FAQ/Walkthrough by KeyBlade999

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    FAQ/Walkthrough by KeyBlade999

    Version: v4.40 | Updated: 04/27/16 | Search Guide | Bookmark Guide

    
    
    Winner of GameFAQs's FAQ of the Month award for March 2015! A huge thanks goes out to all who have helped me achieve this feat!
    
    

    
    
    • Game: Pokémon Shuffle & Pokémon Shuffle Mobile
    • Consoles: Nintendo 3DS, Android, and iOS
    • File Type: Formatted FAQ/Walkthrough
    • Author: KeyBlade999 (a.k.a. Daniel Chaviers)
    • Version: v4.40
    • Time of Update: 9:56 AM 4/27/2016
    
    

    MUST READ -- IMPORTANT NOTES ABOUT MOBILE VERSION!

    This FAQ was originally - and largely still written - from the viewpoint of the Nintendo 3DS release of the game. The two games seem to share much of the same content and much of the same mechanics. (I will detail differences where it is appropriate.) For now, some of the bigger differences include the following:

    
    
    • The Mobile version was changed to be harder. Some argue it could be to make it more challenging, some to say to encourage microtransactions. Whatever.
      • There are changes to the costs of Jewels and limitations, among a few other things. Again, enumerated in their own sections.
      • Item costs are boosted, some quite drastically.
      • In the 3DS version, you could earn Jewels from boss stages. Now you just earn 5 Hearts in Mobile.
      • Pokémon are, on the whole, harder to catch. Their catch rates are a bit lower and they have higher HP. The catch rates stated in this guide are based only upon the 3DS version for convenience; just know that the Mobile port makes 'em lower.
      • Abilities sometimes activate less often and have less of an effect.
    
    
    • Minor graphical changes, such as the map in the Mobile port being vertically oriented and not horizontally.
    
    
    • Event stages are held in a slightly different order than in Pokémon Shuffle's 3DS release, and thus have a different schedule. I have each version's schedule where appropriate.
    
    
    • You MUST have your device connected to the Internet to use it. Server maintenance is done from 5:00 - 6:00 AM UTC on Tuesdays, thus rendering the game unplayable for that hour.
    
    
    • Passcodes in the 3DS version cannot be used in the Mobile port, and the reverse is also true. I have passwords for each in their own sections.
    
    
    • The Mobile port allows Facebook integration in lieu of StreetPass support.
    
    
    • The Mobile port's data cannot cross over to the 3DS's release in any way. For competitive stages, the two versions also have separate leaderboards.
    
    
    • Remember this much - when the Mobile port was released, the game was at v1.2.12 - v1.2.14 on its 3DS version, depending on where you lived. Since the majority of the content is aimed at the 3DS version, remember that version numbers reference that game.
    
    
    
    

    Donations

    While I do write all of my guides for free, it does take a lot of time and effort to put them together. If you're feeling generous and want to show your appreciation, I am gladly accepting donations. I don't know exactly what the donations will be used for, but just know that you would definitely be helping me make more quality FAQs! Even the smallest donation amounts are appreciated, and they are a great way to say how much you appreciate the work I do. If you do decide you'd like to donate, please send the donations through PayPal at the e-mail address listed below. Thank you so very much for at least considering this!!

    
    
    Donation/Contact E-Mail

    keyblade999.faqs@gmail.com

    
    
    
    

    Introduction

    Hello, and welcome to yet another of my numerous Pokémon FAQs. This covers the latest side-series Pokémon game, Pokémon Shuffle, the first "freemium" game in the series. ... ... ... And, honestly, all it is a glorified piece of junk.

    Okay, I'm being harsh there. Pokémon Shuffle is a puzzle game that very much mirrors Pokémon Battle Trozei, a different game released for the 3DS last year. The play styles are very similar: they're games that rely on your ability to match three or more and remove Pokémon from the field to damage your opponent, which may give you a chance to catch them. Simple enough. And that's where my personal beef comes in: there's no need for this title. This title is an absolute non-necessity if one ever existed. Pokémon Shuffle is a big money grab (particularly for those who have no inhibitions) simply because you'll be expected to pay money to get through. (If you've not gotten to that point yet ... you will.) While it is free, I don't really see a point in grabbing this in comparison to something that is cheaper and more expansive like Battle Trozei. (You'll be pretty much forced to spend money at some point in Shuffle - I was able to manage by simply retrying a lot, but not everyone has that patience, hence why I think this is a money grab as compared to an $8.00 game. Trozei is just more fun anyways, IMO.)

    But to each his own. I've bought and beat it, so I may as well do what I can to help you out. Enjoy.

    
    
    
    

    Game Flow & Pre-Battle

    Pokémon Shuffle is divided up into several areas each consisting of a number of stages. In each stage, you will have to beat the Pokémon lying in wait there to pass by. When you begin the game, you will get an introduction on most of the techniques involved in doing so. In any case, the levels of the game are set up in a linear chain, with one Pokémon to be fought per stage. When you choose a stage, you are able to tap the Pokéball icon in the lower-right corner of the screen and choose the four Pokémon species that will accompany you into battle. (May be less, depending on the level.) Pay attention to their level, type, and attack power: you will want strong Pokémon that have a type advantage over your opponent, or at least deal neutral damage. You can alternatively use "Optimize" to set up the best party for yourself: the game will prioritize type advantages and then attack power in this instance.

    
    

    When in the Fray

    The primary goal of any given level is to match up three Pokémon or more to make them disappear: you will do so by moving them on the Touch Screen and they'll swap spots. (You can only move around Pokémon, however, if it would actually cause a matching to occur.) However, you have to make sure you are limited to within a specific number of moves in doing this: if you don't beat the target Pokémon in the prescribed number of turns, you will lose. Therefore, it is more effective to beat Pokémon without using the traditional "wildly match 3" technique. Rather, you will want to try some of the following:

    
    
    • Match up 4, 5, or more! This will increment the damage dealt some. Some abilities even rely on this!
    
    
    • Set up chain reactions. See, whenever you make a match, more Pokémon will fill the screen, with everyone above the matched Pokémon (new or not) falling as if gravity is pulling them to the bottom of the screen. If these Pokémon make a further match, then you can start up a chain reaction, or combo. This allows you to make multiple matches in a single turn, making it all more effective in the long run.
    
    
    • Make multiple simultaneous matches! For example, you can move a Pokémon so that it becomes part of a vertical row of three and a horizontal row of 3. This will count as a combo. Similarly, if you move two Pokémon and they both match up in their destinations, it is still the same as a combo.
    
    
    • Perhaps most importantly, however, pay attention to type matchups! Using "Optimize" can help you do this. Pokémon with a type advantage have orange, up-pointing arrows next to their icon, while those with type disadvantages have down-pointing arrows. See, the thing is, every Pokémon has a "type": sort of like their element. Every Pokémon will have a single type in this game, as compared to the dual-/triple-typing possible in the core series Pokémon games, so the type relationships are very predictable. They are elaborated upon in the walkthrough for specific Pokémon. In any case, having a type advantage lets you deal extra damage, so that's VERY helpful!
    
    
    • Use Mega Pokémon to your advantage! As you go through the game, you will be able to access some Mega Pokémon. When you bring them into battle, holding their respective Mega Stone, you can make them Mega Evolve by making enough matches that involve the Pokémon. When they Mega Evolve, they activate a special ability that allows, usually, for much easier removal of Pokémon when the Mega Pokémon is involved in the match. For example, Mega Audino will, when matched, also remove all Pokémon within one space of the matched Audinos. This can be particularly helpful when you find enemies that like to block you and stuff.
    
    

    Speaking of blocking, do not expect your Pokémon foes to just sit there and take damage. Some Pokémon will, every few turns, activate some kind of special effect. Three primary special effects exist:

    
    
    • Freezing the Pokémon. These Pokémon cannot be moved. However, if you make a match that involves the frozen Pokémon, you will unfreeze it.
    
    
    • Transforming/replacing the Pokémon. In these cases, the Pokémon is replaced by another, often the same species as the opponent. You can deal with this by simply matching them up in some cases. Sometimes, this is even helpful to you, as when it occurs against Ghosts and Dragon Pokémon.
    
    
    • Transforming the Pokémon into blocks. Depending on the block, it will take a while for you to remove it. The blocks will be removed after making enough matches next to them. The block will disappear right after: there are no Pokémon inside them.
    
    

    After the Battle

    Assuming you beat the Pokémon in the stage, you will win. Your score earning during the stage will determine your "rank" on that stage, which will only serve to help unlock the extra-challenging "EX" stages; you'll also get a point boost for having extra moves left at the end of the stage. Finally, you'll then be allowed to catch the Pokémon. The catch rate of the Pokémon is determined based on several things:

    
    
    • The Pokémon itself. Some Pokémon are just harder to catch than others. *shrug*
    • How many moves (or seconds, in the case of EX stages) you have left at the end. This only provides a further boost to the counter.
    
    

    You will begin by attempting a catch with a regular Poké Ball. If this fails to capture the target Pokémon, you can spend 2,500 Coins to attempt to use a Great Ball. (The cost is 3,500 in Mobile.) The Great Ball, contrary to its primary mathematical definition in other Pokémon games, will provide double the catch rate in Pokémon Shuffle. Thus, if you had a 50% catch rate, it would be 100% with a Great Ball, a certain catch.

    On version 1.2.0 and higher, you can also have a random catch to find the "Super Catch Power". It is a randomized boost to the capture rate that, while random, is free. You can also still use the Great Ball if desired, but must still pay for it. This boost is applied after you fail with a normal Poké Ball, but before the Great Ball is used. For example: say a Pokémon is being targeted with a rate of 25%. You fail, and then the Super Catch Power activates and yields 8% for you. It's now 33%, which is 66% - instead of the usual 50% - with the Great Ball if you want to use it.

    If you fail the level, you simply have to retry. If you have any Jewels, you can use them to add five moves to your counter in the game, giving you five extra moves to defeat the Pokémon. Speaking of Jewels.

    
    

    Survival Mode (v1.3.0+)

    Starting in version 1.3.0 on the 3DS version, you can play Survival Mode once you beat Stage 150. You will be able to choose four Support Pokémon and will have to pay three Hearts in order to play. You will play a number of stages at random, for the most part anyhow, from the main 150 stages. You will have a limited, fixed number of moves for each stage, increasing with your success in the game. There are 50 stages in all, with some fixed:

    
    
    StageOpponentStageOpponent
    Stage 3Mega AudinoStage 6Mega Kangaskhan
    Stage 10Mega SableyeStage 11Mega Slowbro
    Stage 15RaichuStage 16Mega Mawile
    Stage 30Mega GlalieStage 35Ampharos
    Stage 40Mega AmpharosStage 45Mega Gengar
    Stage 50Mega Mewtwo Y
    
    

    v1.3.0 also introduced several new Pokémon enhancement items, some of which can be earned by completing the stages in Survival Mode.

    
    
    ItemUnlocked At
    Exp. Booster SLevel 10 (always)
    Exp. Booster MLevel 10 (first completion), Level 20 (always)
    Exp. Booster LLevel 20 (first completion)
    Level UpLevel 35 (always), Level 45 (always)
    Raise Max LevelLevel 30 (always), Level 40 (always)
    Raise Max Level x3Level 50 (always)
    
    

    Stage Rankings

    Whenever you complete a stage, you will obtain a rank (C, B, A, or S, in ascending order of greatness) depending on your performance. The only rank worth any consideration of the best of these, "S". S Rank is the best of all the ranks, and contributes towards obtaining the various EX stages in the game. Depending on the kind of the stage, there is a general guideline to use for determine S-Ranks:

    
    
    • Move-based stages usually give S Ranks if you use less than 50% of the initially-given moves, rounded down. For example, if it is 10 moves that you're limited to, aim for 5 or less. If you're given 15 moves, aim for 7 or less (half of 15 is 7.5, which is 7 when rounded down).
    
    
    • Time-based stages work on the same idea, but based on the number of seconds originally allotted. For example, for a 1 minute, 30 second stage, aim for 45 seconds (as 1:30 is 90 seconds). In a 2 minute stage, aim for 60 seconds (2 minutes is 120 seconds).
    
    

    Hearts, Jewels, Coins, & Microtransactions

    When you play a level in the game, each trial - whether successful or not - will cost you 1 Heart and, at one time, without buying more, you can only have 5 Hearts. These Hearts can replenish with time, however, allowing you to gain one more at a rate of one every 30 minutes, replenishing the stock in 2.5 hours. (This time accumulates even when playing other games or when the console is turned off: one particular strategy for costless gameplay is to play five Hearts at a time, then play something else for 2.5 hours, and repeat.) Hearts can also be replenished via Jewels, which I will discuss momentarily.

    
    
    NOTE: 3DS v1.2.0+ Players

    This update changed the system of the game a little when Heart regeneration. Before, Hearts could not regenerate to any higher than 5, period, no matter from where the Hearts were obtained. This is changed to where you can have five regenerated Hearts in addition to any others you've obtained. In other words, say you have 10 Hearts, all from buying Jewels. You can then get up to 15 in 2.5 hours. You can then spend one to play a stage (now 14 are left) and that'll regenerate.

    NOTE: Mobile Players

    You can send messages via Facebook to your friends! (You must be over 13 years of age to integrate Facebook with this game.) You can use this as a means to get Hearts!

    
    

    Coins are the primary units of money in this game; you can use them to buy items for your battles to make them easier in some way for you. You will get a small amount at the ends of levels. You can also claim some by means of Jewels.

    So, what are these mysterious Jewels? Jewels are items which can be turned into Coins or Hearts at your discretion: do you make the game easier, or do you play more? Or both? It's up to you. Furthermore, you can use a Jewel if you lose a battle to get additional moves so that you may complete it. Usually, every ten levels (Levels 10, 20, etc.) or whenever the end of an area is, beating the level will net you a free one. However, if you run out of Hearts or Coins in-between these times and have no Jewels, you are able to buy some via the Nintendo eShop.

    (NOTE: You are also able to get some via StreetPass, and these will be free! Those with multiple 3DS consoles or friends they can scam off of, you'll want to view!)

    The cost and conversion rates are as follows: keep in mind that, if you buy in bulk, you're essentially getting some free, so if you're going to buy you may as well buy big. Furthermore, there are restrictions on the amount children under 18 in some countries can spend monthly (10,000¥, $100 US, £80, or 100). In Mobile, these limits apply to all players.

    
    
    • On the 3DS, all money is paid through your eShop account, which can be supplied either via prepaid cards or a credit card in set amounts. You can buy Jewels in groups of 1, 6, 12, 35, and 75, with the prices increasing accordingly.
    
    
    • On Mobile, you can buy in groups 1, 6, 10, 26, or 56, again with incrementing prices. You'll pay via credit card, I assume, which also means that, in certain countries, those under 13 are prohibited from buying on Mobile.
    
    

    One final note. The equivalencies at the right side are only accurate for the buyable sets Jewels. After that, I will assume the most efficient method of conversion. See, just as with buying them, by using them in bulk you will essentially get some free (as noted in reference to the unit cost). For 35 Jewels, I assume you use 12, 12, 6, and 3 in that order. For 75, I assume you use 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, and 3, in that order.

    
    
    POKÉMON SHUFFLE - 3DS VERSION
    Jewel AmountRegion & Money PaidEquivalent in HeartsEquivalent in Coins
    1 JewelJapan100¥5 Hearts3,000 Coins
    U.S.$0.99
    U.K.£0.89
    E.U.0.99
    3 Jewels (see right)(cannot be bought in 3's)18 Hearts (3 free)10,000 Coins (1,000 free)
    (cannot be bought in 3's)
    (cannot be bought in 3's)
    (cannot be bought in 3's)
    6 Jewels (1 is free)Japan500¥38 Hearts (8 free)22,000 Coins (4,000 free)
    U.S.$4.99
    U.K.£4.49
    E.U.4.99
    12 Jewels (3 are free)Japan950¥80 Hearts (20 free)48,000 Coins (12,000 free)
    U.S.$8.99
    U.K.£8.09
    E.U.8.99
    35 Jewels (10 are free)Japan2,500¥216 Hearts (41 free)128,000 Coins (23,000 free)
    U.S.$24.99
    U.K.£22.49
    E.U.24.99
    75 Jewels (27 are free)Japan4,800¥498 Hearts (123 free)298,000 Coins (73,000 free)
    U.S.$47.99
    U.K.£42.99
    E.U.47.99
    POKÉMON SHUFFLE - MOBILE VERSION
    Jewel AmountRegion & Money PaidEquivalent in HeartsEquivalent in Coins
    1 JewelJapan100¥6 Hearts4,000 Coins
    U.S.$1.39
    U.K.£0.89
    E.U.0.99
    3 Jewels (see right)(cannot be bought in 3's)20 Hearts (2 free)13,000 Coins (1,000 free)
    (cannot be bought in 3's)
    (cannot be bought in 3's)
    (cannot be bought in 3's)
    6 Jewels (1 is free)Japan600¥42 Hearts (6 free)28,000 Coins (4,000 free)
    U.S.$4.99
    U.K.£4.49
    E.U.4.99
    10 Jewels (2 are free)Japan960¥68 Hearts (8 free)45,000 Coins (5,000 free)
    U.S.$8.99
    U.K.£8.09
    E.U.8.99
    12 Jewels (see right)(cannot be bought in 3's)87 Hearts (15 free)58,000 Coins (7,000 free)
    (cannot be bought in 3's)
    (cannot be bought in 3's)
    (cannot be bought in 3's)
    26 Jewels (6 are free)Japan2400¥186 Hearts (80 free)124,000 Coins (20,000 free)
    U.S.$24.99
    U.K.£22.49
    E.U.24.99
    56 Jewels (16 are free)Japan4800¥402 Hearts (66 free)268,000 Coins (44,000 free)
    U.S.$47.99
    U.K.£42.99
    E.U.47.99
    
    

    Battle Items

    Before a battle, you can, using your Coins, buy any number of items to help your battle out. The items you can buy are restricted by the stage, and you can only buy one of each item per attempt at the stage. Below, you'll find the items, their effects, and their costs.

    
    
    Item NameCostEffects
    Attack Power Up3,000 CoinsDoubles the damage dealt. Great for retries if you can't get far past half-HP!
    Complexity -19,000 CoinsRemoves one of the kinds of Pokémon from the game board, making it much easier to set up combos and chains.
    Disruption Delay1,500 CoinsThe foe cannot make attacks against you for multiple turns.
    Exp. Points x1.5300 CoinsThe Pokémon used in the battle have their EXP. earned boosted by 50%, making level-ups easier! Great to use in general.
    Mega Start2,000 CoinsThe Pokémon used for your Mega (assuming they are in the lead and have their Mega Stone) will begin as a Mega without need to charge up the Mega Evolution Gauge!
    Moves +5800 CoinsYou get 5 extra turns in this stage. Great to prolong those battles you lost by a hair. This will not affect the catch rates of Pokémon!
    Time +10800 CoinsYou get 10 extra seconds in this EX stage. This will not affect the catch rates of Pokémon!
    
    

    Involvement of StreetPass

    Pokémon Shuffle (dang it, keep wanting to say Battle Trozei, lol) makes actual use of the StreetPass feature of the 3DS for two functions. For one, you can use it to share statistics about any two players that pass by, which honestly serves no function.

    The more important one - and the one that'll likely make you download this game on two separate consoles if you have them! - is that, through StreetPass, you can obtain Hearts and Jewels for free! (How do you think I wrote this guide so - relatively - fast? I have three 3DS's in my house right now!) The awards are in accordance with the below. Seriously, if you're the type to try evading the microtransactions, you can use this technique effectively. All you'll need are the two consoles with StreetPass active. Begin by activating StreetPass for Pokémon Shuffle in both games on both consoles. Once this is complete, have both consoles turned on and then put into Sleep Mode. They should soon show that green notification light signifying StreetPass has been completed. Turn both consoles off and wait some time; usually, it takes five to ten minutes from what I've heard, but I've experienced times varying from one to five minutes. After, turn them back on, put 'em in Sleep Mode, and then repeat ad infinitum.

    (This is best done with only two as compared to three or more: you'll be able to get other Hearts from StreetPassing the same console multiple times, remember! Also keep in mind that this will take a few hours to gain a relatively high number of Hearts, so patience is requisite, but at least you don't have to pay! For one final note: for reasons unknown, this may not work with everyone, and may not work in the timeframe mentioned. It works fine for me and has for others; that's all I can really say. There's an element of luck involved, it seems.)

    
    
    GiftHeart EquivalentCoin EquivalentCondition
    1 Jewel5 Hearts3,000 CoinsFor your first StreetPass.
    For your 100th StreetPass total and every 100 thereafter.
    1 Heart1 HeartN/AObtained with your fifth StreetPass.
    Obtained with every tenth StreetPass (10, 20, 30, etc.) after the fifth.
    Obtained by StreetPassing the same person multiple times in a row from 3 times on. The 4th time, for example, also nets one. This will be your main Heart source if you want to complete the game fast without paying money for if you tag 5+ consecutive times, you get 2 Hearts!
    2 Hearts2 HeartsN/AObtained by not StreetPassing someone for an extended period of time. The exact details are unknown, however.
    
    

    Check In

    In this game, there exists a Check In function: this will connect you to the Internet, and you are able to do so once daily starting at 6:00 AM UTC every morning and ending at 5:59 AM UTC the next morning. What does this do for you?

    
    
    • Extra Coins!: Every time you check in, you get 500 Coins - if you check in 10 times, you get 1,000 Coins! (This is repeated every ten times as well.)
    
    
    • EVEN MORE Coins!: Starting in v1.3.0, if you buy a certain number of Jewels, you'll get boosted Coins until the end of the month.
      • 5~9 Jewels: 600 Coins, 6 regenerated Hearts
      • 10+ Jewels: 700 Coins, 7 regenerated Hearts
    
    
    • Game Patching: If a new Miscellany: Game Updates|update to the software has been created, you will be able to download it here. Minor patches are done at your choice and in-software, while major patches will redirect you to the eShop where you can download it. (Both methods are free-of-charge.) If you choose to not install an update, you cannot Check In nor obtain the rewards for doing such.
    
    
    • Stage Updating: Special stages are in play for Pokémon Shuffle that can change daily, typically called "The Daily Pokémon". These will be downloaded upon Check In and will work for 24 hours post-download per your system's clock. (Abuse of the system to maintain the same stages is not recommended.) Keep in mind that this is a service that may become disabled in the future, so if you're reading this and it's been about a year or so since I last updated, then ... yeah, no more of these. >_>
    
    

    Pokémon Type Matchups

    The chart below will details the various Pokémon matchups by type. This is a very simple chart to comprehend since, unlike most Pokémon games, each Pokémon will only have a single type in this game, so the relationships are very direct. Be sure to try and include as many super-effective-hitting Pokémon on your team as possible!

    
    

    
    

    Damage Mechanics

    Following the details on update to the software, we'll now look into, somewhat, how damage works.

    
    
    • Type Matchups: As noted in the previous section, a Pokémon will always deal normal, super-effective, or not-very-effective damage to another Pokémon in this game. There are no pseudoimmunities. Each affect the damage like so:
      • Not Very Effective = Damage x0.5 (half damage)
      • Normally Effective = Damage x1.0 (normal)
      • Super Effective = Damage x2.0 (double)
    
    
    • Pokémon Cleared Initially: The number of Pokémon cleared will affect the damage they add to the growing pool of damage, or just the damage they add outright. You can clear three Pokémon at minimum, all of the way up to six. Clearing 4 or 5 Pokémon under the effects of the Power of 4/5/4+/5+ abilities will boost the damage accordingly.
      • Clear 3 = Damage x1.0 (normal)
      • Clear 4 = Damage x1.5 (+50%)
      • Clear 5 = Damage x2.0 (double)
      • Clear 6 = Damage x3.0 (triple); only normally possible by complete accident, really, like with disruptions or Mega Pokémon attacks
    
    
    • Combo: As you clear more and more Pokémon from a single move, the damage dealt from each clearing will eventually begin to increase as well!
      • Combo of 1 = Damage x1.00
      • Combo of 2-4 = Damage x1.10 (+10%)
      • Combo of 5-9 = Damage x1.15 (+15%)
      • Combo of 10-24 = Damage x1.20 (+20%)
      • Combo of 25~49 = Damage x1.30 (+30%)
      • Combo of 50~74 = Damage x1.40 (+40%)
      • Combo of 75~99 = Damage x1.50 (+50%)
      • Combo of 100~?? = Damage x2.00 (+100%)
    
    

    Altogether, these factors culminate in a single formula rather nicely.

    SCORE/DAMAGE = Attack Power * Effectiveness Bonus * Pokémon Cleared Bonus * Combo Bonus

    Any decimal values are truncated after the full product is determined.

    As an example, let's say we have a Pokémon of 70 Power. It starts off a 13 combo after clearing off 5 of itself, and is super-effective against the target Pokémon. Thereafter, only three Pokémon are ever cleared; all attacks remain super-effective, though, because of the initial clearing. Thus, we have to take an iterated sum for every clearance made:

    
    
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (01) = 70 * 2.0 * 2.0 * 1.00 = 280
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (02) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.10 = 154
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (03) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.10 = 154
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (04) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.10 = 154
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (05) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.15 = 161
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (06) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.15 = 161
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (07) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.15 = 161
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (08) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.15 = 161
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (09) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.15 = 161
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (10) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.20 = 168
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (11) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.20 = 168
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (12) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.20 = 168
    • SCORE/DAMAGE (13) = 70 * 2.0 * 1.0 * 1.20 = 168
    • TOTAL DAMAGE = 2,219
    
    
    
    

    Some Quick Notes

    While this does state that the guide is a walkthrough, I can, by absolutely no means, walk you through the game, hand in hand, like you probably think I can. Those who read my guide for Battle Trozei are obviously questioning this since I was more able to do something with that guide, but keep in mind that, unlike Battle Trozei, there's no certainty of earning a Pokémon in levels here: since I will not force you to repeatedly attempt levels in a failingly expensive attempt to emulate my recommendations, nor do I believe most people would have the patience, I have to try to generalize. Those unfamiliar with games like Shuffle or the FAQ content for them must realize (in addition to the previous) that the game is heavily randomized in the generation of its actual placement of Pokémon in the battle arena, so there's no chance for me to provide an accurate walkthrough for everyone. However, I will give you several tips for completing the battles, which I iterated previously.

    
    
    • Match up 4, 5, or more! This will increment the damage dealt some. Some abilities even rely on this!
    
    
    • Set up chain reactions. See, whenever you make a match, more Pokémon will fill the screen, with everyone above the matched Pokémon (new or not) falling as if gravity is pulling them to the bottom of the screen. If these Pokémon make a further match, then you can start up a chain reaction, or combo. This allows you to make multiple matches in a single turn, making it all more effective in the long run.
    
    
    • Make multiple simultaneous matches! For example, you can move a Pokémon so that it becomes part of a vertical row of three and a horizontal row of 3. This will count as a combo. Similarly, if you move two Pokémon and they both match up in their destinations, it is still the same as a combo.
    
    
    • Perhaps most importantly, however, pay attention to type matchups! Using "Optimize" can help you do this. Pokémon with a type advantage have orange, up-pointing arrows next to their icon, while those with type disadvantages have down-pointing arrows. See, the thing is, every Pokémon has a "type": sort of like their element. Every Pokémon will have a single type in this game, as compared to the dual-/triple-typing possible in the core series Pokémon games, so the type relationships are very predictable. They are elaborated upon in the walkthrough for specific Pokémon. In any case, having a type advantage lets you deal extra damage, so that's VERY helpful! Due to similarities in Pokémon strengths within similar types most of the time, so long as you get a super-effective type you'll be good to go, regardless of who it is from.
    
    
    • Use Mega Pokémon to your advantage! As you go through the game, you will be able to access some Mega Pokémon. When you bring them into battle, holding their respective Mega Stone, you can make them Mega Evolve by making enough matches that involve the Pokémon. When they Mega Evolve, they activate a special ability that allows, usually, for much easier removal of Pokémon when the Mega Pokémon is involved in the match. For example, Mega Audino will, when matched, also remove all Pokémon within one space of the matched Audinos. This can be particularly helpful when you find enemies that like to block you and stuff.
    
    

    I will be able to note some info that will help you make the proper decisions, at least. I am fully capable of noting the Pokémon's type and its advantages and disadvantages, simplifying the process for you and allowing you to make the proper decisions regarding which Pokémon to include in your party in terms of type, ability, and attack. I will also make any other notes as necessary to help you understand the stage and other info. If you have any other information which I should include, feel free to send it by.

    
    

    The Super-Difficult Stages (A MUST READ!)

    Okay, so throughout the game, there are three particular stages that will almost certainly make you want to throw your 3DS at a wall, sheerly due to their difficulty. I will make a few notes about how to handle these stages. These stages are commonly found as Stages 40, 90, and 120. 130 and 150 are also worth including to some degree, though it's not nearly as common as those three.

    Now, pretty much no matter what you do with these stages, even if you have an idealized Pokémon party (short of being overleveled or glitching - yes, there is a glitch that may help), you are going to die. These battles are just so short or so obstacle-filled (or both!) that they pretty much prevent you from winning. A number of theories have gone around as to why this is, but many believe that it is just a money-grabbing attempt, a whole "Ha ha, you have to pay to get forward": you'd basically have to pay for the extra moves at the end of a battle to move forward. That is one option.

    But, see, the thing is, you don't have to pay. You only need Jewels. There are several established methods of getting them, any of which will turn the battle back to being more normal. After all, once you get above 5 turns, you're in a fairly doable battle if you have the ability to abuse type advantages. So, how do you get Jewels? There's obviously paying for them, but I'd recommend one of these two:

    
    
    • Repeated StreetPasses. You probably don't want to do that 100 times just to get the second Jewel, so...
    
    
    • Save them up. I don't care WHERE you get the Jewel, I don't care HOW. DO NOT USE YOUR JEWELS. Several stages in the game net you some free Jewels, so save them up for exactly these kinds of situations. If you're the type to avoid paying money for the Jewels and thus are coming to the conclusion that, under this tactic, you'll only get to play five stages at a time every 2.5 hours, then, yes, this can be annoying in that regard. But would you rather pay? That's the ultimate question. Furthermore, if you have two 3DS's or more, you can always just StreetPass-spam your way to having extra Hearts, meaning you won't need the Jewels for them.
    
    
    • Aside from the previous, I will note that you may not need every Jewel to 100% the game. Nonetheless, save them up. As I illustrated earlier, buying Hearts/Coins in bulk is best by far.
    
    

    Just some food for thought.

    
    

    Area 1: Puerto Blanco

    Some of the earlier stages will have you walked through as you get accustomed to the basics of the game, so that you know.

    
    
    GENERAL STAGE DATA
    Stage #PokémonTypeWeaknessesResistancesNear-ImmuneMovesOther RestrictionsOther Notes
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 1EspurrPsychicDark, Ghost, BugFighting, PsychicNone8NoneNone
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 2BulbasaurGrassFire, Ice, Flying, Bug, PoisonWater, Grass, Electric, GroundNone7NoneNone
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 3SquirtleWaterGrass, ElectricFire, Water, Ice, Steel,None11NoneNone
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 4CharmanderFireRock, Water, GroundGrass, Fire, Ice, Bug, Steel, FairyNone15NoneNone
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 5EeveeNormalFightingNoneGhost15NoneNone
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 6PidgeyFlyingIce, Rock, ElectricGrass, Fighting, BugGround12NoneNone
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 7TogepiFairyPoison, SteelBug, Fighting, DarkDragon10NoneNone
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 8PichuElectricGroundElectric, Flying, SteelNone73 Pokémon onlyNone
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 9AudinoNormalFightingNoneGhost15NoneNone
    Puerto Blanco: Stage 10Mega AudinoNormalFightingNoneGhost15NoneWin Audinite (Audino's Mega Stone) and Jewel on 3DS; adds 5 Hearts to this for Mobile (first win only)
    
    

    Area 2: Sandy Bazaar

    GENERAL STAGE DATA
    Stage #PokémonTypeWeaknessesResistancesNear-ImmuneMovesOther RestrictionsOther Notes
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 11HappinyNormalFightingNoneGhost15NoneNone
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 12MareepElectricGroundElectric, Flying, SteelNone163 Pokémon onlyNone
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 13PurrloinDarkBug, Fighting, FairyGhost, DarkPsychic15NoneNone
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 14TorchicFireRock, Water, GroundGrass, Fire, Ice, Bug, Steel, FairyNone5NoneNone
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 15PhanpyGroundWater, Ice, GrassPoison, RockElectric13NoneNone
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 16Nidoran <F>PoisonGround, PsychicGrass, Fighting, Poison, Bug, FairyNone3NoneNone
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 17Nidoran <M>PoisonGround, PsychicGrass, Fighting, Poison, Bug, FairyNone15NoneNone
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 18KlefkiSteelFire, Fighting, GroundNormal, Grass, Ice, Flying, Psychic, Bug, Rock, Dragon, Steel, FairyPoison16NoneNone
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 19KangaskhanNormalFightingNoneGhost15NoneNone
    Sandy Bazaar: Stage 20Mega KangaskhanNormalFightingNoneGhost20NoneWin Kangaskhanite (Kangakshan's Mega Stone) & Jewel on 3DS; in Mobile, get Kangaskhanite, 5 Hearts, and Mega Start (first win only)
    
    

    Area 3: Night Festival

    Note that, in Pokémon Shuffle Mobile, you cannot play Stage 30 (Mega Sableye) without having caught at least 15 Pokémon. The 3DS game has no such limitations.

    
    
    GENERAL STAGE DATA
    Stage #PokémonTypeWeaknessesResistancesNear-ImmuneMovesOther RestrictionsOther Notes
    Night Festival: Stage 21BunearyNormalFightingNoneGhost30NoneNone
    Night Festival: Stage 22TreeckoGrassFire, Ice, Flying, Bug, PoisonWater, Grass, Electric, GroundNone15NoneNone
    Night Festival: Stage 23PikachuElectricGroundElectric, Flying, SteelNone73 Pokémon onlyNone
    Night Festival: Stage 24SableyeDarkBug, Fighting, FairyGhost, DarkPsychic15NoneNone
    Night Festival: Stage 25LitwickGhostDark, GhostPoison, BugFighting, Normal15NoneNone
    Night Festival: Stage 26ChinglingPsychicDark, Ghost, BugFighting, PsychicNone15NoneNone
    Night Festival: Stage 27SwirlixFairyPoison, SteelBug, Fighting, DarkDragon16NoneNone
    Night Festival: Stage 28VolbeatBugFire, Rock, FlyingGrass, Fighting, GroundNone15NoneNone
    Night Festival: Stage 29IllumiseBugFire, Rock, FlyingGrass, Fighting, GroundNone15NoneNone
    Night Festival: Stage 30Mega SableyeDarkBug, Fighting, FairyGhost, DarkPsychic15NoneWin Sablenite (Sableye's Mega Stone) & Jewel on 3DS; in Mobile, get Sablenite and 5 Hearts (first win only)
    
    

    Area 4: Isla Asul

    GENERAL STAGE DATA
    Stage #PokémonTypeWeaknessesResistancesNear-ImmuneMovesOther RestrictionsOther Notes
    Isla Asul: Stage 31SlowpokePsychicDark, Ghost, BugFighting, PsychicNone19NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 32AzurillFairyPoison, SteelBug, Fighting, DarkDragon16NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 33RioluFightingFlying, Fairy, PsychicBug, Rock, DarkNone15NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 34SwabluFlyingIce, Rock, ElectricGrass, Fighting, BugGround63 Pokémon onlyNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 35SurskitBugFire, Rock, FlyingGrass, Fighting, GroundNone15NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 36TaillowFlyingIce, Rock, ElectricGrass, Fighting, BugGround5NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 37MeowthNormalFightingNoneGhost8NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 38CroagunkPoisonGround, PsychicGrass, Fighting, Poison, Bug, FairyNone15NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 39CorsolaWaterGrass, ElectricFire, Water, Ice, Steel,None16NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 40MarillFairyPoison, SteelBug, Fighting, DarkDragon3NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 41MudkipWaterGrass, ElectricFire, Water, Ice, Steel,None15NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 42VulpixFireRock, Water, GroundGrass, Fire, Ice, Bug, Steel, FairyNone5NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 43LaprasWaterGrass, ElectricFire, Water, Ice, Steel,None15NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 44PidgeottoFlyingIce, Rock, ElectricGrass, Fighting, BugGround15NoneNone
    Isla Asul: Stage 45Mega SlowbroPsychicDark, Ghost, BugFighting, PsychicNone23NoneWin Slowbronite (Slowpoke's Mega Stone) & Jewel on 3DS; in Mobile, get Slowbronite and 5 Hearts (first win only)
    
    

    Area 5: Rainbow Park

    Note that, in Pokémon Shuffle Mobile, you cannot play Stage 60 (Mega Lopunny) without having caught at least 35 Pokémon. The 3DS game has no such limitations.

    
    
    GENERAL STAGE DATA
    Stage #PokémonTypeWeaknessesResistancesNear-ImmuneMovesOther RestrictionsOther Notes
    Rainbow Park: Stage 46MinccinoNormalFightingNoneGhost53 Pokémon onlyNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 47VanilliteIceFighting, Fire, Rock, SteelIceNone15NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 48ChatotFlyingIce, Rock, ElectricGrass, Fighting, BugGround16NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 49AxewDragonIce, Dragon, FairyFire, Water, Grass, ElectricNone15NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 50ZoruaDarkBug, Fighting, FairyGhost, DarkPsychic15NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 51MawileSteelFire, Fighting, GroundNormal, Grass, Ice, Flying, Psychic, Bug, Rock, Dragon, Steel, FairyPoison3NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 52LopunnyNormalFightingNoneGhost53 Pokémon onlyNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 53FlaaffyElectricGroundElectric, Flying, SteelNone15NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 54VaporeonWaterGrass, ElectricFire, Water, Ice, Steel,None15NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 55CharmeleonFireRock, Water, GroundGrass, Fire, Ice, Bug, Steel, FairyNone15NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 56BuizelWaterGrass, ElectricFire, Water, Ice, Steel,None16NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 57WartortleWaterGrass, ElectricFire, Water, Ice, Steel,None15NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 58HawluchaFightingFlying, Fairy, PsychicBug, Rock, DarkNone9NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 59IvysaurGrassFire, Ice, Flying, Bug, PoisonWater, Grass, Electric, GroundNone3NoneNone
    Rainbow Park: Stage 60Mega LopunnyNormalFightingNoneGhost20NoneWin Lopunnite (Mega Stone of Lopunny) & Jewel on 3DS; on Mobile, get Lopunnite and 5 Hearts (first win only)
    
    

    Area 6: Galerie Rouge

    GENERAL STAGE DATA
    Stage #PokémonTypeWeaknessesResistancesNear-ImmuneMovesOther RestrictionsOther Notes
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 61BonslyRockWater, Ground, Steel, Grass, FightingNormal, Fire, Flying, PoisonNone16NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 62GastlyGhostDark, GhostPoison, BugFighting, Normal11NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 63MarshtompWaterGrass, ElectricFire, Water, Ice, Steel,None15NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 64DratiniDragonIce, Dragon, FairyFire, Water, Grass, ElectricNone53 Pokémon onlyNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 65AmauraRockWater, Ground, Steel, Grass, FightingNormal, Fire, Flying, PoisonNone15NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 66CombuskenFireRock, Water, GroundGrass, Fire, Ice, Bug, Steel, FairyNone3NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 67Meowstic <M>PsychicDark, Ghost, BugFighting, PsychicNone15NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 68TogeticFairyPoison, SteelBug, Fighting, DarkDragon5NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 69SlowbroPsychicDark, Ghost, BugFighting, PsychicNone7NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 70UmbreonDarkBug, Fighting, FairyGhost, DarkPsychic15NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 71EspeonPsychicDark, Ghost, BugFighting, PsychicNone15NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 72GrovyleGrassFire, Ice, Flying, Bug, PoisonWater, Grass, Electric, GroundNone4NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 73SwellowFlyingIce, Rock, ElectricGrass, Fighting, BugGround16NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 74CuboneGroundWater, Ice, GrassPoison, RockElectric15NoneNone
    Galerie Rouge: Stage 75Mega AltariaDragonIce, Dragon, FairyFire, Water, Grass, ElectricNone20NoneWin Altarianite (Altaria's Mega Stone) & Jewel on 3DS; in Mobile, get Altarianite and 5 Hearts (first win only)
    
    
    NOTE: Renaming

    Prior to version 1.2.0, this area was known as the Bonbon Boulevard. The v1.2.0 update renamed it to Sweet Strasse. Don't ask me why...

    
    

    Note that, in Pokémon Shuffle Mobile, you cannot play Stage 90 (Mega Mawile) without having caught at least 55 Pokémon. The 3DS game has no such limitations.

    
    
    GENERAL STAGE DATA
    Stage #PokémonTypeWeaknessesResistancesNear-ImmuneMovesOther RestrictionsOther Notes
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 76AzumarillFairyPoison, SteelBug, Fighting, DarkDragon16NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 77MienfooFightingFlying, Fairy, PsychicBug, Rock, DarkNone15NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 78SnoruntIceFighting, Fire, Rock, SteelIceNone15NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 79SylveonFairyPoison, SteelBug, Fighting, DarkDragon15NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 80MiltankNormalFightingNoneGhost16NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 81Meowstic <F>PsychicDark, Ghost, BugFighting, PsychicNone7NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 82MasquerainBugFire, Rock, FlyingGrass, Fighting, GroundNone15NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 83CottoneeGrassFire, Ice, Flying, Bug, PoisonWater, Grass, Electric, GroundNone53 Pokémon onlyNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 84PetililGrassFire, Ice, Flying, Bug, PoisonWater, Grass, Electric, GroundNone15NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 85DedenneElectricGroundElectric, Flying, SteelNone15NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 86SlurpuffFairyPoison, SteelBug, Fighting, DarkDragon16NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 87LiepardDarkBug, Fighting, FairyGhost, DarkPsychic15NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 88ChanseyNormalFightingNoneGhost33 Pokémon onlyNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 89GulpinPoisonGround, PsychicGrass, Fighting, Poison, Bug, FairyNone16NoneNone
    Sweet Strasse: Stage 90Mega MawileSteelFire, Fighting, GroundNormal, Grass, Ice, Flying, Psychic, Bug, Rock, Dragon, Steel, FairyPoison20NoneWin Mawilite (Mega Stone for Mawile) & Jewel on 3DS; win Mawilite and 5 Hearts on Mobile (first win only)
    
    

    Area 8: Silbern Museum

    GENERAL STAGE DATA
    Stage #PokémonTypeWeaknessesResistancesNear-ImmuneMovesOther RestrictionsOther Notes
    Silbern Museum: Stage 91BronzorSteelFire, Fighting, GroundNormal, Grass, Ice, Flying, Psychic, Bug, Rock, Dragon, Steel, FairyPoison16NoneNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 92EmolgaElectricGroundElectric, Flying, SteelNone53 Pokémon onlyNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 93SudowoodoRockWater, Ground, Steel, Grass, FightingNormal, Fire, Flying, PoisonNone15NoneNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 94ScytherBugFire, Rock, FlyingGrass, Fighting, GroundNone15NoneNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 95NidorinaPoisonGround, PsychicGrass, Fighting, Poison, Bug, FairyNone163 Pokémon onlyNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 96NidorinoPoisonGround, PsychicGrass, Fighting, Poison, Bug, FairyNone15NoneNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 97CarbinkRockWater, Ground, Steel, Grass, FightingNormal, Fire, Flying, PoisonNone5NoneNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 98ThrohFightingFlying, Fairy, PsychicBug, Rock, DarkNone15NoneNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 99SawkFightingFlying, Fairy, PsychicBug, Rock, DarkNone15NoneNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 100ChimechoPsychicDark, Ghost, BugFighting, PsychicNone163 Pokémon onlyNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 101DonphanGroundWater, Ice, GrassPoison, RockElectric53 Pokémon onlyNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 102FraxureDragonIce, Dragon, FairyFire, Water, Grass, ElectricNone15NoneNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 103RaichuElectricGroundElectric, Flying, SteelNone133 Pokémon onlyNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 104AerodactylRockWater, Ground, Steel, Grass, FightingNormal, Fire, Flying, PoisonNone15NoneNone
    Silbern Museum: Stage 105Mega AmpharosElectricGroundElectric, Flying, SteelNone20NoneWin Ampharosite (Ampharos's Mega Stone) & Jewel on 3DS; on Mobile, win 5 Hearts and Ampharosite (first win only)