DMed my second game of DnD yesterday.

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User Info: shadowsword87

shadowsword87
4 weeks ago#271
Of course it will be a different system, don't be silly. I was thinking about making a Fiasco playset actually. Maybe a FATE game just super powered down.
The point remains the same, though. Most systems are aimed at very specific types of play, and with everything else being somewhat secondary. You CAN play those systems outside of their own comfort zone, as it were, but at a certain point it's going to involve a lot of homebrew, house rules, and winging it.

The fact that in your specific example you're defaulting to extremely generic systems, where you'd basically be building your specific mechanics from the ground up, just sort of underlines that.

It's not just a question of D&D, because that implies that D&D itself is the problem. But in the same vein, no one goes into Call of Cthulhu with the intentions of playing a game like Toon, no one goes into a game of Risk trying to achieve a "World Peace" cultural ending, and no one is going to play Traveller from the point-of-view of a comic book super hero.

Most systems that try to be everything to everyone either wind up so overly complicated and frustrating that no one wants to use them for anything, or they wind up reduced to such simplistic generic systems that the GM winds up having to do most of the work themselves anyway (which isn't necessarily a bad thing, but still).

Very few games require elaborate crafting rules, because there are very few games where crafting is the core gameplay ethos.

"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family

User Info: shadowsword87

shadowsword87
4 weeks ago#273
ParanoidObsessive posted...
and no one is going to play Traveller from the point-of-view of a comic book super hero.


You can totally become a psychic though! Just go to prison, you're more likely to become one.

User Info: I_Abibde

I_Abibde
4 weeks ago#274
ParanoidObsessive posted...
But in the same vein, no one goes into Call of Cthulhu with the intentions of playing a game like Toon.


....

That would be equal parts disturbing and amusing.
-- I Abibde / Samuraiter
Laughing at Game FAQs since 2002.

User Info: Babbit55

Babbit55
4 weeks ago#275
Soooo my Human Rogue retired (While not planned or forced, made sense for something that happened to the chara)

Thoughts on my new chara Pixie Warmage (3.5e)
GT:- Babbit55

User Info: shadowsword87

shadowsword87
4 weeks ago#276
Bump

User Info: KthulhuX

KthulhuX
4 weeks ago#277
Lightning Bolt posted...
ParanoidObsessive posted...
Materials are a separate system which, as-written, can be replaced by a focus which is analogous to a holy symbol.

I'm aware. I don't feel much need to keep track of the details. Inventory management is an unfun thing so I just use the bag as a holy symbol mechanically.

Put the inventory management off on the player, with periodic checks. Spell casters are the most overpowered characters in the game, and handwaving away potential limits on their power only exasperates the problem. Despite that, I have seen GMs that strictly enforce the need to purchase, scavenge, and keep track of an archer's arrows; yet they let spellcasters purchase a spell component bag at first level and proceed to pull absolutely anything (from sand to diamonds) out of it for the entirety of that character's career.

User Info: Babbit55

Babbit55
4 weeks ago#278
KthulhuX posted...
Lightning Bolt posted...
ParanoidObsessive posted...
Materials are a separate system which, as-written, can be replaced by a focus which is analogous to a holy symbol.

I'm aware. I don't feel much need to keep track of the details. Inventory management is an unfun thing so I just use the bag as a holy symbol mechanically.

Put the inventory management off on the player, with periodic checks. Spell casters are the most overpowered characters in the game, and handwaving away potential limits on their power only exasperates the problem. Despite that, I have seen GMs that strictly enforce the need to purchase, scavenge, and keep track of an archer's arrows; yet they let spellcasters purchase a spell component bag at first level and proceed to pull absolutely anything (from sand to diamonds) out of it for the entirety of that character's career.


Generally the rule for caster comps is mundane crap needed for a lot of spells is renewed when you go town (Small cost up to the GM) Though the more defined components (100g gem for Identify) you need to pay and get.
GT:- Babbit55
PC - i5 4670k, 16g ram, RX 480, 2tb hybrid drive.
KthulhuX posted...
Spell casters are the most overpowered characters in the game, and handwaving away potential limits on their power only exasperates the problem.

I feel like the main check on spellcaster power is that most of them have very limited HP, and an intelligent GM playing NPCs they way NPCs would actually behave can exploit that.

To wit, if you're an NPC in a fantasy world where magic exists, and you KNOW magic exists, and a group of people show up to kill you, you can probably tell just by looking at them what their specialties are (the dude wearing full plate armor and holding a greatsword is pretty clearly a warrior of some kind, while the a****** in the back wearing robes and holding a staff is probably a wizard). And if you know that powerful wizards can throw fireballs or pull meteors out of the sky, the most intelligent thing you can possibly do is gank the caster first (especially since most of them are generally weak, and will go down to a few hits). Clear the field of major threats and mop up the walking tanks afterward.

(And there's the added bonus of, even if you don't kill the wizard in one hit, you're still likely to break their concentration when you smack them in the face with an axe, which limits their utility a bit when it comes to prolonged spells.)

In a similar vein, if you're in a fight and you see one of the enemies going around healing their allies, they should probably become priority target number 1. Being able to knock opponents down doesn't matter if you can't KEEP them down.

A lot of people today sort of have the mentality (spawned by MMO design) that Tanks exist to draw aggro and take hits, so enemies should always focus on them first (allowing the back row spellcasters to do their job), but realistically speaking, NPCs should prioritize magic users as the primary threat and do everything in their power to kill them ASAP.

Tanks and Defender-type characters can still lock down enemies (in D&D, mainly by getting up in their grill and forcing attacks of opportunity if they try to go after your squishier allies), but NPCs should in no way be obligated to play along with that strategy (especially if they have bonus disengage abilities or ranged attacks of their own).

There's also the potential balance from the fact that, while spellcasters get insanely potent at higher levels, most of them are incredibly fragile at lower levels. So depending on how you play, they may get the whole team killed early on anyway.

"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family

User Info: shadowsword87

shadowsword87
4 weeks ago#280
There's the other factor that people don't follow a lot:
It's a f***ing game I play with my friends and I don't care about small things that don't impact the story.
(edited 4 weeks ago)
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