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How long do you think the current phase will last?

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  3. How long do you think the current phase will last?

User Info: whitesamurai

whitesamurai
1 month ago#1
So the 90s through early 2000s was the RPG era and it transitioned into local multiplayer shooters --> online shooters. The era of MMOs exploded with WoW, Runescape, and Maplestory (early version).

Not too far into these, MOBAs really kicked off along with evolved forms of shooters. That era is still dominant, even more so than open world rpgs like Skyrim/GTA/TW3/etc.

The issue is that the attempts to increase revenue have lead to developers trying to instill a whole new era of gaming as a service model. Dota, mobile games like candy crush/gacha games/RTS cash shops, GTAO currency, and Overwatch lootboxes are sort of the model of this era that is trying to take over.

Nearly every single game is trying to take a piece of the same cake now and pretty much everything on the current horizon is adopting some combination of the above.

Shadow of War ---> loot boxes
SW Battlefront II ---> loot boxes
Anthem ---> loot boxes
Red Dead Redemption II Online ---> will definitely have currency cards again and possibly more
etc

I call it the "Minimalist Era". Developers are essentially creating low effort games that are more based on minigames/small scale pvp, grindfests with meaningless sidequests alleviated by convenience cash shops, less voice acting, smaller emptier worlds with a cash shop and crafting system being dubbed "survival/sandbox", and large item pools that require virtual non-profitable gambling with real life currency instead of in game currency.

There are three goals:
- Lower the development budget as much as possible
- Transform each game into a sort of Netflix style service that makes you spend triple digits annually
- Create a grind that keeps you playing for a decade

The only reason this era is happening is because you guys are purchasing these items. You are literally funding laziness and rewarding poor development choices. Some even do it simply because of being fans of a developer and having nostalgia from past gems and wanting to financially support them in case they release another gem in the future.

Bottom line, if you want good games again, stop supporting microtransactions and gambling. The era will evolve and continue with more and more subsequent attempts to add new services to their "games as a service" such as recent attempts to monetize user content as paid mods which have virtually no development costs on their end minus tiny payments to the modders.

I for one will continue only playing old games and quality offline games. The moment anything resembling lootboxes, currency cards, etc appear and I will immediately forego purchasing said game and do everything I can to tarnish the reputation of said game/developer to reduce the player base and profit.

Make gaming great again!

That being said, check out Grim Dawn, it is an example of a great game. Completely open to modding, the 2 paid content are great, add new features, etc.

User Info: Ultimate_Noob

Ultimate_Noob
1 month ago#2
Overwhelming successes dictate the direction of the industry. There might come along something else for every publisher to get stuck in (possibly battle royale survival game modes given the numbers that is raking in) but I think the damage has already been done. Microtransactions don't take a whole lot of imagination to shoehorn in.
A pc's brain is the cpu, its heart is the motherboard, its stomach is the hard drive, and its anus is the user.

User Info: LazyyAmerican

LazyyAmerican
1 month ago#3
Why do people pay for them? What even is the meaning exactly of gamer?
You've got ten minutes. There's policies even your section have to follow
I'll be sure to forward your message to the president.

User Info: CursedPanther

CursedPanther
1 month ago#4
You've forgotten one important factor, people still drop games when they don't enjoy them.

User Info: whitesamurai

whitesamurai
1 month ago#5
CursedPanther posted...
You've forgotten one important factor, people still drop games when they don't enjoy them.


Not the addicted. I was one of the lucky ones in my family without an addictive personality, but have had numerous with drug/alcohol/gambling addictions, friends that eventually had intentional/accidental overdoses, etc.

Combine addiction with competitive attitudes and that's the combination that profits because people want to be the best. In a game like Shadow of War, skill isn't the best, its going to be those with the most legendary orcs and such. Normal play simply won't get you there fast enough to be competitive.

People are not dropping these games because they are the only ones coming out. I like gaming too much to stop, but I find myself rarely playing new games anymore. Other than the recent Grim Dawn expansion, I mostly play Witcher 3, Fallout 3/NV/4, and Skyrim. I'll likely jump into God of War, Last of Us 2, etc, but good games without microtransactions are so far and few between that if you "drop them", then you either have to just wait forever for a rarity or play old games.

Addiction and competitive behavior is a powerful force and developers are taking advantage of it. This is why CDPR and whatnot get so much praise. The petty stuff like costumes and such were free and the paid DLC combined to a full length RPG pratically and it wasn't cut content from the main story like some games where the main story remains unfinished without DLC. It was legitimate extra story lines.

That is the kind of stuff I spend $$$ on, actual substance and production value, not temporary fluff spending.

The only PVP I will ever touch is skill based PVP. Gear, time, and $$$ P2W based PVP is a no go for me. Gear, time, and $$$ should never give an advantage over players. Progression in the form of vanity, ranks, and things like distinctive exuberant player housing and mounts are the best.

User Info: Dawnshadow

Dawnshadow
1 month ago#6
I'm not so sure that lootboxes are always evil.

In cases where the contents are 100% cosmetic, the game offers multiplayer servers, and there's new free content being added it's acceptable. Devs gotta eat, too.
I wish I made $400k a year to spam Twitter with nonsense and go golfing in Florida every other weekend....

User Info: whitesamurai

whitesamurai
1 month ago#7
Dawnshadow posted...
I'm not so sure that lootboxes are always evil.

In cases where the contents are 100% cosmetic, the game offers multiplayer servers, and there's new free content being added it's acceptable. Devs gotta eat, too.


The only way I care about devs is if their products are good. I don't support any company for the sake of support itself. I support a company because I like the product. If the product is bad, then the company can fail for all I care because I'd rather see another good company buy their IPs.

That goes to my original point about fanboys blindly supporting Devs for the sake of enjoying past titles that were good.

If loot boxes are not the only form of progression, have zero effect on time to attain a goal, and player power, then they aren't as bad as the P2W versions. However, it is still not as good ad simply buying the vanity itself. If there are 110 costumes and I like 7 of them, I don't give a s*** about buying the other 103. So i am not going to spend $1000 to gamble 10,000 times on random costumes with a bunch of duplicates even though they are all vanity. I would conditionally spend $5 or less on the costumes themselves but even then, if all in game unlockable vanity is stupid and $$$ version is the only good looking one, then I won't buy it either. It would be like releasing Diablo 2 and making all elite uniques look like generic items and all unique looking gear is transmogs in a cash shop. If that happened, I wouldn't have played Diablo 2.

It's one thing to have some form of monetization in a F2P game, it's a whole other thing if they are doing it to B2P and/or subscription games. More and more F2P features are leaking in B2P/subscription games and so I don't support F2P microtransactions because they opened the door to this crap.

User Info: Sir_Haxor

Sir_Haxor
1 month ago#8
I'm just worried about Japan following this trend. I don't care what AAA Western garbage games do. Haven't bought one of those since BioShock infinite years ago for $7 and still felt cheated.
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User Info: Cozy

Cozy
1 month ago#9
Real talk, these AAA studios now have these crappy minimalist DLC and loot crate gample practices just to generate profit. Grindfests to me feel more like you're working, not really playing a game.

Like you said, as consumers we can vote with your wallet.
"Poop"

User Info: Ultimate_Noob

Ultimate_Noob
1 month ago#10
Problem is, they don't need a whole lot of customers (just a few big-spending ones) in order to justify its inclusion.
A pc's brain is the cpu, its heart is the motherboard, its stomach is the hard drive, and its anus is the user.
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