TRADES THREAD (not so secret Yonic HVAC Chronicles Blog thread)

  • Topic Archived
You're browsing the GameFAQs Message Boards as a guest. Sign Up for free (or Log In if you already have an account) to be able to post messages, change how messages are displayed, and view media in posts.
  1. Boards
  2. Cars and Trucks
  3. TRADES THREAD (not so secret Yonic HVAC Chronicles Blog thread)

User Info: YonicBoom

YonicBoom
3 weeks ago#61
Day 13 (yesterday, missed post because didn't feel like it)

https://i.imgur.com/N4mXbylh.jpg

So the other week we tested capacitors. Monday night we played around with really cool multi capacitors that have a bunch of other capacitors you can jump several terminals to "make" the capacitance you need for a specific thing in case you lack the correct part. This also served to teach that you can run multiple capacitors in parallel to reach a higher capacitance rating than you have with one, as capacitance is additive in parallel. If run in series, it's slightly more complicated (same as calculating resistors in parallel) but the overall effect is a lower capacitance, which could be useful in a pinch.

Day 14:

Into the lab we go! This time we attempted to pull a vacuum on recovery tanks. The EPA doesn't smile until the tank is sucked down to a cool 1000 microns or below. That said, nice things don't always happen and I learned the hard way that sometimes your s*** just doesn't want to pull a vacuum...

https://i.imgur.com/o4yZztGh.jpg

So I set everything up correctly and started pulling the vacuum. Things went well until about 980 microns, when it stopped going any lower. My lab partner decided it was a cool idea to tighten the hell out of all the connectors on everything, and then the microns slowly crept up...

https://i.imgur.com/1SFA9vth.jpg

Turns out the cylinder's just junk. We tried several combinations of vacuum pumps and manifold gauges/hoses. Nothing doing. Prof shook his head and said "well, it's not always gonna be pretty in the field either." I learned a lot from it, including how to use 2 pumps at the same time to try and scrounge for precious microns.

https://i.imgur.com/3dmolrjh.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/cbDw7Lgh.jpg

One group forgot to open the exhaust port on their vacuum pump and wound up blasting oil all over the place. It was hilarious. Thank god nobody was in the blast radius. No pics of the aftermath, it was cleaned up quite promptly. Another group learned the hard way that you can "read" empty on a tank in terms of gauge pressure but still have refrigerant inside. Delicious fumes were enjoyed by all.

All in all, a fun lesson. 100% common sense, and eventually I gave up on the manifold gauges and started going direct from the tank to the pump because of how many times I had to change setups to try and isolate the vacuum leak. I still think the one guy torquing down the connectors did bad things (o-rings not sealing properly) but there was no way around the leakage.
All these boomas like me.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVkkHVl8QvE

User Info: r4X0r

r4X0r
3 weeks ago#62
"100% common sense"

You'd be amazed how uncommon common sense is on an actual job site.
Professionals are predictable- it's the amateurs who are dangerous.

User Info: YonicBoom

YonicBoom
3 weeks ago#63
I mean, most things only work 1 way. If you can logic your way through the flow of refrigerant through hoses, or the flow of electricity between things, or remember to close valves all the way before removing a hose from a fitting, you're gonna do fine. Deviations from that "1 way" produce different results depending on what's going on, and that's diagnostics.

People are dumb though, so yeah...
All these boomas like me.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVkkHVl8QvE

User Info: Albtraum13

Albtraum13
3 weeks ago#64
Putting common sense on your resume makes you shine like a bright star.

User Info: r4X0r

r4X0r
3 weeks ago#65
Most things only work one way. It all SEEMS simple until you get some dumbass in the field who finds another way. When you're on the job, never, ever under estimate the stupidity of the people you're working with. A recent flashback is a total neanderthal who decided to remove a scaffold fastener BEFORE installing the new one, because the existing one was in the way of a conduit path. The whole scaffold shifted a very slight bit, maybe an eighth of an inch, but it scared the f*** out of me. We were 20 floors up in Manhattan and I can deal with heights if I HAVE to, I'm not really all that cool with it. Shifting the scaffold around suddenly, f*** that noise.

A pretty good solution I've found is to find out who's got the best injury stories. Then stay the hell away from them.
Professionals are predictable- it's the amateurs who are dangerous.

User Info: gwwak

gwwak
3 weeks ago#66
Heh my boss had an interesting injury story. A whole floor collapsed on his head and the only thing he remembers is waking up in the hospital. After that he decided on a career change.

He also has seen people shoot themselves in the foot with a nail gun. Also there was a guy who dug through a natural gas line despite being told where it is and how deep it was. After the fail dig the guy decided to take off instead of owning up to his stupidity. Needless to say, that contractor didn't get paid for the dig.
Hardcore - We'll probably be modded for this...
Come visit The Range http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1003-

User Info: YonicBoom

YonicBoom
3 weeks ago#67
Ok, I've got a story that the prof told the class today.

- Prof's friend was the maintenance boss of a place with lots of large chillers that hold LOTS of refrigerant
- These sorts of places are required by ASHRAE code to have detectors with alarms (much like CO detectors) that alert you to large refrigerant leaks, and a ventilation system in place to get rid of it in case it happens
- Obviously refrigerant can asphyxiate you pretty quickly
- Refrigerant that doesn't kill you kindly can still do it by getting in your bloodstream and f***ing your s*** up
- Boss and his employee go to work on something
- Boss has gone his entire time working here knowing that the alarm/vent system is non-functional, no logs or records of any inspections exist, etc
- Refrigerant leak happens
- Boss and his employee are next found wretching outside the building and have to be hauled off to the hospital
- Both nearly die
- Both have to be hooked up to machines and have their blood removed and put back in/transfusions/etc for 2 weeks in order to remove the refrigerant from their souls
- When they arrive back at work, the alarm/vent system is mysteriously functional
- documentation suddenly exists
- faked inspection dates on all the equipment appear

If I get into commercial refrigeration, I'm buying a portable detector/alarm. f*** being killed by dumb s***.
All these boomas like me.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVkkHVl8QvE

User Info: PDXRoverMech

PDXRoverMech
3 weeks ago#68
When my dad was in HS shop class, yeah that actually existed back then, some kid with long hair got caught up in the lathe and it ripped most of his scalp off.

User Info: PDXRoverMech

PDXRoverMech
3 weeks ago#69
YonicBoom posted...
Ok, I've got a story that the prof told the class today.

- Prof's friend was the maintenance boss of a place with lots of large chillers that hold LOTS of refrigerant
- These sorts of places are required by ASHRAE code to have detectors with alarms (much like CO detectors) that alert you to large refrigerant leaks, and a ventilation system in place to get rid of it in case it happens
- Obviously refrigerant can asphyxiate you pretty quickly
- Refrigerant that doesn't kill you kindly can still do it by getting in your bloodstream and f***ing your s*** up
- Boss and his employee go to work on something
- Boss has gone his entire time working here knowing that the alarm/vent system is non-functional, no logs or records of any inspections exist, etc
- Refrigerant leak happens
- Boss and his employee are next found wretching outside the building and have to be hauled off to the hospital
- Both nearly die
- Both have to be hooked up to machines and have their blood removed and put back in/transfusions/etc for 2 weeks in order to remove the refrigerant from their souls
- When they arrive back at work, the alarm/vent system is mysteriously functional
- documentation suddenly exists
- faked inspection dates on all the equipment appear

If I get into commercial refrigeration, I'm buying a portable detector/alarm. f*** being killed by dumb s***.

Damn. If I’m doing an engine swap I wait to crack the lines right before I go home and just call it good.

User Info: YonicBoom

YonicBoom
3 weeks ago#70
PDXRoverMech posted...
When my dad was in HS shop class, yeah that actually existed back then, some kid with long hair got caught up in the lathe and it ripped most of his scalp off.


What is a hat
What is a hair tie
All these boomas like me.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVkkHVl8QvE
  1. Boards
  2. Cars and Trucks
  3. TRADES THREAD (not so secret Yonic HVAC Chronicles Blog thread)

Report Message

Terms of Use Violations:

Etiquette Issues:

Notes (optional; required for "Other"):
Add user to Ignore List after reporting

Topic Sticky

You are not allowed to request a sticky.

  • Topic Archived