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    Xbox 360 FAQ by TravisCombs

    Version: 1.6 | Updated: 06/06/10 | Printable Version | Search This Guide

    Xbox 360 Hardware FAQ
    by Travis Combs (travisipod@yahoo.com)
    
    Version 1.6
    Last updated: 06/06/10
    
    Copyright 2009-2010 Travis Combs. All Rights Reserved.
    This FAQ is protected by copyright. You can not sell this, put this on your
    website without my explicit permission, or violate any other rights granted to
    me by copyright law. You are entitled to saving a copy on your personal hard
    drive for your own use.
    
    -----------------
    Table of Contents
    -----------------
    
     1. Introduction
    
    Hardware
    
     2. The Xbox 360
     3. Xbox 360 Packages
     4. Zephyrs, Falcons, and Jaspers: Oh My!
     5. Error Codes and What to Do
     6. Warranty and Microsoft Repair
    
    Operating System/Xbox Live
    
     7. The Blades and the NXE
     8. What is Xbox Live?
     9. Xbox Live Marketplace
    10. Xbox Live Arcade
    11. Achievements
    12. Child and Adult Accounts
    13. Backward Compatibility
    14. Understanding Microsoft's Digital Rights Management
    15. Storage Devices
    16. Port Forwarding and Your NAT
    
    Miscellaneous
    
    17. Music Controller Compatibility Chart
    18. Official Xbox 360 Accessories
    19. Measuring the 360's Hard Drive Capacities
    20. Asked Questions
    
    21. Version History
    22. Credits
    
    This guide is a large guide. If you want to find something specific, you can
    press Ctrl + F to bring up a "Find" menu. From here, you can type in a word you
    are specifically looking for. Alternatively, you can copy and paste the entire
    section title (for example, "0. Section Name") from the Table of Contents and
    be brought directly to the section.
    
    ---------------
    1. Introduction
    ---------------
    
    Hello there, and welcome to my FAQ for the Xbox 360 console!
    
    I decided to write this guide because the only other .txt guide on GameFAQs as
    of this writing was a guide by fellow member Foppe, and, while not a bad guide,
    hasn't been updated since just after the launch of the Xbox 360, causing the
    vast majority of the guide to be outdated and no longer relevant. I have been a
    long time member of the Xbox 360 message board on GameFAQs and I am always
    answering various questions about both the hardware of the Xbox 360 and its
    specialized operating system. Because of this, I decided it may be beneficial
    to compile a guide like this to answer many of the questions people may have,
    so that they don't have to rely on the message board if they don't want to.
    
    If you want to know something that isn't in this guide, or if you notice any
    errors in my guide (be it factual or with spelling and grammar), you can email
    me at the address <travisipod@yahoo.com>. You can also post a question on the
    Xbox 360 message board. A response by user "TravisCombs" is me.
    
    It may also be worth mentioning that I am in the United States, and as such,
    the information in this guide is accurate as far as the North American region
    goes. While much of this guide will be accurate for other regions too, be aware
    that not everything may apply to you if you are outside of the United States.
    
    ---------------
    2. The Xbox 360
    ---------------
    
    What is the Xbox 360?
    
    Well, to keep it simple, it's the second console by manufacturer and software
    giant Microsoft, and the successor to their first console, the "Xbox". A part
    of the seventh generation of video game consoles, it directly competes with the
    PlayStation 3 by Sony and the Wii by Nintendo. The name Xbox 360 came from the
    idea that it was a complete revolution, or "360 degrees". This is where the
    spherical logo comes in to play.
    
    The Xbox 360 is a favorite of PC game developers, as the architecture of the
    360 allows PC developers to port their games to the 360 with great ease as
    opposed to difficulties that can be encountered by the porting process to the
    PlayStation 3 and Wii.
    
    The Xbox 360 was unveiled on May 12, 2005, and further information regarding it
    was announced a few months later during the annual Electronic Entertainment
    Expo (E3). It was launched in the US on November 22, 2005 in two configurations
    (see section 3).
    
    System Specifications of the Xbox 360:
    
    - Custom triple-core IBM PowerPC-based CPU ("Xenon")
      - Each core runs at 3.2GHz
      - Connects to graphics chip with 21.6GB/s front side bus
      - 1MB Level 2 cache shared between each core
      - Uses a 90nm or 65nm die (see section 4 for more details)
    
    - ATI graphics chip "Xenos"
      - Two separate silicon dies (GPU and eDRAM), 90nm or 65nm (see sect. 4)
      - Clock speed is 500MHz
      - 10MB eDRAM by NEC
      - 4x FSAA, Z-buffering, and alpha blending with no interference to CPU
    
    - 512MB GDDR3 RAM
      - Clocked at 700MHz
      - Shared by CPU and GPU
    
    - 12X Dual-layer DVD-ROM drive
      - Maximum read rate of 15.85 MB/s
      - Made by (old to new) Samsung/Toshiba, Hitachi/LG, BenQ/Philips, or Lite-On
      - Games: region-free (publishers can choose to lock specific games, though)
      - Movies: region-locks enforced
      - Security design allows for ~7GB of usable space per disc for game content
    
    - 5.1 Channel Dolby Digital Surround Sound
      - All games required to support at least the 5.1 Dolby standard
      - Console uses over 256 audio channels
      - 320 independent decompression channels using 32-bit processing for audio
      - Sound files for games are in Microsoft's XMA audio format
    
    - 10/100Base-T Ethernet port
      - No model comes with internal Wi-Fi, but a separate accessory is available
    
    - 3 USB 2.0 ports (1 in back, 2 in front)
      - Xbox 360 supports up to 3 USB controllers out of the box, 4 with a USB hub
      - A max of 4 controllers (wired and wireless) are supported
    
    - HDMI 1.2 output
      - Only on Zephyr, Falcon, and Jasper motherboards. Any newly manufactured 360
        (not refurbished) from the past 2+ years will include an HDMI port.
    
    - 2.4GHz Frequency for connecting controllers
      - Xbox 360 supports up to 4 wireless controllers
      - A max of 4 controllers (wired and wireless) are supported
    
    - Physical Size (set horizontally)
      - 11 5/8 in. wide
      - 12 in. (309mm) wide (with hard drive)
      - 3 1/4 in. (83mm) tall
      - 10 1/4 in. (258mm) deep
      - 7.7 lbs.
    
    --------------------
    3. Xbox 360 Packages
    --------------------
    
    In the past few years, the Xbox 360 has been available in a number of different
    bundles, each with their own characteristics and included accessories. In this
    section, we'll take a look at all of the major (non-limited edition) packages.
    Note: see section 4 for more details on chipsets and power bricks.
    
    It's also important to mention that all 360s have the ability to do the same
    things other 360s can do. For example, a launch Xbox 360 Premium can do every
    thing a brand new Xbox 360 Elite can do, including play Xbox 360 games, watch
    DVD movies, connect to Xbox Live, play Xbox Live Arcade games, play original
    Xbox games via backward compatibility, etc. The only exceptions across all
    models are that, non-HDMI units can't connect via HDMI (that's a given) and
    that a hard drive is required for some features (but understand that ALL 360
    models support ALL 360 hard drives, so you can add one and this won't be a
    hinderance).
    
    Xbox 360 Premium:
    - Launch date: November 22, 2005
    - Original MSRP: $399.99
    - Console color: White with chrome disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - 20GB hard drive
      - Wireless controller
      - Component HD AV cable
      - Xbox Live Microphone Headset
      - Ethernet cable
      - Power brick
    - Did not feature an HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Xenon
    - In production: No
    
    Xbox 360 Core:
    - Launch date: November 22, 2005
    - Original MSRP: $299.99
    - Console color: White with white disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - Wired controller
      - Composite AV cable
      - Power brick
    - Did not feature an HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Xenon
    - In production: No
    
    Xbox 360 Elite (original configuration):
    - Launch date: April 29, 2007
    - Original MSRP: $479.99
    - Console color: Black with chrome disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - 120GB hard drive
      - Black wireless controller
      - Component HD AV cable
      - HDMI cable with separate cable for optical audio output
      - Black Xbox Live Microphone Headset
      - Ethernet cable
      - Power brick
      - Halo 3/Fable II combo package (in last of original Elites)
    - First model to feature an HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Zephyr, Falcon
    - In production: No (not the original configuration)
    
    Xbox 360 Pro:
    - Launch date: July 2007
    - Original MSRP: $399.99
    - Console color: White with chrome disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - 20GB hard drive (units prior to August 2008)
      - 60GB hard drive (units August 1, 2008 and on)
      - Wireless controller
      - Component HD AV cable
      - Xbox Live Microphone Headset
      - Ethernet cable
      - Power brick
    - Features HDMI port
    - Initial 20GB version is exact same as Xbox 360 Premium, but with HDMI
    - Chipsets: Zephyr, Falcon, Jasper
    - In production: No
    
    Xbox 360 Arcade:
    - Launch date: October 23, 2007
    - Original MSRP: $279.99
    - Console color: White with white disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - Wireless controller
      - Composite AV cable
      - 256MB Memory Unit (Zephyr and Falcon versions)
      - 256MB internal storage (initial Jasper versions)
      - 512MB internal storage (newest Jasper versions)
      - Game disc with 5 full XBLA games (Zephyr and Falcon versions)
      - Power brick
    - Features HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Zephyr, Falcon, Jasper
    - In production: Yes (current MSRP: $199)
    
    Xbox 360 Elite (current configuration):
    - Launch date: August 28, 2009
    - Original MSRP: $299.99
    - Console color: Black with chrome disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - 120GB hard drive
      - Black wireless controller
      - Composite AV cable
      - Black Xbox Live Microphone Headset
      - Ethernet cable
      - Power brick
      - Pure/Lego Batman combo (Holiday 2009 Bundle)
      - Forza 3/Halo 3: ODST combo (Spring 2010 Bundle)
    - Features HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Falcon, Jasper
    - In production: Yes (current MSRP: $299)
    
    --- Special Edition Consoles/Bundles ---
    
    Xbox 360 Halo 3 Special Edition:
    - Launch date: September 14, 2007
    - Original MSRP: $399.99
    - Console color: "Spartan green-and-gold"
    - Included accessories:
      - 20GB hard drive
      - Spartan green wireless controller
      - Component HD AV cable
      - Spartan green Xbox Live Microphone Headset
      - Play and Charge Kit
      - Ethernet cable
      - Power brick
      - Free Halo 3 theme and gamerpics download
    - Features HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Zephyr
    - In production: No
    
    Xbox 360 Resident Evil 5 Edition:
    - Launch date: March 13, 2009
    - Original MSRP: $399.99
    - Console color: Red with chrome disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - 120GB hard drive
      - Red wireless controller
      - Component HD AV cable
      - HDMI cable with separate cable for optical audio output
      - Black Xbox Live Microphone Headset
      - Ethernet cable
      - Power brick
      - Resident Evil 5 and exclusive RE5 Premium Theme
      - Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix
    - Features HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Jasper
    - In production: No
    
    Xbox 360 Modern Warfare 2 Edition:
    - Launch date: November 10, 2009
    - Original MSRP: $399.99
    - Console color: Black with MW2 theme and black disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - 250GB hard drive
      - 2 black wireless controllers
      - Composite AV cable
      - Black Xbox Live Microphone Headset
      - Ethernet cable
      - Power brick
      - Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 Standard Edition
    - Features HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Jasper
    - In production: No
    
    Xbox 360 Final Fantasy XIII Bundle:
    - Launch date: March 9, 2010
    - Original MSRP: $399.99
    - Console color: White with chrome disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - 250GB hard drive
      - 2 wireless controllers
      - Composite AV cable
      - Xbox Live Microphone Headset
      - Ethernet cable
      - Power brick
      - Final Fantasy XIII
    - Features HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Jasper
    - In production: No, but leftover supply MSRP: $399.99
    
    Xbox 360 Splinter Cell Conviction Bundle:
    - Launch date: April 13, 2010
    - Original MSRP: $399.99
    - Console color: Black with chrome disc tray
    - Included accessories:
      - 250GB hard drive
      - 2 black wireless controllers
      - Composite AV cable
      - Black Xbox Live Microphone Headset
      - Ethernet cable
      - Power brick
      - Splinter Cell Conviction Standard Edition
    - Features HDMI port
    - Chipsets: Jasper
    - In production: No, but leftover supply MSRP: $399.99
    
    ----------------------------------------
    4. Zephyrs, Falcons, and Jaspers: Oh My!
    ----------------------------------------
    
    Now, maybe you've heard about these different chipset types before now, maybe
    this is the first you're hearing of them. Either way, these chipset revisions
    are quite important. Each new revision of the chipset is designed to make the
    system more reliable and last longer than the previous. When a new chipset type
    is released, they generally stop producing older ones. For example, they no
    longer manufacture Falcon chipsets after they started to make Jasper chipsets.
    
    So what is the difference? Well, let's break it down and see what changes have
    been made since the original chipset. Afterward, we can see how to determine
    what chipset is in your Xbox 360.
    
    Power usage stats are taken from Anandtech.
    
    Xenon:
    - Original chipset
    - Not officially named, but commonly known as Xenon after the CPU
    - Did not feature an HDMI port
    - Featured 90nm CPU, 90nm GPU
    - Very prone to errors, especially the "three red lights"
    - Came with a power brick with a max output of 203W
    - Power usage:
      - System off: 2.3W
      - System on and idle: 155.7W
      - Halo 3: 177.8W
      - Rock Band 2: 167.7W
      - Gears of War 2: 177.1W
    
    Zephyr:
    - First motherboard to feature the HDMI port
    - Extremely similar to the Xenon, but with the HDMI port and a bigger heatsink
    - Continued to feature a 90nm CPU, 90nm GPU
    - Still very prone to errors, but slightly better due to new heatsink
    - Power brick was still 203W
    - Power usage stats unavailable, but very likely to be similar to Xenon
    
    Falcon:
    - First of the "second generation" boards
    - Continued to have HDMI port
    - Brought CPU size down to 65nm
    - New CPU used less heat, so it was less "three red light" prone
    - However, same 90nm GPU lead to problems known as "E74"
    - New power brick had a max output of 175W
    - Power usage:
      - System off: 2.8W (yes, an increase)
      - System on and idle: 101.4W
      - Halo 3: 121.2W
      - Rock Band 2: 112.8W
      - Gears of War 2: 121.5W
    
    Opus:
    - A second generation board, only found in refurb units
    - Is largely similar to the Falcon, but lacks an HDMI port
    - Used in Microsoft refurbished units that originally had Xenons
    - As it's only found in refurb units, it often didn't come with a power brick
    - Power usage stats unavailable, but very likely to be similar to Falcon
    
    Jasper:
    - First of the "third generation" boards, and the newest one to date
    - In addition to the 65nm CPU, now features a 65nm GPU
    - Smaller GPU helps tremendously on E74 error
    - Power brick is physically smaller, and has an output of 150W
    - Power usage:
      - System off: 2.0W
      - System on and idle: 93.7W
      - Halo 3: 105.9W
      - Rock Band 2: 101.0W
      - Gears of War 2: 105.9W
    
    So now that we know a little bit about the different chipsets out there, how
    can we identify what is current in our system? Well, there are a few different
    methods people use to know this.
    
    Before we discuss the methods, let me explain something that will apply for the
    first two methods: On the top of the box that the Xbox 360 comes in, there will
    be a hole (a flap on older boxes) that will allow you to see a sticker on the
    back of the console with some information on it, such as serial number, power
    rating, and manufacture date. This hole can be useful if you're in a store and
    you're about to purchase a 360, as you can be more knowledgeable about what
    version you're buying. Now, from least reliable to most reliable, here are
    three ways to determine what type of chipset is in a 360:
    
    Method 1: Manufacture Date:
    People have previously used this date to estimate what type of chipset they
    had, because as mentioned above, when a new one comes out, the old one is no
    longer made. Example: if the date on it is March 20, 2009, they would guess
    that the system is a Jasper. The problem with this, is that it could be a
    Falcon, and there is no real way of confirming this by date alone. It is only
    recommended that you rely on this if you're about to buy a 360 in a store, and
    method 2 will not help you.
    Reliability: 75% for a brand new console, 0% for a refurb
    (refurb consoles have the date they were fixed, but parts are much older; you
    should get back whatever you sent in, except for Xenons which are upgraded to
    Opus chipsets)
    
    Method 2: Power Rating:
    Also on the sticker I mentioned above, is a power rating on the left side. Each
    chipset has a different rating, so you should be able to simply see the rating
    and then compare to the list below:
    
    16,5A: Xenon or Zephyr (remember, Zephyr has HDMI)
    14,2A: Falcon or Opus (remember, Opus doesn't have HDMI and is only in refurbs)
    12,1A: Jasper
    
    Now, this is a pretty reliable thing to go by. However, depending on exactly
    how tightly the Xbox 360 was packaged in the box, the hole may not be quite big
    enough for you to clearly make out the rating (it may be just a tad bit too far
    to the left for you to see through the hole). If you can try to dig a little
    bit into the cardboard to peel it back some, you may be able to tell what it
    says. If you can't make it out, you can choose to depend on method 1, or take
    the unit home, follow method 3, and choose to take it back if it's not what you
    are quite after. If you can make it out clearly, here's the reliability:
    Reliability: 99% for a brand new console (rarely is it wrong but it has been in
    a few cases in the past), 75% for a refurb (sometimes they just slap a sticker
    on it)
    
    Method 3: Power Connector on Console:
    This method requires the Xbox 360 to be out of the box, but it's an absolute
    guarantee that you'll have a specific chipset. Each chipset has a different
    power connector, so you'll be able to tell based on the following image:
    
    http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/gadgets/microsoft/jasper/identifying.jpg
    
    Look at what your connector looks like on the back of the 360, and compare it
    to the three connectors above. The differences are the block in the very middle
    (for the Xenon and Zephyr) and the broken line on top for the Jasper.
    Reliability: 100% for a brand new console, 100% for a refurb. Absolutely no way
    they could screw this up.
    
    Based on those methods, you should know exactly what type of Xbox 360 you have.
    
    -----------------------------
    5. Error Codes and What to Do
    -----------------------------
    
    It's no secret that the Xbox 360 is a very problematic system. Partially due to
    the fact that it was rushed to market to beat the PlayStation 3 and Wii's
    release, and partially due to corner-cutting parts to cut production costs, the
    Xbox 360 is very prone to errors. As explained in section 4, as time went on,
    the reliability has increased. But errors still do exist, and it's important to
    know what's going on when they're happening. So here's a quick rundown at some
    of the errors to be found on the Xbox 360.
    
    First off, we'll discuss red lights. Red lights are vague errors, and from that
    point we can narrow it down to a more specific problem. By "red lights", I'm
    referring to lights that emit red on the front of the 360, on the "Ring of
    Light". The Ring of Light is normally green and shows what controllers are
    connected to the console, but doubles as a diagnostic tool for errors.
    
    If your console needs servicing, we will discuss how to send your Xbox 360 to
    Microsoft in the next section, "6. Warranty and Microsoft Repair". We will also
    discuss the Xbox 360's warranty.
    
    Be absolutely sure that you know the difference between a "light" and a "ring".
    A ring is a complete circle. There is no such thing as "three red rings" as the
    Xbox 360 only has one complete ring.
    
    --- 4 Red Lights ---
    
    With the 4 red lights error, all four of the lights on the Ring of Light are
    flashing red. This is usually caused by the Xbox 360 not detecting the A/V
    cable.
    
    Possible solutions:
      - Make sure your A/V cable is connected
      - Disconnect the A/V cable, and reconnect it
      - Make sure the A/V port is not covered with dust
      - Try a different A/V cable if you can
      - If the problem still persists, it may be an internal problem. This will
        require servicing by Microsoft
    
    GameFAQs user bucketbot360 suggests taking off the faceplate to see if you
    actually have 4 red lights, or if you have 3 red lights that appear to be all
    lights if the faceplate is left on. The warranty for the Xbox 360 varies if
    you have 4 red lights as opposed to 3 red lights (see the next section for more
    details).
    
    --- 3 Red Lights ---
    
    With the 3 red lights error, the top left, bottom left, and bottom right lights
    will be flashing. Explained by Microsoft as a "general hardware failure", I
    explain this as a CPU error, thus the vagueness of the error as opposed to a
    specific error like "E74" (see below). This can also be caused by a power brick
    problem. If you experience 3 red lights as the result of a power surge, it is
    most likely harmless and restarting your console will most likely resolve your
    issue. However, if it's a legitimate 3 red lights error...
    
    Possible solutions:
      - Restart the console. It could be a fluke
      - Unplug all of the cables, and plug them back in
      - Try turning the console on without the hard drive
      - Try letting the console sit for a period of time and cool
      - Make sure the power brick is green, indicating no problem with the brick
      - If the problem still persists, it may be an internal problem. This will
        require servicing by Microsoft
    
    --- 2 Red Lights ---
    
    With the 2 red lights error, the top left and bottom left lights will flash
    red. This will indicate that the Xbox 360 is overheating. It may be a fluke, or
    it may be a problem with the cooling system.
    
    Possible solutions:
      - Restart the console
      - Make sure the console has adequate room to breathe. Do not put it in small,
        closed off spaces
      - Try using compressed air on the back fans, ensuring that dust is not being
        blown around when the fans are spinning
      - Let the console cool for a few hours - a full day
      - If the problem still persists, it may be an internal problem. This will
        require servicing by Microsoft
    
    --- 1 Red Light ---
    
    An error with only 1 red light is a bit vague. With this type of error, there
    will be a specific error code displayed on your display. The error code will
    give you a better idea of what may be wrong with your system. Here's a list of
    some of the errors that can be displayed. These may not be 100% accurate, but
    from research done, seem to be consistant.
    
    E01: Power brick problem
    E02: Network interface problem
    E03: Power brick problem, or something preventing quality power flow
    E05: CPU overheating
    E06: GPU overheating
    E07: RAM overheating
    E12: Temperature control issue
    E18: Error with either CPU, GPU, or RAM; perhaps caused by cold solder joints
    E20: RAM error, perhaps caused by cold solder joints
    E35: GPU overheating, perhaps problem with thermal compound on GPU
    E64: DVD drive error; could be wrong firmware, kernel launch failure, broken
         NAND Flash chip, bad dashboard update
    E65: DVD drive error; could be DMA configuration error
    E66: DVD drive does not match the one the motherboard is looking for
    E67: Hard drive error; timed out during reset
    E68: Hard drive error; possibly DMA configuration error
    E69: Hard drive error; failure reading hard drive security sector
    E70: Hard drive error; error finding data on drive
    E71: xam.xex error, possibly dashboard update failure
    E72: xam.xex error, possibly a problem with the NAND flash chip
    E73: Possibly a problem with the ethernet or rear USB port
    E74: Problem with the solder/connection to the ANA or HANA chip
    E75: Ethernet port error
    E76: Ethernet port could not be reset properly
    E77: Ethernet error; PHY request failed, reading registry failed
    E78: AsicID check failed
    E79: xam.xex error, possibly a corrupt file system, possibly HDD error
    E80: Wrong LDV version in NAND flash
    
    Possible solutions:
      - Restart the console
      - Let the console sit, and try again at a later time
      - Try using compressed air on the back of the Xbox into the fan area
      - If it's a hard drive problem, try again without the hard drive connected
      - If it's an ethernet port error, try disconnecting the cord from the port
      - If it's an overheating problem, try again later when the console is cool
      - If it's a dashboard error (including xam.xex errors), try the method below
      - If the problem still persists, it may be an internal problem. This will
        require servicing by Microsoft
    
    If you have a dashboard error, it may be caused by a failed update. There is a
    method you can try to reverse the failed update, known as the "console reset
    code". To attempt the console reset code:
    
    1. Turn the console off if it's on.
    2. Hold down the controller sync button (to the right of Memory Unit Slot B)
    3. Turn the console on, while continuing to hold down the button.
    4. While the 360 is booting, it should clear any failed updates.
    5. If it didn't work, you may need to send your console in to Microsoft.
    
    My explanation of the 3 red light and E74 errors:
    
    These errors are very common. I, as well as most people, believe the primary
    reason behind these errors are due to the low-quality solder used in the Xbox
    360. As the console is used over time, heat built up in the system slowly adds
    wear-and-tear to the solder. Eventually, the solder will develop a hairline
    crack in it, and render essentially the entire Xbox 360 unusable. When this
    happens to the CPU, 3 red lights occur because the Xbox does not know how to
    "process" the error. When it happens to the GPU (the CPU still working), the
    CPU can process the error and display E74 on the television screen. These
    errors are very closely related. This is why the "towel trick" used to work.
    What the towel trick did, was have you wrap your Xbox, with nothing but the
    power cord in, in several thick towels, and turn the Xbox on. It would over-
    heat and shut off, but the towels would trap the heat inside. The heat would
    "re-melt" the solder in a usable state. However, due to the low quality of the
    job, this method typically didn't fix the system for long, lasting from as
    little a few minutes to maybe a week.
    
    Note: I in no way endorse the towel trick method and I highly recommend not
    doing it, as it can cause major damage to the other components in your 360. As
    well, if you send it to Microsoft and they discover that you did this, your
    warranty will be void.
    
    --- Play DVD and Open Tray Error ---
    
    Another problem one may have is the "Play DVD" error. In this situation, you
    don't get an error code exactly, as the Xbox doesn't exactly understand that
    something is wrong. What will happen is, you will put a 360 game into your disc
    tray, and instead of saying "Play [game]", it will say "Play DVD". Launching it
    will show you a screen that will say "To play this disc, put it in an Xbox 360
    console" and translations in many other languages.
    
    Each Xbox 360 game has a 4-second DVD-format video track on it, the error you
    see above. It was intended to be played in a DVD player other than the Xbox. So
    for example, if you were to put the Xbox 360 game into your PC, PS3, or DVD
    player, that four second video is what you would see.
    
    The problem is, the Xbox 360 doesn't see the "game" track, and instead sees the
    DVD track and plays it instead. This problem occurs because the disc drive is
    dying. The lens may be dirty or misaligned.
    
    This error can appear at different frequencies. It may occur for every game,
    every time. It may occur for some games at most times. Some people experience
    this issue with only one game.
    
    The most common workaround is to eject the disc and reinsert it. Typically,
    the Xbox will eventually see the "game" track and launch the disc as normal.
    One may also try to use a DVD drive cleaning kit, to attempt to clean the lens
    if that is the problem. This problem is covered under Microsoft's one-year
    general warranty.
    
    The "Open Tray" error is similar, except in this instance, the 360 doesn't see
    the game OR the DVD track. Because of this, it doesn't think there is a game
    in the tray. This is also caused by a dirty, dying, or misaligned lens. The
    same workarounds above may help, but this one may need to be sent to Microsoft.
    
    --------------------------------
    6. Warranty and Microsoft Repair
    --------------------------------
    
    The Xbox 360 comes with a one-year general warranty, which covers anything
    relating to the manufacturing of the console. It won't cover physical damage,
    soda spills, or anything of that nature, but it will cover the errors above.
    The Xbox 360 also has a special three-year warranty that applies to the
    specific errors of "3 red lights" and "E74".
    
    The date of the warranty starts on the purchase date of the console, not the
    manufacture date as some people believe. So if your console was purchased on
    August 12th, 2009 and the manufacturing date was June 27th, the warranty will
    expire a year (or three years for 3 red lights/E74) from the August 12th date.
    
    If you send your Xbox to Microsoft while it's under warranty, the warranty when
    you receive it back will be the remainder of the original year, or 90 days,
    whichever is longer. So, if you have a console for 6 months, and it breaks and
    you send it in, the unit you receive back will be under warranty for 5 more
    months (deducting a month for the time it takes to be replaced) or for 29 more
    months (2 years and 5 months) for the E74 or 3 red lights. If you send your
    console in after 2 years and 11 months for an E74 error, you will only have the
    90-day warranty on the returned unit (but this warranty will apply for ALL
    errors).
    
    If you send your Xbox to Microsoft while it's not under warranty and pay for
    service, the general warranty is reset to one year and you have the remainder
    of the original 3 year warranty for the E74 and 3 red light errors or one
    full year, whichever is longer.
    
    When you send an Xbox 360 unit to Microsoft, you will most likely not receive
    your own console back. What happens is, they will take your unit and throw it
    on a "to-be-fixed" line. They will then grab a console off of the "fixed" line
    to send to you. This is done to reduce turnaround time, as sending you your
    specific console would take at least a week longer. If they were to fix your
    own console, they would have to diagnose it and physically replace parts in it,
    a time consuming process considering the volume of units they deal with.
    
    The unit you get shipped back will be equivalent to what you sent. You should
    get the same color and chipset type as what you send in. So if you send in an
    Xbox 360 Arcade unit with a Falcon chipset, you'll get a white 360 with a white
    disc tray back, with a Falcon chipset. This is also true for limited edition
    consoles like the Halo 3 console. The only exception is, as mentioned in an
    earlier section, Xenon chipsets will be upgraded to an Opus motherboard.
    
    The information sticker on the back of your Xbox 360 will feature the date the
    unit was repaired as the "manufacture" date, but that doesn't mean all of the
    parts are new. It will retain the same serial number as the unit you sent in to
    keep consistency. 
    
    To actually set up the repair with Microsoft, you have two options. You can
    call their customer service number at 1-800-4MY-XBOX and set up the repair with
    a customer service representative, or you can set up the repair on the Support
    section of xbox.com. The latter will require you to register your console, but
    that can be done at any time and is a very short process.
    
    If you're in warranty, the price of repair is free (including shipping costs).
    If you're out of warranty, the cost is a flat-rate of $119.99 (plus tax) if you
    arrange the repair via the phone. If you arrange the repair online, the flat-
    rate is $99.99 (plus tax). I'm not 100% sure about their phone line policy, but
    if you set up the repair online, you have three shipping options: You can have
    them ship you a box (takes approximately 4 business days to receive) that you
    will ship the Xbox in; you can have them ship you a prepaid label (and not a
    box) that you can put on your own packaging, which will receive about 4 days
    to receive; or you can opt to print your own shipping label from Xbox.com.
    The latter method is instant and still free (pre-paid label) but will require
    a printer. Regardless of what method you choose, the shipping cost is free all
    ways.
    
    The entire turnaround will take roughly 3-4 weeks, maybe a max of 5 weeks if
    it's around a holiday where shipping companies are not operating. The repair
    center is located in Mesquite, Texas. The closer you are to that area, the less
    time it will take to ship your console.
    
    -------------------------
    7. The Blades and the NXE
    -------------------------
    
    Every console out there has its own specialized operating system, for which
    games are programmed to run on. As time goes on, consoles get much more complex
    operating systems. Among the changes made are a graphical user interface in
    which the user can do things such as browse the files on their save files, tell
    the console to start a game or a movie, that kind of thing. With the Xbox 360
    and the seventh generation of game consoles, these interfaces are grown quite
    massively and have become very complex, with an endless number of menus and
    options.
    
    When the Xbox 360 launched and for the first few years it had been released,
    the Xbox 360 had its own user interface (officially known as "the dashboard")
    that was (and still is) commonly known as "the blades". Designed by a company
    known as "AKQA", the dashboard was (originally) four blades wide. From left-to-
    right, the blades were "Xbox Live" (yellow background), "Games" (green),
    "Media" (blue), and "System" (purple). One blade would appear in its entirety
    as the other blades would appear on the left and right in condensed form with
    the name of the blade listed.
    
    For example, if you were on the Games blade, you could see all of the options
    that were listed on that blade. To the left, you would see a bar that said
    "Xbox Live" and to the right you would see two bars, one saying "Media" and one
    saying "System". Scrolling to the left from the Games blade would bring up
    the Xbox Live blade, and now a bar saying "Games" would be added to the right.
    
    Here's an example of what the blades dashboard looked like:
    http://img268.imageshack.us/img268/6599/bladesr.jpg
    
    Here's the content that each blade had:
    
    - Xbox Live
      - View your gamer profile
      - See friends list
      - See messages
      - Go to the Xbox Live Marketplace
      - Launch disc in tray
      - Sign in (if not signed in)
    
    - Games
      - View your gamer profile
      - See your games played and achievements
      - Play games in your Xbox Live Arcade
      - Launch demos from Xbox Live Marketplace
      - Launch disc in tray
      - Sign in (if not signed in)
    
    - Media
      - View your gamer profile
      - Listen to music
      - View pictures
      - Watch video
      - Launch disc in tray
      - Sign in (if not signed in)
    
    - System
      - Change console settings
      - Adjust parental controls
      - Manage the items on your storage devices
      - Adjust network connection settings
      - Connect your Xbox to a Windows PC with Windows Media Center
      - Restart inital system setup
    
    In addition to the main dashboard, the Xbox 360 user interface also had a menu
    known as "the Xbox Guide". Pressing the middle X logo on the 360 controller
    would bring out the guide, a "half-blade" that appeared on the left half of the
    screen. Options on the guide included shortcuts to your gamer profile, music
    settings, and friends list.
    
    On May 9th, 2007, approximately a year and a half after the system launched, a
    fifth blade was added to the left of Xbox Live, entitled "Marketplace".
    
    On November 11th, 2008, Microsoft released an update to the dashboard, referred
    to as the "NXE" which stands for "New Xbox Experience". A completely new
    ground-up design, the NXE replaced the blade system with a new menu system
    designed to reflect the look of Windows Media Center, and be similar to the
    PlayStation 3's "XMB" (XrossMediaBar) design.
    
    Instead of the blades system as before, the NXE has its main categories listed
    in rows that one scrolls up or down to view, and then the contents of those
    categories are listed horizontally when the category is highlighted. Categories
    (the ones listed up and down) include My Xbox, Spotlight, Friends, Game
    Marketplace, Video Marketplace, Inside Xbox and a few others that vary based on
    exact update version.
    
    Here's a screenshot of what the NXE dashboard looked like:
    http://img704.imageshack.us/img704/1715/nxe.jpg
    
    Here's some of the things that the new categories have under them (can vary):
    
    - Spotlight
      - Advertisements for new games/movies and demos/DLC
    
    - My Xbox
      - Play disc in tray
      - Profile (view and edit your profile)
      - Game Library
      - Video Library
      - Photo Library
    
    - Game Marketplace
      - Link to Game Marketplace, to buy new content
      - Advertisements for new game content
    
    - Video Marketplace
      - Link to Video Marketplace (older NXE versions)
      - Link to Zune Marketplace (newer versions)
      - Advertisements for new video content
    
    - Friends
      - Shows parties and friends
    
    - Inside Xbox
      - See videos such as "Major's Minute" and "IGN Strategize"
    
    The NXE also brought about a new, redesigned guide. As opposed to the older
    half-blade guide, the new guide is a smaller, slightly modified version of the
    old original blade-style dashboard. It was recolored blue to match the new NXE
    color schemes.
    
    ---------------------
    8. What is Xbox Live?
    ---------------------
    
    Xbox Live is the online service for the Xbox. With over 17 million members, it
    is a key feature for the 360. As such, the 360 is built around the Xbox Live
    service, with many features of the 360 itself integrating online use. Xbox Live
    allows members to do multiple things, such as play online multiplayer games,
    voice chat, download new content for their games as well as new "Xbox Live
    Arcade" games, browse the Zune store, and more.
    
    There are two membership levels for Xbox Live; Silver (free) and Gold (paid
    subscription). The price for Gold is $19.99 for 3 months or $49.99 for 12
    months, and can be purchased via a redemption card in a retail store, online
    via the 360 itself and a credit card, or online via the Xbox website. A Gold
    membership allows a member to do everything a standard Silver account can do,
    with many Gold exclusive features.
    
    Every user on the Xbox Live service has a user name known as a "Gamertag". The
    gamertag is used on the friends list and for sending messages to people. When
    you sign up for Xbox Live, you pick the gamertag you want. If you choose to
    change it at a later date, it will cost 800 Microsoft Points ($10) to change
    it.
    
    Here's a brief list of Xbox Live features:
    
    Available to both Silver and Gold members:
    
    - Private Chat (chat with another Live member)
    - Avatars
    - DLC (Downloadable Content)
    - Xbox Live Arcade downloads
    - Friends List
    - Gamer Profile with name, motto, bio, and "Games Played" list
    - Windows Live Messenger
    
    Available exclusively to Gold members:
    
    - Online multiplayer gaming
    - Xbox Live parties (chat with up to 7 other members)
    - Video chat
    - Netflix movie streaming (requires separate Netflix account)
    - Facebook app
    - Twitter app
    - Last.fm app
    - Zune marketplace
    - 1 vs. 100 (free Primetime game)
    - Select demos available one week early
    - Gold Member Veterans
    
    ------------------------
    9. Xbox Live Marketplace
    ------------------------
    
    The Xbox Live Marketplace is where Xbox Live members can buy and download new
    items. Products in the Marketplace include Xbox Live Arcade games (see the next
    section for more details), downloadable content, Games on Demand (full retail
    Xbox 360 titles) and Xbox Originals (full retail original Xbox titles), themes
    and gamerpics, and other various items.
    
    The Xbox Live Marketplace uses a proprietary currency that is referred to as
    "Microsoft Points", or commonly shortened to "MSP". These points can also be
    used on the Zune Marketplace or the Games for Windows Live Marketplace.
    
    The conversion rate for MSP stands at 80MSP being equal to ~$1USD. Therefore, a
    prepaid 1600 MSP card retails for $19.99 and the 4000 MSP card retails for
    $49.99. Because these points are compatible with Zune, you can use the Zune
    service to buy points in $5 increments (400 MSP) if you do not want to buy a
    minimum of 1600 at a time.
    
    Games on Demand offer Xbox Live members the choice of buying select Xbox 360
    titles over the Xbox Live service. Games on Demand can be purchased either
    with Microsoft Points or directly with a credit card. Pricing on these games
    range from around $20 to $30 (or 1600 to 2400 MSP).
    
    --------------------
    10. Xbox Live Arcade
    --------------------
    
    The Xbox Live Arcade (XBLA) is a key feature to the Live online service.
    Essentially, the service provides smaller-scale downloadable games for a lower
    price than retail games. Games available include classics such as Pac-Man or
    Centipede, ports of older games such as Doom or Sonic the Hedgehog 2, or fully
    developed new games, some of which are Xbox 360 exclusive, such as Shadow
    Complex or South Park Let's Go Tower Defense Play!. Game sizes range from just
    a few MB to nearly a GB. Prices typically range from 400 Microsoft Points ($5)
    to 1600 Microsoft Points ($20) with the average being 800 Points ($10).
    
    While typically downloaded from the Xbox Live service, select Xbox Live Arcade
    titles are available on compilation discs you can purchase at a store.
    
    Xbox Live Arcade games can be as fully featured as retail games, with features
    including online play and leaderboards. All Xbox Live Arcade games also have
    achievements (see section 11 for more details).
    
    ----------------
    11. Achievements
    ----------------
    
    A feature introduced with the Xbox 360, achievements are the idea behind doing
    specific tasks in a video game, and in turn being rewarded with a certain
    amount of "gamerscore". For example, a game may have an achievement for killing
    50 of a particular enemy, and the achievement may be worth a score of perhaps
    "25G" (the G is used to denote that it refers to gamerscore). Achievements can
    be as simple as pressing a button to being as complex as beating a game on the
    hardest difficulty with other strings attached. Every game on the Xbox 360 has
    achievements. A user's gamerscore is the total from all of the games they have
    played.
    
    Developers have to follow certain achievement policies. For the most part, a
    retail game must have a total of 1000 gamerscore ("1000G"). Typically, a game
    will not have more than 50 achievements for the base 1000G, although there
    are a few exceptions. Originally, games could bring the total gamerscore up to
    1250G with downloadable content (DLC), although they could leave it anywhere
    inbetween (such as 1100G). Also, developers had the option to leave less than
    1000G on the game, but were required to add the rest via free DLC. For example,
    Crackdown initially only had 900G, but with DLC was brought up to the max of
    1250G.
    
    Because these rules weren't exactly explicit at the launch of the 360, a few
    games do not quite follow them. For example, Condemned: Criminal Origins is
    based out of 970G, and Tiger Wood's PGA Tour 06 is based out of 960G. Also,
    some games have more than 50 achievements for the base 1000G. For example, The
    Orange Box has 99 achievements, and because it contained essentially 5 complete
    titles, an exception was made.
    
    Recently, Microsoft has changed their rules a little bit regarding their policy
    with achievements. The policy now allows for a game to have 250G added to it
    per quarter (of a year), for a max of 1750G. However, there seems to be some
    criticism over this as Halo 3 jumped straight from 1000G to 1750G overnight.
    
    Xbox Live Arcade games also have achievements too. Typically, an XBLA game will
    feature 12 achievements for a total of 200G. DLC for these titles can bring the
    total to 15 achievements for 250G. There are a few exceptions here, too, such
    as Tinker featuring 15 achievements for only 200G.
    
    ----------------------------
    12. Child and Adult Accounts
    ----------------------------
    
    When you register for a gamertag, you are asked for a date of birth. If you say
    that you are under 18 when you make your account, you are automatically put on
    a child account. The differences between a child account and an adult account
    are:
    
    A child account can NOT:
    
    - Download demos to an M rated game
    - Download DLC for an M rated game
    - Download M rated XBLA or full 360 games
    - Download content that is not rated or "Rating Pending"
    
    A child account CAN, however, PLAY M rated games that were actually purchased
    at a retail store, provided the parental controls allow it. The reasoning is
    because, Microsoft can't legally block you from playing something you own, but
    they CAN refuse to SELL you something, hence the blocks listed above.
    
    Child accounts can also be monitored by parental controls. Some parental
    control features include blocking games by rating, or limiting the amount of
    time a child user can spend on Xbox Live. Parental controls can not be applied
    to an adult account.
    
    In order to be promoted to an adult account, one must turn 18 as determined by
    the original date of birth when registered, and they must enter a credit card
    number, which apparently "confirms" they are an adult.
    
    --------------------------
    13. Backward Compatibility
    --------------------------
    
    In addition to Xbox 360 content, a 360 console equipped with a hard drive can
    play many original Xbox titles via backward compatibility.
    
    The official list of compatible titles is listed on this page:
    http://www.xbox.com/en-US/games/backwardcompatibilitygameslist.htm
    
    A more detailed list with exact compatibility notes can be found here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Xbox_games_compatible_with_Xbox_360
    
    In order to play Xbox games on the 360, you must have an official hard drive
    attached. The reason is because each compatible Xbox game has what's referred
    to as an "emulation profile", which contains software and code to assist the
    game's stability. The Xbox 360 has a totally different processor architecture
    than the original Xbox did, so hardware emulation can not be done. These
    profiles are stored in the non-user accessible part of the hard drive.
    
    The final update to the list of backward compatible games was released in
    November 2007. No further updates or fixes for original Xbox games will be
    released.
    
    In the event you need to update your backward compatibility, there are quite
    a few ways this can be done. First off, if your hard drive was made since
    November 2007, it should already have the latest update on it. Secondly, if you
    already updated your console to the NXE dashboard, that update included the
    last backward compatibility update.
    
    If your hard drive is older than 11/07 and you are still using the blades
    dashboard, then you can using the following methods to update your backward
    compatibility:
    
    - Update via Xbox Live. If you have an internet connection to your 360, and you
      attempt to play an Xbox game that isn't compatible with your current profiles
      you should be prompted to update your backward compatibility. You can use
      either a Gold or Silver account to do this update.
    
    - Burn a disc with the latest update. This will require a blank CD and a CD
      burner on your computer. You can download the backward compatibility update
      file here:
    
      http://www.xbox.com/en-US/games/backwardscompatibilityredirect.htm
    
      That will redirect you to a .zip file with the file you need inside. Using a
      burning program, make a "data disc" and burn the file "default.xex" to the
      disc. After the disc is burned, run the disc in your Xbox 360 console and
      follow the on-screen instructions. This method does not require internet to
      be connected to your console.
    
    - Use an Official Xbox Magazine ("OXM") demo disc to update your backward
      compatibility. Every OXM disc contains the latest backward compatibility
      update. Just pick a disc from a month in 2008 or newer to and use it to do
      the update.
    
    - Order a disc from Microsoft. The disc is free, but they will charge a little
      bit for shipping. You can order the disc from a link on this page:
    
      http://www.xbox.com/en-US/games/backwardscompatibility.htm#order
    
    There are a few other setbacks with backward compatbility. For one, you can not
    transfer original saves from an Xbox, so you will have to start all of your
    games over. In addition, any DLC you had will have to be redownloaded, some may
    have to be purchased again. Also, you can not use an original Xbox controller;
    you can only use a controller compatible with the 360.
    
    -------------------------------------------------------
    14. Understanding Microsoft's Digital Rights Management
    -------------------------------------------------------
    
    Digital Rights Management (DRM) is an electronic security measure that most
    files have to prevent illegitimate use or piracy. Microsoft has DRM on every
    file that is downloaded from Xbox Live. These restrictions placed on the files
    can sometimes prove to be annoying, however, if one is using a different user
    account or 360 console.
    
    Files that you download are tied to you in two ways; firstly, they are tied to
    your gamertag, and secondly, they are tied to your console. They are NOT tied
    to a storage device (like your hard drive) so you can switch that at will and
    will not suffer from any DRM restrictions.
    
    When you download a file, your basic usage rules allow for:
    
    - All users on that original Xbox 360 console to use that content
    - Your gamertag to always be able to use it, on any console, but for consoles
      OTHER than the original, you must be connected to Live
    
    This means that, if your account is "XboxLiveUser" and you download a file from
    Xbox Live, that account "XboxLiveUser" will ALWAYS be able to use that file,
    but will have to be on Xbox Live to use it if on another console from the
    original. If the original console has users "XboxLiveUser2" and "XboxLiveUser3"
    then they will be able to use the file on the original console. They will NOT
    be able to use that content on another console, regardless of if they are
    connected to Live or not.
    
    If you change consoles and wish to use your downloaded content offline, then
    you will have to do the License Transfer process. This will change the licenses
    to all of your files from your old console to your new console. This process
    can only be done once a year. To do this, you will need to be able to have both
    your PC and your new Xbox 360 on the network at the same time. To start, follow
    this link:
    
    http://www.xbox.com/en-US/support/systemuse/xbox360/licensemigration/
    
    -------------------
    15. Storage Devices
    -------------------
    
    You're going to want a way to save your progress, as well as your downloaded
    content, etc. This section will discuss the ways in which you can save your
    data.
    
    The Xbox 360 supports three types of storage devices: the official hard drive,
    the Xbox 360 Memory Unit, or a USB storage device.
    
    As of this writing, Xbox 360 hard drives have been released in sizes of 20GB,
    60GB, 120GB, and 250GB (see section 19 for more details). Memory units were
    released in 64MB and 512MB sizes, with 256MB in existance due to their previous
    inclusion in Arcade bundles. Memory units, however, were discontinued when the
    Xbox 360 had the update to use the third type of storage, USB drives.
    
    Unlike hard drives and memory units, the Xbox 360 will accept non-official USB
    drives. However, there are some criteria that the drives need to meet. They
    must be at least 1GB, and you can not get more than 16GB of storage from a
    single drive. You can use larger drives, such as a 32GB flash drive or even a
    large hard drive, but the 360 will partition off a maximum size. The Xbox will
    reserve 512MB of space for its own use. Therefore, with a 1GB drive, you will
    only get ~512MB of storage, and with a 16GB drive, you'll get about 15.5GB. If
    you're using a larger drive, the 360 will allow you to use 16.5GB of space, in
    order to have the 16GB of storage in addition to the 512MB of space the 360
    takes.
    
    Originally, Microsoft encouraged use of USB flash drives as opposed to USB hard
    drives, citing speed as the primary reason, saying that hard drives would be
    too slow for optimal performance. However, tests have been done by multiple
    people, including some on YouTube, that show that hard drives tend to be faster
    than flash drives.
    
    If you attach an Xbox 360 hard drive or your Xbox 360 memory unit to the Xbox
    360, it will be able to be written and read from immediately (no configuration
    needed). If you plug in a USB device that is not formatted for Xbox 360 use, it
    will not be automatically formatted; you'll need to go to the Memory screen to
    configure it. You will have the option of either formatting the entire drive,
    or an option that allows you to pick how much of the drive is partitioned for
    Xbox 360 use. You will not be able to use the Xbox 360 partition for files on
    your PC, such as your Word documents. I would recommend backing up any data you
    have on your USB drive prior to any formatting to ensure that you don't lose
    any of your data.
    
    While you won't be able to save to a USB device that's larger than 16GB, you
    can certainly read from them. Feel free to plug in an external hard drive or
    media player to play music, view photos, or watch movies from these devices.
    Note that, you can only rip music from an audio-format CD, not from an MP3 CD,
    portable media player, or USB drive/hard drive.
    
    --------------------------------
    16. Port Forwarding and Your NAT
    --------------------------------
    
    If you're going to connect your Xbox 360 to Xbox Live, I highly recommend that
    you port forward so that you will get better performance. For security reasons,
    your router will often block many incoming connections if they don't know what
    they are on certain ports. This can create problems when you're connected to
    Xbox Live, as your router may be blocking things you're legitimately trying to
    access. Port Forwarding is a process that tells your router "Hey, if something
    comes for me (your Xbox's IP) on these ports, it's something I want".
    
    I can't provide exact step-by-step instructions for this, as routers are very
    different and their administrative user interfaces can vary greatly. I will
    provide basic instructions that most moderate-to-advanced users will probably
    be able to follow. If you're not able to follow what I'm saying, the links I
    will have listed at the end of this section will be of more assistance with a
    variety of router types.
    
    First, we'll want to make your Xbox's IP address static. You don't HAVE to do
    this, but if you don't, your Xbox's IP can change at any time and thus the
    changes we do here will no longer be configured properly, leaving you with the
    port problems that we were at risk with before.
    
    To do this, switch on your 360 and find the network connection settings in the
    settings area. Go to the "IP settings" option and change your IP address to
    "manual". You'll need to enter a manual IP address, Subnet Mask, and Default
    Gateway.
    
    According to http://www.freewebs.com/haximo/portsstaticip.htm, these are the
    recommended values you should put depending on what router you have:
    
    D-Link
    IP Address: 192.168.0.200
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Gateway: 192.168.0.1
    
    Netgear
    IP Address: 192.168.1.200
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Gateway: 192.168.1.1
    
    Linksys
    IP Address: 192.168.1.140
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Gateway: 192.168.1.1
    
    Belkin
    IP Address: 192.168.2.200
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Gateway: 192.168.2.1
    
    Click done after you've entered the values and do an Xbox Live connection test.
    If you fail it, that's ok, we're not done yet.
    
    Go back to the IP settings again, and this time, we want to change the DNS
    settings, which are right under the IP settings. Again, we want manual. We're
    going to put in the recommend numbers in provided to us by
    http://www.freewebs.com/haximo/portsstaticip.htm. We are going to leave the
    secondary option blank, only filling in the Primary DNS server setting.
    
    D-Link: 192.168.0.1
    Netgear: 192.168.1.1
    Linksys: 192.168.1.1
    Belkin: 192.168.2.1
    
    Now, after finishing that, we want to run another Xbox Live connection test.
    You shouldn't fail this time, but you are still likely to get a message to tell
    you that your NAT isn't open. That's ok, now it's time to configure the router.
    
    This is the part that will start to vary by router, so if you can no longer
    follow me at this point, resort to the two links at the bottom of this section
    for more in-depth help.
    
    We're going to need to log in to your router's configuration page. Open up your
    web browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, etc.; whatever you use to go to a web
    site) and type in the address below for whichever router model you have. The
    user names and passwords provided are defaults; someone may have changed them
    if they don't work for you.
    
    D-Link: 192.168.0.1 (username: admin, password: [blank])
    Netgear: 192.168.1.1 (username: admin, password: password)
    Linksys: 192.168.1.1 (username: [blank], password: admin)
    If your router isn't listed here, try the 2nd link at the bottom of this sect.
    for the rest of the instructions.
    
    Now, we need to navigate to the section of your router that deals with port
    forwarding. Navigate to the page listed below:
    
    D-Link: Advanced tab, then "Virtual Server"
    Netgear: Port Forwarding/Port Triggering under Advanced on left panel
    Linksys: Applications and Gaming at the top
    
    Now we're going to need to tell your router to allow ports 88 and 3074 for the
    static IP address we gave your Xbox earlier (the one you manually entered in to
    the Xbox 360). 
    
    For all routers, name the first one port forward "Xbox1" and tell it to forward
    the ports "88-88". If it wants you to specify UDP or TCP, I would tell it to do
    both. For the IP address, enter the one you put on your Xbox. Make sure it is
    enabled, and save it. Now, we're gonna do the process again. Type in "Xbox2"
    and tell it to forward the ports "3074-3074" on both UDP and TCP if it asks.
    Making sure it's enabled, save it. You should now see Xbox1 and Xbox2 in your
    list of forwarded ports. Other websites will tell you to forward ports 53, 80,
    and 2074, but there is no added benefit and it can cause problems with your PC
    trying to go online, so DON'T do it. If your router wants you to specify a time
    to have the port forwarding active, have it checked as "Always" or a similar
    option.
    
    For safe measures, at this point, unplug your router and wait 30 seconds to a
    minute to plug it back in. This will reset the router. After your router is
    fully reset, run a network connection test on your 360. It should complete
    properly, and should not have a message at the end alerting you that your NAT
    is moderate or strict. On the NXE, if it says nothing, that means your ports
    are opened.
    
    If it didn't work out for you, your router wasn't listed above, or if you're
    having trouble, here are two links you can try.
    
    http://www.freewebs.com/haximo/ports.htm
    http://www.portforward.com/english/routers/port_forwarding/routerindex.htm
    
    A note: If the second link instructs you to port forward ports 53, 80, or 2074,
    I would recommend disregarding that. Only follow the instructions to forward
    ports 88 and 3074, as this is all the 360 needs.
    
    ----------------------------------------
    17. Music Controller Compatibility Chart
    ----------------------------------------
    
    In this section, I will list the music simulation games available for the Xbox
    360 and will denote which instruments they are compatible with. The acronyms
    across the top will denote that game's instruments; for example, "GH2" will
    represent a shorthand way of saying "Guitar Hero II's X-Plorer Guitar". The
    legend is listed below the charts.
    
    Note: This chart is only accurate for the Xbox 360 versions of these games.
    The PlayStation 3 and Wii have different compatibilities.
    
    Guitar Hero II, Guitar Hero III, and Guitar Hero Aerosmith can be played via a
    standard Xbox 360 controller. No full-band games (any game with drums or mics)
    can be played with a standard controller, as the controller is automatically
    associated with mics, and therefore require the specialized instruments to be
    played.
    
    
    --- Guitar Chart ---
    
    Game                                          Instrument
    
                                 GH2   GH3   GHWT  GH5   RB    RB2   TB:RB MCFB  
    
    Band Hero                    Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Green Day: Rock Band         Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero II               Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   No    No    No    No
    Guitar Hero III              Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   No    No    No    No
    Guitar Hero Aerosmith        Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero World Tour       Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero Metallica        Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero Smash Hits       Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero 5                Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero Van Halen        Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Lego Rock Band               Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Rock Band                    Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Rock Band 2                  Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Rock Band Track Packs        Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Rock Revolution              Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    The Beatles: Rock Band       Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    
    Legend:
    
    GH2   - Guitar Hero II wired X-Plorer guitar
    GH3   - Guitar Hero III wireless Les Paul guitar
    GHWT  - Guitar Hero World Tour wireless guitar
    GH5   - Guitar Hero 5 wireless guitar
    RB    - Rock Band wired Stratocaster guitar
    RB2   - Rock Band 2 wireless Stratocaster guitar
    TB:RB - All 3 of The Beatles: Rock Band limited edition wireless guitars
    MCFB  - Mad Catz Fender Bass (listed because this is RB officially licensed)
    
    --- Drum Chart ---
    
    Game                                    Instrument
    
                                 GHWT  RB    RB2   TB:RB RR    ION
    
    Band Hero                    Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Green Day: Rock Band         Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   No    Yes
    Guitar Hero World Tour       Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero Metallica        Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero Smash Hits       Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero 5                Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero Van Halen        Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Lego Rock Band               Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   No    Yes
    Rock Band                    Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   No    Yes
    Rock Band 2                  Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   No    Yes
    Rock Band Track Packs        Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   No    Yes
    Rock Revolution              Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    The Beatles: Rock Band       Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   No    Yes
    
    Legend:
    
    GHWT  - Guitar Hero World Tour drum kit
    RB    - Rock Band wired drum kit
    RB2   - Rock Band 2 wireless drum kit
    TB:RB - Special Edition The Beatles: Rock Band wireless drum kit
    RR    - Rock Revolution drum kit
    ION   - Ion drum kit
    
    --- Microphone Chart ---
    
    Game                                 Instrument
    
                                 GHWT  RB    LIPS  MS    XBL
    
    Band Hero                    Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Green Day: Rock Band         Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   ???
    Guitar Hero World Tour       Yes   Yes   No    No    Yes
    Guitar Hero Metallica        Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero Smash Hits       Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero 5                Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Guitar Hero Van Halen        Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Lego Rock Band               Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Lips                         No    No    Yes   Yes   No
    Lips Number One Hits         No    No    Yes   Yes   No
    Rock Band                    Yes   Yes   No    No    Yes
    Rock Band 2                  Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes
    Rock Band Track Packs        Yes   Yes   No    No    Yes
    The Beatles: Rock Band       Yes   Yes   Yes   Yes   No
    
    Legend:
    
    GHWT - Guitar Hero World Tour microphone
    RB   - Rock Band/Rock Band 2 USB microphone
    LIPS - Lips wireless microphone
    MS   - Official Microsoft-brand Xbox 360 Wireless Microphone
    XBL  - Xbox Live Headset
    
    ---------------------------------
    18. Official Xbox 360 Accessories
    ---------------------------------
    
    In this section, I will list the first-party (made by Microsoft) peripherals
    and accessories that you can buy for the Xbox 360. To save time and space, I
    won't put "Xbox 360" in the title for all of them, as that's a given. Some of
    the items on this list may have been limited edition items; also, some limited
    edition items may not be listed here. I will also not be able to list every
    store-specific accessory out there, because there is no way to possibly know
    all of them.
    
    - Wired Controller
      - Colors: White
      - Interface: USB
      - Can also be used on PC with drivers and compatible games
      - MSRP: $39.99
    
    - Wireless Controller
      - Colors: White, Black, Pink, Blue
      - Can also be used on PC with wireless controller adapter
      - MSRP: $49.99
    
    - Wireless Controller with Play and Charge Kit Bundle
      - Colors: Black, Special Edition Red
      - Includes wireless controller, charging cable and rechargable battery
      - Can also be used on PC with wireless controller adapter (not charge cable)
      - Charge cable can be plugged into any USB 2.0 port to charge (PC, etc.)
      - MSRP: $64.99
    
    - Play and Charge Kit
      - Colors: White, Black
      - Includes charging cable and rechargeable battery
      - Charge cable can be plugged into any USB 2.0 port to charge (PC, etc.)
      - MSRP: $19.99
    
    - Rechargeable Battery
      - Colors: White, Black
      - Replacement or spare battery for charging cable or Quick Charge kit
      - MSRP: $11.99 *Possibly discontinued separately
    
    - Quick Charge Kit
      - Colors: White
      - Includes charging dock and rechargeable battery
      - Allows you to attach battery for charging from the wall quickly
      - MSRP: $29.99
    
    - Headset
      - Colors: White
      - Plugs in to bottom of controller
      - Allows you to chat and hear others on Xbox Live
      - MSRP: $19.99
    
    - Wireless Headset
      - Colors: White
      - Includes wireless headset and charging cable
      - Wirelessly syncs to your Xbox 360
      - Allows you to chat and hear others on Xbox Live
      - Built in battery
      - MSRP: $59.99
    
    - Wireless Microphone
      - Colors: Black
      - Can be used in compatible music games for vocals
      - Features built-in lights and motion sensor
      - MSRP: $49.99
    
    - Wireless Racing Wheel
      - Colors: White/Black unit
      - Includes steering wheel top, brake/accelerate pedals, and table mount
      - Force Feedback enabled
      - MSRP: $99.99
    
    - Universal Media Remote
      - Colors: White
      - Allows you to control your TV, Xbox 360, and Windows Media Center via 360
      - Buttons light up green so you can see them in the dark
      - MSRP: $19.99
    
    - Wireless G Networking Adapter
      - Colors: White, Green (for Halo 3 console)
      - Allows your Xbox 360 to connect to a router over Wi-Fi
      - Supports Wi-Fi A/B/G
      - MSRP: Discontinued, was $99.99
    
    - Wireless N Networking Adapter
      - Colors: Black
      - Allows your Xbox 360 to connect to a router over Wi-Fi
      - Supports Wi-Fi A/B/G/N
      - MSRP: $99.99
    
    - Vision Camera
      - Colors: White
      - Includes camera, headset, UNO Xbox Live Arcade Game, one month of Live Gold
      - Allows you to take pics in-game and enables voice chat capability
      - MSRP: $19.99 *Possibly discontinued
    
    - Messenger Kit
      - Colors: White
      - Includes chatpad and headset
      - Chatpad plugs in to the bottom of the controller
      - Allows you to type using a physical QWERTY keyboard
      - MSRP: $29.99
    
    - HD-DVD Player
      - Colors: White
      - Includes HD-DVD player, remote, and King Kong on HD-DVD
      - Adds an external HD-DVD player to the Xbox 360
      - MSRP: Quickly discontinued, originally $199
    
    - Component HD AV Cable
      - Colors: Gray
      - Allows you to hook up your Xbox 360 via R/G/B/R/W component
      - Also supports R/W/Y composite connection
      - Supports up to 1080i with most TVs, 1080p with some TVs
      - Upscales DVDs up to 480p
      - Optical audio output port
      - MSRP: $39.99
    
    - VGA HD AV Cable
      - Colors: Gray
      - Allows you to hook up your Xbox 360 to a TV or monitor via VGA
      - Supports 480i/p, 720p, 1080i/p
      - Supports special resolutions 848x480, 1024x768, 1280x768, 1280x1024,
        1360x768 (if your screen is 1366x768, this option will put 3 columns of
        black pixels on both sides to avoid stretching), 1440x900, 1680x1050 (if
        you select 1680x1050, it adds black borders to make the screen 16:9 rather
        than 16:10)
      - Upscales DVDs up to 1080p
      - Includes R/W composite connectors for sound
      - Optical audio output port
      - MSRP: $39.99
    
    - HDMI Cable
      - Colors: Gray
      - Includes HDMI cable and optical output port cable that plugs into A/V port
      - Allows you to hook up your Xbox 360 via HDMI
      - Supports up to 1080p
      - Upscales DVDs up to 1080p
      - MSRP: $49.99
    
    - 64MB Memory Unit
      - Colors: White
      - Includes memory unit and clear carrying case
      - Allows you to store data on an external memory unit
      - MSRP: Discontinued, was $29.99
    
    - 512MB Memory Unit
      - Colors: White
      - Includes memory unit and clear carrying case
      - Allows you to store data on an external memory unit
      - MSRP: Discontinued, was originally $49.99, lowered to $29.99
    
    - 20GB Hard Drive
      - Colors: Gray/Chrome
      - Allows you to add a hard drive to your Xbox 360
      - MSRP: Discontinued, was $99.99
    
    - 60GB Xbox Live Starter Pack
      - Colors: Gray/Chrome
      - Includes 60GB hard drive, headset, ethernet cable, and 3 months of Live
      - Allows you to save data and Xbox Live downloads
      - MSRP: $99.99
    
    - 120GB Hard Drive
      - Colors: Gray/Chrome
      - Includes 120GB hard drive and transfer cable
      - Allows you to upgrade your current hard drive or add a new one
      - Transfer cable allows you to move all your data from your old hard drive
      - MSRP: Discontinued, was $149.99
    
    - 250GB Hard Drive
      - Colors: Gray/Chrome
      - Includes 250GB hard drive and transfer cable
      - Allows you to upgrade your current hard drive or add a new one
      - Transfer cable allows you to move all your data from your old hard drive
      - MSRP: $129.99
    
    - 8GB USB Flash Drive
      - Colors: Black
      - Includes 8GB USB Flash Drive and 1 month Xbox Live Gold service
      - Preformatted for Xbox 360 use
      - Manufactured by SanDisk, but licensed as official Microsoft accessory
      - MSRP: $34.99
    
    - 16GB USB Flash Drive
      - Colors: Black
      - Includes 16GB USB Flash Drive and 1 month Xbox Live Gold service
      - Preformatted for Xbox 360 use
      - Manufactured by SanDisk, but licensed as official Microsoft accessory
      - MSRP: $69.99
    
    - 1600 Microsoft Points Card
      - Colors: N/A
      - One-time use code that adds 1600 Microsoft Points to your account balance
      - MSRP: $19.99
    
    - 4000 Microsoft Points Card
      - Colors: N/A
      - One-time use code that adds 4000 Microsoft Points to your account balance
      - MSRP: $49.99
    
    - 1 Month Live Card
      - Colors: N/A
      - One-time use code that adds 1 month of Xbox Live Gold to your account
      - MSRP: $7.99
    
    - 3 Month Live Card
      - Colors: N/A
      - One-time use code that adds 3 months of Xbox Live Gold to your account
      - MSRP: $19.99
    
    - 12 Month Live Card
      - Colors: N/A
      - One-time use code that adds 12 months of Xbox Live Gold to your account
      - MSRP: $49.99
    
    - 12+1 Month Live Card
      - Colors: N/A
      - One-time use code that adds 13 months of Xbox Live Gold to your account
      - MSRP: Discontinued, was $49.99
    
    ---------------------------------------------
    19. Measuring the 360's Hard Drive Capacities
    ---------------------------------------------
    
    Back when the 360 first launched, the only hard drive available for it was a
    20GB model. However, people quickly discovered that they could only use 13.9GB
    of the space, and that, because the drive came loaded with videos and demos, it
    appeared to be only about 10GB. People wondered how Microsoft could really call
    this drive a "20GB" hard drive.
    
    In this section, I will explain to you why the 360 hard drives are the way they
    are and how they got to be that way.
    
    First, we need to understand that basically every hard drive in existance (and
    not just for the Xbox 360, but even the PlayStation 3, an iPod, a Zune, a HDD-
    camcorder, or even your computer's hard drive) is measured by the manufacturer
    differently than how the computer calculates space. The manufacturer will say
    that every 1000MB is 1GB, but the computer calculates 1GB as 1024MB. Because
    1000MB is smaller than 1024MB, the computer's output of the final usable space
    is actually smaller than the manufacturer's measure. This is also true for ALL
    units; a manufacturer will say 1000KB is 1MB, but the computer will say 1024KB
    is 1MB, and a manufacturer will say 1000GB is 1TB, but the computer will say
    1024GB is 1TB, etc.
    
    We can use the following formula to figure out how much usable space there will
    be (as reported by the computer) based on what the manufacturer tells us; this
    formula works for ANY hard drive, not just the 360:
    
    AS x .93 = US
    
    AS = Manufacturer's advertised space
    US = Actual usable space, as defined by the computer
    
    Using this formula, we see that the 20GB drive is actually "18.6GB" (and that
    number can vary a very slight amount due to formatting and exact byte count).
    
    From there, the Xbox 360 (and this IS exclusive to the Xbox 360, not a PS3/PC/
    etc.) uses an additional approx. 4.7GB of space for system resources, such as
    a cache for system updates and Xbox backward compatibility emulation profiles.
    
    So, we'll take that 4.7GB from the 18.6GB available to us, and that leaves us
    with 13.9GB, which is the amount that a "blank" Xbox 360 hard drive will report
    as being free.
    
    These numbers are consistant with all Xbox 360 hard drives, too. For the 60GB
    version, we'll do the .93 formula and come up with 55.8GB of actual space, and
    then we'll subtract the 4.7GB the Xbox uses to come up with a final measure of
    51.1GB of usable space, which happens to be the exact amount a blank 60GB drive
    for the 360 reports as having.
    
    For the 120GB drive, again we'll do the .93 trick to see that we have 111.6GB
    of actual space, and with the 4.7GB that the Xbox uses, we have 106.9GB that is
    actually accessible to us.
    
    So remember, the formula to find the final user-accessible space on an Xbox 360
    hard drive is:
    
    AS x .93 = US - 4.7GB = UAS
    
    with UAS = User-Accessible Space.
    
    And before anyone asks, yes, the whole 1000=/=1024 thing is legal. Every hard
    drive manufacturer puts a small print disclaimer on their packaging that says
    they are defining 1GB as 1,000,000,000 bytes, or a similar phrase.
    
    Usable Hard Drive Space on Xbox 360 Hard Drives:
    
    20GB = 13.9GB usable
    60GB = 51.1GB usable
    120GB = 106.9GB usable
    250GB = 227.8GB usable
    
    -------------------
    20. Asked Questions
    -------------------
    
    This section is reserved to answer email inquiries that I get. So far, I have
    not received any. Questions will be added here when they come in.
    
    -------------------
    21. Version History
    -------------------
    
    12/13/09 - Version 1.0
    First version of the guide. Started 12/12/09. Features 15 total sections.
    
    12/23/09 - Version 1.1
    Reorganized the guide into three main categories. Added 4 new sections, and
    renamed 2 sections. Added more to the Error Codes section and music controller
    section. Also added special edition consoles in the Xbox 360 Packages section.
    
    12/24/09 - Version 1.1a
    Fixed a mistake in the Table of Contents (sections 16 and 17 were flipped).
    Also centered "Instrument" in the microphone compatibility chart as it became
    uncentered when I added the "XBL" column.
    
    12/29/09 - Version 1.2
    Hope everyone had a Merry Christmas/Happy [insert holiday here]. This update
    includes an explanation on 360 hard drive capacities and a section about the
    Xbox 360's backward compatibility.
    
    01/02/10 - Version 1.3
    Changed some information in the warranty section of the guide to reflect rather
    recent policy changes. Added some notes in the backward compatibility section.
    It's a new year, so I updated the copyrights.
    
    03/06/10 - Version 1.4
    Updated accessory pricing and limited edition consoles. Added lower cost of
    controllers to reflect what stores are currently selling them at. Updated
    section 9 to discuss Games on Demand in more detail. Added a summary of usable
    hard drive space in section 18.
    
    03/27/10 - Version 1.5
    Updated the accessories section to add the new standalone 250GB hard drive.
    Added the Splinter Cell bundle to the list of consoles. Added a new section to
    provide details on storage devices, namely the new USB functionality. Added
    Green Day: Rock Band to the music controller compatiblity chart.
    
    06/06/10 - Version 1.6
    Made some updates to the accessories section due to some peripherals that were
    discontinued, as well as some new ones introduced. Updated the storage devices
    section. Added what resolutions the VGA cable can support.
    
    -----------
    22. Credits
    -----------
    
    Thanks to:
    
    - Various Wikipedia contributors for their collective knowledge on many of the
      subjects discussed in this guide. They provided for a great confirmation on a
      few details, and for dates.
    
    - Xbox-Scene.com and members of its forum. Their collective knowledge on errors
      of the Xbox 360 greatly contributed to the "Error Codes" section.
    
    - GameFAQs Xbox 360 message board members. Shoutouts to Renamon, Killah Priest,
      fustmonkey/CaPwnD, Dragon Nexus, and Winternova for much of the knowledge
      they have shared on the forum.
    
    - More credit to CaPwnD, whose site (http://www.freewebs.com/haximo/ports.htm)
      made for a great resource regarding port forwarding information.
    
    - GameFAQs member peach freak (Tim Brastow) and my friend "thegreenblob" for
      insight and direction on FAQ content.
    
    - GameFAQs member bucketbot360 (Paolo Camilo) for updated information regarding
      the Xbox 360 warranty
    
    - Anandtech for their research and information regarding power usage of the
      Xbox 360 hardware
    
    - Major Nelson (http://majornelson.com) for providing news and updates relating
      to the Xbox 360 and Xbox Live.
    
    
    The following sites are allowed to host this FAQ:
    
    GameFAQs (gamefaqs.com)
    Neoseeker (neoseeker.com)
    
    Copyright 2009-2010 Travis Combs. All Rights Reserved.