G&W)
1981 -- Lion (G&W)
1981 -- Parachute (G&W)
1981 -- Octopus (G&W)
1981 -- Chef (G&W)
1981 -- Egg (G&W)
1981 -- Turtle Bridge (G&W)
1982 -- Fire Attack (G&W)
1982 -- Oil Panic (G&W)
1982 -- Green House (G&W)
1983 -- Rain Shower (G&W)
1983 -- Life Boat (G&W)
1984 -- Spitball Sparky (G&W)
1984 -- Crab Grab (G&W)
1988 -- Goldcliff (G&W)
1988 -- Climber (G&W)
1997 -- Game & Watch Gallery (GB)
1998 -- Game & Watch Gallery 2 (GBC)
1999 -- Game & Watch Gallery 3 (GBC)
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2002 -- Game & Watch Gallery 4 (GBA)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

Unfortunately, it's kinda tough to define exactly what roles have featured 
Mr. G&W.  Certain games, while not obviously featuring specific characters, 
are defined enough that they don't look like a blank black-colored fellow.

================
3DD. Ganondorf =
================

Culture:
 Far more villainous than Bowser, but with more personality than any Metroid, 
 Ganondorf has a large fan following as one of Nintendo's more favorite 
 villains.  Originally conceived as a massive blue pig demon known as "Ganon" 
 (no, not "Gannon"), he was installed as the main antagonist for the Zelda 
 series.  Later games in the series fleshed out his character, establishing 
 him as being a human before his current form, then establishing his history 
 and beginnings, making him one of the few Nintendo characters with a large 
 retroactive history.

 Like the rest of the Zelda cast, Ganondorf has never spoken audible lines, but 
 has grunted and yelled.  He has been voiced by Takashi Nagasako and Hironori 
 Miyata.  Ganon has appeared in the Zelda animated series as a brown pig-like 
 sorcerer, where he was voiced by Len Carlson.

Character:
 While there are reportedly several "Links" and "Zeldas" throughout Hyrule's 
 history, there is believed to be only one Ganondorf, also known as Ganon.  
 He was born as one of the only males born to the Gerudo tribe every 100 
 years, and as such, he became their king.  Despite his power and abilities, 
 he desired more, so he feigned pledging loyalty to the King of Hyrule so he 
 could become closer to the power of the Triforce.  Once he acquired the 
 Triforce, the holy artifact split, and he retained only one third: the 
 Triforce of Power.  Since then he has been obsessed both with acquiring the 
 complete Triforce as well as wreaking his revenge on the Royal House of 
 Hyrule and the line of Heroes.

Appearance:
 Ganondorf's human appearance is that of a bronze-skinned red-haired Gerudo 
 thief.  He generally wears dark clothes or armor of varying styles, depending 
 on the game.  In his "pig" form, he's generally blue in color, and his actual 
 form varies depending on the game, be it bulbously humanoid, more feral with 
 larger horns, or completely a hairy boar-like creature.  In his human form, 
 he tends to use one or two swords as weapons, while his pig forms wield a  
 large trident.

Series:
 See Link.

Roles:
1987 -- The Legend of Zelda (NES) 
1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES) 
1993 -- Link: The Faces of Evil (CD-i) 
1993 -- Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon (CD-i) 
1994 -- Zelda's Adventure (CD-i) 
1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (N64) 
2001 -- The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC) 
2001 -- The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (GBC) 
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2002 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past & Four Swords (GBA)
2003 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GCN)
2004 -- The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GCN)
2006 -- The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (GCN/Wii)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

=================
3EE. Jigglypuff =
=================

Culture:
 Most of what has been said about Pokémon can be found in Pikachu's entry.  
 Notable about Jigglypuff is that it's reported as being the second most-
 popular Pokémon.

 Also, it's important to note that the Japanese name of Jigglypuff is 
 Purin, which means pudding.  This is due to its bouncy and jiggly physical 
 nature.

Character:
 Like Pikachu, there are two facets to the character of Jigglypuff.  The 
 first is as National Pokédex #039, the Normal-type Balloon Pokémon.  Its 
 most popular attack is its voice, which can lull almost any trainer or 
 Pokémon into a deep sleep.  It's said that a Jigglypuff's deep blue eyes and 
 ability to adjust the wavelength of its voice contribute to its singing power.

 The second is as the character in the Pokémon anime.  The Jigglypuff that 
 tends to hound Ash and his friends enjoys singing, and does so often, which 
 puts anyone who hears it into a fast sleep.  There being no one to 
 appreciate its music, Jigglypuff gets huffy and proceeds to draw on the faces 
 of those who've fallen asleep.

Appearance:
 A Jigglypuff appears as a round pink object, with small pointed ears, and a 
 tuft of "hair" growing out of the top of its head (although this is more than 
 likely an extension is rubbery skin).  It also has four floppy limbs; two 
 arms and two legs, a mouth, and two big blue eyes.

Series:
 See Pikachu.

Roles:
1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB) (introduced in Japan as Red/Green, then Blue)
1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)  
1999 -- Pokémon Pinball (GB)  
1999 -- Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition (GBC)  
1999 -- Pokémon Snap (N64)  
2000 -- Pokémon Stadium (N64)  
2000 -- Pokémon Trading Card Game (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokémon Puzzle League (N64)  
2000 -- Pokémon Gold/Silver (GBC)  
2000 -- Pokémon Puzzle Challenge (GBC)  
2001 -- Pokémon Stadium 2 (N64)  
2001 -- Pokémon Crystal (GBC)  
2001 -- Pokémon Card GB 2 (GBC) Japan Only
2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
2003 -- Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire (GBA)
2003 -- Pokémon Pinball Ruby & Sapphire (GBA)
2004 -- Pokémon FireRed/LeafGreen (GBA)
2004 -- Pokémon Colosseum (GCN)
2005 -- Pokémon Emerald (GBA)
2005 -- Pokémon Dash (DS)
2005 -- Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness (GCN)
2006 -- Pokémon Trozei! (DS)
2006 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon Red Rescue Team (GBA)
2006 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon Blue Rescue Team (DS)
2006 -- Pokémon Ranger (DS)
2007 -- Pokémon Diamond/Pearl (DS)
2007 -- Pokémon Battle Revolution (Wii)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Darkness (DS)
2008 -- Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time (DS)

================
3FF. Toon Link =
================

Culture:
 Dateline: August, 2001.  Nintendo's Space World show in Tokyo.  A technical 
 demonstration of the GameCube's hardware, in which a fully 3D exhibition of 
 Link and Ganondorf battle bitterly in a castle setting.  Flash forward to the 
 first quarter of the next year, where the next Zelda game is named and 
 revealed, and faces all across the world fell.  Truly one of the more 
 controversial moves in any Nintendo series, fanboys were up in arms over 
 "Celda", their pet name for The Wind Waker, which would be the first Zelda 
 game to feature fully cel-shaded graphics in a cartoonish setting.  After 
 learning the game was just as well-made as any other Zelda game, the 
 complaints grew mostly quiet.

Character:
 This specific Link is a young boy from Outset, one of the many islands in 
 the Great Sea.  After his sister Aryll is kidnapped, he is forced to don the 
 green garb of the ancient hero and set off for the Forsaken Fortress, in the 
 company of Tetra and her band of pirates.

Appearance:
 Toon Link wears the dark green tunic of the hero of Hyrule, with a lighter 
 green undershirt and white breeches.  He wears short brown boots and a floppy 
 green cap.  He also wears a belt with a spiralish buckle.  As weapons, he 
 carries a small sword and shield, tailored for his size.

Series:
 See Link.

Roles:
2003 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GCN)
2007 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Phantom Hourglass (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

NOTE: There is some controversy regarding what defines "Toon Link".  For the 
purpose of this Nostalgia FAQ, I'm operating on the assumption that this 
Link is very specifically the Hero of Winds from Wind Waker.  Other Links that 
look similar to this Link (like the Four Swords Link) will not be counted, 
simply because of the fact that this is a very specific Link.

===========
3GG. Wolf =
===========

Culture: 
 Wolf has had rather little cultural impact, aside from being a member of the 
 Star Fox cast.  His leadership of the antagonistic Star Wolf team does give 
 him a nice amount of notoriety, though.

Character:
 Wolf O'Donnell, like Fox McCloud, is an ace pilot and leader of a mercenary 
 squadron, known as Star Wolf.  Unlike Fox, Wolf has fewer qualms about who he 
 works for, and sells the talents of his team to the highest bidder.  He does 
 have a code of honor, as he has on more than one occasion teamed up with Fox 
 to counter a galactic threat, but the rivalry between the two runs deep.

 The Star Wolf team has seen several members of varying backgrounds join its 
 ranks, such as the conniving Leon Powalski, the traitorous Pigma Dengar, the 
 nephew of Andross, Andrew Oikonny, the flirtatious Panther Caruso, and even 
 the psychic warrior, Krystal.

Appearance:
 Wolf is an anthropomorphic wolf with grey fur.  He's taller than Fox and 
 wears a dark-colored flight suit.  He also has an eyepatch over his left 
 eye, something that Fox apparently gave him.

Series:
 See Fox.

Roles:
1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)  
2005 -- Star Fox: Assault (GCN)
2006 -- Star Fox Command (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)

============
3HH. Snake =
============

Culture:
 When one talks about the culture of Solid Snake, one has to look at the 
 Metal Gear mythos as a whole, from each individual game all the way to the 
 series creator, Hideo Kojima.  Designed to take a different direction from 
 the action games of the time, Metal Gear was created as incorporating 
 stealth as much as action, rewarding the character for not being seen.

 While this was a modestly novel concept and execution in the beginning, 
 once Kojima released Metal Gear Solid in 1998, the popularity exploded 
 exponentially.  Suddenly, the Metal Gear world was full of anime-inspired 
 influences: full 3D mecha of destruction, ninjas with cloaking abilities, 
 pontificating villains, and lots of kooky one-liners that didn't translate 
 perfectly.  This led to a large franchise blossoming from this one point, 
 securing Snake's status as an icon among gamers.

 In the series, Kojima often tries to tie several war-related themes 
 together to amplify the human side of the series: the futility of war, 
 the attitude of the battlefield, the danger of nuclear proliferation, the 
 reliance on technology, and connections to military history, among others.

 Since Metal Gear Solid, Snake has been voiced by actor David Hayter in 
 English appearances, and Akio Otsuka in Japanese appearances.

 As the first announced character in the Smash Bros. series to not be of 
 Nintendo origin (or the origin of one of its second parties), Snake has 
 thrown open the door to all kinds of speculation regarding the inclusion of 
 third-party fighters in this and future installments of Smash Bros.  
 Smash Bros. series director Masahiro Sakurai is reported as saying that 
 Kojima "practically begged" for his character to be in Super Smash Bros. 
 Melee, but time constraints wouldn't allow it.

Character:
 Solid Snake began his military days as a soldier for the unit FOXHOUND, 
 where he infiltrated the military fortress "Outer Heaven" in order to 
 destroy the weapon, Metal Gear, and defeat the fortress leader, Big Boss.  
 After completing that mission, he was called again to infiltrate the 
 commune "Zanzibar Land" to again combat the threat of Metal Gear.

 Following those missions, Snake went into retirement in Alaska, but was 
 called back to service to combat the FOXHOUND unit itself, it having gone 
 rogue, and destroy a new model of Metal Gear, this time in the remote base, 
 Shadow Moses.  Following that, Snake and his closest ally, Otacon, 
 established an anti-Metal-Gear organization: Philanthropy, and Snake 
 attempted to stop a Metal Gear-related plot in the Hudson Bay, alongside a 
 fellow agent, Raiden.

 Really, I'm only touching the highlights here, as spoiling the plotlines 
 is not what I'm after, here.  If you really want insight into the character 
 of Snake, you owe it to yourself to play the Metal Gear games, even if it 
 would require owning non-Nintendo systems to do so.

Appearance:
 Snake is an average-sized, but well-built man, generally appearing to be 
 in his mid-to-late thirties.  He has brown hair, and sometimes sports 
 facial hair, depending on the game.  His costume is typically some sort of 
 combat gear.  In particular, he's famous for wearing a "Sneaking Suit": 
 a blue-gray skin-tight suit that allows him to blend in with his 
 surroundings more easily.

Series:
 The Metal Gear series was designed to be a stealth infiltration series.  
 The protagonist (usually Snake) would enter his mission and attempt to reach 
 his objective, ideally being spotted as infrequently as possible.  Snake 
 is often able to hide and subvert his enemies in creative ways, such as 
 distracting them, hiding in lockers or underneath tables, as well as using 
 his weapons or close-combat techniques to subdue them.  The series began with 
 a top-down perspective, but was changed with the Metal Gear Solid series to 
 become more cinematic.

Roles:
1987 -- Metal Gear (NES/MSX2)
1990 -- Snake's Revenge (NES)
1990 -- Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake (MSX2)
1998 -- Metal Gear Solid (PS1)
1999 -- Metal Gear Solid: Integral (PS1/PC)
1999 -- Metal Gear Solid: VR Missions (PS1/PC)
2000 -- Metal Gear: Ghost Babel (GBC)
2001 -- Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty (PS2)
2002 -- Evolution Skateboarding (PS2)
2002 -- Metal Gear Solid 2: Substance (PS2/XBOX/PC)
2003 -- DreamMix TV World Fighters (GCN/PS2) Japan Only
2004 -- Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes (GCN)
2004 -- Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater (PS2)
2004 -- Metal Gear Ac!d (PSP)
2005 -- Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence (PS2)
2005 -- Metal Gear Ac!d 2 (PSP)
2006 -- Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops (PSP)
2007 -- Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops Plus (PSP)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots (PS3)

Note: I'm aware of the "actual" stars for certain games on this list.  
 However, these games all feature (if nothing else), a "Snake-like" character, 
 which, in order to eliminate confusion, will be enough for me.

============
3II. Sonic =
============

Culture:
 The mascot of the Sega corporation, Sonic the Hedgehog was reportedly 
 designed by artist Naoto Oushima, designer Hirokazu Yasuhara, and programmer 
 Yuji Naka.  Envisioned as being a new mascot for the Sega Genesis, 
 seemingly specifically designed to directly take on Nintendo's Mario, Sonic 
 won hearts the world over for his cocky attitude and lightning-fast speeds.

 Sonic has been voiced by several actors in games and television media, 
 including Takeshi Kusao, Jaleel White (yes, Urkel himself), Masami Kikuchi, 
 Samuel Vincent, Martin Burke, Junichi Kanemaru, and Ryan Drummond.  His 
 current "game" voice is provided by Jason Griffith.

 As a bit of irony, the April 2002 edition of EGM magazine gave, as their 
 April Fool's joke of the year, a fake code giving the means to unlock Sonic 
 and Tails as playable characters in Super Smash Bros. Melee.  Sonic's 
 induction into Brawl brings that back to light, and further throws open the 
 door for even more potential newcomers from outside Nintendo.

Character:
 Known as "the fastest thing alive", Sonic the Hedgehog lives in the "real 
 world" (according to the games), along with several of his anthropomorphic 
 pals.  Given his speed and tenacity, he's very cocky, aggressive, and tends 
 to lack forethought, often impatiently jumping into dangerous situations 
 feet-first.  He's also very positive and righteous, willing to brave dangers 
 for a good cause, while still maintaining his optimism.

 Sonic's clear and obvious primary ability is his outright land speed, which 
 has allowed him to reach speeds above Mach 1.  He often uses this speed and 
 momentum in his attacks, often combining them with a hedgehog's natural 
 inclination to roll up into a ball, allowing him to barrel into enemies, 
 either in the air or on the land.  Some games have also given him the ability 
 to grind on rails with nothing but his shoes.  Sonic can also turn into Super 
 Sonic using the powers of the Chaos Emeralds, which turns him gold and gives 
 him the added abilities of flight and near-invincibility.

 Despite all these abilities, Sonic has a few glaring weaknesses.  For one, 
 he dislikes water, and can't swim.  For another, he's not very durable.  In 
 many games, being hit once will cost him his collected rings, and another hit 
 will finish him.

Appearance:
 Sonic appears as a predominantly blue anthropomorphic hedgehog.  His skin is 
 beige in parts of his stomach, his arms, his maw, and inside his ears.  His 
 head is his most promiennt feature, featuring two pointed ears, a flat rodent-
 like face, and a mane of blue hair or spikes that curves from the back of 
 his head.  He also has a short blue tail.  For clothing, Sonic wears white 
 gloves and shoes that are mostly red, with some white and gold accent.

Series:
 In the simplest sense, the Sonic series is a platform series.  The important 
 thing that sets it apart from most other series is related to Sonic's 
 blinding speed.  Essentially, a lot of the game involves Sonic travelling 
 fast and blazing through an area, rather than taking his time and exploring.  
 The original games in the series were side-scrolling, and 3D adaptations 
 were developed in later years.

Roles:
1991 -- Sonic the Hedgehog (GEN/SMS/GG)
1991 -- Sonic Eraser (Mega Drive) Japan Only
1992 -- Sonic the Hedgehog 2 (GEN/SMS/GG)
1993 -- Sonic the Hedgehog CD (SCD/PC)
1993 -- Sonic Chaos (SMS/GG)
1993 -- Sonic Spinball (GEN/SMS/GG)
1993 -- SegaSonic the Hedgehog (Arcade) Japan Only
1994 -- Sonic the Hedgehog 3 (GEN)
1994 -- Sonic Drift (GG) Japan Only
1994 -- Tails and the Music Maker (Sega Pico)
1994 -- Sonic & Knuckles (GEN)
1994 -- Sonic Drift 2 (GG)
1994 -- Sonic Triple Trouble (GG)
1995 -- Tails Skypatrol (GG) Japan Only
1995 -- Tails Adventure (GG)
1995 -- Sonic Labyrinth (GG)
1996 -- Sonic 3D Blast (GEN/PC/SAT)
1996 -- Sonic Blast (GG)
1996 -- Sonic's Schoolhouse (PC)
1996 -- Sonic the Fighters (Arcade)
1996 -- Christmas NiGHTS (SAT)
1997 -- Sonic & Knuckles Collection (PC)
1997 -- Sonic Classics 3 in 1 (GEN)
1997 -- Sonic Jam (SAT/Game.com)
1997 -- Sonic R (SAT)
1999 -- Sega Smash Pack (PC/DC/GBA)
1999 -- Sonic Adventure (DC)
1999 -- Sonic Pocket Adventure (NGPC)
2000 -- Sonic Shuffle (DC)
2001 -- Segagaga (DC)
2001 -- Sonic Adventure 2 (DC)
2001 -- Sonic Advance (GBA)
2002 -- Sonic Adventure 2 Battle (GCN)
2002 -- Sonic Mega Collection (GCN)
2003 -- Sonic Advance 2 (GBA)
2003 -- Sonic Pinball Party (GBA)
2003 -- Sonic Adventure DX: Director's Cut (GCN/PC)
2003 -- SonicN (N-GAGE)
2004 -- Sonic Battle (GBA)
2004 -- Sonic Heroes (GCN/PS2/XBOX/PC)
2004 -- Sonic Advance 3 (GBA)
2004 -- Sonic Mega Collection Plus (PS2/XBOX/PC)
2004 -- Sega Superstars (PS2)
2004 -- Sonic Gems Collection (GCN/PS2)
2005 -- Shadow the Hedgehog (GCN/PS2/XBOX)
2005 -- Sonic Rush (DS)
2006 -- Sonic Riders (GCN/PS2/XBOX/PC)
2006 -- Sonic the Hedgehog Genesis (GBA)
2006 -- Sega Genesis Collection (PS2/PSP)
2006 -- Sonic Rivals (PSP)
2006 -- Sonic the Hedgehog (2006) (PS3/360)
2007 -- Sonic and the Secret Rings (Wii)
2007 -- Sonic Rush Adventure (DS)
2007 -- Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games (Wii/DS)
2007 -- Sonic Rivals 2 (PSP)
2008 -- Sonic Riders: Zero Gravity (Wii/PS2)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Sega Superstars Tennis (Wii/DS/PS2/PS3/360)
2008 -- Sonic: Unleashed (PS3/360)

==========================================
3JJ. Notes on the Animal Crossing Series =
==========================================

Despite the use of the Animal Crossing series as a stage, certain items, and 
music, there are no playable characters featured from the series in this 
game.  Still, if this is a series that's important enough to warrant its own 
emblem (the leaf), then I should do it proper by explaining what it's all 
about:

Series:
 Animal Crossing is a series where you live in a town.  This town contains 
 many creatures of varying animal species.  You begin the game having a debt 
 to pay off to Tom Nook, the local shopkeep, for your house.  You must work, 
 farm, hunt, fish, and explore in order to earn money to pay off your house, 
 and then decorate this house however you wish.  The series is a rather open-
 ended simulation game with no clear objective; just to live and work with 
 your neighbors.  Some of its more well-known features involve working with 
 the system's internal clock to plan events, and the incorporation of other 
 Nintendo series in the decorations, etc.

"Roles":
2001 -- Animal Forest (N64) Japan Only
2002 -- Animal Crossing (GCN)
2005 -- Animal Crossing: Wild World (DS)
2008 -- Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii)
2008 -- Animal Crossing: Cityfolk (Wii)

******************************************************************************
4. CHARACTERS IN GAME
******************************************************************************

As the title says, here you'll find info on the characters as they relate to 
this game, then back to their other appearances.  Or, to put it another way, 
this section tells you why Mario throws fireballs out of his hands, why 
Kirby can inhale, and who that blonde chick in the blue jumpsuit is.

===========
4A. Mario =
===========

Appearance: Mario wears his classic red shirt, red cap, and blue overalls.  
 All his voice tracks are derived from his Super Mario 64 appearance.  His 
 details have been slightly updated for this appearance, otherwise he retains 
 his classic look.

Emblem: Mario's emblem is the Super Mushroom, a prominent item in the early 
 days of Super Mario Bros, which doubled Mario's size and made him more 
 resistant to damage.

Entrance: Mario enters the field through a Warp Pipe, a common mode of 
 transport since the earliest days of Super Mario Bros.

Alternate Costumes: Mario has a white and red ensemble, mimicking what he 
 looks like when he picks up a Fire Flower, and a yellow and purple ensemble, 
 which resembles Wario's original plumber outfit.  He also has a reversed 
 red/blue overalls scheme that refers to his original Donkey Kong outfit, and 
 a brown and green outfit that might be reminiscent of Luigi.

---

Jump: The sproing noise Mario makes as he jumps originates from jumping 
 in Super Mario Bros.

Standard Attack: Originates from Mario's punch-punch-kick combo in Super Mario 
 64.

Down Smash Attack: This is Mario's crouching swing kick from Super Mario 64.

Dash Attack: This is similar to Mario's sliding kick in Super Mario 64.

Dash Attack (with swinging item): With an item in his hand, Mario mimics his 
 dive attack from Super Mario 64.

Grab and Back Throw: This may originate from Super Mario 64, when Mario flings 
 Bowser around by the tail.

Wall Jump: In Super Mario 64, Mario could bounce off walls to extend his 
 jumping.  He can also do so in Brawl.

Up Taunt: Mario grows whenever he snags a Super Mushroom.  Granted, the taunt 
 is spontaneous, but that's where it comes from.

Side Taunt: Mario's little "cap-removing" salute stems from New Super Mario 
 Bros., which resembles a pose he did upon completing a level.

Down Taunt: Mario spins around vertically and falls to the ground belly up, 
 with legs in the air.  This is a mimicking of his "defeat animation" for 
 when he loses a life in the original Donkey Kong.

---

Standard Special - Fireball: Originated in Super Mario Bros., and also exists 
 in Super Mario Bros. 3, Super Mario World, and New Super Mario Bros., among 
 other games.  Mario gains the power to cast fire from his hands when he 
 collects a Fire Flower.  This isn't true to every one of his fire-invoking 
 appearances, but serves as a standard for most purposes.  The sound of 
 shooting the fireball has been reproduced from Super Mario Bros.

Side Special - Cape: In Super Mario World, Mario earned himself a yellow 
 cape when he grabbed a Feather.  While the Smash Bros. use is a simple swing, 
 its use in SMW was based around both flight and a spinning attack.

Up Special - Super Jump Punch: This attack to Mario's famed jump dating back 
 to Super Mario Bros.  It invokes the same *boing* sound, and involves Mario 
 punching the air as he goes up.  The coins that pop up are the same that 
 Mario collects in his many games.

Down Special - F.L.U.D.D.: This device was introduced in Super Mario 
 Sunshine.  Mario used F.L.U.D.D. throughout the game to spray water at 
 paint, enemies, dirt, and just about anything else that struck his fancy.

Final Smash - Mario Finale: While Mario has yet to specifically have an attack 
 such as this, it's based on his fireball powers (see Fireball above).  The 
 flashiest attack he's had in relation to his fire powers up until now had been 
 his "Ultra Flame" in Super Mario RPG, which was several large fireballs that 
 attacked enemies randomly.

=================
4B. Donkey Kong =
=================

Appearance: DK's first appearance with his necktie was in Donkey Kong for 
 the Game Boy, but Donkey Kong Country was the first game to have the current 
 three-dimensional model appearance.

Emblem: The "DK" emblem as it stands has been in place since Donkey Kong 
 Country.  It's a simple derivation of his initials from the similar font used 
 in the original game.

Entrance: DK starts as a barrel, then bursts out of it, as was done in 
 Donkey Kong Country.

---

Air Forward Attack: DK slams both hands forward, similar to his midair attack 
 in Donkey Kong 64.

Grab and Forward Throw: DK carries enemies over his head much like he carries 
 barrels in Donkey Kong Country, and throws in the same manner.

Up Taunt: DK beats his chest like the stereotypical cartoon gorilla.  This 
 also occured in Donkey Kong Country if you let him idle for a time.

---

Down Special - Hand Slap: From Donkey Kong Country.  DK used this move to 
 unearth things underground.

Final Smash - Konga Beat: This attack is quite obviously based around the 
 recent Donkey Konga series of games.  Not only does DK utilize the bongos and 
 clapping attributed to the bonogs peripheral, but proper musical timing 
 also plays a factor in how effective this move is.

==========
4C. Link =
==========

Appearance: Link's appearance in this game is derived from Twilight Princess, 
 which has a slightly duller color scheme than past games, the brown leggings, 
 and the chainmail beneath the tunic.  Link is armed with the Master Sword and 
 Hylian Shield, staple weapons for him since Ocarina of Time.

Emblem: The Triforce serves as the emblem for the Zelda crew.  This artifact 
 is a relic left behind by the goddesses of Hyrule after its creation, and 
 bestows considerable abilities to the one who possesses it, usually centered 
 around wishes.

Entrance: Link rides into the area on a whirlwind.  This could either be a 
 reference to the original Legend of Zelda, where Link uses a whistle that
 calls a whirlwind, or the Wind Waker, where Link can be transported by 
 cyclones.

Alternate Costumes: Link has a Dark costume, which represents Dark Link faced 
 in Ocarina of Time.  He also has red and blue colored costumes, which are 
 references to the other tunics in Ocarina of Time, specifically the Goron 
 and Zora Tunics, respectively.

---

Air Up Attack: Link uses his Upward Thrust technique from Adventure of Link, 
 a technique he needs to learn as his experience level progresses.

Air Down Attack: Link uses his Downward Thrust technique from Adventure of 
 Link, another technique he needs to learn as his experience level progresses.

Grab: Link uses the Clawshot from Twilight Princess to grab, which debuted as 
 the Hookshot in Link to the Past, and has appeared in some form in many other 
 games in the series.  This is a device that consists of a claw attached to a 
 long retractable chain, which can either bring things to Link or carry him to 
 them.

Up Taunt: Link swings his sword around, then sheathes it, which he also did in 
 Twilight Princess at various points in the game.

Side Taunt: Link releases a fairy that floats around him.  Fairies are common 
 Legend of Zelda beings that refill Link's hearts when he touches them.

Down Taunt: While this doesn't relate to any Zelda game, this is Link's taunt 
 from the original Super Smash Bros., looking as odd as it ever did.

---

Standard Special - Hero's Bow: Link has used a bow in the majority of his 
 adventures, ever since the original Legend of Zelda.  They were used as 
 long-range piercing weapons.  He never had to hold the button to make the 
 arrow go farther, though.  The arrow always flew straight and never succumbed 
 to gravity.  This particular bow is patterned off the same one from Twilight 
 Princess.

Side Special - Gale Boomerang: Link used boomerangs in several games, 
 beginning with the Legend of Zelda.  The use of boomerangs is generally 
 meant to stun enemies and retrieve items.  The Gale Boomerang, which debuted 
 in Twilight Princess, attached the power of wind to the boomerang, carrying 
 a small cyclone, with which to manipulate objects.

Up Special - Spin Attack: Link knew this technique starting in Link to the 
 Past.  It's a relatively simple spinning technique that Link uses by 
 focusing power in his sword, then releasing it.

Down Special - Bomb: Link had bombs in all the Zelda games but Adventure of 
 Link.  The point of bombs is quite simply as a means of explosive to clear 
 rocks or damage enemies.  These particular bombs are designed off the type 
 that appeared in Twilight Princess.

Final Smash - Triforce Slash: This doesn't really translate to any particular 
 attack that Link has ever had.  It just uses the familiar Triforce as a 
 focus point.

===========
4D. Samus =
===========

Appearance (PSS): Samus wears the Varia variation of her power suit, 
 specifically derived from her appearance in the Metroid Prime series.

Appearance (ZSS): Samus wears a more detailed version of her jumpsuit, which 
 first appeared in Metroid: Zero Mission.  She's also armed with the 
 "Paralyzer", an emergency pistol that didn't do any serious damage in Zero 
 Mission.

Emblem: The "S" emblem first appeared in Super Metroid, and was roughly the 
 game's emblem.  This was held to all future games.  Some believe the "S" 
 emblem to be a derivation of the Screw Attack item.  Although the Screw 
 Attack's symbol clearly is a lightning bolt and not an angular "S", there is 
 grounds for seeing how the emblem could have been based off the item.

Entrance: A small beam of light opens and Samus steps out of it, as if she 
 was exiting a space ship or a Save Station in Super Metroid.

Alternate Costumes: Samus has a blue and yellow pallette scheme which, while 
 not an exact replica, is reminiscent of her Fusion Suit from Metroid Fusion.  
 She also has a dark costume which is similar in color scheme to the Phazon 
 Suit from Metroid Prime, or perhaps the Dark Suit from Metroid Prime 2, as 
 well as a purple-accented suit, meant as a representation of the Gravity Suit 
 from Super Metroid.

---

Double Jump (PSS): Samus' second jump is a remake of the Space Jump, 
 introduced in Metroid II.  In the side-scrolling Metroid games, the Space 
 Jump gave Samus unlimited jumps in midair.  In the Prime series, the Space 
 Jump is simply a second mid-air jump for extra lift.

Grab (PSS): Samus uses her Grappling Beam to grab enemies, which was 
 introduced in Super Metroid, which was used to grab onto special blocks or 
 enemies so Samus could swing to new locations.

Ground Dodge (PSS): Samus rolls up into her Morph Ball form to dodge while 
 on the ground, something she's been able to do in every Metroid game, which 
 allows her to enter small tunnels.

Wall Jump (PSS): In Super Metroid and subsequent side-scrolling Metroid 
 games, Samus could kick off a wall if she jumped against it, allowing her to 
 climb up shafts she otherwise wouldn't have been able to.

---

Standard Special - Charge Shot (PSS): Samus first used a Charge Beam in Super 
 Metroid.  She could hold down the fire button and release a charged up 
 blast, which did more damage and tended to be of a larger area.  Its use 
 has persisted throughout later games in the series.

Side Special - Missile (PSS): Samus has always had a payload of Missiles to 
 use against enemies as an extra punch.  Only in the Prime series did these 
 missiles home in on enemies (which came after the first homing usage in 
 Melee).

Up Special - Screw Attack (PSS): One of Samus' more useful items, the Screw 
 Attack turned Samus into a whirling ball of energy when she jumped, allowing 
 her to smash through enemies and obstacles.  Its power has been seriously 
 toned down for the Smash Bros. series.

Down Special - Bomb (PSS): Another staple item for Samus.  These small 
 explosive energy packets are used by Samus in her Morph Ball form to serve as 
 a main weapon while she's in said form.

Final Smash - Zero Beam (PSS): Well, Samus has never had a weapon that blasted 
 her Power Suit off.  The closest this beam comes to being something 
 established is the Hyper Beam from Super Metroid, but there are still marked 
 differences between the two.

Standard Special - Paralyzer (ZSS): Samus' emergency pistol has been fleshed 
 out for this appearance.  This is as close as it gets to the original pistol, 
 a paralyzing shot, which was quite long-range in Zero Mission, but here is 
 very short-range.

Final Smash - Power Suit Samus (ZSS): The pose Samus adopts when invoking 
 this manuever looks similar to a move in Super Metroid called the "Crystal 
 Flash", where Samus would use a Power Bomb to restore her health, encasing 
 herself in a cocoon of light.

===========
4E. Yoshi =
===========

Appearance: Yoshi's appearance appears to be more focused on his Yoshi 
 Story look, where he looks more anthropomorphic and less lizard like.  This 
 is apparent in the placing of his feet and the way his back is straighter.

Emblem: The Yoshi Egg has become the emblem for Yoshi, separating him from 
 the rest of the Mario crew.

Entrance: First a Yoshi Egg appears, then Yoshi bursts out of it.  Yoshis 
 commonly begin life hatching from eggs.

---

Double Jump: Yoshi's double jump is much the same as it was in Yoshi's 
 Story.  He kicks in the air repeatedly to gain height.

Air Down Attack: Yoshi's Pedal Kick is somewhat taken from Yoshi's Island, 
 where his second jump didn't go as high, but it looked like it took more 
 effort.

Grab and Throw: From his beginning in Super Mario World, Yoshi could grab 
 enemies with his tongue and spit them out.  Yoshi's throws are a play on 
 that.

---

Standard Special - Swallow: Yoshi's prehensile tongue has been a standard since 
 his introduction in Super Mario World.  Yoshi's Island was the first game in 
 which he could turn his enemies into eggs.

Side Special - Egg Roll: Yoshi has never been able to specifically roll 
 himself up in his own egg, but in Yoshi's Story, when Yoshi ate a Turbo 
 Tulip, he could encase himself in an egg and launch himself.

Up Special - Egg Throw: Starting with Yoshi's Island, Yoshi could take the 
 eggs he made and throw them, as long as he had some to spare.  These throws 
 were targeted, instead of the Smash Bros. series more awkward throw.  On the 
 other hand, the Smash Bros. series does give Yoshi unlimited eggs to play 
 with.

Down Special - Yoshi Bomb (aka Hip Drop): Starting in Yoshi's Island, Yoshi 
 has been able to slam down into the ground from midair, damaging all in his 
 path.

Final Smash - Super Dragon: The flying and fire-breathing abilities of Yoshi 
 are derived from his very first appearance in Super Mario World.  Holding a 
 blue shell in his mouth would give him wings, and holding a red shell would 
 allow him to breathe fire.

===========
4F. Kirby =
===========

Appearance: Kirby, being the most uniform of all the characters, looks 
 pretty much like he always does, a pink guy with a little face, floppy 
 arms, and red shoes.

Emblem: Kirby's emblem is the Warp Star, an item he frequently uses to 
 transport between areas and worlds.

Entrance: Kirby rides into the battle on a Warp Star.  As stated above, 
 this is the item he rides to transport between areas.

Alternate Costumes: Kirby adopts different colors for his alternate costumes, 
 some of which were used in Kirby & the Amazing Mirror to simulate his split 
 selves.

---

Double Jump: Kirby can float indefinitely in most Kirby games.  The Smash 
 Bros. series only gives him a limited number of jumps.

Neutral Attack (rapidly): Kirby uses the Fighter Power's Quick Jab from Kirby 
 Super Star.

Dash Attack: Kirby spins on his head with his feet sticking out.  This is 
 copied from his "Yo-yo" power in Kirby Super Star.

Up Throw: Kirby uses his Ninja power from Kirby Super Star and performs his 
 Air Drop.

Forward Throw: Kirby uses his Suplex power from Kirby Super Star and performs 
 a Pile Driver.

Back Throw: Kirby uses his Suplex power from Kirby Super Star and performs a 
 German Suplex.

Down Throw: Kirby uses his Suplex power from Kirby Super Star and performs a 
 Quick Stamp.

Up Taunt: Kirby does a quick little jig.  This is a common theme to his games, 
 in that after beating a level, Kirby did a little celebratory dance.

---

Standard Special - Swallow: In all Kirby games, he had the ability to inhale, 
 and then either spit or swallow.  In Kirby Adventure and on, he gained the 
 ability to copy powers from his enemies.

Standard Special - Bowser Hat: The manner in which Kirby blows the Fire Breath 
 is exactly the way he blows fire or ice in Kirby Super Star.

Standard Special - Zelda Hat: This hat is actually the headdress of young 
 Zelda (from Ocarina of Time).

Side Special - Hammer: The Hammer was a power in Kirby Adventure.  Kirby 
 could swing the hammer normally by standing still, and spin around with it in 
 the air.

Up Special - Final Cutter: This is similar to the Cutter power in Kirby Super 
 Star.  Getting close to an enemy and repeatedly hitting attack ended with an 
 attack similar to the Final Cutter.

Down Special - Stone: When Kirby copies the Stone power, he can drop like a 
 rock in various forms.  This ability was in various games.  It started in 
 Kirby's Adventure, and Kirby Super Star was the first game to use different 
 forms for aesthetic effect.  He drops in the Stone form from Kirby's 
 Adventure, a Thwomp from Super Mario 64, a spiked ball, a garbage block from 
 Tetris Attack, or a 100t weight.

Final Smash - Kirby Cook: From Kirby Super Star, this is a power Kirby gets 
 from swallowing a chef enemy.  It's a one-time move that calls all enemies to 
 his pot and turns them into food items.

=========
4G. Fox =
=========

Appearance: Fox has a somewhat new appearance that seems to be largely based 
 on Star Fox Command's Fox.  One of his most apparent changes from other 
 iterations are the red boots he's now wearing.

Emblem: The left-facing fox with wings coming out of its back is the insignia 
 of the Star Fox team, and is emblazoned on all their ships.

Entrance: Fox enters the battle by jumping from his low-flying Arwing.  The 
 Arwing is the main attack fighter for the Star Fox team, used in all the 
 games.

---

Standard Special - Blaster: Fox uses a blaster in Star Fox: Assault, but its 
 first video game related appearance was the original Super Smash Bros.  It's 
 something that Fox has supposedly always had since the old days, but it never 
 needed to be used since Fox was always in an Arwing.  The first time Fox was 
 even referenced to having a blaster was in the Nintendo Power comic series for 
 Star Fox.

Down Special - Reflector: Fox never actually had a power of his own like this, 
 but the shield itself is copied from rings he can fly through in his 
 Arwing, particularly the ones in the older games that weren't as defined.

Final Smash - Landmaster: Introduced in Star Fox 64, this tank based on the 
 design of an Arwing was used for certain ground-based missions.  It has a 
 top-mounted main cannon, the ability to roll, and the ability to hover.  
 All these are adapted into the game.

=============
4H. Pikachu =
=============

Appearance: Pikachu's appearance, being basic, is common to most Pikachu.  
 There haven't really been any updates to its look.

Emblem: Like all Pokémon, Pikachu's emblem is the Poké Ball, the devices used 
 to capture Pokémon.

Entrance: Like all Pokémon, Pikachu appears on the battlefield from a thrown 
 Pokéball, which is how Pokémon are sent to battle in most games.

---

Neutral Attack: This is a headbutt manuever, which could correspond with the 
 Headbutt move in Pokémon, which Pikachu cannot learn normally, but can  
 through TM02.

Forward Smash Attack: This close-range electric move could correspond to 
 Thundershock, Pikachu's default move.

---

Standard Special - Thunder Jolt: Although there is no specific attack with 
 this name in any Pokémon game, this probably corresponds best with 
 Thundershock, which is an attack Pikachu starts with.

Side Special - Skull Bash: This is actually not a power that Pikachu can 
 learn normally, but other Pokémon do.  Pikachu can possibly use the power 
 through the use of TM40.

Up Special - Quick Attack: Another one of Pikachu's attacks from Pokémon, 
 which it learns at Level 16.  This is a normal-type attack that does small 
 damage.

Down Special - Thunder: Correlates to Thunder from Pokémon, which Pikachu 
 learns at Level 43.  It is an accurate and rather highly damaging electric 
 attack.

Final Smash - Volt Tackle: This highly damaging move originated in Pokémon 
 Emerald, which could only be learned through breeding.  Outside of the 
 Pokémon series, this move ACTUALLY originated from the game Pulseman, also 
 developed by Game Freak, and the move was called Volteccer.

============
4I. Bowser =
============

Appearance: Bowser's appearance is much the same as it was in Melee, with the 
 minor change in his legs, making them more turtle-like and less lizard-like.

Emblem: Bowser, like the rest of the Mario crew has a Super Mushroom as his 
 emblem.

---

Standard Special - Fire Breath: Bowser has used his Fire Breath (as it appears 
 here) in both Super Mario 64 and Luigi's Mansion when the respective brother 
 fought against him.  Bowser's been breathing fire, however, since the 
 days of Super Mario Bros.

Down Special - Bowser Bomb: In Super Mario Bros. 3, this was one of Bowser's 
 attacks used against you.

Final Smash - Giga Bowser: Originating in Super Smash Bros. Melee, this was a 
 non-playable secret boss to the Adventure Mode.  With the induction of Final 
 Smashes, this seriously beefed-up rendition of Bowser is fully utilized.

===========
4J. Peach =
===========

Appearance: Peach is wearing a more detailed version of her current gown, 
 which has darker pink frills that hang down on either hip.  The embroidering 
 and lace are much more detailed than any other appearance.

Emblem: Like all members of the Mario cast, Peach's emblem is the Super 
 Mushroom.

Alternate Costume: Peach has a yellow dress and brown hair costume, which 
 makes her look like Princess Daisy, who has been featured in several recent 
 sports/party games.  She also has a white costume that might be reminiscent 
 of her wedding dress from Super Paper Mario.

---

Float: Peach uses this ability in Super Mario Bros. 2 (USA), where she 
 can float to hold herself in the air.

Neutral Attack: Peach's standard attack is a slap, similar to her unarmed 
 attack in Super Mario RPG (or when armed with the Slap Glove or Super Slap).

Side Smash Attack: Each of the items pulled out has a history:
 Frying Pan: Weapon for Peach from Super Mario RPG
 Golf Club: Peach was a character in Mario Golf
 Tennis Racket: Peach was a character in Mario Tennis

---

Standard Special - Toad: Although Peach never uses Toad this way, her faithful 
 retainer is often at her side to attend to matters of state.  Toad was first 
 seen at the end of every fourth world in Super Mario Bros. except the final 
 one.

Up Special - Parasol: In Super Mario RPG, this was one of Peach's weapons 
 against the forces of Smithy.  She also used a parasol as her main weapon in 
 Super Princess Peach, although this occured after her intial appearance in 
 Melee.  The shape of the parasol, however, which includes a heart-shaped 
 handle, is the way her parasol was shaped in Super Paper Mario.

Down Special - Vegetable: This relates to Super Mario Bros. 2 (USA), where you 
 plucked vegetables from the ground and used them as weapons.  All characters 
 could do this in Super Mario Bros. 2, not just Peach.

Final Smash - Peach Blossom: This translates to no game I know of, but marks 
 one of the few times Peach's name has been applied to the fruit she's named 
 after.  Peach did have an attack called "Sleepy Time" in Super Mario RPG that 
 put enemies to sleep, but that used sheep.

=================
4K. Zelda/Sheik =
=================

Appearance (Z): Zelda assumes her Twilight Princess portrayal, which has a 
 more subdued color scheme than previous versions, as well as browner hair 
 and brown boots beneath her dress.

Appearance (S): Sheik is a more detailed version of the original costume, 
 with several highlighs in the stitching, as well as a braided ponytail out 
 the back.  This is reportedly a version that was rendered for Twilight 
 Princess, but was cut from the final print of the game.

Emblem: Like other Legend of Zelda cast members, Zelda's emblem is the 
 Triforce.

Alternate Costume (Z): Zelda has a costume with blonde hair and a lighter 
 colored dress, meant to represent the original style Zelda.

---

Standard Special - Nayru's Love (Z): This spell was available to Link in 
 Ocarina of Time.  It surrounded him with a protective shield.

Side Special - Din's Fire (Z): This spell was available to Link in Ocarina 
 of Time. It casts a sphere of fire around him.

Up Special - Farore's Wind (Z): This spell was available to Link in Ocarina of 
 Time. It allowed him to teleport to the entrance of a dungeon.

Up Special - Vanish (S): Commonly, once Sheik had finished speaking with 
 Link, a smoke bomb would mark his/her exit.  This is replicated here.

Down Special - Transform: Although she only did this specifically once in 
 Ocarina of Time, Zelda uses a flash of light to change her appearance to 
 Sheik (or from).

Final Smash - Light Arrow: This is specifically from Twilight Princess.  The 
 concept of sacred arrows that can destroy evil has been around since the 
 original Legend of Zelda (then they were called Silver Arrows).  The first 
 actual Light Arrows appeared in Ocarina of Time, but they were used by only 
 Link.  Zelda first took a bow in her hands in Wind Waker to help in the 
 fight against Ganondorf with Light Arrows, but these specific Light Arrows 
 are the power of the Light Spirits of Hyrule from Twilight Princess infused 
 into a physical weapon, which allow Zelda to help Link in his fight against 
 Ganondorf.

==================
4L. Ice Climbers =
==================

Appearance: Popo and Nana are upgraded from their original NES appearance.  
 Their parkas are more detailed, up to being able to make out individual hairs, 
 and the two are distinguishable not only by their color, but also by the 
 amount of hair peeking out from under the top of their hoods.

Emblem: The eggplant is the icon of the Ice Climbers, as their goal in the 
 game was to recover their stolen vegetables.

Entrance: The condor drops off Popo & Nana to enter the battle.  The condor 
 was at the top of every Ice Climbers mountain, which they had to grab to 
 finish the level in style.

Losing Pose: When the Ice Climbers lose, they cry like they do in the 
 original game if they miss a bonus.

---

Jump: The Ice Climbers had a decently high vertical jump, but couldn't get a 
 lot of horizontal movement out of it.  Their jump in Smash Bros. is an 
 homage to that.

Side Smash Attack: This is a strong version of the standard Ice Climber hammer 
 smash.

Air Down Attack: The Ice Climbers make an 8-bit "dropping" noise, which they 
 also made in Ice Climber when they fell off a ledge.

Up Taunt: The hopping up and down taunt is reminiscent of when the Ice Climbers 
 get a bonus on a level.  They'll jump up and down on the results screen.

---

Standard Special - Ice Shot: The ice blocks used are a homage to those the 
 Topi pushed around to fill the gaps in the floors.

Final Smash - Icicle: While nothing this big ever appeared in Ice Climber, 
 this is mostly a larger version of the same kind of ice block used in Ice 
 Shot.

=================
4M. Meta Knight =
=================

Appearance: Meta Knight maintains his standard look, only slightly more 
 detailed for Smash Bros.  His costume is slightly more shiny and 
 accessorized.  His sword is also more detailed.

Emblem: Meta Knight's emblem is the Warp Star, as he is part of the Kirby 
 universe.

Entrance: Meta Knight uses his cape to materialize.  He often wrapped himself 
 in his cape in Kirby Super Star to teleport.

---

Standard Special - Mach Tornado: In Kirby Super Star, Meta Knight was able 
 to generate small tornadoes with a flick of his sword for use as a ranged 
 attack.  This ability is transferred here.

Side Special - Triple Dash: In Kirby Super Star, Meta Knight also had the 
 ability to dash straight ahead with his sword.

Up Special - Shuttle Loop: The Shuttle Loop is actually a power that Kirby 
 has with the Wing ability equipped in Kirby Super Star.  This is an ability 
 where Kirby tosses an enemy into the air, then immediately strikes 
 afterwards.

Down Special - Dimensional Cape: One of Meta Knight's new powers in Kirby 
 Super Star is when he uses his cape to warp from one point of the battle 
 to another.

Grab and Throw: Many of MK's throws are based on Kirby's, which in turn are 
 based Kirby's Suplex and Ninja powers from Kirby Super Star.  See Kirby for 
 more info.

Final Smash - Galaxia Darkness: Meta Knight's sword is named "Galaxia" 
 in the anime, but he has never used an attack like this, so this one is new 
 for Smash Bros. 

=========
4N. Pit =
=========

Appearance: Pit's look is basically a vast update from his original look 
 in Kid Icarus.  He maintains the chiton, sandals, and laurel look, only 
 with more adornment, as well as bracers on his forearms and a noticably 
 larger pair of wings.  His Sacred Bow is now a dual-blade that can be 
 split apart.

Emblem: Pit's emblem is his sacred bow, his main weapon in all his games.

---

Hammer Item: When Pit picks up the hammer, he swings it in a two-frame 
 animation.  This is based on the hammers in Kid Icarus, which Pit could 
 collect so he could free Centurions to help him in the boss fight in that 
 mission.

---

Standard Special - Palutena Arrow: Pit's standard attack is to fire an 
 arrow from his Sacred Bow.  Pit could also fire straight upwards, and that 
 ability is translated into this game, with being able to aim straight up 
 after drawing the bowstring.

Up Special - Wings of Icarus: Pit's wings are actually non-functional in 
 his games, until the final stage of the original Kid Icarus, where he 
 has unlimited flight through the power of the Pegasus Wings.  This might 
 be a combination of the two concepts.

Down Special - Mirror Shield: One of the three treasures that Pit is tasked 
 with finding in Kid Icarus, Pit used this to reflect the nasty attacks of 
 Medusa.

Final Smash - Palutena's Army: Palutena is the ruling goddess of Angel 
 World.  The Centurions summoned by this Final Smash are reminiscent of 
 the boss battles in Kid Icarus.  In the fortresses, Pit could free 
 Centurions from statues using Hammers.  Once free, they would fly in during 
 the boss battle to assist him.

===========
4O. Wario =
===========

Appearance: Wario is decked out in his biker's costume that is largely 
 associated with the WarioWare series.

Emblem: Wario's emblem is the "W" that is seen on his gloves.

Entrance: Wario rides in on his famous motorcycle.  See Wario Chopper below.

Alternate Costume: Wario's standard alternate costume is his classic yellow and 
 purple plumber overalls, meant to be a mockery of Mario's.  He also has a 
 red and blue theme and a green and brown theme, each meant to be homages to 
 Mario and Luigi.

---

Side Smash: Wario charges forward, shoulder first.  This is a technique that 
 he first adopted in Super Mario Land 3: Wario Land, which he used to barrel 
 through obstacles.

---

Side Special - Wario Chopper: Wario's new biker attitude for the WarioWare 
 series meant he needed a bike, so he adopted one in the WarioWare series.

Down Special - Wario Waft: Wario has always been a bit crude, with a tendency 
 towards more "Comic Mischief" than the Mario cast.  This is an example of 
 that.

Final Smash - Wario-Man: In WarioWare Touched! and WarioWare Twisted!, the 
 "final" area was Wario-Man, which Wario turned into after being fed garlic.  
 He seemed to have the typical superhero powers of flight and strength, 
 although he's not completely "super".

=========
4P. Ike =
=========

Appearance: Ike's look is based on his Ranger look in Path of Radiance.  
 There's been some updating to his costume for detail, but not much has 
 changed.  The sword he wields in this game is the sacred blade, Ragnell, 
 which, oddly enough, he never carried while in his Ranger costume.

Emblem: The sword emblem of the Fire Emblem series is Marth's Falchion.

Entrance: Ike teleports to the battle by the use of Warp Powder, a substance 
 commonly used by the Black Knight in Path of Radiance.

---

Standard Special - Eruption: While Ike doesn't have any attack like this in 
 any games he's been in, the fiery animation is based on the spell "Bolganone".

Side Special - Quick Draw: This is based on Ike's "critical hit" animation 
 as his Ranger class in Path of Radiance.

Up Special - Aether: This is an adaptation of Ike's "Master" skill, which he 
 learned by reading an Occult scroll.  This is his best attack, and probably 
 the best attack in the whole game.

Down Special - Counter: One of the common aspects of Fire Emblem games is that 
 even if you attack an enemy, they have a chance to counterattack to give you 
 back some of that damage.  This is an adaptation of that concept.

Final Smash - Great Aether: See Aether.  This more or less just a more 
 flashy version.

=====================
4Q. Pokémon Trainer =
=====================

Appearance: The default costume for the Pokémon Trainer is "Red" from Pokémon 
 Fire Red/Leaf Green, which is based on the original Red from Red/Blue.

Emblem: Naturally, the emblem of the Trainer is the Poké Ball.

Entrance: The Pokémon Trainer is already on the scene at the beginning of the 
 fight.  He tosses out his first Pokémon to begin the fight.

Down Special - Pokémon Change: It's good strategic advice for a trainer to 
 switch out his Pokémon in order to find the right one for the current 
 enemy.

---

Charizard

Standard Special - Flamethrower: This is a fire-type move that Charizard can 
 learn at Level 46 (in Generation I).

Side Special - Rock Smash: This is a fighting-type move that Charizard can't 
 learn on its own, but can learn from TM08 (in Generation II).

Up Special - Fly: This is a flying-type move that Charizard (and many other 
 Pokémon) can learn through HM02 (starting at Pokémon Yellow).

---

Squirtle

Standard Special - Water Gun: This is a water-type move that Squirtle can 
 learn at Level 15 (in Generation I).

Side Special - Withdraw: This is a water-type move that Squirtle can learn at 
 Level 28 (in Generation I).

Up Special - Waterfall: This is a water-type move that Squirtle can't learn 
 on its own, but can learn from HM07.

---

Ivysaur

Standard Special - Bullet Seed: This a grass-type move that Ivysaur cannot 
 normally learn, except through TM09.

Side Special - Razor Leaf: This is a grass-type move that Ivysaur can learn 
 at Level 30 (in Generation I).

Up Special - Vine Whip: This is a grass-type move that Ivysaur can learn 
 at Level 10.

---

Final Smash - Triple Finish: The attacks used in this FS are Fire Blast from 
 Charizard (learns from TM38), Hydro Pump from Squirtle (learns at Level 42), 
 and Solar Beam from Ivysaur (learns at Level 54).  The text window that pops 
 up refers to the Pokémon games, including the phrase "It's super effective", 
 referring to when a Pokémon used an attack against another type of Pokémon 
 that they were dominant against.

================
4R. Diddy Kong =
================

Appearance: Diddy's appearance in Brawl more or less matches his current 
 appearance in recent games.  He's wearing his more recent starred t-shirt.

Emblem: The DK emblem of the Kong clan is also Diddy's emblem.

Entrance: Like Donkey Kong, Diddy Kong starts as a barrel, then bursts out of 
 it, much as they did in Donkey Kong Country.

Alternate Costume: Diddy has a lighter brown fur and pink clothing ensemble, 
 which is likely an homage to his girlfriend, Dixie Kong.

---

Dash Attack - This is a cartwheel, which is Diddy's main form of attack in 
 Donkey Kong Country.

---

Standard Special - Peanut Popguns: This is a move from Donkey Kong 64, which 
 was more or less the point when the Kongs got more individualism.  Diddy 
 used these as long-range weapons.

Up Special - Rocketbarrel Blast: Another move from Donkey Kong 64, these
 allowed Diddy to fly through the air for a short while, much like a 
 jetpack.

Down Special - Banana Peel: Bananas are an important part of a Kong's life, 
 and Diddy employs them as weapons here.

Final Smash - Rocketbarrel Barrage: While using the Rocketbarrels in DK64, 
 Diddy was able to use his popguns.  This is implemented here, although in 
 DK64, Diddy was only able to fire straight ahead, not straight down.

===========
4S. Lucas =
===========

Appearance: Lucas appears in a 3D version of his normal likeness, based on 
 Ness' model; a larger, chubby head, solid black eyes, and more detailed 
 clothes.

Emblem: Like Ness before him, Lucas' emblem is the Earth, the symbol for the 
 Mother games.

Entrance: Lucas rides into the level on a Mr. Saturn tea table.  There's a 
 table similar to this in Mother 3 at a point where Lucas can find a table 
 that he can ride some time before reaching Saturn Valley.

Alternate Costume: One of Lucas' costume shows him with orange hair, meant to 
 be an homage to his brother, Claus.

Victory Pose: One pose has Lucas pulling something up from the ground.  This 
 is one of the "Seven Needles", a major plot point in the game.  Another has 
 him hunting around in the ground, looking for said needles.

---

Side Smash Attack: Lucas uses a stick as his main weapon in Mother 3.

Grab: The Rope Snake is an item from Mother 3, which Duster would use to grab 
 distant ledges.  There is also a taunt that feature the Rope Snake.

Up Taunt: In Mother 3, once you name Lucas, he walks off-screen and trips on 
 the way.  This is represented in this taunt.

---

Standard Special - PK Freeze: Lucas doesn't know any of the powers in his game 
 that are used in Brawl.  This is an attack used by his friend, Kumatora, 
 which targets a single enemy for cold damage.

Side Special - PK Fire: This is an attack that, in Mother 3, struck all 
 enemies for fire-based damage.

Up Special - PK Thunder: This power randomly strikes enemies, and may miss 
 when there are few.

Down Special - PSI Magnet: In the Mother series, the Magnet take Psychic Points 
 from an enemy and adds it to the user's.

Final Smash - PK Starstorm: This is a powerful attack that targets all enemies 
 in Mother 3.

=================
4T. King Dedede =
=================

Appearance: Dedede maintains his current and traditional appearance of his 
 "kingly" robes and crown.  He's also carrying his hammer full-time.

Emblem: Like the others in the Kirby-verse, Dedede's emblem is the Warp Star.

Entrance: Dedede is brought in on a divan carried by his loyal Waddle Dee 
 subjects.  The divan itself appears to be a model of his wrestling ring from 
 when you faced him as a boss in several Kirby games.

Alternate Costume: One of Dedede's costumes is a very subdued, nearly 
 monochrome scheme, possibly meant to look as he did on the original Game Boy.

---

Dash Attack - When fighting Dedede in Kirby's Dream Land, one of his attacks 
 is to dive on the ground and skid forward, which is employed in this move.

---

Standard Special - Inhale: Like Kirby, Dedede also has the power to inhale 
 forcefully.  The only difference is that he can't copy the abilities of his 
 foes.

Side Special - Waddle Dee: One of the members of King Dedede's army of 
 followers, Waddle Dee has no special abilities of his own to speak of.  
 Sometimes, Dedede will throw a Waddle Doo, which has a beam power, and 
 the indestructible spiked ball, Gordo.

Up Special - Super Dedede Jump: This is a move Dedede has had from his first 
 appearance: the ability to launch himself into the air and slam hard on the 
 ground.  

Down Special - Jet Hammer: This is a combination of Dedede's signature move 
 and perhaps Kirby's Hammer ability, specifically the "Hammer Flip" move, 
 where he charges his hammer and swings it upwards.

Final Smash - Waddle Dee Army: Similar to the Waddle Dee move, Dedede has 
 never actually used an attack like this in a Kirby game, but the Waddle Dees 
 are part of his army of cronies.

============
4U. Olimar =
============

Appearance: Olimar has a slightly more detailed look than his GameCube 
 iterations, particularly on his space suit.

Emblem: A five-petaled flower, the same kind of which that can be found on 
 the tops of certain Pikmin.

Entrance: Olimar rides in on his ship from Pikmin 2, the one that carried both 
 him and Louie.

---

Standard Special - Pikmin Pluck: Pikmin begin life as seeds, and grow in 
 the ground.  Olimar must pluck them from the ground to use them.

Side Special - Pikmin Throw: One of the main movements of Olimar involving 
 Pikmin is to throw them.  After this, they'll either try to carry something 
 or attack an enemy.  The latter of this is translated.

Down Special - Pikmin Order: There are several times during a Pikmin game 
 where the Pikmin get scattered and you need to get them to you.  Using 
 the Order command would bring any Pikmin right to your side.

Final Smash - End of Day: At the end of any given day in a Pikmin game, 
 you're required to finish up and account for all your Pikmin, as you all 
 have to take off and spend the night airborne.  This is because during the 
 night, the planet's predators are out in force.  This is translated in 
 Smash, where Olimar and his crew take off, leaving the rest of the fighters 
 to deal with several Pikmin-related enemies (mostly Red Bulborbs).  The 
 crash-landing at the end could easily refer to the beginning of the original 
 Pikmin game, where Olimar crash-landed on the planet.

==========
4V. Ness =
==========

Appearance: Ness largely maintains his look from Super Smash Bros. Melee.

Emblem: Ness's emblem is the Earth, which is the symbol for the Mother games 
 in Japan.

Entrance: Ness uses the Teleport psychic ability.  The blackish and burnt look 
 actually comes from a failed teleport attempt.  If you smash into something 
 while winding up the teleport, you'll look all black and crisp.  This was more 
 comedic than anything.

Alternate Costume: Although he never wore anything like this in game, one of 
 Ness's costumes gives him a black t-shirt with Mr. Saturn on the front.

---

Side Smash Attack: Ness uses his bat as a main weapon in EarthBound.

Down Smash Attack or Up Smash Attack: Ness can also use yo-yos as weapons in 
 EarthBound.

---

Standard Special - PK Flash: Ness has this power in EarthBound.  Instead of 
 attacking, this power caused different status effects on enemies, possibly  
 resulting them in being destroyed outright.

Side Special - PK Fire: This power actually belonged to Paula from EarthBound.  
 She used the power to attack a row of enemies.

Up Special - PK Thunder: This power actually belonged to Paula and Poo from 
 EarthBound, but not Ness.  This interesting power had more of a chance to 
 strike with more enemies, and it struck more times at higher power levels.

Down Special - PSI Magnet: This power belonged to Paula and Poo in EarthBound, 
 but not Ness.  This power stole Psychic Points from the enemy and gives them 
 to the party.

Final Smash - PK Starstorm: This power is unique to Poo in EarthBound, which 
 dealt massive damage to all enemies.

===========
4W. Marth =
===========

Appearance: Marth appears in greater detail than he does in any game he's 
 been in.  His model, which is based off the Melee model with greater detail, 
 is itself based off common Fire Emblem art, since he's never been detailed 
 enough in a game to have a proper starting model.

Emblem: Marth's emblem is his Falchion, which is the best sword in the 
 original Fire Emblem game.

---

Down Special - Counter: One of the common aspects of Fire Emblem games is that 
 even if you attack an enemy, they have a chance to counterattack to give you 
 back some of that damage.  This is an adaptation of that concept.

Final Smash - Critical Hit: Critical hits in Fire Emblem games typically do 
 three times normal damage, and are always part of the calculation when 
 determining how a strike will fare in combat.  The life meter that appears 
 is similar to those that appear near units in a Fire Emblem game.

===========
4X. Luigi =
===========

Appearance: Like Mario, Luigi wears his classic shirt, overalls, boots, gloves, 
 and painter's cap, only colored green as opposed to Mario's red.  More 
 detail than usual has been added to his jean overalls.

Emblem: Like all Mushroom Kingdom inhabitants, Luigi's emblem is the Super 
 Mushroom.

Entrance: Luigi pops out of a pipe, much like Mario.

Alternate Costumes: One of Luigi's costumes is a white/green scheme that he 
 looks like when he picks up a Fire Flower (this is also his original Super 
 Mario Bros. color scheme).  He also has a purple outfit meant to resemble 
 Waluigi.

===========
4Y. Falco =
===========

Appearance: Falco appears similar to his Star Fox 64 and Star Fox Command 
 look, with a white jacket.  He also has a more detailed communications 
 headset, like Fox.

Emblem: The left-facing fox with wings coming out of its back is the insignia 
 of the Star Fox team, and is emblazoned on all their ships.

Entrance: Like Fox before him, Falco cruises in on his Arwing.

====================
4Z. Captain Falcon =
====================

Appearance: Falcon appears in a slightly updated version of his Melee look.

Emblem: Falcon's emblem is a stylized bird with spread wings, which is 
 emblazoned on his helmet and serves as his insignia.

Entrance: Captain Falcon rides in on his racer, the Blue Falcon.

Alternate Costume: Falcon has a red costume which is meant to evoke his 
 evil clone, Blood Hawk, who first appeared in F-Zero 64.

---

Standard Special - Falcon Punch: This was created for Super Smash Bros., but 
 in an interesting bit of trivia, it was used later in the F-Zero anime by 
 Captain Falcon.

Final Smash - Blue Falcon: Falcon's racer for the F-Zero series finally plays 
 a role in his fighting.

==============
4AA. Lucario =
==============

Appearance: In an update to its standard appearance, Lucario's blue and white 
 fur is now visible on its legs, arms, head, and chest.

Emblem: Like all Pokémon, Lucario's emblem is the Poké Ball.

---

Standard Special - Aura Sphere: This is a fighting-type move that Lucario can 
 learn at Level 37. 

Side Special - Force Palm: This is a fighting-type move that Lucario can learn 
 at Level 11.

Up Special - ExtremeSpeed: This is a normal-type move that Lucario can learn 
 at Level 51.

Down Special - Double Team: Lucario can learn this normal-type move from 
 TM32.

Final Smash - Aura Storm: This move does not exist in Pokémon currently, but 
 is more than likely derived from Lucario's Aura abilities.

=============
4BB. R.O.B. =
=============

Appearance: R.O.B. maintains his classic look, down to the details in the 
 plastic, and has red highlights to match how he was presented with the 
 Japanese Famicom.

Emblem: R.O.B.'s emblem is a gyro from Gyromite, which he moved around during 
 said game.

---

Standard Special - Robo Beam: R.O.B.'s eyes don't emit light.  Actually they 
 receive light signals from the TV.  However, you don't have eyes like that in 
 a video game and not have them spit out lasers.  It'd be criminal.

Side Special - Arm Rotor: While they never moved this fast, R.O.B. can spin 
 his arms and upper body independently of the rest of him.

Down Special - Gyro: A holdover from the game, Gyromite, this is one of the 
 accessories that R.O.B. can manipulate.

=======================
4CC. Mr. Game & Watch =
=======================

Appearance: G&W appears as a side-facing humanoid shape, completely black and 
 two-dimensional.  Several G&W games featured a man like that, but as the 
 games went on, they became more detailed.

Emblem: The emblem for G&W is a guy holding a bell.  I believe this was part 
 of the alarm function commonly employed on several G&Ws.  When the alarm was 
 turned on, this little guy would be lit up in a corner.

Entrance: G&W moves in frames as if he were on an LCD screen.

---

Standard Attack: The sprayer is from the game Greenhouse, where you sprayed 
 worms and spiders that tried to eat your flowers.

Up Attack: The flag G&W swings is from the game Flagman.  In this game, G&W 
 copies the flag movements of another G&W.

Forward Attack: The chair is from the game Lion, where you controls two 
 G&Ws that try to keep two lions in cages.

Up Smash Attack: The diving helmet is the one G&W wears from the game 
 Octopus.  In this game, G&W had to make his way to treasure while avoiding 
 the tentacles of the octopus.

Forward Smash Attack: The torch used is from the game Fire Attack, where 
 you had to defend the fort from attacking Native Americans.

Down Smash Attack: The hammers are from the game Vermin, where G&W smacked 
 moles with hammers.

Air Attack: G&W employs a fishbowl from the game Tropical Fish, where a guy 
 had to catch fish in a bowl and keep them away from a cat.

Air Up Attack: From the game Spitball Sparky.  In this game, G&W had to blow a 
 ball up to hit blocks.

Air Back Attack: Taken from the game Turtle Bridge.  G&W had to cross a bridge 
 of turtles carrying packages.  Fish swam under and the turtles dove to eat 
 them, which G&W had to watch out for.

Dash Attack: Relates to the game Helmet, since G&W has his hardhat on.

Grab and Throw: All of G&W's throws are based on the game Ball, where G&W 
 juggles balls (like he juggles enemies here).

Grab and Hit: G&W uses the bell to be mentioned shortly.

Up and Side Taunt: G&W's bell represents the alarm function that existed in
 some Game and Watch games.

Glide: The parachute is from the game of the same name, where you had to catch 
 parachuting guys.

Ledge Recover: G&W uses the aforementioned bell.

Floor Recover: G&W uses the hammer from Vermin.

---

Standard Special - Chef: From the game of the same name, you needed to catch 
 the sausages in the game, as opposed to throwing them.

Side Special - Judgement: From the game Judge, where players were two GWs on 
 the screen.  You would press a button, and you'd see a number appear above 
 your head.  If your number was higher then the other GWs number, you'd press 
 a button to hit him on the head with a hammer. If it was lower, you'd press a 
 button to move back, because the other GW was going to hit you on the head.  

Up Special - Fire: Designed after the game of the same name, where you had to 
 bounce falling people to a waiting ambulance.

Down Special - Oil Panic: In the game of this name, you had to catch oil 
 dripping in your bucket, then deposit it in another G&W's bucket, who'll then 
 give it to a customer.

Final Smash - Octopus: In the original Octopus, G&W had to avoid the tentacles 
 so he could get treasure.  In this iteration, G&W IS the octopus, and can 
 use the tentacles to attack enemies.

================
4DD. Ganondorf =
================

Appearance: Ganondorf appears as he did in Twilight Princess, with heavy 
 armor, and less pronounced facial features than other games.

Emblem: Like all of "Zelda Team", Ganondorf uses the Triforce as his 
 emblem.

Entrance: Ganondorf warps into the battle arena in a pool of darkness.  He 
 used similar "pools" to teleport in Twilight Princess, particularly in late 
 battles.

---

Down Taunt: Ganon pulls out his sword.  In Twilight Princess, this sword was 
 used in an attempt to kill him, but he corrupted it with the Triforce of 
 Power and made it his own.

---

Final Smash - Dark Beast Ganon: In Twilight Princess, Ganondorf used his 
 powers to transform into a large boar-like beast, and used charging attacks 
 to take down Link.  This is a nod to that.

=================
4EE. Jigglypuff =
=================

Appearance: Jigglypuff appears much like it always has: a pink balloony 
 animal.

Emblem: Like all Pokémon, Jigglypuff's emblem is the Poké Ball, the devices 
 used to capture Pokémon.

Entrance: Like Pikachu, Jigglypuff appears on the battlefield from a thrown 
 Pokéball, which is how Pokémon are sent to battle in most games.

Alternate Costume: One of Jigglypuff's hats is the same hat worn by the 
 female trainer in Pokémon FireRed.

---

Standard Special - Rollout: This is a representation of Jigglypuff's Rollout 
 attack from Pokémon, which is learned at Level 19.

Forwards Special - Pound: This is a representation of Jigglypuff's Pound
 attack from Pokémon, which is learned at Level 9.

Up Special - Sing: This is a representation of Jigglypuff's Sing attack from 
 Pokémon, which Jigglypuff starts with.

Down Special - Rest: This is a representation of Jigglypuff's Rest attack from 
 Pokémon, which is learned at Level 29.

================
4FF. Toon Link =
================

Appearance: Toon Link is a near perfect representation of the Link that 
 appeared in Wind Waker, only he doesn't appear cel-shaded.  He's fully 3D, 
 but the level of detail is kept consistent with that of Wind Waker.  He's 
 armed with the Hero Shield and the Master Sword from that game.

Emblem: Like all of "Zelda Team", Toon Link uses the Triforce as his emblem.

Alternate Costume: The red, blue, and purple costumes are a nod to the Four 
 Swords games, where four Links adopted those colors.  The brown-haired Link 
 is an homage to the original Legend of Zelda, where Link appeared in those 
 colors.  The Dark Link costume probably refers not only to the constant 
 instance of Dark Link enemies in the games, but also the Dark Links that 
 showed up in Four Swords Adventures.

---

Up Taunt: Link pulls out the Wind Waker and conducts with it.  This baton 
 is used in the game of the same name to play tunes.

Down Taunt: This simple "looking around" animation might refer to Link's 
 idle animation in Wind Waker.

===========
4GG. Wolf =
===========

Appearance: Wolf is probably closest to his Assault appearance, but his 
 look incorporates elements of most games that featured him, as well as 
 elements that are completely original, such as his decorative chain.

Emblem: Like all of the Star Fox characters, Wolf's emblem is the Star Fox 
 logo, odd considering he plays for the opposing team.

Entrance: Much like Fox and Falco hop off of Arwings, Wolf hops out of his 
 Wolfen starfighter as he swoops in.

============
4HH. Snake =
============

Appearance: Snake appears much like he did in Metal Gear Solid 2.  He sports 
 his mullet from that game, and the thinner sneaking suit.

Emblem: The FOX symbol serves as Snake's emblem.  It's a left-facing fox 
 viewed, from the side, with the tail curved downward.  In place of legs, 
 lightning bolts come from the fox's body.  This is not the "FOXHOUND" symbol 
 like I previously thought.  It's also the emblem for Kojima Productions.

Entrance: Solid Snake appears on the field as he deactivates his stealth 
 camouflage.  The stealth camo has been a device used in the Metal Gear 
 Solid universe since the first MGS game.  The specific pose he uses was 
 copied from Metal Gear Solid 2, as he touched down on the tanker he was 
 infiltrating.

Alternate Costume: Snake utilizes different camouflage for his costumes.  
 These were all employed in Metal Gear Solid 3 so Snake could disguise himself 
 better.  The alternate costumes are "Fire", "Splitter", "Snow", "Jungle", and 
 "Animal".

---

Duck and Crawl - Snake flattens himself on the ground and can crawl back and 
 forth, much as he can in the Metal Gear Solid series to enter vents and 
 other low spaces.

Standard Attack - Snake's standing combo is a replica of his hand-to-hand 
 combo in Metal Gear Solid, with two punches and a jumping spin kick.

Dash Attack - Snake's diving roll is used in Metal Gear Solid games, which is 
 employed when Snake uses a melee attack while running.

Up Smash - Snake didn't use a mortar in any game until MGS4, in which he 
 can grab one that's lying around and utilize it.

Forward Smash - This move employs a Stinger missile launcher, a weapon found 
 late in most Metal Gear games, usually used to subdue some nasty enemy.

Down Smash - Snake plants a mine in the ground.  Claymore mines are a common 
 weapon in most Metal Gear games, but these particular mines more resemble 
 those found in Metal Gear 2.

Grab - Snake's grab manuever is to subdue the enemy from behind and get a 
 hand around its neck, which was used in Metal Gear Solid.  Also, attacking 
 while holding the enemy causes Snake to tighten his grip, which was also 
 used to subdue his enemies.

Taunt - Snake covers himself in a cardboard box.  This is a box that's often 
 used in Metal Gear Solid games as a means of hiding oneself in plain sight.  
 Of course, moving or being run into would foil the disguise, so it's rarely 
 the best plan, but it does work.

Hidden Taunt - Snake can use his codec on the Shadow Moses Island stage.  When 
 he does this, he'll contact one of his team for advice on the situation.  
 This is a motif that has held since the original Metal Gear.  Conversations 
 with team members can be helpful, insightful, and downright hilarious.  Brawl 
 seems to take the latter approach.

Hidden Taunt (Yoshi) - Snake referring to Yoshi's "taste" is a reference to 
 Metal Gear Solid 3, where the Snake character in that game would have to 
 capture animals to eat.  Whenever his teammate "Para-Medic" brought up a new 
 animal he found, he'd ask how it tastes, sometimes to her chagrin.

Hidden Taunt (Fox) - Snake mentioning that he's "sick of foxes" could be a 
 reference to his former unit, FOXHOUND, or one of his old friends, Gray 
 Fox.

Hidden Taunt (Pikachu) - During this conversation, Snake mentions Ocelot.  
 During MGS1, Revolver Ocelot interrogated Snake using electric shocks as 
 torture.

Hidden Taunt (Luigi) - The Colonel's odd behavior here is a reference to the 
 end of Metal Gear Solid 2, where a hacked program messed with the 
 communication, sometimes causing the Colonel to spew inane babble.

Hidden Taunt (Falco) - Slippy contacts Snake for this version of the taunt.  
 Slippy is the mechanic and brains of the Star Fox team, often coming up with 
 new ships and inventions.  The concept of people hacking into Snake's codec 
 is actually a rather common occurence.

Hidden Taunt (Snake) - The "Les Enfants Terrible" project was first mentioned 
 in Metal Gear Solid, where it was revealed that Solid Snake (and Liquid Snake) 
 are clones created in the likeness of Big Boss.  Snake and the Colonel are 
 just assuming that the "mirror" Snake is another clone.

---

Standard Special - Hand Grenade: Snake has employed grenades in most of his 
 missions, and they're always useful for clearing a crowd.

Side Special - Remote Missile: In this move, Snake employs the Nikita, a 
 rocket launcher from MGS1 and 2.  The launcher allows you to control the 
 movement of the missile, at the sacrifice of not being able to control 
 yourself.  The only major difference in Smash is that the missile is 
 controlled vertically, not horizontally as it was originally.

Up Special - Cypher: Introduced in Metal Gear Solid 2, these hovering robots 
 are used for spying, surveillance, and point defense.  In Smash, Snake simply 
 rides one up as his recovery move, something he never did in the MGS games.

Down Special - C4: Starting in Metal Gear Solid, Snake used plastic explosives 
 to ambush enemies and uncover hidden passages.  His first move was to set 
 the bomb, then he could blow them up.

Final Smash - Grenade Launcher: I can't believe I forgot this at first, but 
 this chopper-based firing frenzy is derived from an event in Metal Gear Solid 
 2.  During a fight against a Harrier jet, Snake blasted at the Harrier from 
 a Kasatka helicopter with an RGB6 launcher.

============
4II. Sonic =
============

Appearance: Sonic is represented in his current iteration, which is derived 
 from Sonic and the Secret Rings, with slightly longer legs and arms than his 
 classic appearances.

Emblem: Sonic's emblem is a representation of his head, which is also the logo 
 for the developer team, Sonic Team.

---

Standard Special - Homing Attack: Ever since Sonic went fully 3D in Sonic 
 Adventure, he's employed an attack that can home in on enemies to eliminate 
 the guesswork in landing on bad guys.

Side Special - Spin Dash: Sonic has been using this move since his first 
 game: where he rolls into a ball and zips along the ground.

Up Special - Spring Jump: Springs have been a part of Sonic's environment for 
 years, always there to launch Sonic all over the area, adding to the general 
 disorientation and sense of speed in his games.

Down Special - Spin Charge: Sonic's Spin Dash can be charged to have a greater 
 impact.  Of course, more impact on his spin means that he has less control, 
 but more speed.

Final Smash - Super Sonic: In several Sonic games, once Sonic collected all 
 seven Chaos Emeralds, he was able to transform into a gold version of  
 himself, with the powers of flight and invulnerability (depending on the 
 game).

******************************************************************************
5. SUBSPACE EMISSARY
******************************************************************************

There are certain characters, settings, etc. that are in Subspace Emissary, 
but in no other parts of the game, so those items will fall here.  Naturally, 
I'm only going to include anything here if it has any connection to an older 
Nintendo game.

Petey Piranha
Origin: 2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
 A rather large version of the Piranha Plants that have plagued Mario for 
 years, this one has developed an almost anthropomorphic quality, using leaves 
 for arms and walking around on leg-like protrusions.  It has a large trade-
 mark Piranha Plant head including yellow petals.  Mario tends to defeat it 
 by smashing its weak belly.

Rayquaza
Origin: 2005 -- Pokémon Emerald (GBA)
 This is one of a set of three legendary Pokémon found in the third generation 
 of the series, the other two being Groudon and Kyogre.  When those two began 
 battling, it would be Rayquaza that ended their fight.  It's a "Sky High" 
 Pokémon and has both Dragon and Flying types.

Porky
Origin: 1994 -- Mother 2/EarthBound (SNES)
 Originally translated as "Pokey" in the English adaptation of EarthBound, 
 Porky Minch is "the worst person in the neighborhood" in Ness's hometown of 
 Onett.  Although he sometimes treats Ness as a friend (when it's to his 
 advantages), he soon renounces humanity to join with the alien, Giygas.  He 
 also makes an appearance in Mother 3.  His appearance in Brawl actually 
 connects the most with his Mother 3 appearance.

Ridley
Origin: 1987 -- Metroid (NES)
 If there's any being that could be considered a "nemesis" to Samus Aran, 
 Ridley is it.  This huge "space dragon" is a high-ranking commander of the 
 Space Pirates, and it was established through the official Metroid e-manga 
 that he was responsible for the deaths of Samus' parents.  Samus has faced 
 him (or at least clones of him) at many points throughout the series.  Some 
 of his attacks in the games are used here, such as using his tail to stab, 
 and flying from the back of the screen to the front.

Meta Ridley
Origin: 2002 -- Metroid Prime (GCN)
 Following his first defeat against Samus on Zebes, Ridley was retrieved by 
 the Space Pirates and outfitted with cybernetic enhancements to improve 
 his combat capabilities.  Samus faced him on Tallon IV just before her fight 
 with Metroid Prime.

******************************************************************************
6. STAGES
******************************************************************************

The majority of the stages in this game take their appearances and mannerisms 
from games in Nintendo's library, most often related to a particular character 
or group of characters playable in the game.  Here follows a breakdown of 
each stage, and how (and if) they relate to other games.

==================
6A. Brawl Stages =
==================

Battlefield
Origin: Smash Bros. Series
 A generic staple of the series.  Battlefield holds no loyalties to any 
 particular game or series from Nintendo.  It's just a basic arena to fight in, 
 and has been that way since the original Super Smash Bros.

Final Destination
Origin: Smash Bros. Series
 The classic flat battlefield, introduced in the first Smash Bros., but made 
 a generically playable stage in Melee.  This is entirely nothing but one 
 flat platform.  It has become the stomping ground for many tournament 
 players who seek to rely on nothing but their own skill to win battles, 
 which is how they put it.  Personally, I think one's skill is determined by 
 how well one can adapt to different situations, not just how well one can 
 master a single stage, but that's just me.

Delfino Plaza
Origin: 2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
 Isle Delfino is the location of Super Mario Sunshine.  Specifically, Delfino 
 Plaza is the main hub, whereby Mario accesses all the different worlds.  
 This stage flies around the Plaza and settles in various areas.

Luigi's Mansion
Origin: 2001 -- Luigi's Mansion (GCN)
 Lucky Luigi won a mansion in a contest.  Mario went ahead to check it out, 
 and when Luigi arrived, he couldn't find Mario, but he did find the mansion 
 full of ghosts.  What followed was a romp through its many rooms sucking up 
 ghosts using Professor E. Gadd's Poltergust 3000.  The mansion is mildly 
 recreated with this stage.  Although it had multiple floors, it wasn't 
 possible to destroy the mansion as you do in this game, but completing the 
 game would make the mansion disappear.

Mushroomy Kingdom
Origin: 1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)
 This is a nearly block-by-block recreation of Super Mario Bros. World 1-1, 
 updated to look pretty.  As the stage auto-scrolls, you'll be taken through 
 the entire area.  Also, randomly, you'll be given a recreation of World 1-2, 
 the underground.

Mario Circuit
Origin: Mario Kart Series (1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES))
 All games in the Mario Kart series have featured a "standard" racetrack, 
 named after Mario.  This stage isn't a direct copy of any one track from 
 the series, but incorporates elements that were starting to appear once Mario 
 Kart 64 was released.  Oddly enough, the Shy Guys that populate this track 
 weren't seen in karts until Mario Kart DS.

Rumble Falls
Origin: 2005 -- Donkey Kong Jungle Beat (GCN)
 This is based on one of the areas you play in Donkey Kong Jungle Beat.  The 
 tropical setting, ladders and platforms, and upward scrolling are typical of 
 the game.

Bridge of Eldin
Origin: 2006 -- The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (GCN/Wii)
 East of Hyrule Castle is the Eldin Province, and the Great Bridge of Eldin 
 spans a chasm there.  In the course of the game, the center of the bridge is 
 stolen away, then replaced, and the same is repeated in Brawl.  Also featured 
 are Bulblins and King Bulblin, who toss Bombs.

Pirate Ship
Origin: 2003 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GCN)
 Tetra and her crew of pirates sail the Great Sea on a modest but effective 
 pirate ship.  Link didn't use this ship often in Wind Waker, but he did get 
 a chance to meet most of the crew early on.  The ship is faithfully recreated 
 using Wind Waker's trademark cel-shaded graphics.  Points of interest are 
 the launcher on the bow of the ship (which launched Link into the Forsaken 
 Fortress), the smaller boat: the King of Red Lions, which can pull up behind 
 the ship, as well as cyclones which can suck up the ship, which Link would 
 use to transport himself across the sea.

Norfair
Origin: Metroid Series (1986 -- Metroid (NES))
 One of the harshest environments on Planet Zebes, Norfair is a lava-filled 
 cavern in the depths of the planet's underground cave network, featured in 
 Metroid, Metroid: Zero Mission, and Super Metroid.  Besides the the basic 
 setup, of particular note is the "safe area", which uses the classic Zebes
 "bubble door" to access.

Frigate Orpheon
Origin: 2002 -- Metroid Prime (GCN)
 The first location in Metroid Prime is this Space Pirate frigate, a nearly 
 abandoned ruin when Samus finds it, the ship having been taken over by 
 Phazon-induced lifeforms.  The Parasite Queen in the background is a major 
 enemy that Samus had to fight before escaping the frigate.  The concept of 
 the stage flipping wasn't derived from the game, though.

Yoshi's Island
Origin: 1995 -- Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (SNES)
 This area is based on the world of Yoshi's Island.  Features from that game 
 include the floating Shy Guys, the Support Ghost that pops out on the side, 
 and in the background is Raphael the Raven's moon, during winter.

Halberd
Origin: Kirby Series (1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES))
 The Halberd first appeared as Meta Knight's ride in Kirby Super Star, and 
 the game within it, called "Revenge of Meta Knight", detailed Kirby trying to 
 stop Meta Knight from taking over Dream Land with it.  One of the obstacles 
 on the Halberd is the Combo Cannon, which Kirby faces during the fight.  The 
 Combo Cannon fires shots, laser beams, and has a grabbing hand.

Lylat Cruise
Origin: Star Fox Series
 The Pleiades, which is the name of the ship that makes up the stage, has not 
 appeared in any Star Fox game.  This stage doesn't match with any particular 
 game, but features several places in the Star Fox series: the Asteroid Belt, 
 the planet Corneria, and a space battle with large ships.

Pokémon Stadium 2
Origin: Pokémon Series
 Based on the Melee stage of the similar name, this Stadium is meant to 
 represent the site where Pokémon battle professionally.  The changing of the 
 stage reflects different types of Pokémon that would have an advantage in the 
 area.  For the second iteration of the stadium, the types involved are 
 Electric, Flying, Ice, and Ground.

Spear Pillar
Origin: 2007 -- Pokémon Diamond/Pearl (DS)
 This is a key area in the Sinnoh region of D/P, in which it's where Dialga or 
 Palkia show up for you battle and capture (depending on the version).  This 
 has been recreated for Smash, with the players having equal chance of Dialga 
 or Palkia situated in the background of the stage, where the Pokémon will 
 cause effects on the gameplay based on their abilities of manipulating time 
 and space.  Other legendary Pokémon from Sinnoh can also appear here.

Port Town Aero Dive
Origin: F-Zero Series (2003 -- F-Zero GX (GCN))
 Port Town is a mainstay of the F-Zero series, and this particular course 
 is known for its dips and dives.  This stage is similar to Mute City in 
 SSBM, in that the platforms travel the course, and every so often you'll 
 find yourself assaulted by racers as they speed along the track.

Castle Siege
Origin: Fire Emblem Series
 Sakurai himself has stated that this castle under attack doesn't represent 
 any specific castle from any of the Fire Emblem games.  It's just a random 
 castle.  Of course, the concept of sieging is nothing new to the Fire 
 Emblem series, as the battles could transition from fields to inside 
 castles at any time during the story.

WarioWare, Inc.
Origin: WarioWare Series (2003 -- WarioWare, Inc: Mega Microgame$ (GBA))
 The basic form of this stage is a simple setup with the background being 
 the elevator from one of the towers in the original WarioWare game.  Of 
 course, it doesn't stay that way, as you'll be thrust into one of several 
 of the famous WarioWare microgames every so often.

Distant Planet
Origin: Pikmin Series (2001 -- Pikmin (GCN))
 This is Earth, only you're really small, which is the whole point behind 
 Pikmin, anyway, being a little fish in a big pond, and using the Pikmin 
 against much tougher enemies.  All the vegetation seems to be huge compared 
 to you, and there are several elements of the Pikmin series worked in to 
 the stage, such as Red Bulborbs (common enemies from the game), Onions (the 
 home base of the Pikmin), and pellets (nourishment for Pikmin that are 
 placed in the Onions to create more).

Smashville
Origin: Animal Crossing Series
 This area is based on the Animal Forest/Animal Crossing simulation series, 
 where your player sets up a house in a small town and works to communicate 
 with others and improve his house.  Much like the real series, the time on 
 this stage reflects the internal clock.  Characters that appear in the 
 background also appear in the series, and at 8PM on Saturday, just like in 
 the series, K.K. Slider (aka Totakeke) will appear with his guitar to 
 perform.

New Pork City
Origin: 2006 -- Mother 3 (GBA) Japan Only
 This large and flashy city is the ultimate area on Nowhere Islands, the 
 setting for Mother 3.  Also featured is the monster "Ultimate Chimera", one 
 of the enemies in Mother 3.

The Summit
Origin: 1984 -- Ice Climber (NES)
 This is a representation of the top of Icicle Mountain (the stage of which 
 was featured in Melee).  Once at the summit, the Ice Climbers could collect 
 their precious vegetables.  The breaking off and sliding down is brand new, 
 though.  The large fish in the water is a fish that appeared in Balloon 
 Fight.

Skyworld
Origin: 1987 -- Kid Icarus (NES)
 This is a more modernized (graphically) version of the third world in Kid 
 Icarus.  The connections are vague, given the tremendous jump in graphics, 
 but match with the concept of the world suspended in the sky.

75m
Origin: 1981 -- Donkey Kong (Arcade)
 This is a carbon copy of the original Donkey Kong's third level.  In this 
 particular stage, Mario (or Jumpman, as he was then known) needed to cross 
 the moving platforms, avoid the springs, and reach Pauline at the top.  The 
 stages were named 25m, 50m, 75m, and 100m to illustrate Donkey Kongs being 
 stacked on top of one another.

Mario Bros.
Origin: 1983 -- Mario Bros. (Arcade)
 Following in the traditions of the "Mushroom Kingdom" stages of games past, 
 this is a near-pixel-perfect recreation of the NES classic, the first game 
 to feature Mario's brother, Luigi.  Much as the original goal of Mario Bros. 
 is to knock enemies on their back by hitting them from underneath, so too 
 does this stage recreate that, only you can now use these enemies as weapons 
 against your fellow fighters.

Flat Zone 2
Origin: Game & Watch Series
 Much like Flat Zone before it, this is a representation of a Game & Watch 
 game.  Unlike the first Flat Zone, this one periodically changes to appear 
 like different G&W games.  It can appear as Fire, complete with a trampoline 
 one can bounce off of.  It can appear as Chef, with a frying pan that can 
 flip you.  It can appear as Oil Panic, with people and objects that get in 
 your way.  It can appear as Lion, with two people holding you back with 
 chairs trying to keep you in a cage.

Pictochat
Origin: 2004 -- DS Hardware (DS)
 This is a stylized area based on the Pictochat program on a Nintendo DS.  
 Combatants fight on the screen.  Their main platform is the Pictochat notice 
 window (that monitors when people enter or leave).  During the fight, 
 pictures, etc. will be drawn on the screen.  Some of these pictures are 
 platforms.  Some are hazards.

Hanenbow
Origin: 2006 -- Electroplankton (DS)
 Electroplankton, for those who don't know, is a DS "game" based around 
 creating music and sounds.  I put "game" in quotes because there is no 
 actual objective, only to make music and play around with the concepts the 
 game presents.  Hanenbow is one of the types of plankton that can be used.  
 Tossing one up to the leaves will cause it to rebound off them, creating 
 noise and changing their colors.  This is faithfully recreated in this 
 stage, including creating flowers when all leaves on a plant are turned 
 red.

Shadow Moses Island
Origin: Metal Gear Series (1998 -- Metal Gear Solid (PS1))
 Shadow Moses is a fictional island off the Alaskan shoreline.  It was the 
 setting of Metal Gear Solid.  This particular area is based on the helipad, 
 the first open area in the game.  Spotlights scan the area, as they did in 
 the game, and being spotted will give you a "!" marking, much as being 
 discovered in any Metal Gear game.  Also, during the fight, appearances will 
 be made by Metal Gear REX (from Metal Gear Solid), Metal Gear RAY (from 
 Metal Gear Solid 2), and the Gekko (from Metal Gear Solid 4).  Finally, 
 during fighting, Snake can communicate with his allies: Colonel Roy Campbell 
 (voiced by Paul Eiding), scientist Mei Ling (voiced by Kim Mai Guest) and 
 Metal Gear REX designer Hal "Otacon" Emmerich (voiced by Christopher 
 Randolph).

Green Hill Zone
Origin: Sonic Series (1991 -- Sonic the Hedgehog (GEN/SMS/GG))
 This is a recreation of the very first level of Sonic the Hedgehog, which 
 takes place in a stylized running course, with grass, hatched ground, the 
 famous shuttle loop in the background, as well as one of the famous power-up 
 TVs on top of it.  Also running in the background are Sonic series characters 
 Tails, Knuckles, and Silver.

==================
6B. Melee Stages =
==================

Rainbow Cruise
Origin: Mario Series (1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64))
 The Rainbow Ride was one of several areas in Super Mario 64, consisting of 
 wide-open space, small platforms, a floating ship, and nothing but air at 
 the bottom.  Objects such as the rotating platforms and the donut drops were 
 common and only added to the tense nature of floating so high in the air.

Jungle Japes
Origin: Donkey Kong Country Series (1993 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES))
 This stage takes place at Cranky's Cabin in Donkey Kong Country, complete 
 with sunset in the background.  You can also see Cranky wandering around 
 inside.  His cabin was never known for having a raging river beneath it, 
 though.

Temple
Origin: The Legend of Zelda Series
 Although the area has no literal translation, it's based on the temples 
 in Zelda II: Adventure of Link that were side-scrolling, much like this 
 situation.  The architecture has been updated to look more current, but can 
 trace its roots to the looks of the temples in Zelda II.

Brinstar
Origin: Metroid Series (1986 -- Metroid (NES))
 Brinstar was the "main" area of Zebes in the first Metroid game, consisting 
 of rocks, platforms, and tunnels.  Going into Super Metroid, the sector was 
 fleshed out, including a jungle-type area, giving it a more organic feel.  
 This stage doesn't take much from that jungle area, mostly using basic 
 organic-looking platforms.  Certain other elements from Metroid include a 
 Chozo Statue that walks in the background (which held items for Samus), as 
 well as a quivering mass far in the background that may actually be Mother 
 Brain, although there's no proof of this.

Yoshi's Island
Origin: 1991 -- Super Mario World (SNES)
 Yoshi's Island was the original home of Yoshi, when he was first discovered 
 in Super Mario World.  This stage takes elements of Super Mario World, 
 including blocks that spin when struck, and diagonal slopes and pipes.  A 
 "Fishing Lakitu", new to the series in that game, floats in the background.

Green Greens
Origin: 1992 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB)
 The very first area of Kirby's Dream Land (there are a lot of "firsts" in 
 the Melee stages) is a sprawling green field with relatively weak enemies, 
 and the large tree named "Whispy Woods" at its end.  Whispy Woods is here 
 in the middle, blowing wind and dropping apples just as he does in the 
 game of origin.

Corneria
Origin: Star Fox Series (1993 -- Star Fox (SNES))
 The fourth planet of the Lylat System is home to most of its sentient 
 inhabitants, and the city is always prominently featured whenever the Star 
 Fox team visit the planet.  Here is no exception, as the Star Fox mothership, 
 Great Fox, flies through the cityscape.  While fighting here, Arwings and 
 Wolfen fighters will attack, the first being the official craft for Star 
 Fox, the second being the official craft for Star Wolf.

Pokémon Stadium
Origin: Pokémon Series
 The original Pokémon Stadium from Melee uses the following types when it 
 changes: Fire, Water, Rock, and Grass.  See Stadium 2 for more info.

Big Blue
Origin: F-Zero Series (1990 -- F-Zero (SNES))
 Big Blue is a common track in the F-Zero series, but you don't see much of 
 the track in this stage.  No, this stage is a showcase of a large number of 
 the racers in F-Zero X, which you move across as you play the stage.

Onett
Origin: 1994 -- Mother 2/EarthBound (SNES)
 This is Ness's hometown, which featured several shops and homes, giving 
 him plenty of places to explore.  Featured in this stage are two homes and 
 the Drug Store.  Also, Onett typically has traffic touring around the 
 streets, but the traffic actually stopped for you, unlike in this stage.  
 One of the more important vehicles that comes by is the tour bus of the 
 Runaway Five, a travelling band that Ness and his friends meet with on more 
 than one occasion.

******************************************************************************
7. ITEMS
******************************************************************************

Similar to the Stages section above, this section takes a look at each of 
the game's items, and if they relate to anything else in Nintendom.

==================
7A. Normal Items =
==================

The following are items that are the same every time you pick them up.  
They don't have a chance of doing anything different or releasing anything 
different when used (in other words, not Poké Balls nor Assist Trophies).

---

Smash Ball
Origin: Smash Bros. Series
 Certainly, the Smash Emblem on the front would be a dead giveaway, but this 
 item is unique to Smash Bros.

Crate
Origin: Smash Bros. Series
 With the Smash logo on its side, these crates are vintage Smash Bros.  
 Looking at the other styles, I can't make any connections to other series.

Barrel
Origin: Smash Bros. Series
 Although one could make a case of the connection between barrels and Donkey 
 Kong, and you wouldn't be far off in doing so, these barrels have the Smash 
 logo on them, and are termed as being a basic item.  No connections can be 
 derived with the other styles.

Capsule
Origin: Pop Culture
 While certain games throughout history have employed capsules in one form or 
 another, they can all be traced back to Japanese vending machines, which can 
 hold collectible capsule toys.

Party Ball
Origin: Pop Culture
 Often employed in Japanese parties, these tend to contain candy or presents.  
 The same idea is employed here, only on a larger scale.

Blast Box
Origin: Pop Culture
 The concept of exploding barrels, boxes, etc. has existed in gaming for some 
 time, and can't really be traced back to anything specific.

Sandbag
Origin: Smash Bros. Series
 Sandbag first appeared in Melee as a target for the Home Run game.  Described 
 as a fellow who doesn't mind the punishment and enjoys watching people let 
 loose, Sandbag's destiny is to be beaten to the point that he'll sail far and 
 wide when struck with a bat.  This is the first game in which he's featured 
 as an in-game item.

Maxim Tomato
Origin: Kirby Series (1992 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB))
 This tomato with a big M on its front hails from the Kirby series of games.  
 Picking one up would completely restore Kirby's health.

Heart Container
Origin: Zelda Series (1987 -- The Legend of Zelda (NES))
 When Link picked up this useful item in most Legend of Zelda games, his 
 heart meter would be completely refilled and increased by one.

Dragoon
Origin: 2003 -- Kirby Air Ride (GCN)
 One of the two legendary rides in Kirby Air Ride, the Dragoon has an 
 incredible gliding ability compared to other rides.  Much like in this 
 game, Kirby needed to find all three pieces of the Dragoon before he could 
 use it in the game.

Super Mushroom
Origin: Mario Series (1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES))
 This classic item made Mario or Luigi double in size when they grabbed it, 
 and allowed them to take a hit from an enemy without falling.

Poison Mushroom
Origin: Mario Series (1986 -- Super Mario Bros. 2 (Famicom) Japan Only)
 The antithesis of the Super Mushroom, the Poison Mushroom basically just 
 served as an enemy that moved like a Super Mushroom, in that you would take 
 a hit if you touched it.  In the Smash Bros. series, the Mushroom works as a 
 shrinker, and the differences between Super and Poison are subtle, meaning 
 you have to watch closely, while they were rather obvious in the old game.

Warp Star
Origin: Kirby Series (1992 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB))
 These magical stars are found throughout the Kirby series.  Touching one 
 would take Kirby on a ride to another area.  They were mainly used for 
 transport in his series, not to attack.

Starman
Origin: Mario Series (1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES))
 A useful find in many Mario games.  This bouncy golden star with eyes has the 
 ability to render its user invincible for a short amount of time, often with 
 the added ability to damage enemies simply by plowing through them.

Metal Box
Origin: Mario Series (1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64))
 In Super Mario 64, these green boxes contain a metal cap, which turn Mario 
 into Metal Mario, giving him invincibility, and the ability to sink to the 
 bottom of water and walk on the bottom.

Bunny Hood
Origin: Zelda Series (1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (N64))
 While this first appeared in Ocarina of Time, the Bunny Hood's trademark 
 ability to speed you up wasn't applied until Majora's Mask was released.  
 Equipping this on Link in the land of Termina allowed you to run at double 
 speed and jump much further.  Definitely one of the most used "masks" in 
 that game.

Superspicy Curry
Origin: Kirby Series (1992 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB))
 When Kirby snagged this hot stuff, he had abilities to spit fireballs 
 for a limited time.  The application in Brawl is similar.

Timer
Origin: Gaming Culture
 It's nearly impossible to narrow this item down to a single game, as so 
 many have featured the concept of a clock or stopwatch that, when grabbed by 
 the player, either slows down or stops time or everyone but the player.

Lightning
Origin: Mario Kart Series (1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES))
 While lightning has been a part of hundreds of games, this particular 
 lightning bolt applies to the Mario Kart series, as one of the many items 
 you can pick up while driving.  Often received when you are behind in the 
 race, using this will shrink all other drivers but yourself, allowing you 
 to possibly catch up to your foes.

Beam Sword
Origin: Pop Culture, Sci-fi
 A lot of people want to call this a lightsaber.  While there are certain 
 common aspects of the two, there really is no direct connection, and a lot 
 of Japanese sci-fi media employ beam swords.

Home-Run Bat
Origin: Pop Culture, Sports
 Yes, I know people want this to be from the Mother series, or from any 
 Nintendo sports game, but this is just a regular old bat, which has been 
 confirmed in the Trophy section.  Baseball is a popular sport in Japan, 
 possibly moreso than America.

Fan
Origin: Pop Culture
 Despite certain characters using fans as weapons, the folded paper fan is a 
 common aspect of Japanese slapstick.  Oftentimes, such a fan was used to bop 
 the teller of a particularly bad joke, or someone who has done something 
 particularly dense.

Lip's Stick
Origin: 1995 -- Panel de Pon (SNES) Japan Only
 While we definitely got this game, as Tetris Attack, starring Yoshi, we were 
 denied the original setup, which pit a fairy girl named Lip in similar 
 circumstances.  This is the stick she carried.

Star Rod
Origin: Kirby Series (1993 -- Kirby's Adventure (NES))
 This was a key item (or MacGuffin) in Kirby's Adventure.  Dedede steals this 
 and breaks it into seven pieces, and it's up to Kirby to reassemble it so 
 the citizens of Dream Land can dream once more.  In the finale of the game, 
 he uses the Star Rod as a weapon against the Nightmare.

Hammer
Origin: Donkey Kong Series (1981 -- Donkey Kong (Arcade))
 In the original Donkey Kong, picking up a hammer would send you into a 
 pounding frenzy.  Such is also the case here.

Golden Hammer
Origin: 1985 -- Wrecking Crew (NES)
 This special hammer was used in Wrecking Crew.  If you smashed things in the 
 proper order, one would appear, which would allow you to work fast and smash 
 harder.  Also, as is replicated in this game, you can use it to hover over 
 the air for a limited time.  Unlike the original Golden Hammer, the Smash 
 version has been adapted to copy the Donkey Kong Hammer.

Super Scope
Origin: 1992 -- Super Scope 6 (SNES)
 This is an actual physical peripheral that existed as the Super Nintendo 
 iteration of the NES Zapper.  It is compatible with eleven games on the 
 Super Nintendo.

Ray Gun
Origin: Sci-fi
 If someone can tie this to one specific game, I'll be shocked, because 
 sci-fi media throughout history has supplied us with fancy and futuristic 
 laser weapons.  This is just one other representation.

Fire Flower
Origin: Mario Series (1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES))
 This mystical flower granted Mario and Luigi the ability to toss fireballs.  
 In this series, they can do so without the use of the flower, so the Flower 
 has been adapted to spew continuous flames over a short distance.

Cracker Launcher
Origin: 2003 -- Kirby Air Ride (GCN)
 This is one of the several powerups found in Air Ride, specifically found 
 in green boxes.  The only difference here is that the original constantly 
 shot fireworks.

Bob-Omb
Origin: Mario Series (1987 -- Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES))
 The Bob-Omb is a walking bomb with little eyes.  Its life consists of 
 walking around aimlessly, then stopping to explode violently.  They dogged 
 Mario and the gang in SMB2 and many games since.

Motion Sensor Bomb
Origin: 1997 -- Goldeneye 007 (N64)
 Wellll, sort of.  This item actually has a bit of history.  In the original 
 Smash Bros., it was quite obviously a proximity mine from Goldeneye 007.  In 
 the Japanese (and in beta English) version of Melee, it was a proximity mine 
 from Perfect Dark, but was then changed in non-Japanese versions to look 
 more like the mine from Goldeneye again.  This is most likely due to rights 
 complications, considering Rare was in charge of distribution of Perfect Dark 
 and Goldeneye in the west.  To simplify matters, the Brawl Motion Sensor 
 Bomb has a wacky purple color scheme that doesn't apply it to anything.

Gooey Bomb
Origin: Brand New
 This sticky bomb is unique to this game.

Smart Bomb
Origin: Star Fox Series (1993 -- Star Fox (SNES))
 While the concept of "smart bomb" has long existed in video games to denote 
 any type of large-yield explosive that could take out a decent amount of 
 enemies, this "B"-marked circle is unique to the Star Fox series.  Also 
 called "Nova Bomb", this was used by Arwings and Landmasters to create a 
 large explosion that could vaporize several small enemies.  The red color and 
 "B" were introduced in Star Fox 64, and have been used in every game since.

Deku Nut
Origin: Zelda Series (1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (N64))
 These are nuts that grow from the mystical Deku Tree in Hyrule.  They're 
 found in many places.  If Link threw one at the ground, it would cause a  
 bright flash, stunning nearby enemies.

Freezie
Origin: Mario Series (1983 -- Mario Bros. (NES))
 This sliding block of ice with a face was one of the myriad enemies in 
 the original Mario Bros.  If it touched a lower level, it melted, coating 
 the platform in ice.  This adaptation simply freezes an enemy solid.

Smoke Ball
Origin: Pop Culture
 Lots of games (as well as other media) have the concept of a smokescreen, 
 used to obscure passage and confuse chasers.  This game is now officially one 
 of them, I suppose.

Pitfall
Origin: Animal Crossing Series (2002 -- Animal Crossing (GCN))
 This naughty little item doesn't truly have a use in Animal Crossing, only 
 to trap the unsuspecting in a hole.  It has much the same function in this 
 game.

Hothead
Origin: Mario Series (1991 -- Super Mario World (SNES))
 The concept of beings or traps that follow the length of a platform is a 
 constant worry in most platforming games, and the Hothead certainly falls in 
 that category.  Quite simply, a large living fireball (with eyes) that traces 
 around whatever surface it's currently stuck to.

Mr. Saturn
Origin: 1994 -- Mother 2/EarthBound (SNES)
 This is a member of the Mr. Saturn species, all of whom are named Mr. Saturn.  
 The live in the odd Saturn Valley and speak in their own peculiar language, 
 although they are quite understandable.  They're a generally laid back and 
 well-meaning folk, but tend to be rather passive.

Green Shell
Origin: Mario Series (1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES))
 Koopa Troopas reside in these shells as a form of armor.  When hit, they 
 retreat into their shells where they cannot be defeated by being jumped 
 upon.  However, this meant that Mario or Luigi could then kick the shell, 
 where it slid into enemies.

Banana Peel
Origin: Pop Culture
 Certainly there are connections to the Mario Kart series, and the reviled 
 Banana Peel item commonly used in the series, but this object has long 
 existed in cliché comedy, and is termed in-game as a Smash item.

Bumper
Origin: Smash Bros. Series
 This item bedecked with the Smash emblem is derived from pinball machine 
 bumpers, and it works in much the same way.  While it appeared in the first 
 Smash Bros., it was absent in Melee in favor of the Flipper.

Spring
Origin: Donkey Kong Series (1982 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade))
 These first made their appearance in Donkey Kong Jr., in the second stage, 
 so DK Jr. could get help in making his ascent.  Naturally, it's appeared in 
 many varied games since, particularly the Mario series.

Unira
Origin: 1985 -- Clu Clu Land (NES)
 In the little-known game, Clu Clu Land, the Unira are a type of villainous 
 sea urchin that steal all the treasures in the land, leaving Bubbles with 
 the unenviable task of retrieving them.

Soccer Ball
Origin: Sports
 I'm guessing this is supposed to coincide with the Home-Run Bat as 
 representing important sports worldwide, although it does also appear in 
 the Mario Striker series.

Team Healer
Origin: Unique
 I really can't think of any connection this thing could have to any other 
 game or pop-culture reference.

Franklin Badge
Origin: Mother Series (1989 -- Mother (NES))
 Yes, this item appeared in the first "Mother", as well as appearing in 
 Mother 2 (EarthBound) and Mother 3.  In the Mother games, possessing this 
 item will allow any Lightning-based attacks to be reflected back at the 
 enemy.  In Smash Bros., it reflects projectile attacks, much like Fox's 
 Reflector.

Screw Attack
Origin: 1987 -- Metroid (NES)
 This is one of the more devastating items Samus Aran can pick up during her 
 travels, and appears in several Metroid games.  With the Screw Attack enabled, 
 a forward flip jump by Samus can transform her into a spinning ball of 
 energy.  The devastation has been toned down for its induction into Smash, 
 but it's annoying nonetheless.

Sorry, but I'm not going into Food, CDs, Trophies, Stickers, Keys, Trophy 
Bases, Stock Balls, or Coins and Bills.  Frankly, I think you guys can figure 
out what those are.

================
7B. Poké Balls =
================

Origin: Pokémon Series (1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB))
 The symbol of the Poké World.  Poké Balls are used as means to make your 
 Pokémon portable.  Inside is apparently an environment well-suited to the 
 Pokémon in question.  Really a black box of technology, when you get right 
 down to it.

---

Meowth
 National Pokédex Number: 52
 Origin: Pokémon Red/Green/Blue/Yellow
 Appearance: White bipedal cat with a coin on its forehead, based on the 
  "Lucky Cat" famous in Japan.
 Attack: Pay Day (throws coins repeatedly), learned at Level 17 in RGBY.
 Note: Known as "Nyarth" in Japan.  Both names are based off the sound a 
  cat makes.  Also, a major character in the Pokémon anime, as the one that 
  tags along with Team Rocket is one of the few Pokémon that can speak 
  English/Japanese.

Electrode
 National Pokédex Number: 101
 Origin: Pokémon Red/Green/Blue/Yellow
 Appearance: Ball-like creature resembling an upside-down Pokéball with a 
  face.
 Attack: Explosion (causes explosive damage), which it learns at Level 50 in 
  RGBY. 

Goldeen
 National Pokédex Number: 118
 Origin: Pokémon Red/Green/Blue/Yellow
 Appearance: Two-foot-long goldfish with a horn at the top of its head.
 Attack: Splash (does nothing) 
 Note: In the series, Goldeen cannot learn Splash.  It's known as "Tosakinto" 
  in Japan.

Staryu
 National Pokédex Number: 120
 Origin: Pokémon Red/Green/Blue/Yellow
 Appearance: Brown starfish with a red gem in its center.
 Attack: Swift (shoots a rapid series of shots at one character), which it 
  learns at Level 32 in RGBY.
 Note: Its Japanese name is "Hitodeman".

Snorlax
 National Pokédex Number: 143
 Origin: Pokémon Red/Green/Blue/Yellow
 Appearance: Large blue and white bear-like animal.  Often seen in a sitting 
  position.
 Attack: Body Slam (drops down from above for heavy damage), which it learns 
  at Level 35 in RGBY.
 Note: Its Japanese name is "Kabigon".

Moltres
 National Pokédex Number: 146
 Origin: Pokémon Red/Green/Blue/Yellow
 Appearance: A large bird colored yellow to red, which seems to trail flames.
 Attack: Fly (learned through HM02)
 Note: This is one of the three Legendary Birds in the first generation of 
  Pokémon.  In Japan, it was simply called "Fire".

Mew
 National Pokédex Number: 151
 Origin: Pokémon Red/Green/Blue/Yellow
 Appearance: Small alien-like animal with light-purple skin and a long tail.
 Note: The ultra-secret Pokémon of RGBY, very rarely available.

Chikorita
 National Pokédex Number: 152
 Origin: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal
 Appearance: Green bean-shaped plant being with four stubby legs and a large 
  leaf growing out of the top of its head.
 Attack: Razor Leaf (flings leaves horizontally), learned at Level 8 in GSC.
 Note: One of the three starter Pokémon in Gold/Silver/Crystal.

Togepi
 National Pokédex Number: 175
 Origin: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal
 Appearance: A small white creature still partially encased in a speckled 
  eggshell.
 Attack: Metronome (which can trigger Night Shade, Magnitude, Sing or Leech 
  Seed), which it learns at Level 7 in GSC.
 Note: Misty carried a Togepi for some time in the anime.

Bellossom
 National Pokédex Number: 182
 Origin: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal
 Appearance: A plant shaped like a small human, with dark green and yellow 
  leaves forming a sort of skirt, and red flowers forming "hair".
 Attack: Sleep Powder (lulls nearby characters to sleep), which it can learn 
  from a previous evolution in GSC.

Wobbuffet
 National Pokédex Number: 202
 Origin: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal
 Appearance: A blue bean-like creature with a permanent scowl on its face.  
  It has a small black tail with a secondary face on it.
 Attack: Counter (returns any attack it is hit with), which it knows initially 
  in GSC.

Entei
 National Pokédex Number: 244
 Origin: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal
 Appearance: Four-legged brown furry mammal.  Has white spikes and trailing 
  white hair out its back, a red and gold crest on its face, and bracers on 
  each of its legs.
 Attack: Fire Spin (shoots fire out of its back straight up), which it learns 
  at Level 31 in GSC.
 Note: One of the three Legendary Pokémon in Gold/Silver/Crystal.

Suicune
 National Pokédex Number: 245
 Origin: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal
 Appearance: Four-legged blue-skinned mammal-type.  Has purple "hair" trailing 
  from its back, white ribbons coming out its sides, and a blue crystal 
  shape forming out of its head.
 Attack: Blizzard (forms a cloud of cold air around it), which it can learn 
  through TM14 in GSC.
 Note: One of the three Legendary Pokémon in Gold/Silver/Crystal.

Lugia
 National Pokédex Number: 249
 Origin: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal
 Appearance: Winged dragon/plesiosaur.  Mostly white/silver with a blue 
  underbelly and purple accents on its tail, spikes, and head.
 Attack: Aeroblast (large rush of air from the background), which it knows 
  intially in GSC.
 Note: The version mascot of Pokémon Silver.

Ho-Oh
 National Pokédex Number: 250
 Origin: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal
 Appearance: Phoenix-like bird, predominantly red and white, with yellow 
  feathers.
 Attack: Sacred Fire (massive rising flames), which it knows intially in GSC.
 Note: The version mascot of Pokémon Gold.

Celebi
 National Pokédex Number: 251
 Origin: Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal
 Appearance: Fairy-like, white and green animal.
 Note: The ultra-secret Pokémon of GSC, very rarely available.

Torchic
 National Pokédex Number: 255
 Origin: Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald
 Appearance: Torchic appears as a small red bird with yellow accent feathers.  
 Attack: Fire Spin (spiralling flames), which it learns at Level 25.
 Note: This one of the three starting Pokémon found in Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald.  
  Its Japanese name is "Achamo".

Gardevoir
 National Pokédex Number: 282
 Origin: Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald
 Appearance: A being that looks similar to a human with a flowing gown, 
  largely colored green and white.
 Attack: Reflect (reflects projectiles), which it can learn through TM33.
 Note: The Japanese name of this Pokémon is "Sirnight".

Gulpin
 National Pokédex Number: 316
 Origin: Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald
 Appearance: A squat bulbous green thing with a large mouth.
 Attack: Swallow (munches on enemies), which it learns at Level 34.

Metagross
 National Pokédex Number: 376
 Origin: Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald
 Appearance: A four-legged tank-like Pokémon, predominantly colored blue.
 Attack: Earthquake (shakes ground nearby), which it can learn from TM26.

Latias/Latios
 National Pokédex Number: 380/381
 Origin: Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald
 Appearance: A pair of small bird-like creatures with longish necks and 
  small wings.  The Latios is colored blue and the Latias is colored red.
 Attack: Steel Wing (zips across the screen), which can be learned by each 
  through TM47.

Kyogre
 National Pokédex Number: 382
 Origin: Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald
 Appearance: An orca with odd wings and tail feathers, colored blue.
 Attack: Hydro Pump (shoots out water), which it learns at Level 45.
 Note: Kyogre is a legendary Pokémon, and is also the mascot for Pokémon 
  Sapphire.

Groudon
 National Pokédex Number: 383
 Origin: Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald
 Appearance: Large red lizard-like beast with claws, spikes, and baldes.  
  Seems to have a plated shell on its back.
 Attack: Overheat
 Note: The version mascot of Pokémon Ruby.

Jirachi
 National Pokédex Number: 385
 Origin: Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald
 Appearance: A small humanoid with a yellow headress with blue tags on it.
 Note: One of the super legendary Pokémon from the third generation.

Deoxys
 National Pokédex Number: 386
 Origin: Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald
 Appearance: Based on a strand of DNA, Deoxys is a red and blue colored 
  being with string-like appendages for arms.  In Brawl, he appears in his 
  Attack Form.  He has three other forms in the Pokémon games, which were 
  introduced over the course of the series.
 Attack: Hyper Beam (down-firing beam of light), learned at Level 50 in RS.
 Note: The last Pokémon in the Generation 3 Pokédex.

Piplup
 National Pokédex Number: 393
 Origin: Pokémon Diamond/Pearl
 Appearance: Small penguin-like bird with big eyes, a short beak, and \
  predominantly blue feathers.
 Attack: Surf (torrent of water), learned using HM03.
 Note: One of the starter Pokémon in Diamond/Pearl.  Its Japanese name is 
  Pochama.

Bonsly
 National Pokédex Number: 438
 Origin: Pokémon Diamond/Pearl
 Appearance: A small brown rock Pokémon with three green tufts on the top of 
  its head, looking similar to a bonsai.
 Attack: Tackle, an ability it can't learn, but is rather common.  If you 
  want to get technical, you could make a case that it's using its "Rock Head" 
  ability.
 Note: Bonsly is known as Usohachi in the Japan.

Munchlax
 National Pokédex Number: 446
 Origin: Pokémon Diamond/Pearl
 Appearance: The earlier form of Snorlax, Munchlax has a lot of features of 
  its evolution: predominantly blue, cat-like ears, but largely bear-like 
  otherwise.
 Attack: Swallow (eats items on the stage), learned at Level 28 in DP.
 Note: The first Generation 4 Pokémon revealed to the public.  Its Japanese 
  name is Gonbe.

Weavile
 National Pokédex Number: 461
 Origin: Pokémon Diamond/Pearl
 Appearance: A small humanoid, half black and half maroon.
 Attack: False Swipe (strikes swiftly), a Normal-type attack, which it can 
  learn from TM54.
 Note: The Japanese name for this Pokémon is Manyula.

Manaphy
 National Pokédex Number: 490
 Origin: Pokémon Diamond/Pearl
 Appearance: A small, blue aquatic-looking being.  It seems humanoid in 
  basic shape, but has flippers for "arms", and a long antenna coming out of 
  its head.
 Attack: Heart Swap (switches players), learned at Level 76 in DP.
 Note: This is a Legendary Pokémon that was the star of the ninth Pokémon 
  movie. 

=====================
7C. Assist Trophies =
=====================

Origin: Smash Bros. Series
 Based off SSB Melee's concept of collecting trophies, these particular 
 glass cases are used in battle to release whatever character is inside, which 
 will then attack, or do whatever it does.

---

Hammer Bro
Origin: Mario Series (1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES))
 Hammer Bros are more combat-oriented members of Bowser's evil army.  They 
 walk on their hind legs (which regular Koopa Troopas did not do originally) 
 and repeatedly throw claw hammers.  As of Super Mario Bros. 3, they're also 
 seen with helmets on their heads.

Lakitu
Origin: Mario Series (1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES))
 This cloud-riding member of Bowser's army is considered artillery.  He 
 floats above Mario and rains down Spinies from above.  The Brawl iteration of 
 him is pixel for pixel equivalent to his Super Mario Bros. appearance.

Waluigi
Origin: Mario Sports/Party Series (2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64))
 One of the few Mario series characters to not really have an identity of his 
 own, Waluigi was designed as a companion to Wario and an antagonist to 
 Luigi.  He's only been featured in "ensemble cast" games, like the sports 
 games and the Mario Party series, and his character has never been elaborated 
 on; only that he's sneaky and mean.  The racket he comes with as an AT is 
 meant as an homage to his first appearance in Mario Tennis.

Tingle
Origin: Zelda Series (2000 -- The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64))
 This thirty-five year old man wanders Hyrule wearing a green costume.  His 
 dream in life is to become a fairy, and he often dances and cavorts as he 
 imagines one would.  Despite his appearance and demeanor, he's a talented 
 mapmaker and chart decipherer.  In Brawl, he appears as he did in Wind Waker, 
 and calls his "Kooloo-Limpah" power, which he could use in Wind Waker to 
 cause random effects to happen.

Metroid
Origin: Metroid Series (1986 -- Metroid (NES))
 The titular character of its attendant series, the name "Metroid" derives 
 from the Chozo term meaning "ultimate warrior".  This parasitic, semi-
 sentient species was devised by the Chozo as a means of eradicating an 
 insidious parasite they called "X".  Metroids then became a problem of their 
 own in later times, as the Space Pirates had learned how to employ them as 
 weapons to use against the Galactic Federation.  Only vulnerable to cold 
 temperatures, Metroids will latch onto their prey and drain "life force" 
 from them.  In Brawl, they use this energy-sucking ability to increase the 
 damage of whoever they latch onto.

Knuckle Joe
Origin: Kirby Series (1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES))
 This spiky-haired cartoony bruiser is not only an adversary in Kirby Super 
 Star, but also a potential helper.  To put it simply, he's what appears if 
 Kirby makes a helper out of the "Fighter" ability.  His moves, the Vulcan 
 Jab, the Smash Punch, and the Rising Break, are all derived from the same 
 ability in the game.

Andross
Origin: Star Fox Series (1993 -- Star Fox (SNES))
 The greatest scientist the Lylat system has ever seen, Andross views himself 
 as something of a higher being amongst his fellow sapients, thus giving to his 
 attempts to rule the system.  This polygonal face represents his appearance 
 in the first Star Fox game.  Not truly his face, this is a telekinetic 
 representation of him, which he uses to battle the Star Fox team at the game's 
 climax.  Much like his representation there, his attack in Brawl is to spit 
 out polygonal panels.

Samurai Goro
Origin: F-Zero Series (1990 -- F-Zero (SNES))
 Goro is a F-Zero GP racer who has a hatred of Captain Falcon.  He drives the 
 Fire Stingray, one of the heaviest, yet fastest, machines.  While it has 
 long been established that he carries a katana, this is the first in-game 
 instance of him using it.

Kat & Ana
Origin: Warioware Series (2003 -- WarioWare, Inc: Mega Microgame$ (GBA))
 Kat and Ana are a pair of ninjas who are still in kindergarten.  Kat, the 
 one with lavender hair, tends to be the more adventurous of the two, while 
 Ana is the more caring.  They've been in the Warioware series from the 
 beginning, and each game shows them getting into different kinds of hijinx.  
 They've never specifically used this X-shaped slice, so this is more than 
 likely just another exhibition of their fine ninja skills.

Lyn
Origin: Fire Emblem Series (2003 -- Fire Emblem (GBA))
 Lyn is one of the few female Lords in the Fire Emblem series, as well as the 
 first Lord playable in North America, as Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken was the 
 first Fire Emblem game to be localized.  Also known as "Lyndis", Lyn is the 
 granddaughter of the Marquess of Caelin.  She uses a katana-style sword in 
 battle, specifically the "Mani Katti", and her attack in Brawl is reminiscent 
 of her attack in FE, where she moves so fast that she seems to vanish.

Jeff
Origin: 1994 -- Mother 2/EarthBound (SNES)
 Jeff Andonuts is the son of the brilliant inventor Dr. Andonuts.  A genius 
 on his own, Jeff makes up for being the only one on his team lacking psychic 
 abilities by employing his technological know-how to make gadgets for 
 combat.  In Brawl, he employs the Multi-Bottle Rocket, which was one of 
 the most damaging items in the game.

Gray Fox
Origin: Metal Gear Series (1987 -- Metal Gear (NES/MSX2))
 First appearing as a friend to Snake, then later an enemy, then later a 
 ghost from the past, Frank Jaeger has had a rough life.  He appears in this 
 game as he did in Metal Gear Solid (specifically Twin Snakes), as the 
 "cyborg ninja" with a high-frequency blade.

Shadow the Hedgehog
Origin: Sonic Series (2001 -- Sonic Adventure 2 (DC))
 Shadow is a bioengineered lifeform, created by Gerald Robotnik (relative of 
 Dr. Eggman) and an alien known as "Black Doom".  He looks much like Sonic, 
 but has a lot of differences, such as his predominantly black color and 
 spines.  In Brawl, he uses "Chaos Control", which he something he could use 
 in Sonic Adventure 2 to teleport.

Mr. Resetti
Origin: Animal Crossing Series (2002 -- Animal Crossing (GCN))
 Make sure you save after playing Animal Crossing, or else you'll find this 
 blowhard outside your house the next time you boot up.  He'll lecture you 
 about not saving and sometimes make you write apologies.  This nonstop 
 lecturing has been transferred to Smash, making him a relatively useless AT.

Devil
Origin: 1984 -- Devil World (NES) Japan Only
 This blue-skinned demon is the antagonist for the NES game Devil World.  
 In it, you play a little green lizard guy called Tamagon who explores a maze.  
 The eponymous Devil's job was to dance at the top of the screen, then point 
 in a certain direction, causing the screen to scroll and potentially crushing 
 you in the scrolling.  His role in this game is similar, scrolling the screen, 
 thereby reducing the field of play.  This game never made it to America, 
 mostly due to the religious imagery (crosses, bibles, and the Devil himself).

Excitebike
Origin: 1985 -- Excitebike (NES)
 This motocross-riding fellow is recreated from his original game in 2D pixel 
 form.  In his original game, he rode motocross courses with jumps, pitfalls, 
 and obstacles to win the race.

Little Mac
Origin: 1987 -- Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! (NES)
 Hailing from the Bronx in NYC, this 107 lb. kid is dwarfed by his rivals, 
 but he has the heart of a champion and the drive to defeat all his giant 
 opponents in Punch-Out.  Although there were two Punch-Out games before this 
 (in the arcade), this was the first game to give a name to your character.  
 In Brawl, he utilizes his trademark jabs and super uppercut.

Dr. Wright
Origin: 1991 -- SimCity (SNES)
 Based on SimCity creator Will Wright, this green-haired fellow acts as an 
 advisor in the Super Nintendo version of the long-running city-building 
 simulation series, developed by Maxis.  It was Dr. Wright's job to inform you 
 of your progress and any situations that were arising, such as public 
 disapproval, building issues, or a Bowser attack.

Saki Amamiya
Origin: 2000 -- Sin & Punishment: Successor to the Earth (N64) Japan Only
 This waif-like fellow is one of the main characters in a rail-shooter game 
 developed by Treasure, but published by Nintendo.  In this game, you control 
 your character as he moves to the left and right on the screen, but the game 
 carries you through the mission on its own, and you need to gun down enemies 
 as well as slash them with a laser sword.  This weapon has been recreated for 
 Brawl.  Although it says "Japan Only" up there, S&P is now available on the 
 Virtual Console.

Helirin
Origin: Kururin Series (2001 -- Kuru Kuru Kururin (GBA)) Japan/EU Only
 One of the few Nintendo series that has touched down on both Europe and 
 Japan, but not North America, the Kururin series has you controlling the 
 object known as the Helirin, which slowly spins, as you try to avoid crashing 
 into the walls of mazes.  In Brawl, the Helirin itself acts as the barrier, 
 slowly spinning, creating a platform and a wall alike.

Infantry and Tanks
Origin: Advance Wars Series (2001 -- Advance Wars (GBA))
 The Advance Wars series (which actually began as the Famicom Wars series) is 
 a turn-based strategy involving units of infantry, tanks, and other vehicles 
 of destruction.  These units are specifically culled from Advance Wars, the 
 first title to see release stateside in the series.

Isaac
Origin: Golden Sun Series (2001 -- Golden Sun (GBA))
 Isaac is a young man from the village of Vale.  Gifted with the ability 
 to control Psynergy, he sets out with a group of friends to save the world 
 from those who would steal the power of the lighthouses.  His attack is his 
 "Move" Psynergy, which he can use in the series to push objects around.

Stafy
Origin: Densetsu no Stafy Series (2002 -- Densetsu no Stafy (GBA)) Japan Only
 Stafy is a star who lives in the sky.  When he accidentally released the 
 demon, Ogura, from the Magic Jar that keeps him confined.  He then launched 
 on several quests to the ocean (where the denizens refer to him as a 
 starfish) in order to stop Ogura and recover the Magic Jar.  "Densetsu no 
 Stafy" roughly means "Legend of Stafy".

Barbara
Origin: 2004 -- Daigasso! Band Brothers (DS) Japan Only
 This young lady is the mascot of this Japan only music game.  The focus of 
 the game, like many music games, is to create the tune in proper time, and 
 it included many tunes from Japanese pop culture as well as Nintendo themes.

Nintendogs
Origin: 2005 -- Nintendogs Series (DS)
 This labrador retriever is one of the several cute and cuddly puppies that 
 one can pet, train, and love in the pet simulator series, Nintendogs.  The 
 screen-obscuring tactic it employs is based on the fact that sometimes your 
 Nintendog, when it's excited to see you, will put its paws up on the "lower 
 screen" of the DS.

Jill & Drill Dozer
Origin: 2006 -- Drill Dozer (GBA)
 This pink-haired schoolgirl rides the Drill Dozer, a machine with the most 
 prominent feature of a big drill on the front.  Drill Dozer is an action 
 puzzle game that puts Jill in several different areas, requiring her to use 
 her drill in various ways to progress.  In Brawl, she simply charges forward 
 on the Drill Dozer.

Ray MkIII
Origin: Custom Robo Series (2007 -- Custom Robo Arena (DS))
 Ray MkIII is one of the many customizable mini-robots one can control in 
 the Custom Robo series.  He uses a gun, like most Robos.

******************************************************************************
8. MUSIC ANALYSIS
******************************************************************************

My favorite part of these little guides is where I take a look at the 
wonderful musical pieces in the game.  I'm quite sure that I wasn't the 
only fan squealing like a girl as I saw the large list of musical contributors 
to this game, not just from Nintendo, but from all of the video game culture.  
Let's take a look at each track, and their significance.

All stage music falls into three different main types:

New: An original tune made for Brawl.
Remix: An arranged tune from another game (including former Smash Bros.)
Original: A tune from another game, implemented with no or very few changes.

=============================
8A. Super Smash Bros. Brawl =
=============================

Super Smash Bros. Brawl Main Theme - (New)
 Get used to this tune, because it's reprised endlessly throughout the game.  
 Composed by the legendary Nobuo Uematsu, famous for his Final Fantasy 
 soundtracks, the main theme itself is an orchestral and choral overture.  
 Focusing deeply on the Latin vocals, the main tune tells the story of the 
 fighters, heroes, and villains.

Menu 1 - (New)
 An allegro march version of the main theme, focusing on the driving 
 percussion and low brass.

Menu 2 - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 As in this game, this was a hidden menu theme in Melee.  It takes the main 
 Melee theme and turns it into a light, flowing, but still driving piece, 
 focused on high woodwind sounds and piano.  While it has changed a bit from 
 its inception in Melee, the change really is slight.

Battlefield - (New)
 This pounding rendition of the Brawl theme is a rather quick march focused on 
 strings and horns.

Battlefield Ver.2 - (New)
 Going in a different direction, this is a somewhat islandish, latin version 
 of the Brawl theme, focused on guitar.  Halfway through, it will change to 
 focus on electric guitar as opposed to acoustic.

Final Destination - (New)
 Like Final Destinations before it, this version is pounding, driving, and 
 features the main theme prominently.  Specifically, sound samples from the 
 choral lyrics (the male lyrics) are laid over the music to give the tune a 
 more epic feel.  The tune showcases many instruments, including a piano solo, 
 an electric guitar solo, and an orchestral bells section.

Online Practice Stage - (New)
 This is a very simple rendition of the Brawl theme with an acoustic guitar 
 playing the melody and rhythm, and some light percussion and accents to 
 support it.  The theme is also rather short, as they probably hoped you don't 
 spend a lot of time listening to it.

Results Display Screen - (New)
 This is a flowing piece with strings providing the moving rhythm.  Piano 
 provides a simple melody and the trumpet comes in every once in a while to 
 provide accent.

Tournament Registration Screen - (New)
 A light muzak style piece with passing resemblence to the Brawl theme.  Light 
 tones have the melody and low strings provide a rhythm with accents.

Tournament Grid - (New)
 Similar to the Tournament themes in Melee, this is a simple accented piece 
 with brass and percussion meant to imply forthcoming tension.

Tournament Match End - (New)
 An extension of the Reg. Screen, this has a little more background 
 percussion, guitar, and background music.

Classic: Results Screen - (New)
 A nice and staccato fanfare and string ensemble celebrating your short-lived 
 victory.

All-Star Rest Area - (New)
 The Brawl theme takes a relaxing tone here, sort of a light jazz.  High tones 
 and bells play the melody with strings backing them up.

Home-Run Contest - (Remix)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 This quick tune starts fast and speeds up towards the end.  It's a simple 
 brass feature providing a fanfare, which ends abruptly as time runs out for 
 your home-running.

Boss Battle - (Remix)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 This is a remix of the Melee main menu theme in the form of a fanfare march.  
 Strings provide the main melody, with trumpets and percussion providing 
 accent.

Trophy Gallery - (New)
 This light jazz piece takes the main Brawl theme and slows it right down, 
 almost to a cha-cha.  The piano and flute take turns playing the melody.

Sticker Album/Album/Chronicle - (New)
 This is an andante version of the Brawl theme that opens with strings and 
 goes into a simple piece with high tones and strings playing the melody.

Coin Launcher - (New)
 Here we have a techno-ish version of the Brawl theme, but still pretty quiet, 
 almost an ambient piece, only featuring light percussion, a flowing melody, 
 and a few soft accents.

Stage Builder - (New)
 This is a slow march with strings providing accents and the oboe and clarinet 
 providing melody.  It builds a bit near the end with strings, but just as 
 quickly drops back down.

Target Smash!! - (New)
 This reminds me of the circus, which is more or less what you're kind of 
 doing in Target Smash.  This remix of the Brawl theme focuses on tonal 
 percussion to provide the melody while strings and low brass form the driving 
 rhythm.

Adventure Map - (New)
 This slightly fast march (they do a lot or marches, don't they) has low 
 strings and percussion for the driving rhythm and low tones for the melody.

Step: The Plain - (New)
 This is yet another march based on the Brawl theme, but focuses more on 
 panflute for a melody and guitar for rhythm, giving the tune a bit of a 
 rustic feel as one marches across grassy plains.  There's also a little bit 
 of organ providing rhythm.

Step: The Cave - (New)
 Opening with strings, this is an odd little melody that mostly focuses 
 around darkness and quiet.  There's a bit of percussion rhythm, some harp 
 rhythm, and the Brawl melody cuts with flute in a minor key.

Step: Subspace - (New)
 All Subspace tunes start with a cymbal roll.  This is a soft rock beat 
 with not much more than percussion and accent by various instruments.  A 
 little ways in, a distorted string sound plays the Brawl theme.  After the 
 theme, some vibrating strings accent the dire nature of the tune.

Step: Subspace Ver. 2 - (New)
 Cymbal roll, then echoing accents.  Bass guitar begins, then the distorted 
 strings return with the Brawl theme in a minor key.  Running string accents 
 then begin, followed by a cascading tonal melody.  Then the percussion stops 
 for a light melody of strings.

Step: Subspace Ver. 3 - (New)
 Cymbal roll, then immediately into the distorted strings playing the Brawl 
 theme.  This then breaks into a simple rock theme with accents.

Boss Battle Song 1 - (New)
 This harsh industrial piece focuses on rhythm guitar, low brass, and fast-
 moving percussion, with the Brawl theme over it all in flowing tones.

Boss Battle Song 2 - (New)
 This is Tabuu's theme.  It opens with rhythm guitar providing a riff, which 
 remains the focal point for the tune.  A light Brawl theme plays behind it.  
 Then the tune speeds up with a techno melody playing over the rhythm guitar, 
 going high and low very quickly.  A pipe organ then joins in to overlay the 
 rhythm guitar to slow it back down to the beginning.

Save Point - (New)
 This a very breathy tune mostly with windy sound samples.  The Brawl theme 
 is in this tune, but it's barely audible as it floats on the wind.

Credits - (New)
 This credits tune incorporates the best of all themes of the Smash Bros. 
 series.  It opens with a fanfare, then quickly goes into the N64 Smash Bros. 
 credits theme in brass and guitar.  After about twenty seconds of that, it 
 will switch to the Melee menu in the same instruments.  Suddenly it breaks 
 off for a piano solo of the slow section of the main Melee theme.  Then, it 
 will return slowly with flute playing the bridge of the Brawl theme.  Strings 
 will join it, then build to a slow crescendo and ending percussive theme.

=======================
8B. Super Smash Bros. =
=======================

Menu (Super Smash Bros. Melee) - (Remix)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 This is the Melee menu theme, with trumpet and strings focusing on the 
 melody and low strings driving the march tempo.

Credits (Super Smash Bros.) - (Remix)
Origin: 1999 -- Super Smash Bros. (N64)
 This is a quick rock version of the Smash Bros. credit sequences with staccato 
 tones providing the rhythm for a high tonal melody.  The fanfare section 
 becomes incorporated into the rhythm itself, as opposed to switching gears.

Opening (Super Smash Bros. Melee) - (Remix)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 As it says, this is the main Melee theme.  It opens on its fanfare, then 
 drops down with a vocal chorus.  Brass focuses on the main melody with strings 
 providing a staccato march tempo.  The whole tune speeds through the Melee 
 theme at a higher tempo than the original.

Princess Peach's Castle (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)
 This techno-ish tune opens with the "Underworld" theme beginning, then hops 
 straight into the "Overworld" Mario theme, being played on steel drum and
 percussion.  After the first verse, the tune returns to "Underworld" for a 
 brief interlude, then switches back to the trumpets for the second verse of
 "Overworld".

Rainbow Cruise (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)
        1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)
 The first half of this tune is taken from Super Mario 64, specifically the 
 "Rainbow Ride" area, complete with synthesized strings and banjo.  Halfway 
 through, it switches gears to the waltz-like "underwater" theme from the 
 original Super Mario Bros.

Kong Jungle (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1999 -- Donkey Kong 64 (N64)
 The infamous DK Rap is taken from the game Donkey Kong 64.  The lyrics are 
 almost exactly the same ("hell" was changed to "heck" in the last verse).  
 The voices change with the verses in SSBM, to match the style of music or 
 the character they describe.

Jungle Japes (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
 This is a swing/jazz version of the first level of Donkey Kong Country.  
 The main melody is played on brass and saxophone and percussion persists 
 throughout.

Temple (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1988 -- Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES)
 This tune is the main temple theme of Zelda II, played in all the temples 
 that Link explores.  Strings are the main focused instrument here.

Brinstar (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1986 -- Metroid (NES)
 This is a teched-up version of the original Metroid's theme for the area of 
 Brinstar.  After that, as a transition, the tune becomes the "beginning 
 the mission" theme that appears when one starts a game, then settles on the 
 Metroid title screen theme, which consists of alien-like sounds and tones.

Brinstar Depths (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1986 -- Metroid (NES)
 The lower area of Brinstar (where you face Kraid) had this separate theme, 
 which is reproduced in tinny percussion and high tones.  Near the end, the 
 theme that plays is what's heard in areas one can find items, before 
 switching back to the Depths melody.

Yoshi's Island (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1991 -- Super Mario World (SNES)
 This is the "obstacle course" theme from Super Mario World, played in 
 stages that are generally considered to be more difficult as far as their 
 jumping puzzles are concerned.  The original melody was played on synthesized 
 piano, but this version is on a banjo.

Fountain of Dreams (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES)
 Here's something vastly different.  The tune itself originates from Kirby 
 Super Star, specifically the Gourmet Race, where it was picked up for 
 mini-games in Kirby 64.  What makes this orchestrated tune different is that 
 the song was originally light and bouncy, but was made into an overture 
 style piece featuring the full range of the SSBM orchestra, featuring 
 mainly woodwinds, but also very professionally incorporating the brass, 
 percussion and strings.  One of my favorites.  Apparently, this is very 
 similar to the piece called "Gourmet Race" performed in an Orchestrated 
 Game Music Concert.

Green Greens (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1992 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB)
 This is the melody of the very first area of Kirby's Dream Land, only done 
 more slowly, and with a melody that's almost all brass with strings to back 
 them up.

Corneria (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1994 -- Star Fox (SNES)
 The opener of this music is the theme that plays on the planet Venom in the 
 original Star Fox.  It then switches to the main Star Fox theme before 
 ending on the Space Armada level theme.  This is all done orchestral and 
 very driving.

Venom (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)
 This is an orchestral remake of the Super Smash Bros. Sector Z theme, 
 specifically.  It's based off Star Fox 64, and the fanfare-like tune that 
 plays when you enter a new area.  The style is actually very similar to its 
 counterpart in SSB.

Pokémon Stadium (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB)
 This is the main Pokémon theme that plays on the title screen of the original 
 games, only jazzed up with a full orchestra, which mimicks roughly how it 
 sounds on the anime, only with extra flourish, including choral sounds near 
 the end.

Poké Floats (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB)
 This is an amalgamation of two battle tunes.  The first is the trainer 
 battling theme from Red/Blue, and the second is the gym leader battling 
 theme from Red/Blue.  Both are focused around quick brass and percussion, 
 with tones playing the melody.

Mute City (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1990 -- F-Zero (SNES)
 More similar to the N64 version than any other, this is the music that 
 plays on the Mute City track, played in the hard rock format, with full 
 guitar support.

Big Blue (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1990 -- F-Zero (SNES)
 Big Blue is a recurring track in the F-Zero series.  This is the theme 
 that plays when racing on it, focused on synthesized tones and electric 
 guitar.

Mother (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1989 -- Mother (Famicom) Japan Only
 The main part of this tune is called "Being Friends", which plays as the 
 overworld theme in the original Mother after you gain the companionship of 
 Lloyd.  Once that breaks down, it becomes "Maria's Song", which is an eight 
 part melody that is a critical plot device of the game.  To transition back 
 to the beginning, the tune switches to a short rising set of tones that 
 signify a monster attack.

Icicle Mountain (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1984 -- Ice Climber (Arcade)
 This is a jazz version of the two elements of the Ice Climber music that 
 exists.  The first part is the title screen/bonus stage tune, played in 
 synthesized winds and jazz organ.  The latter part is the main gameplay 
 theme, played as a softer jazz on piano with jingle bells in the background.

Flat Zone (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 This is a techno tune created for the Game & Watch stage in Melee.  It 
 doesn't originate anywhere, but several samples of Game & Watch sounds are 
 thrown in to simulate the retro feel.

Super Mario Bros. 3 (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1990 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)
 Opening on electric guitar, this tune quickly settles into gameplay music 
 for Super Mario Bros. 3 (heard in World 1-1, and several others), heard in 
 brass.  In the latter part, the tune becomes light piano, focusing on the 
 "Grass Land" map screen theme.

Battle Theme (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 2000 -- Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal (GB)
 This tune begins with the main battle theme from Gold and Silver, as well as 
 a few pieces of the Gym Leader theme from the same games.  Lastly, there is a 
 little bit of the main Red/Blue theme in the mix.

Fire Emblem (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1990 -- Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi (Famicom) Japan
 The Melee theme of the Fire Emblem characters begins with the tune 
 "Together, We Ride!", which plays in several games in the series when the 
 party acquires a new character.  After that, the tune calms down, and settles 
 on the main Fire Emblem Theme.

Mach Rider (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1985 -- Mach Rider (NES)
 Taken from the old NES game of the same name.  This synthesized organ and 
 guitar track starts with the game's title screen theme, then quickly jumps 
 into the battle mode theme.  Soon afterwards, it switches to the stage 
 select, and stage intro music, and ends with the game over theme.

Mother 2 (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1989 -- Mother (Famicom) Japan Only
 While the tune of this track has an arrangement in Earthbound, the tune as 
 its heard is actually from the original Mother; a tune called Polyanna's 
 Theme.  The main theme is bounced around from synthesized guitar, to horn, 
 keyboard in this adaptation.

Dr. Mario (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 1990 -- Dr. Mario (NES)
 This is the classic "Fever" tune from Dr. Mario, including some of the classic 
 NES bleeps and bloops that made the original so catchy.

Battlefield (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 This is a fast-moving rendition of the Melee menu theme, performed with 
 synthesized sounds.

Menu (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 The secondary Melee theme is a driving march much like the Brawl theme, 
 focused on dueling strings and brass.

Multi-Man Melee 1 (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 Opening with organ, then switching quickly to a hard rock beat with guitars 
 and percussion, this is the main Melee theme.

Final Destination (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 Another remix of the Melee menu theme, only sort of a reimagining of the 
 melody.  Near the end is also the fanfare section of the N64 Smash Bros. 
 theme.

Giga Bowser (Melee) - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Super Smash Bros. Melee (GCN)
 This is the Final Destination Melee tune, only faster, in a different key, 
 and with more driving percussion.  It was played when you face off against 
 either Crazy Hand in Classic Mode or Giga Bowser in Adventure Mode.

=======================
8C. Super Mario Bros. =
=======================

Deflino Plaza - (Original)
Origin: 2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
 This is the islandish theme that plays in Delfino Plaza as Mario explores it, 
 a peppy tune featuring accordion, guitar and winds.  Halfway through, the 
 tune will repeat, only this time with bongo percussion supporting it, which 
 happens when Mario rides Yoshi while exploring the plaza.

Title/Ending (Super Mario World) - (Remix)
Origin: 1991 -- Super Mario World (SNES)
 As the slash implies, this is a mixing of two tunes from Super Mario World.  
 The first is the title theme done in much the same style as the original, 
 peppy and driving.  After that, it settles into the swing-style ending theme, 
 which alternates between the calmer "credits" style, and the more fast-paced 
 "cast list" style.

Main Theme (New Super Mario Bros.) - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- New Super Mario Bros. (DS)
 Different, yet feeling very familiar, this is the new theme for New Super 
 Mario Bros.  Island-style and light-hearted, much like the original theme, 
 focusing on guitars and island percussion.

Ricco Harbor - (Original)
Origin: 2002 -- Super Mario Sunshine (GCN)
 This slightly more driving version of the Delfino Plaza theme uses saxophone 
 sounds for the main melody, implying a more business oriented side of Isle 
 Delfino that Ricco Harbor illustrates.

Main Theme (Super Mario 64) - (Original)
Origin: 1996 -- Super Mario 64 (N64)
 The main theme of Mario 64 gets away from the islandy style that Kondo was 
 fond of in the older games, and instead is more of a peppy pop.  This is the 
 tune that accompanies Mario as he explores Bob-Omb Battlefield, Whomp's 
 Fortress, and a few other worlds in Mario 64.

Ground Theme (Super Mario Bros.) - (Remix)
Origin: 1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)
 This is a subdued jazz piano arrangement of the very famous theme from World 
 1-1 of Super Mario Bros., performed by Koji Kondo himself, the original 
 composer.

Ground Theme 2 (Super Mario Bros.) - (Remix)
Origin: 1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)
 More of a traditional rendering of the main theme than the first one, this 
 uses tones that are more obviously electronic and less like real instruments.

Gritzy Desert - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time (DS)
 This is a more modern Arabian mix of the Gritzy Desert theme of Partners in 
 Time.  This type of area is a rather traditional archetype of Mario games, so 
 an appropriate tune is fitting.

Underground Theme (Super Mario Bros.) - (Remix)
Origin: 1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)
 The classic underground theme of Super Mario Bros. is reimagined as a quiet 
 percussive tune.  I find it reminiscent of a dank and drippy cavern.

Underwater Theme (Super Mario Bros.) - (Remix)
Origin: 1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)
 Opening on classic chip sounds, this is the famous Super Mario Bros. 
 underwater waltz.  After one verse, the chip sounds change to a standard 
 orchestra, then, for a little variety, the tune speeds up to a banjo-driven 
 hoe-down with the same melody.

Underground Theme (Super Mario Land) - (Remix)
Origin: 1989 -- Super Mario Land (GB)
 The underground areas of Sarasa Land were Egyptian in style, so this Middle 
 Eastern tune was an obvious choice for background.  This remix of the tune 
 runs with that theme further, using proper Middle Eastern instruments, 
 accented by vocals.

Luigi's Mansion Theme - (Remix)
Origin: 2001 -- Luigi's Mansion (GCN)
 This ultra-spooky tune is the main theme as you explore Luigi's haunted 
 mansion.  Focused around music box sounds and later pipe organs (the two 
 spookiest instruments in the music kingdom, of course), the music evokes 
 Luigi's fears cowardly nature.

Castle/Boss Fortress (Super Mario World/SMB 3)
Origin: 1991 -- Super Mario World (SNES)
        1990 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)
 The castle theme of Super Mario World is a spooky affair based off the 
 game's main theme.  This remix is a slightly faster version of the original.  
 The remix also leads into the theme of "Boom Boom" from Super Mario Bros. 3.

Airship Theme (Super Mario Bros. 3) - (Remix)
Origin: 1990 -- Super Mario Bros. 3
 The end of every "world" in Super Mario Bros. 3 involved assaulting a 
 flying ship commanded by one of Bowser's Koopalings.  This pounding low 
 brass march signifies its dark and diabolical nature.

================
8D. Mario Kart =
================

Mario Circuit - (Remix)
Origin: 1992 -- Super Mario Kart (SNES)
 The very first track on the very first Mario Kart was Mario Circuit, a simple 
 course with only one bend.  The tune to accompany it (and the other Mario 
 Circuits to follow) was this peppy and driving tune.

Luigi Circuit - (Remix)
Origin: 1997 -- Mario Kart 64 (N64)
 The Luigi Raceway is the first track of the second Mario Kart game, similar 
 in style to Mario Circuit, both in track style and music.

Waluigi Pinball - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- Mario Kart DS (DS)
 One of the more odd tracks in the Mario Kart series, this puts you through 
 a series of pinball-related obstacles.  Its theme is wacky yet somewhat 
 sinister, in keeping with Waluigi's character (or what little has been 
 established).

Rainbow Road - (Original)
Origin: 2004 -- Mario Kart: Double Dash!! (GCN)
 Rainbow Road is the "final" track in ever single Mario Kart game.  Every 
 time Rainbow Road appears, a new tune is attached to it, but the tunes all 
 have a main theme in common: that of being "galactic" and "far-reaching".  
 This is the tune that plays on Rainbow Raod in Double Dash.

=================
8E. Donkey Kong =
=================

Jungle Level Ver.2 - (Remix)
Origin: 1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
 This version of the DKC Jungle theme is a bit modified from the original.  
 First, there are vocal sounds accompanying the opening.  Once the melody 
 kicks in, the jazz style is exchanged for a more straight rock style. 

Jungle Level - (Remix)
Origin: 1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
 Unlike the Ver.2 above, this is a more "classic" version of the Jungle 
 theme.  Soft and distant percussion to begin with, followed by the jazzy 
 melody.

King K.Rool/Ship Deck 2 - (Remix)
Origin: 1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
 It's an odd situation.  You've completed the entire game of Donkey Kong 
 Country to face the last boss, the villainous King K. Rool, yet you fight 
 him on his Gangplank Galleon.  He's not specifically a pirate, yet it's a 
 pirate ship, so you have to open with the pirate shanty.  As the tune goes 
 on, it shifts to a proper "final boss" theme that fits with the game's 
 jungle style.  It's a low and driving tune with heavy percussion and a wind 
 melody.

Bramble Blast - (Remix)
Origin: 1995 -- Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (SNES)
 This seems to be a favorite and long-time desire of a lot of DKC fans.  This 
 soft, yet driving tune, focused around a guitar and violin melody 
 accompanies the level in DKC2 of the same name.  It's known in the soundtrack 
 as "Stickerbrush Symphony".

Battle for Storm Hill - (Original)
Origin: 2005 -- Donkey Kong Jungle Beat (GCN)
 This is the background music for the stage of the same name.  A driving and 
 dire tune that accompanied Donkey Kong as he scaled Storm Hill, dogged by 
 cannonballs all the way.

DK Jungle 1 Theme (Barrel Blast) - (Original)
Origin: 2007 -- Donkey Kong: Barrel Blast (Wii)
 Barrel Blast is a recent racing game starring DK and his crew, and this 
 fast-paced, yet still islandy tune, accompanies racers in the Jungle 1 
 Track.

The Map Page/Bonus Level - (Original)
Origin: 1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
 The first part of this is a nice low key tune combining synthesized 
 percussion and piano to make a simplistic map exploring screen.  The latter 
 part is played on the bonus levels in DKC.  It's lighter and bouncier, but 
 still focuses on the same kind of island theme.  It's been used in other 
 Donkey Kong games as a theme for the DKC series.

Donkey Kong - (Remix)
Origin: 1981 -- Donkey Kong (Arcade)
 This is a reimagining of the original theme for Donkey Kong.  It begins on 
 the "level begin" jingle, then moves into the main theme for gameplay, which 
 is a simple repetitive series of notes.  This remix expands on that theme 
 with new accents and undertone.

Opening (Donkey Kong) - (Remix)
Origin: 1981 -- Donkey Kong (Arcade)
        1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
 This is an amalgamation of new and old, and actually reminds me of 
 "Moustache, Barrel, and Gorilla" from DDR Mario Mix.  It begins with the 
 "bonus level" theme of DKC, then slides into the "Donkey Kong is a bad guy" 
 theme of DK, followed by the 25m BGM, then the hammer theme, then back to 
 the DKC bonus theme.

25m BGM - (Original)
Origin: 1981 -- Donkey Kong (Arcade)
 There's not much to say, except that this is straight up the theme that 
 played in the first level of Donkey Kong.  Amazing how music has changed, 
 hmm?

=========================
8F. The Legend of Zelda =
=========================

Main Theme (The Legend of Zelda) - (Remix)
Origin: 1987 -- The Legend of Zelda (NES)
 One of the most timeless themes in all of gaming, this march is derived from 
 the original Legend of Zelda, specifically the main overworld.  It has been 
 rewritten and reimagined many times throughout the series.

Ocarina of Time Medley - (Remix)
Origin: 1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (N64)
 This is a medley of several tunes from Ocarina of Time, specifically those 
 that can be played on the game's eponymous ocarina.  The tune begins with 
 "Zelda's Lullaby" then overlays the "day beginning theme" in Hyrule Field, 
 then crescendoes into the "Song of Storms", before sliding into "Epona's 
 Song" (including elements of the Lon Lon Ranch theme).  A brief stop leads 
 into the deep "Song of Time", before the finale with "Saria's Song".  The 
 whole medley has a background of acoustic guitar, with some fanfare.

Title (The Legend of Zelda) - (Remix)
Origin: 1987 -- The Legend of Zelda (NES)
 This version of the Zelda main theme specifically ties to the title screen 
 of the original Legend of Zelda.  A chorus vocalizes the theme for this, 
 and strings and brass accompany.  After that, the tune switches to the 
 "dungeon" theme for the original Legend of Zelda, featuring organs playing 
 the melody.

The Dark World - (Remix)
Origin: 1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES)
 This tune is first heard as Link steps into the mirrored dark world of 
 Hyrule, and plays as he explores its ruin.  This version, in my mind, doesn't 
 sound as "villainous", but it does sound dark.  Accordion and low strings 
 give this tune a nice rustic feel.

Hidden Mountain & Forest - (Remix)
Origin: 1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (SNES)
 In the Dark World of Link to the Past, this grim tune would play in the 
 forest and the mountain area.  This version retains much of the same feel 
 of the original, with some added high wind instruments for effect.

Hyrule Field Theme - (Remix)
Origin: 1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (N64)
 Not counting Zelda II, this is probably one of the more major departures of 
 the "overworld" tune from the main Zelda theme.  While roaming the expansive 
 Hyrule Field, this travelling march plays.  While this version is set in its 
 rotation of themes, certain phrases of the tune may play in different order 
 in the original game.

Main Theme (Twilight Princess) - (Original)
Origin: 2006 -- The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (GCN/Wii)
 Like Ocarina of Time before it, this is a further reimagining of a departure 
 from the main Zelda theme, but with its own proper melody.  Also, like 
 Hyrule Field, this tune will change depending on where you are, if you're 
 riding a horse, and what time of day it is.

The Hidden Village - (Original)
Origin: 2006 -- The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (GCN/Wii)
 Calling to mind the fresh sound of Gerudo Valley (more on that in its 
 section), this guitar tune based on the TP theme will play in the Hidden 
 Village area as you try to liberate it from Bullblins.

Midna's Lament - (Original)
Origin: 2006 -- The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (GCN/Wii)
 This somber piano tune (again based on the TP theme) plays during a point in 
 the game where Midna is in dire straits and you need to get her help.  It's 
 significant in the sense that it replaces tunes you would normally hear as 
 you run across Hyrule Field.

Great Temple/Temple - (Remix)
Origin: 1988 -- Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES)
 This remix of the Temple theme from Melee includes the "Great Temple" theme, 
 which plays in the last temple of the game, before switching over to the 
 latter portion of the main Temple theme.

Dragon Roost Island - (Original)
Origin: 2003 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GCN)
 This island is home to the Rito tribe, an anthropomorphic birdlike race.  
 They live rather simply, despite having a rather thorough postal system.  
 Their theme, and island's theme, is and upbeat tune based around light guitars 
 and flute-like winds.

The Great Sea - (Original)
Origin: 2003 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GCN)
 Based loosely on the main Legend of Zelda theme, this music accompanies Link 
 as he sails across the Great Sea.  It's very much a "travelling" piece of 
 music, yet more grandiose.  Low strings and brass dominate, but aren't 
 overpowering, allowing the music to flow better.

Tal Tal Heights - (Remix)
Origin: 1992 -- The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (GB)
 The main Legend of Zelda theme has gone through much remixing and reiterating 
 over the years, and this particular remix showcases one of the earlier 
 works on that theme.  Despite being described as Tal Tal Heights, a location 
 in Link's Awakening, this tune actually plays throughout most of the 
 overworld areas.  It starts very clearly as the main Zelda theme, but then 
 switches to a different style late in the verse, applying higher notes and 
 more crescendo to the end.

Song of Storms - (Remix)
Origin: 1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (N64)
 An old favorite from Ocarina of Time, this was first heard in the windmill 
 in Kakariko Village.  The proprietor plays the tune on his organ grinder.  
 This variation expands on that idea with a multi-instrument piece.  Near the 
 end the piece will change into the theme of Ganon (first heard in Link to the 
 Past), and then the Serenade of Water, one of the Ocarina pieces used in 
 Ocarina of Time to warp.

Gerudo Valley - (Original)
Origin: 1998 -- The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (N64)
 One of the more well-received new pieces from Ocarina of Time, this tune 
 departs from the traditional grand marches and light melodies to switch over 
 to a rhythmic piece very heavy on classical guitar, sounding rather Spanish 
 in its delivery.  This tune plays in the eponymous Gerudo Valley, home of 
 the desert thieves.

Molgera Battle - (Original)
Origin: 2003 -- The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GCN)
 This quiet and percussion heavy tune plays during the battle against the boss 
 of the Wind Temple, Molgera, in Wind Waker.  There's not much else to say 
 about it, besides the fact that, like Gerudo Valley, it's a departure from 
 the marches and light melodies.

Village of the Blue Maiden - (Original)
Origin: 2004 -- The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GCN)
 Most people would quickly recognize this as the them for Kakariko Village, 
 which, in most Zelda games, is generally one of the few villages left 
 untouched by evil.  This peppy woodwind based version of the tune is 
 actually played in the village that bears this tune's name in FSA, which is 
 one of Link's stops on his way to fight the bad guys.

Termina Field - (Original)
Origin: 2000 -- The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64)
 There was a bit of an outcry after Ocarina of Time that the much beloved 
 Zelda main theme was being retired.  Quick to placate the masses, Majora's 
 Mask returned the theme to form, this time basing it around the mildly 
 creepy setting of Termina.

=============
8G. Metroid =
=============

Main Theme (Metroid) - (Remix)
Origin: 1986 -- Metroid (NES)
 While the origin for this tune is the Brinstar theme of the first Metroid, 
 Kenji Yamamoto's rock guitar version actually appears in Metroid Prime: 
 Pinball.

Ending (Metroid) - (Remix)
Origin: 1986 -- Metroid (NES)
 A more modern imagining of the ending theme of the original Metroid, which 
 is also heard in Metroid: Zero Mission, in a more updated fashion than the 
 original NES chipset sounds.

Norfair - (Remix)
Origin: 1986 -- Metroid (NES)
 This ambient tune is a representation of the "music" that plays when you 
 first enter Norfair in the original Metroid.  Awesome composer Yuzo Koshiro 
 has taken this theme and expanded it into a cool drum'n'bass track.

Theme of Samus Aran, Space Warrior - (Remix)
Origin: 1994 -- Super Metroid (SNES)
 With the advent of Super Metroid, arguably one of the finest pieces of 
 gaming ever committed to history, came Samus' own musical theme.  This 
 fanfare piece is meant to represent her eternal struggle.  In certain Prime 
 games, this theme also represents the Galactic Federation.

Vs. Ridley - (Remix)
Origin: 1994 -- Super Metroid (SNES)
 Ridley's theme actually originated as a more generic boss theme in Super 
 Metroid, being the theme for fighting both Ridley and Draygon.  In games 
 following, Ridley's theme was specifically tailored for him.  This electronic 
 rock mix maintains the dire nature of the Space Pirate villain.

Vs. Parasite Queen - (Original)
Origin: 2002 -- Metroid Prime (GCN)
 The first major enemy Samus faces in the first of her fully 3D outings is 
 the Parasite Queen.  The theme surrounding this loathsome monster is a 
 taste of the highly electronic sounds of the Prime trilogy, featuring harsh 
 accents and dire synthesized strings.

Opening/Menu (Metroid Prime) - (Remix)
Origin: 2002 -- Metroid Prime (GCN)
 Building the minimal nature of the original Metroid, Metroid Prime's opening 
 theme is a spooky affair that seems based in old Martian movies, complete 
 with alien-sounding static.  The menu music is more melodic and driving, but 
 still focuses on the spooky alien style.

Sector 1 - (Remix)
Origin: 2002 -- Metroid Fusion (GBA)
 Sector 1 is one of the initial areas of Metroid Fusion, a part of the 
 space station designed to look like the planet SR388.  This is the tune that 
 plays in the background while exploring it.

Vs. Meta Ridley - (Original)
Origin: 2002 -- Metroid Prime (GCN)
 Ridley's theme was retooled for the Prime series.  With the new trilogy's 
 attempt to hold to the atmospheric approach, they pulled back on the main 
 melody to the theme in order to bring out the percussion and background 
 accents more, using the same electronic style of sounds they used throughout 
 Metroid Prime.

Multiplayer (Metroid Prime 2) - (Original)
Origin: 2004 -- Metroid Prime 2: Echoes (GCN)
 Only two Metroid games actually have multiplayer, and most of the existing 
 Metroid music is quiet and ambient, which just doesn't work for the frantic 
 firefights of multiplayer, so this reiteration of the Prime theme was 
 produced, focusing more on the driving rhythms than melodies.

====================
8H. Yoshi's Island =
====================

Obstacle Course - (Remix)
Origin: 1995 -- Yoshi's Island (Super Mario World 2) (SNES)
 Actually similar in style to the Obstacle Course theme of the original 
 Super Mario World, this is a faster, yet still light tune, meant to focus 
 around the more tense nature of constantly shifting platforms that accompany 
 a Mario-themed obstacle course.

Ending (Yoshi's Story) - (Remix)
Origin: 1998 -- Yoshi's Story (N64)
 This is a jazzy version of the ending of Yoshi's Story, focusing more on an 
 island nature with percussion and island-themed strings.  The voices used 
 are supposed to be infant Yoshis singing along.

Yoshi's Island - (Remix)
Origin: 1995 -- Yoshi's Island (Super Mario World 2) (SNES)
 This the main theme for the "grassy" levels in Yoshi's Island.  A light and 
 bouncy tune accompanies Yoshi and Baby Mario as they explore the early stages.

Flower Field - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- Yoshi Touch & Go (DS)
 This light-hearted piece plays in several stages in Touch & Go.  This remix 
 focuses on high winds and silly sound effects to accent the goofy nature of 
 the game.

Wildlands - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Yoshi's Island DS (DS)
 A more upbeat (and banjo-laden) version of the original theme, which plays 
 on certain stages in Yoshi's Island DS.

===========
8I. Kirby =
===========

Meta Knight's Revenge - (Remix)
Origin: 1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES)
 This is a somewhat jazzy version of the main tune that plays in "Meta 
 Knight's Revenge", which one of the several "games" in Kirby Super Star.  
 This fast-moving, but still pounding tune, plays as Kirby assaults the 
 Halberd, with time ticking away.

The Legendary Air Ride Machine - (Remix)
Origin: 2003 -- Kirby Air Ride (GCN)
 This isn't actually much of a remix, and is quite like the original version 
 of the tune, which plays when Kirby assembles all the pieces of the Dragoon 
 air machine.

Gourmet Race - (Remix)
Origin: 1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES)
 Also known for being Kirby's theme in both of the previous Smash Bros. games, 
 this tune was first introduced in the Gourmet Race mode in Kirby Super Star.  
 This particular mix of the tune is more electronic and rock than other 
 versions.

Butter Building - (Remix)
Origin: 1993 -- Kirby's Adventure (NES)
 This medley opens with a remix of the first Butter Building theme, but also 
 branches out into other tunes, such as the "star jingle", the main theme from 
 Kirby's Dream Land, and the Green Greens theme.

King Dedede's Theme - (Remix)
Origin: 1991 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB)
 The theme of the penguin king is a tough-sounding piece, going well with 
 Dedede's wrestling motif that he employs when you fight him.

Squeak Squad Theme - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Kirby: Squeak Squad (DS)
 When the Squeak Squad gets on your tail, you know you'll hear this theme.  
 The intensity in this theme is further accented by the discordant intro.

Vs. Marx - (Remix)
Origin: 1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES)
 The final boss of Kirby Super Star is this demonic fellow who conspired to 
 control Popstar.  Seemingly jester-like in appearance, he faces Kirby at 
 the end of "Milky Way Wishes".  His theme evokes the mystery of space plus 
 his mildly comical appearance as a jester, focusing around strings in 
 minor tones.

0˛ Battle - (Remix)
Origin: 2000 -- Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards (N64)
 0˛ was the final boss of the Kirby 64, an amalgamation of Dark Matter.  You 
 face him upon finding all the crystal shards.  Being the final battle, even 
 happy-go-lucky Kirby finds it in him for a hard rock theme.

Boss Theme Medley - (Remix)
Origin: 1993 -- Kirby's Adventure (NES)
        1993 -- Kirby's Dream Land 2 (GB)
        1996 -- Kirby Super Star (SNES)
        2000 -- Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards (N64)
        2006 -- Kirby: Squeak Squad (DS)
 This is a collection of boss themes from the Kirby series.  The first is the 
 boss theme from Kirby's Adventure, then the boss theme from Dream Land 2, then 
 the boss theme from Kirby Super Star.  Next comes the mini-boss theme from 
 Kirby 64, then the miniboss theme from Kirby's Adventure and Kirby Super Star.
 Lastly is the boss theme (when not facing a Squeak) from Squeak Squad.

Checker Knights - (Original)
Origin: 2003 -- Kirby Air Ride (GCN)
 This is the background music when playing in the Checker Knight Course in 
 Air Ride.

Forest/Nature Area - (Original)
Origin: 2004 -- Kirby & The Amazing Mirror (GBA)
 A simple and bouncy tune that is Kirby through and through, this accompanies 
 Kirby as he explores the world of Kirby&TAM.

Frozen Hillside - (Original)
Origin: 2003 -- Kirby Air Ride (GCN)
 This is the background music when playing in the Frozen Hillside Course in 
 Air Ride.

==============
8J. Star Fox =
==============

Space Armada - (Remix)
Origin: 1993 -- Star Fox (SNES)
 This is an updated interpretation of the "Space Armada" level from the 
 original Star Fox.  In this level, Fox and company flew through a fleet 
 of ships, sometimes flying into them in order to destroy their cores from 
 the inside.  

Corneria - (Remix)
Origin: 1993 -- Star Fox (SNES)
 The first stage of the original Star Fox game featured this light rock 
 techno theme, faithfully recreated with more modern sound capabilities.

Main Theme (Star Fox) - (Remix)
Origin: 1993 -- Star Fox (SNES)
 A bit of a chestnut, since it's only been heard in the original Star Fox 
 game and the Smash Bros. series.  This is the original fanfare theme to 
 accompany Star Fox on their adventures, in incidents like the map screen 
 and mission results screen.  This version is obviously updated to modern 
 instruments, but maintains its grandiose nature.

Main Theme (Star Fox 64) - (Remix)
Origin: 1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)
 This is a speedy and jazzy remake of the now-classic current Star Fox 
 theme.  Instead of being a usual fanfare march, this version employs 
 more electronic sounds and a rather increased tempo.

Area 6 - (Remix)
Origin: 1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)
 The penultimate area in Star Fox 64 (if you fulfilled certain conditions), 
 was this section of space where Fox and his team could punch through the 
 defenses of Venom to reach the planet.  The fast-paced and busy march 
 emphasized the tense and hectic nature of the battle, which can be one of the 
 highest scoring areas in the game (my personal best is 462).

Area 6 Ver. 2 - (Remix)
Origin: 1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)
 This is a more subdued and techno take of the Area 6 theme, but maintains 
 the melody.

Star Wolf - (Remix)
Origin: 1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)
 This is the theme of Star Fox's rival team, Star Wolf.  The theme has been 
 reproduced in several Star Fox games, and this remix resembles the original 
 from Star Fox 64 the closest.  It takes the form of a march, with some 
 latin undertones.

Star Wolf (Star Fox: Assault) - (Original)
Origin: 2005 -- Star Fox: Assault (GCN)
 The reimagining of the Star Wolf theme for Star Fox: Assault strips the 
 driving force of the tune and instead focuses more on the main melody, 
 increasing the latin feel with the melody being on trumpet.  It plays, 
 naturally, whenever Star Wolf is present to fight in Assault.

Space Battleground - (Original)
Origin: 2005 -- Star Fox: Assault (GCN)
 This is the theme that plays over the first mission: Fortuna.  In this 
 mission, Cornerian forces have engaged the forces of Andross' nephew, Andrew 
 Oikonny, and Star Fox is deployed to break through the lines and strike 
 at the villain.  Given that, this tune is an orchestral march.

Break Through the Ice - (Original)
Origin: 2005 -- Star Fox: Assault (GCN)
 This somewhat tense-sounding tune is heard on the planet Fichina.  It's a 
 remix of Star Fox 64's tune on the same planet (a planet which was 
 mislabelled Fortuna in the English translation).

=============
8K. Pokémon =
=============

Pokémon Main Theme - (Remix)
Origin: 1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB)
 The main title for the original Pokémon games begins in this arrangement 
 with electric guitars before proceeding to the brass fanfare of the main 
 melody, led by the french horn.

Road to Viridian City (From Pallet Town/Pewter City) - (Remix)
Origin: 1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB)
 This light and happy march is a remix of the theme that plays on Route 1, 
 which then switches to a more driving soft rock version, and then playing 
 a portion of the Viridian City theme.

Pokémon Center - (Remix)
Origin: 1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB)
 Another fanfare piece based on the tune you hear when in Pokémon centers in 
 R/B.

Pokémon Gym/Evolution - (Remix)
Origin: 1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB)
 After the opening strings, this breaks into the Gym theme of the original 
 Pokémon games as a fanfare, then goes into the pounding rhythms of the 
 evolution theme.

Wild Pokémon Battle! (Ruby/Sapphire) - (Remix)
Origin: 2003 -- Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire (GBA)
 Like most battle themes, this is an intense rock-style brass tune, this 
 particular one being feature in R/S/E.

Victory Road - (Remix)
Origin: 2003 -- Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire (GBA)
 This a rather different mix of the original Victory Road tune, which was 
 FAR more subdued, now replaced with a hard rock, fast paced tune.  Victory 
 Road is featured in several Pokémon games and regions and always leads 
 intrepid trainers to the Elite Four.

Dialga/Palkia Battle at Spear Pillar! - (Remix)
Origin: 2007 -- Pokémon Diamond/Pearl (DS)
 Dialga and Palkia are the "mascot" Pokémon of D/P, and this is the theme 
 that plays when you battle the featured one at Spear Pillar.

Wild Pokémon Battle! (Diamond/Pearl) - (Remix)
Origin: 2007 -- Pokémon Diamond/Pearl (DS)
 This is the theme of random battles in D/P, much like all the others: a 
 rock-style brass tune.

Team Galactic Battle! - (Remix)
Origin: 2007 -- Pokémon Diamond/Pearl (DS)
 Team Galactic is the villanous team in D/P, sort of that game's version of 
 Team Rocket.  This remix is a speedy version based on when you fight a 
 Galactic Grunt.

Route 209 - (Remix)
Origin: 2007 -- Pokémon Diamond/Pearl (DS)
 This is a subdued remix of the Route 209 theme in daytime from D/P.

============
8L. F-Zero =
============

Mute City - (Remix)
Origin: 1990 -- F-Zero (SNES)
 Unlike the Melee version of this track, this seems more focused on the 
 original F-Zero's version, a more subdued opening leading into the main 
 guitar.

Fire Field - (Remix)
Origin: 1990 -- F-Zero (SNES)
 This is a more modern rock remix of the theme that plays on the track of the 
 same name in F-Zero.

White Land - (Remix)
Origin: 1990 -- F-Zero (SNES)
 This is a more modern rock remix of the theme that plays on the track of the 
 same name in F-Zero.

Car Select - (Original)
Origin: 1998 -- F-Zero X (N64)
 As the name implies, this is the song that plays when you select your car in 
 F-Zero X.

Dream Chaser - (Original)
Origin: 1998 -- F-Zero X (N64)
 This tune plays in F-Zero X on the Silence courses.

Devil's Call in Your Heart - (Original)
Origin: 1998 -- F-Zero X (N64)
 This tune plays in F-Zero X on the Devil's Road courses.

Climb Up! And Get The Last Chance! - (Original)
Origin: 1998 -- F-Zero X (N64)
 This tune plays in F-Zero X on the White Land courses.

Brain Cleaner - (Original)
Origin: 2003 -- F-Zero GX (GCN)
 This tune plays in F-Zero GX when you watch the replay after a race.

Shotgun Kiss - (Original)
Origin: 2003 -- F-Zero GX (GCN)
 This is the track that plays on a Casino Palace course in GX.

Planet Colors - (Original)
Origin: 2003 -- F-Zero GX (GCN)
 This is the track that plays on any Green Planet course in GX.

=========================
8M. EarthBound (Mother) =
=========================

Porky's Theme - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Mother 3 (GBA) Japan Only
 This is a theme heard many times throughout the game as it relates closely 
 to the Pig Army, which usually plays whenever they show up in force.  This 
 specific arrangement accompanies the Masked Man when he arrives on the scene.

Unfounded Revenge/Smashing Song of Praise - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Mother 3 (GBA) Japan Only
 This is a medley of two boss songs in the game.  The first is a song heard 
 when taking down high-level Pig Army troopers.  The second is the song you 
 hear when fighting the Mecha Gorilla.

Mother 3 Love Theme - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Mother 3 (GBA) Japan Only
 The main theme of Mother 3 has several iterations heard throughout the 
 game.  This specific arrangement is heard in the beginning of the game, while 
 exploring the initial areas.

You Call This a Utopia?! - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Mother 3 (GBA) Japan Only
 This is the background theme when exploring New Pork City, the final area 
 of Mother 3.  It's a more subdued version of the main "Pig Army" theme, used 
 to illustrate the theme of the locale.

Humoresque of a Little Dog - (Remix)
Origin: 1989 -- Mother (Famicom) Japan Only
 Most people know this as the "store theme" from EarthBound, which is fine, 
 because it was also the store theme from Mother, only the sound makes it 
 seem more taken from EarthBound given that it was a Super NES title, and 
 thus had a better sound system.  It also appears in Mother 3 as a "bonus" 
 tune heard on a jukebox.

Snowman - (Remix)
Origin: 1989 -- Mother (Famicom) Japan Only
 This wintery tune first appeared in the original Mother focused around the 
 town named Snowman.  The tune was later updated for the Super NES when 
 EarthBound was released and it played while the player explored Snow Wood 
 Boarding School in the land of Winters.  It also appears in Mother 3 on 
 Snowcap Mountain.  This version of the tune identifies more with the Super 
 NES version, and adds a delightful choral introduction.

=================
8N. Fire Emblem =
=================

Fire Emblem Theme - (Remix)
Origin: 1990 -- Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi (Famicom) 
  Japan Only
 Every single Fire Emblem game has featured the theme, in one capacity or 
 another.  Most often, it's a simple instrumentation on the theme, usually 
 at the title screen.  Of course, the lyrics imply something more, and indeed, 
 one of the more epic commercials from Nintendo's earlier days was the first 
 Fire Emblem commercial, which had a chorus in medieval garb singing the Fire 
 Emblem theme in Japanese.  The lyrics have been rewritten and changed to 
 Latin for this game, but the idea remains the same.

With Mila's Divine Protection (Celica Map 1) - (Remix)
Origin: 1992 -- Fire Emblem Gaiden (Famicom) Japan Only
 This is a latin-style remix of the map theme when you play as Celica, a 
 priest from Nova Monastery who rises up along with the fighter Arum to save 
 the Kingdom of Sofia from invasion.

Attack - (Remix)
Origin: 2003 -- Fire Emblem (GBA)
 This tune opens right up with the main "battle" theme from the GBA Fire 
 Emblem, which plays whenever you engage in combat.  About halfway through, 
 it will switch to the standard boss theme.

Preparing to Advance - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones (GBA)
 This a fanfare remix of the theme of the Preparation Screen in Sacred 
 Stones.

Winning Road - Roy's Hope - (Remix)
Origin: 2002 -- Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi (GBA) Japan Only
 I've never played Fuuin no Tsurugi, but I do know that the melody of this 
 tune is also Eliwood's theme from Fire Emblem (GBA), which makes sense given 
 that Roy is Eliwood's son.  A hopeful stringed tune with fanfare accents.

Shadow Dragon Medley - (Remix)
Origin: 1990 -- Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi (Famicom) 
  Japan Only
 This is a remixed medley of three tunes from the original Fire Emblem.  The 
 first is the tune that plays when the enemy makes their move, then the 
 theme you hear when you begin a mission, then lastly the theme that plays 
 when the player makes his move.

Ike's Theme - (Original)
Origin: 2007 -- Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn (Wii)
 This is a map theme in Radiant Dawn, specifically the theme that plays in 
 missions where you lead Ike and the Greil Mercenaries.

Against the Dark Knight - (Original)
Origin: 2005 -- Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance (GCN)
 The Black Knight of Daein comes with his own theme song, which is here, a 
 rather bitter and dire piece, focusing on his monstrous strength and mystery.

Crimean Army Sortie - (Original)
Origin: 2005 -- Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance (GCN)
 This instrumental fanfare tune plays in the background in the latter half of 
 the game after Ike assumes control of the Crimean army, specifically when 
 it's your turn to move.

Power-Hungry Fool - (Original)
Origin: 2005 -- Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance (GCN)
 This sinister harpsichord tune is the theme of the Duke of Tanas, Oliver, a 
 rather insane senator of Begnion obsessed with the concept of beauty.  The 
 tune evokes his madness yet attention to his standing.

Victory is Near - (Original)
Origin: 2005 -- Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance (GCN)
 It's a time of relaxation in the world of Fire Emblem, as you've taken out 
 all the bad guys in the area, except perhaps the boss, but this strings-led 
 piece gives a nice hopeful dance melody to a battle that's nearing its end.

================
8O. Kid Icarus =
================

Underworld - (Remix)
Origin: 1987 -- Kid Icarus (NES)
 This is a brass-led march recreating the theme of the first world in Kid 
 Icarus.  It constitutes the majority of the song until late, when the 
 percussion takes over and the goofy theme of the Grim Reaper takes over, 
 followed by the game over theme.

Skyworld - (Remix)
Origin: 1987 -- Kid Icarus (NES)
 A mislabeled tune, as the melody heard during this piece actually plays in 
 the area known as "Overworld", not the later "Skyworld".  The original 
 tune seemed a lot lighter compared to the Brawl version, which focuses on 
 brass.  Also of note is an example of Nintendo's old use of public domain 
 songs, as a small riff here very closely resembles the early American tune 
 "The Girl I Left Behind".

Title (Kid Icarus) - (Remix)
Origin: 1987 -- Kid Icarus (NES)
 Opening with a tone similar to the original NES bleep, this is an orchestral 
 recreation of the title theme of the game.  It also has a few little aspects 
 of Underworld in it.

Kid Icarus Original Medley - (Original)
Origin: 1987 -- Kid Icarus (NES)
 This is a cute mix of several different tunes directly from Kid Icarus, 
 powered by the old NES sound technology.  The tune progresses as follows: 
 title screen, Underworld theme, Fortress theme, "level complete" jingle, 
 Overworld theme, Skyworld theme, final level theme, then the game over theme, 
 going back to Underworld to repeat.

=====================
8P. WarioWare, Inc. =
=====================

WarioWare, Inc. - (Remix)
Origin: 2003 -- WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$ (GBA)
 This is a slight remixing of the title screen of the original WarioWare game, 
 which is relatively low-key and subdued, yet still indicative of the title 
 character's mischievous tendencies.

WarioWare, Inc. Medley - (Remix)
Origin: 2003 -- WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$ (GBA)
 This is a hashing together of several various themes during WarioWare 
 gameplay.  The first tune is the intro to 9-Volt's games in the original.  
 Second is the boss theme for Jimmy's stage, then the them for Dribble & 
 Spitz's games.  Next is the toilet scene from the beginning of Crygor's 
 stage.  Next comes the intro for Wario's second stage, then the news reports 
 that occur throughout the game.  Lastly is the mode select screen's song.

Ashley's Song - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- WarioWare Touched! (DS)
 This is Ashley's signature song, which plays during her stage.  Instead of 
 music accompanying each microgame, this song plays over the whole of the 
 gameplay.  The original tune is far more subdued, with more of a spooky feel 
 and less jazz.  The lyrics, however, remain.

Ashley's Song (JP) - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- WarioWare Touched! (DS)
 This is the same song as above, only with the Japanese vocals.  Apparently, 
 Sakurai-san thought we'd be missing out if he excluded a version from the 
 game for different regions.

Mike's Song - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- WarioWare Touched! (DS)
 Mike's Song is heard in the intro to his stage.  The original slower bebop 
 song has received a rockabilly overhaul in this version, with the original 
 robo voice replaced by a proper baritone.

Mike's Song (JP) - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- WarioWare Touched! (DS)
 Again, this is the same song as above, only with Japanese vocals.  Of note is 
 that the intro voice is of a young woman, not a group of people, which is 
 what it sounded more like in the original game.

Mona Pizza's Song - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- WarioWare Twisted! (GBA)
 This is Mona's signature song from her stage in WarioWare Twisted!  Like 
 Ashley's song, this plays instead of the individual music for each microgame.  
 This remix is slightly peppier, but maintains the spirit of the original.

Mona Pizza's Song (JP) - (Remix)
Origin: 2005 -- WarioWare Twisted! (GBA)
 Again, this is the same song as above, only with Japanese vocals.

============
8Q. Pikmin =
============

Main Theme (Pikmin) - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Pikmin (GCN)
 The music of Pikmin as a whole evokes a "natural" feeling, the quiet of 
 nature.  This is easily evident in the title theme itself, which features 
 soft rhythms and a low wind-like instrument playing the main melody.

World Map (Pikmin 2) - (Remix)
Origin: 2004 -- Pikmin 2 (GCN)
 This tune is only slightly remixed, having a bit of percussion added and the 
 tempo slightly speeded up to accompany the style of Brawl.  The original tune 
 played, as the title suggests, on the map where you select the area to 
 explore.

Stage Clear/Title (Pikmin) - (Remix)
Origin: 2001 -- Pikmin (GCN)
 This cute and light jingle plays at the end of every day in Pikmin, played 
 on whistle and orchestra bells.  It jumps from there into a more intense 
 version of the game's title theme.

Forest of Hope - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Pikmin (GCN)
 The second area in the original Pikmin game has this relaxing theme 
 accompanying it.  Percussive bells and strings play delicately to play 
 you through this area.

Ai no Uta - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Pikmin (GCN)
 While this was never heard in any game, this single was released by the 
 group Strawberry Flower in conjunction with the release of Pikmin, and its 
 members were named Red, Yellow, and Blue Pikmin.  This cute little song 
 describes life as a Pikmin, and was used in commercials advertising the 
 game.

Ai no Uta (French Version) - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Pikmin (GCN)
 A French version of the original Ai no Uta, which was specially made for 
 when Pikmin was promoted in Paris.

Tane no Uta - (Original)
Origin: 2004 -- Pikmin 2 (GCN)
 Like the original Ai no Uta, this is a song by Strawberry Flower meant to 
 promote the second Pikmin game, and again describes the Pikmin, this time 
 adding the two new ones.

Environmental Noises - (Remix)
Origin: 2001 -- Pikmin (GCN)
 Having listened to this back to front, there really isn't much besides 
 standard sounds of nature, particularly insects.  Probably would have been 
 cooler to feature some sounds of the creatures found in the series, but 
 oh well.

=====================
8R. Animal Crossing =
=====================

Title (Animal Crossing) - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Animal Crossing: Wild World (DS)
 Brawl tells you wrong; this is actually from Wild World, the title screen, 
 naturally.  This is a more peppy version of the original title.

Go K.K. Rider! - (Remix)
Origin: 2002 -- Animal Crossing (GCN)
 One of the many tunes played by guitar virtuoso K.K. Slider, this can be 
 heard during his concerts on Saturday night, only a little more subdued, 
 since he only has his guitar to accompany him, and not a full synthetic 
 orchestra.

2:00 a.m. - (Remix)
Origin: 2002 -- Animal Crossing (GCN)
 As the titel suggests, this tune plays at 2AM in your Animal Crossing town, 
 and this particular version is a remix as if the tune were performed by K.K. 
 Slider.

Town Hall and Tom Nook's Store - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Animal Crossing: Wild World (DS)
 This a combination of two tunes from Wild World, one the background music 
 from the Town Hall, the other from Tom Nook's Store.  They've been slightly 
 updated from their originals, but maintain the same style.

The Roost - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Animal Crossing: Wild World (DS)
 A slightly remixed version of the relaxing theme in the Roost Café, where 
 you could find K.K. Slider playing.

==============
8S. Nintendo =
==============

Ice Climber - (Remix)
Origin: 1984 -- Ice Climber (Arcade)
 This jazzy tune is actually rather similar to the Ice Climbers tune in 
 SSBM, and is based off the two music pieces featured in the original Ice 
 Climber.  The first part of the tune features the title/bonus tune, which 
 speeds up to accommodate the Ice Climber stage.  Once the summit crashes 
 into the water, the tune switches over to the main gameplay tune.

Balloon Trip - (Remix)
Origin: 1984 -- Balloon Fight (Arcade)
 This airy jingle-like tune is a representation of the only music to 
 accompany the Balloon Fight game, which plays when you're on the bonus 
 areas.

Shin Onigashima - (Remix)
Origin: 1987 -- Shin Onigashima (Famicom Disk System) Japan Only
 One of several video games that borrow from old Japanese mythology, this 
 game follows characters Donbe and Hikari as they seek to overthrow the Oni 
 that plague the land.  The tune itself is classically Japanese, through and 
 through.

Clu Clu Land - (Remix)
Origin: 1985 -- Clu Clu Land (NES)
 Much like Ice Climbers before it, this is a jazzy remix of an old Nintendo 
 tune, this time the Clu Clu Land gameplay theme (starting with the "level 
 entering" music).

Mario Bros. - (Remix)
Origin: 1983 -- Mario Bros. (Arcade)
 This piece starts on chipset type sounds with the opening line of the 
 Mario Bros. gameplay, which is also the opening to Mozart's Eine Kliene 
 Nachtmusik, a popular melody.  The tune then breaks into more modern 
 synthesized instruments to follow the main melody of the Mario Bros. theme, 
 closing with a string version of the opening melody as a tribute to its 
 classical origins.

Gyromite - (Remix)
Origin: 1985 -- Gyromite (NES)
 This is a remix of the title and main gameplay theme of the R.O.B.-based 
 game, Gyromite, in which you guided a professor through a course.  The song 
 is in happy bouncy synths in keeping with the theme.

Famicom Medley - (Original)
Origin: 1988 -- Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)
        1985 -- Wrecking Crew (NES)
        1985 -- Excitebike (NES)
        1987 -- Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! (NES)
        1987 -- Soccer (NES)
        1984 -- Devil World (Famicom) Japan Only
        1993 -- Joy Mech Fight (Famicom) Japan Only
        1985 -- Duck Hunt (NES)
        1982 -- Donkey Kong Jr. (Arcade)
        1989 -- Famicom Tantei Club Part II (FDS) Japan Only
        1986 -- Urban Champion (NES)
 As implied by the title, this is a medley of several classic NES (Famicom) 
 tunes in their original form.  The first is the four-note intro to a Hammer 
 Bros. Battle in Super Mario Bros. 3, followed by the main gameplay theme of 
 Wrecking Crew, followed by the title screen in Excitebike.  Next is the iconic 
 jogging theme from Punch Out! (the first half of it), then the theme from 
 "Soccer" for the NES, followed by the game theme of Devil World, then the 
 second half of Punch Out's jogging theme, then the gameplay theme from Joy 
 Mech Fight.  Next is the title for Duck Hunt (characterized by the dog barks), 
 then the theme for Donkey Kong Jr., music from Famicom Tantei (Detective) Club 
 Part II, then finally the victory theme for Urban Champion.

Power-Up Music - (Original)
Origin: 1985 -- Wrecking Crew (NES)
 This is theme that plays when you grab a Golden Hammer, both in Brawl and in 
 the original Wrecking Crew.  You can see the Golden Hammer in Items for more 
 info on how it works.

Douchuumen (Nazo no Murasamejo) - (Original)
Origin: 1986 -- Nazo no Mursamejo (Famicom Disk System) Japan Only
 Translated as "Mysterious Murasame Castle", this chestnut from Nintendo's 
 early days puts the samurai Takamaru against the forces of demons as he 
 explores castles in a setup somewhat similar to the Legend of Zelda.  This 
 is unaltered music from the original game.

Flat Zone 2 - (Remix)
Origin: 1997 -- Game & Watch Gallery (GB)
 Like Flat Zone before it, this tune focuses on the distinctive sounds, 
 buzzes, and bleeps of the old Game & Watch games.

Chill (Dr. Mario) - (Remix)
Origin: 1990 -- Dr. Mario (NES/GB)
 With "Fever" having been introduced in Melee, this was an obvious choice.  
 An electric guitar leads into Chill, the more subdued tune of the two 
 selectable in the old Dr. Mario game.

PictoChat - (Remix)
Origin: 2004 -- Nintendo DS Hardware
 This is an original jazzy tune with incorporated sound effects from the 
 PictoChat function of the DS (since it doesn't have background music).

Mii Channel - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Nintendo Wii Mii Channel (Wii)
 As far as I can tell, the only think "remixed" of this tune is an underlying 
 percussion beat, adding a bit of drive to an otherwise relaxing tune.  The 
 tune begins with the "preview" music that you hear when you access the game's 
 window, but before you start the channel itself.

Wii Shop Channel - (Original)
Origin: 2006 -- Nintendo Wii Shop Channel (Wii)
 This relaxing muzak tune accompanies you as you explore the Wii's Shop 
 Channel.

Shaberu! DS Cooking Navi - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Shaberu! DS Cooking Navi (DS) Japan Only
 This is a remix of the title theme for this cooking helper released in Japan 
 and soon to be released in Australia.  The "game" is actually a simulator 
 where you receive step by step instructions to cook dishes in real life.  In 
 addition to a more modern light pop theme to the tune, the digitized voices 
 from the simulator have been interspersed.

Brain Age: Train Your Brain In Minutes a Day - (Original)
Origin: 2006 -- Brain Age: Train Your Brain In Minutes a Day (DS)
 This is a medley of all the low-key instrumental tunes in Brain Age.  First 
 is the title theme, then the theme that plays as you make your selection.

Opening Theme (Wii Sports) - (Original)
Origin: 2006 -- Wii Sports (Wii)
 This light muzak based around high winds and piano is the opening theme to 
 the Wii Sports pack-in for the Wii.  Very relaxing.

Charge! (Wii Play) - (Original)
Origin: 2007 -- Wii Play (Wii)
 This short and bouncy country tune accompanies the game "Charge!" in Wii 
 Play, in which you ride a cow as it topples over scarecrows.

Lip's Theme (Panel de Pon)
Origin: 1995 -- Panel de Pon (Super Famicom) Japan Only
 Remixed as a bouncy rock tune, this is the theme of the character Lip from 
 Panel de Pon, which was a game that received a retread and was released in 
 America as Tetris Attack, starring Yoshi.

Tetris: Type A - (Remix)
Origin: 1989 -- Tetris (GB)
 This famous Russian tune is known as "Korobeiniki", or "The Peddlers", 
 which originated as a folk tune before becoming popular in the west for its 
 inclusion as the theme for Tetris.  The Brawl version harkens back to the 
 original Russian roots.

Tetris: Type B - (Remix)
Origin: 1989 -- Tetris (GB)
 While an original piece not related to Russian folklore, this tune still 
 has nostalgia value for its use in the original, and has been remixed to 
 sound like a classic Russian folk tune.

Title (3D Hot Rally)
Origin: 1988 -- Famicom Grand Prix II: 3D Hot Rally (Famicom Disk System)
  Japan Only
 This is the title screen music of 3D Hot Rally, remixed in a more modern 
 rock style.  3D Hot Rally was an FDS game that played as a simple off-road 
 racer, and featured Mario and Luigi.

Tunnel Scene (X) - (Remix)
Origin: 1992 -- X (GB) Japan Only
 X was a game released only in Japan and was one of the first on the system 
 to use a 3D first-person theme.  This futuristic driving tune can be heard 
 during gameplay, and has been updated past the Game Boy's limited 
 capabilities.

Mario Tennis/Mario Golf - (Remix)
Origin: 2000 -- Mario Tennis (N64)
        1999 -- Mario Golf (N64)
 This tune is a combined remix of the title themes for these Mario sports 
 games.  The first being the fanfare-like Mario Tennis, the second being 
 the island-style-based Mario Golf.

Marionation Gear - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Chousouju Mecha MG (DS) Japan Only
 This game is a mecha battling game that never made it out of Japan.  The 
 game focuses on controlling mecha robots through the stylus.  This track 
 is a piano/orchestral remix of one of the battle themes.

Title (Big Brain Academy) - (Remix)
Origin: 2006 -- Big Brain Academy (DS)
 As implied, this is the theme one can hear on the title screen on the 
 brain training game, Big Brain Academy, where one perform several mind-
 stretching puzzles in a quick amount of time to impress the blob-like 
 Dr. Lobe.

Golden Forest (1080 Snowboarding) - (Original)
Origin: 1998 -- 1080 Snowboarding (N64)
 As the title suggests, this is the track that plays in the Golden Forest 
 course in 1080 Snowboarding.

Battle Scene/Final Boss (Golden Sun) - (Remix)
Origin: 2003 -- Golden Sun: The Lost Age (GBA)
 This tune is a rock remix of two songs in the second Golden Sun game.  The 
 first is the main battle theme (which is also known as Felix's battle theme) 
 and the last is the theme which plays when you fight the final boss, the 
 Doom Dragon.

Excite Truck - (Original)
Origin: 2006 -- Excite Truck (Wii)
 This is the track that plays while driving on the "Fiji Circuit" in Excite 
 Truck.

================
8T. Metal Gear =
================

MGS4 ~Theme of Love~ Super Smash Bros. Brawl Version - (Remix)
Origin: 2008 -- Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots (PS3)
 As it says "Brawl Version", this arrangement isn't heard in MGS4 on its own.  
 However, the haunting cello melody that plays over the percussion and rhythm 
 is prominently featured in Solid Snake's final mission.

Encounter - (Remix)
Origin: 1998 -- Metal Gear Solid (PS1)
 Used for when you're discovered and for boss fights, this tune incorporates 
 pieces of the Metal Gear Solid main theme for a pounding piece meant to 
 boost your adrenaline.

Theme of Tara - (Remix)
Origin: 1987 -- Metal Gear (MSX2)
 There's no character in any Metal Gear game named "Tara".  This tune begins 
 with the "opening" theme as Snake swims into Outer Heaven, then the main 
 gameplay tune as Snake explores the base.  It was named "Tara" by Kojima 
 after he heard the sounds the theme made and equated the sounds "ta-ra" with 
 the melody.  Seriously!

Battle in the Base - (Original)
Origin: 2004 -- Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater (PS2)
 This deep driving orchestral piece plays in MGS3 when you're discovered.  
 Its title specifically applies to the fortress, Groznyj Grad, which Naked 
 Snake infiltrated to destroy the Shagohod.

Yell "Dead Cell" - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty (PS2)
 One of the signature songs from Metal Gear Solid 2, this would play whenever 
 you fight a boss, particularly one of the members of the group, Dead Cell.  
 A decent-paced techno beat with a string section melody makes for a slick 
 piece.

Cavern - (Original)
Origin: 1998 -- Metal Gear Solid (PS1)
 This is the theme that plays inside the cavern that leads from the base 
 itself to the snow field where you fight Sniper Wolf.  A low key yet 
 percussive and echoing tune.

Snake Eater (Instrumental) - (Original)
Origin: 2004 -- Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater (PS2)
 The title song for Metal Gear Solid 3, only without vocals.  Perhaps Nintendo 
 couldn't secure the rights to them.  In contrast to the techno themes of 
 Metal Gear Solid 1 and 2, the music style of Snake Eater sounded more like 
 an old 60's spy film, with jazzy brass, orchestral percussion, and string 
 accompaniment, almost settling into a disco style of music.

Theme of Solid Snake - (Original)
Origin: 1990 -- Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake (MSX2)
 This is the opening title theme to Metal Gear 2, played on the sound chip of 
 the MSX2.  A simple driving tune with a deep melody to accompany the opening 
 credits.

Calling to the Night - (Original)
Origin: 2007 -- Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops (PSP)
 This is the haunting song that plays over the credits in MGS:PO.  Not much 
 else to say, really.

========================
8U. Sonic the Hedgehog =
========================

Green Hill Zone - (Original)
Origin: 1991 -- Sonic the Hedgehog (GEN/SMS/GG)
 One of the first tunes heard by the original Sonic players, this upbeat 
 tune accompanied the very first level.

Angel Island Zone - (Remix)
Origin: 1994 -- Sonic the Hedgehog 3 (GEN)
 This is a remix of the Angel Island theme from Sonic 3, remixed by the 
 original artist himself, Jun Senoue.  The remix focuses on more modern 
 guitar sounds than the old Genesis sound chip.

Scrap Brain Zone - (Original)
Origin: 1991 -- Sonic the Hedgehog (GEN/SMS/GG)
 This is the theme of the final area of the original Sonic the Hedgehog, 
 which Sonic need to pass before battling Dr. Eggman.

Emerald Hill Zone - (Original)
Origin: 1992 -- Sonic the Hedgehog 2 (GEN/SMS/GG)
 Another upbeat tune to accompany the first level, which plays in Sonic 2.

Sonic Boom - (Original)
Origin: 1993 -- Sonic the Hedgehog CD (SCD/PC)
 One of the more memorable lyrical tunes in early console history, this 
 female-sung rock anthem accompanied the title screen of Sonic CD.

Super Sonic Racing - (Original)
Origin: 1997 -- Sonic R (SAT)
 This is the main theme of Sonic R (a racing game), and is also the theme 
 of the course "Radiant Emerald" when you play the course as Super Sonic.

Open Your Heart - (Original)
Origin: 1999 -- Sonic Adventure (DC)
 This is the main theme for Sonic Adventure, which is played in the first 
 battle against Perfect Chaos.  The lyrics are very character driven, speaking 
 of the battle between Perfect Chaos and Super Sonic.

Live and Learn - (Original)
Origin: 2001 -- Sonic Adventure 2 (DC)
 The main theme to Sonic Adventure 2 is one of Sonic's most popular.  This 
 driving rock anthem accompanies Sonic and company particularly at the final 
 battle of the game.  At the game's most dire point, Sonic's fiery 
 determination to save the world is illustrated in this positive piece.

Sonic Heroes - (Original)
Origin: 2004 -- Sonic Heroes (GCN/PS2/XBOX/PC)
 Sonic Heroes is a game which focuses on teams of heroes to accomplish the 
 goals, and this tune, more than others in the Sonic series, implies a more 
 hopeful and positive theme.

Right There, Ride On - (Original)
Origin: 2005 -- Sonic Rush (DS)
 This is the background music for Sonic's "Leaf Storm" stage in Sonic Rush, 
 a jamming rock tune, typical of Sonic's style.

HIS WORLD (Instrumental) - (Original)
Origin: 2006 -- Sonic the Hedgehog (2006) (360/PS3)
 This is the main theme of the aforementioned game, designed by the band 
 Zebrahead.  The instrumental version (naturally) removes the lyrics and 
 melody for a more subdued version.

Seven Rings In Hand - (Original)
Origin: 2007 -- Sonic and the Secret Rings (Wii)
 This is the main theme of Sonic and the Secret Rings, which is heard while 
 battling the final boss, but also on the menu and results screen.

=============
8V. Fanfare =
=============

In case you're wondering, you can hear these in the Sound Test, under Sound 
Effects.  They're the last category.

1) Mario, Luigi, Bowser, Peach
Origin: 1985 -- Super Mario Bros. (NES)
 This is the theme that played in Super Mario Bros. when your character 
 reached the flagpole at the end of the stage.

2) Donkey Kong, Diddy Kong
Origin: 1994 -- Donkey Kong Country (SNES)
 This jingle played once DK or Diddy completed a bonus stage or beat a boss.

3) Link, Zelda, Shiek, Ganondorf, Toon Link
Origin: 1987 -- The Legend of Zelda (NES)
 Once Link grabbed a piece of the Triforce of Wisdom, this little tune played.

4) Samus, Zero Suit Samus
Origin: 1986 -- Metroid (NES)
 This soft theme played whenever Samus found a new item, and has stayed with 
 her all throughout the series.

5) Yoshi
Origin: 1998 -- Yoshi's Story (N64)
 This is a small combination of the opening title theme to Yoshi's Story, as 
 well as the quick jingle that plays when you complete a level.

6) Kirby, King Dedede
Origin: 1992 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB)
 Once Kirby completed a level, he'd split into three guys and do a little 
 jig.  This is the short version of the tune that played over that jig.

7) Fox, Falco, Wolf
Origin: 1997 -- Star Fox 64 (N64)
 This is a short version of the Star Fox 64 title theme.

8) Pikachu, Pokémon Trainer, Jigglypuff, Lucario
Origin: 1998 -- Pokémon Red/Blue (GB)
 This is a short version of the title theme for the original Pokémon games.

9) Captain Falcon
Origin: 2003 -- F-Zero GX (GCN)
 This is the quick tune that plays when you come in first in F-Zero GX.

10) Ness, Lucas
Origin: 1989 -- Mother (Famicom) Japan Only
 This is a short passage that plays on the title screen of the original Mother.

11) Ice Climbers
Origin: 1984 -- Ice Climber (Arcade)  
 This quick little ditty plays once you complete a level by grabbing the 
 condor in Ice Climber.

12) Marth, Ike
Origin: 1990 -- Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryuu to Hikari no Tsurugi (Famicom) 
  Japan Only
 This is a variation on the main Fire Emblem theme, heard on the title screen.

13) Mr. Game & Watch
Origin: Game & Watch Series
 While this is an original composition (like Flat Zone), the background uses 
 G&W sounds underneath the melody.

14) Wario
Origin: WarioWare Series
 Although this is really tough to pin down, some think it might be a jingle 
 related to the music that plays between microgames.

15) Meta Knight
Origin: 1992 -- Kirby's Dream Land (GB)
 A rock version of the same melody that Kirby gets.

16) Pit
Origin: 1987 -- Kid Icarus (NES)
 This is a quick fanfare based on the title screen theme of Kid Icarus.

17) Olimar
Origin: 2001 - Pikmin (GCN)
 A quick passage from the title screen of Pikmin.

18) R.O.B.
Origin: 1985 -- Gyromite (NES)
 This is a jingle based on the title screen of Gyromite.

19) Snake
Origin: 1998 - Metal Gear Solid (PS1)
 While odd for a victory jingle, this probably is the most recognizable 
 Snake tune, since it's the fanfare that plays when Snake dies.  That said, 
 this is part of the original Metal Gear Solid theme, too.

20) Sonic
Origin: 1994 -- Sonic the Hedgehog 3 (GEN)
 This is the victory jingle that plays once Sonic completes a level in Sonic 
 the Hedgehog 3.

******************************************************************************
9. STANDARD GUIDE STUFF
******************************************************************************
===========
9A. Legal =
===========

This FAQ was made 100% by me, and is Copyright © 2008 Scott "CyricZ" 
Zdankiewicz.  You may not take it in whole or in part and claim it as your 
own.  You may not alter it in any way, even if you ask me first, and that 
includes putting it in HTML format.  Please don’t post this on your site 
unless you have express consent by me.  I’ve put a lot of time into this.  
Give me some credit.

Super Smash Bros. and all its characters are copyright Nintendo Co., Ltd.  
Snake and Metal Gear are copyright Konami Digital Entertainment.  Sonic and 
related characters are copyright Sega Co., Ltd.

Currently, the following sites have permission to post my FAQ:

www.gamefaqs.com
www.gamewinners.com
www.ign.com
www.cheatcc.com
www.cheatplanet.com
www.neoseeker.com

I don't plan on adding any more sites, really.  You can ask all you want, but 
you'd seriously have to wow me if you plan to get on a level that surpasses 
these long-established sites.

=======================
9B. E-mail Guidelines =
=======================

If you wish to e-mail me, be sure to follow these guidelines:

- I will NOT tell you how to unlock or beat anything, so don't ask.
- Make ABSOLUTELY sure I haven't already answered your question in the guide.
- Make sure it has something to do with Brawl.  I don't want spam, chain 
letters, offers for friendship.  Compliment me on the FAQ all you want, 
though.
- Make sure you specify that your e-mail is about the Brawl version of my 
Nostalgia guides.  I have one for Melee, too.
- Spell correctly and use proper grammar, please.  If I can't understand 
your e-mail, it'll go to the junk pile.

=============
9C. Credits =
=============

CJayC, SBAllen, and all webmasters, for having this on their sites.

The following people for additions, addendums, or corrections: Mike P, 
 Sorround2002, Neophos, TheMusrich888, dualteradyne, Chicobo329, TJ Cencula, 
 thanos6, simplyizzy, DeuxHero, lpfanatic23, ascensionday, yuchun722, 
 Erraticus, Evan George, Nathan Smith

Nintendo, Sega, Konami, and especially Masahiro Sakurai, for bringing us 
this game.

=====================
9D. Version Updates =
=====================

Version 0.4 - (3/10/2008) - Character Bios and Normal Items are all that's
 really "complete".  Everything else is still a work in progress.

Version 0.5 - (3/17/2008) - Okay, a few additions, but not a heck of a lot.  
 Mostly, this update is in place to quell some of the more vocal criticisms.

Version 0.7 - (4/9/2008) - No, I haven't lost interest!  I'm just really busy, 
 not only with life, but also trying to actually play Brawl to get everything 
 done.  All Items are finished.  Subspace Emissary and Stages are also taken 
 care of.

Version 0.9 - (5/16/2008) - Wow, I am SO SO sorry that I haven't been keeping 
 up with this.  Other games invaded my life and slowed down my progress.  I'm 
 still going to finish this, though, but I've opened up to anyone who wants to 
 help.

Version 1.0 - (12/7/2008) - No way!  He FINISHED?  Well, more or less.  I 
 kinda cut some music descriptions short (particularly those I wasn't very 
 familiar with myself), but this should be more or less complete.  I'll still 
 take submissions, of course.  Thanks to everyone who contributed!

====================
9E. The Final Word =
====================

So, another iteration of Smash Bros. comes and goes, celebrating the 
awesomeness that is Nintendo, and the efforts they're willing to go to make 
their fans happy.  I gotta say, thanks so much to Masahiro Sakurai for 
coming back to put this game together.

And thank you for reading!