Why don't consoles come in more colour options?

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User Info: SigmaLongshot

SigmaLongshot
3 years ago#11
Troll_Directory posted...
SigmaLongshot posted...
Oh, and I have no idea why Americans altered the native "colour". The "ou" sound in the word designates a diluted vowel that lasts a fraction longer than the "o" in the first syllable. So though it doesn't go on long enough to sound like "Cuhl-ow-er, the lips begin that motion as the second syllable ends.

ELOCUTION, BABY!
speaking of rhotic, when's the last time you heard a so-called native english speaker pronounce the "r" in that word? i'm guessing it was just prior to the american revolutionary war.

not very elocutionary, to drop the pronunciation of a letter for reasons contempt and condescension. (i kid, sort of)


The English pronounce the vowels with a greater degree of emphasis. We Scots are a lot more aggressive with the consonants, which is really the biggest difference in the dialect.

I'm not saying I speak the Queen's English perfectly, I'm saying I know the theory behind it, and was just explaining what you brought up, that's all.
Double Jump Game Comics: http://doublejump.thecomicseries.com/

User Info: Troll_Directory

Troll_Directory
3 years ago#12
SigmaLongshot posted...
Troll_Directory posted...
SigmaLongshot posted...
Oh, and I have no idea why Americans altered the native "colour". The "ou" sound in the word designates a diluted vowel that lasts a fraction longer than the "o" in the first syllable. So though it doesn't go on long enough to sound like "Cuhl-ow-er, the lips begin that motion as the second syllable ends.

ELOCUTION, BABY!
speaking of rhotic, when's the last time you heard a so-called native english speaker pronounce the "r" in that word? i'm guessing it was just prior to the american revolutionary war.

not very elocutionary, to drop the pronunciation of a letter for reasons contempt and condescension. (i kid, sort of)


The English pronounce the vowels with a greater degree of emphasis. We Scots are a lot more aggressive with the consonants, which is really the biggest difference in the dialect.

I'm not saying I speak the Queen's English perfectly, I'm saying I know the theory behind it, and was just explaining what you brought up, that's all.
i got it. my irish grandmother came to the states on a boat. and to my ear, the scots might be closer to the mark than most: http://youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s

User Info: SigmaLongshot

SigmaLongshot
3 years ago#13
Troll_Directory posted...
SigmaLongshot posted...
Troll_Directory posted...
SigmaLongshot posted...
Oh, and I have no idea why Americans altered the native "colour". The "ou" sound in the word designates a diluted vowel that lasts a fraction longer than the "o" in the first syllable. So though it doesn't go on long enough to sound like "Cuhl-ow-er, the lips begin that motion as the second syllable ends.

ELOCUTION, BABY!
speaking of rhotic, when's the last time you heard a so-called native english speaker pronounce the "r" in that word? i'm guessing it was just prior to the american revolutionary war.

not very elocutionary, to drop the pronunciation of a letter for reasons contempt and condescension. (i kid, sort of)


The English pronounce the vowels with a greater degree of emphasis. We Scots are a lot more aggressive with the consonants, which is really the biggest difference in the dialect.

I'm not saying I speak the Queen's English perfectly, I'm saying I know the theory behind it, and was just explaining what you brought up, that's all.
i got it. my irish grandmother came to the states on a boat. and to my ear, the scots might be closer to the mark than most: http://youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s


I have to say, though that's not really Scottish/Irish tongue per se, you're definitely along the right lines in terms of the lingual differences. 17th century English nuances are mostly heard in places like Yorkshire, Gloucestershire, etc - that's what the clip references, but you're right on the money referencing Scottish and Irish dialects being very similar. It's because the English language continued to evolve to sound a lot more like mainland Europe (with lots of deep, vowel-heavy sounds, whilst us in Scotland worked from the Celtic tongue and adapted ancient English to suit our own dialects.

Here's a wee example - my mum is from Gloucester. When she says "bowl", she pronounces it, "Boe-oo" (with only the slightest hint of the "l" at the end). When I say "bowl", I pronounce it, "Bole" (with extra stress on the "l").

I'm guessing that the evolved American-English is more influenced by the English rather than the Scottish/Irish tongue en-masse.

Hey, sorry for going so far off-topic. You piqued my interest there.

But yeah, Console colours - hidden marketing complexity which far outweigh the financial returns.
Double Jump Game Comics: http://doublejump.thecomicseries.com/

User Info: Sith Jedi

Sith Jedi
3 years ago#14
Exodus_Prime posted...
You guys want colors? you want a white Xbox One? why wait just go here and BEHOLD.



http://www.decalgirl.com/skins/Microsoft-Xbox-One-Skins


I usually not a decal guy... but if I get an XB1, I have to have that NES skin.
https://www.youtube.com/user/Bandin6385/
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