DMed my second game of DnD yesterday.

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Well, if it was, I would certainly feel better now!

But yeah, I was mostly just interested in the D&D podcasts, because it seems like that's what most of the actual likeable personalities with a view towards "game-as-entertainment" seem to play, as opposed to people who are either less likeable/more grating or who are clearly treating it more as just a documenting of their normal playstyle.

I couldn't even get into Foreververse when they were doing their 7th Sea run in spite of liking that system. And I've never been able to get into Heroes and Halfwits in spite of liking all of the Rooster Teeth guys because their DM irritates me (and I don't watch Twits and Crits because it's behind the paywall).

At this point, I'm mostly just watching the Acq Inc. stuff, Critical Role, Dice Camera Action (which I just finished binging to catch up on, mainly because of Perkins being the DM and because of the Holly Conrad/Strix guest appearance in the main Acq Inc game), and I've just started slogging through the Yogscast crew game (partly because I liked their guest appearances on DCA, and partly from watching them play on the Stream of Annihilation).

I suppose I technically also watch Force Grey, but that's less of a show and more of a mini-series sort of deal.

"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family

User Info: shadowsword87

shadowsword87
1 month ago#242
ParanoidObsessive posted...
Well, if it was, I would certainly feel better now!


Oh please, RPG-related stuff is just half of what I listen to!
I am going to double down on the Fear the Boot Actual Play podcast though, I heavily recommend it:
http://ap.feartheboot.com/
There's only 9 episodes so far so it's not too much to actually catch up on, but holy crap they're amazing.
(edited 1 month ago)
shadowsword87 posted...
Oh please, RPG-related stuff is just half of what I listen to!

Yeah, but my point was that, if I was starting to feel bad about listening to too much D&D/RP, then the fact that you're clearly listening to way more WOULD make me feel better.

As for it only being half of what you listen to, I probably listen to/watch more wrestling and video game stuff per week than I do RPG (my main channels are basically everything Rooster Teeth, Outside Xbox, Playstation Access, WhatCulture, WhatCulture Gaming, WhatCulture Wrestling, WrestleTalk, and Wrestling with Wregret, plus PreRec and RedLetterMedia when they come out with stuff, and I generally try to keep up with most new videos for each channel). But YouTube has pretty much become TV for me at this point.

Plus most of the time I'm listening to RP stuff is usually in tandem with playing Minecraft, where like I said in the Geek topic, I'm basically covering an entire world in cobblestone (about 750,000 blocks) - in Survival Mode - because I am a sick person. Made sicker because, since the last time I mentioned it, I decided to box in the sides as well (which is going to take another 500,000 blocks or so).

"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family
Oh, and here's something else I've been considering:

Material Components - does anyone actually like/use them as a mechanic?

I know they've been a thing since pretty much forever, but I've always loathed them as a concept (even in other systems, like Warhammer), and I've noticed that almost none of the more casual D&D games I watch use them at all (except to occasionally mention someone spreading flower petals or whatever as flavor-fluff that is never brought up again, and no one ever has to buy or harvest components as they travel).

So I was wondering if people here are more inclined to actually use them as presented, forcing players to constantly restock supplies or be unable to cast spells, or if pretty much everyone other than the hardest of hardcore grognards brush off the mechanic entirely and straight up ignore it.

And on a more or less related note:

Spellcasting Focus - 5e rules allow a spellcaster to substitute a "Spellcasting Focus" instead of using material components in a spell, which is sort of like how a clerical holy symbol works mechanically, except for arcane casters instead. They list stuff like crystal balls, orbs, rods, staves, etc. as recommended focuses (foci), with Druids having their own separate list (of stuff like mistletoe, sickles, etc). It's seemingly presented as being entirely optional, though, and it seems like it would be completely unnecessary in a game where a DM didn't require material components. Indeed, in much the same way none of the spellcasters in the various podcast games I watch ever use material components, none of them seem to use foci either.

I do remember this specifically being more of a required thing in 4e (at least, I remember giving my Sorcerer runic daggers and my Warlock had a staff because of it, and I don't remember it being optional), but in the same vein, I don't remember Perkins ever really requiring it in the 4e Acq Inc games (though Jim's obsession with wands more or less fills that niche anyway - and ironically, his tendency to treat them like holstered guns actually echoes one of the earliest D&D characters in Gygax's home campaign, who was more or less a Wild West gunslinger-type mage).

So, does anyone here use/require foci in games? Or is that something else that most groups simply ignore as being too cumbersome/restrictive?

"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family

User Info: Mario_VS_DK

Mario_VS_DK
1 month ago#245
In Pathfinder, components are pretty simple to deal with.

You just have a spell component pouch that is assumed to have any component or focus without a written value, and you are assumed to stock it back up whenever you're in town.

For components with a cost, you're assumed to have them and just subtract the cost from your gold whenever you cast it. For foci, it's just a one time cost in most cases. (If it asks for a weapon, you're certainly not going to be pulling that out of a small pouch.)

And that's the rules as they are written. If you want to do it a different way, either steal their component pouches while they're far away from civilization or OK it with them first. It would add a lot of extra bookkeeping if you decide not to do it that way.
Stupid signature!
(edited 1 month ago)

User Info: Lightning Bolt

Lightning Bolt
1 month ago#246
Materials are basically the "Arcane Focus". Instead of a symbol of god, it's a bag. So nah, I don't feel much need to keep track of the details. Adds very little fun gameplay, and inventory management in general is very "solo play" which I don't like to encourage.
Reflavoring the bag to an orb is fine, whatever their cute little hearts desire.

I wouldn't remove them, since players won't use them unless there's a reason to, and they feel neat so I want to encourage them. Though making them optional and giving them bonus stats could work. It's so harmless to require it that I usually just do so in case I want to play with the mechanic at some point. Rare materials, getting captured and losing materials, expensive materials, and such work. Not a fan of inventory management and travel preparation usually.

Inventory management being the micromanaging of amounts of supplies and consumables you'll need. Magical item upgrades, allocating your money as a power budget, is fine, though a little stale in execution in some games.
One day dude, I'm just gonna get off the bus, and I'm gonna run in the woods and never come back, and when I come back I'm gonna be the knife master!
-The Rev
(edited 1 month ago)
Mario_VS_DK posted...
In Pathfinder, components are pretty simple to deal with. You just have a spell component pouch that is assumed to have any component or focus without a written value, and you are assumed to stock it back up whenever you're in town.

It's the same in 5e. Basically, you can use a component pouch in the same way you use a focus - ie, substitute it for any material component that doesn't have a cost.

What I'm basically asking is if anyone ever uses a more active material component system, assuming that players don't bypass it entirely by using foci or pouches that way. Or if literally everyone bypasses it via the provided workarounds. Or just ignores it entirely.



Lightning Bolt posted...
Materials are basically the "Arcane Focus". Instead of a symbol of god, it's a bag.

Well, no. The Arcane Focus for an arcane spellcaster is literally an Arcane Focus (or more broadly, a Spellcasting Focus, with Arcane Focus being more specifically for Wizard and the like, with Druid Focus as a separate category of Spellcasting Focus that works for Druids).

Materials are a separate system which, as-written, can be replaced by a focus which is analogous to a holy symbol.

It might sound like semantics, but there IS a separate step in there, which is sort of at the root of the question I'm asking.

Though the fact that every answer to the question so far seems to miss that might in and of itself be the answer to the question.



Lightning Bolt posted...
and inventory management in general is very "solo play" which I don't like to encourage

In a similar vein, I'm also not a fan of Encumbrance rules - but that's an entirely different discussion.

"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family

User Info: I_Abibde

I_Abibde
1 month ago#248
ParanoidObsessive posted...
Does anyone actually like/use them as a mechanic?


No. I suspect those components originally existed to help balance the magic-using classes (i.e. reduce their overpoweredness at high levels), but, in my experience, all they do is slow down play and add one more element to track.
-- I Abibde / Samuraiter
Laughing at Game FAQs since 2002.

User Info: Babbit55

Babbit55
1 month ago#249
I_Abibde posted...
ParanoidObsessive posted...
Does anyone actually like/use them as a mechanic?


No. I suspect those components originally existed to help balance the magic-using classes (i.e. reduce their overpoweredness at high levels), but, in my experience, all they do is slow down play and add one more element to track.


The basic spell comps are included in a bag that is deemed to restock. Just certain spells require a more advanced comp, like a 100g gem for Identify. They are the only ones you need to worry about.
#250
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