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User Info: Jgurn0421

Jgurn0421
4 weeks ago#1
Making the switch from console to PC in the next year, just finishing some of my ps4 backlog before i do. Couple questions

- I know i know, i should build my own, but i have ABSOLUTELY NO IDEAhow and i don't want to screw it up and be out whatever hundred, or thousand dollars so I'm looking at prebuilt first and then i can upgrade parts, etc myself from there. My next one will be pre built once i get the hang of it. Any retailer/brand anybody would recommend? (looking ot spend maybe under $1000) Between Cyberpower/Ibuypower/Digital storm, etc?

- I can upgrade parts myself over time with a prebuilt, correct?

- How long realistically will my gaming pc last me? I know it's more money up front than console, but it will last me much longer if i upgrade parts ,etc over time right?

- Any recommendations at all? Looking forward to getting out of console and switching, just looking for advice

User Info: MMG_

MMG_
4 weeks ago#2
Jgurn0421 posted...
- I can upgrade parts myself over time with a prebuilt, correct?

Yeah, that's what I did with my pc.

Jgurn0421 posted...
- How long realistically will my gaming pc last me? I know it's more money up front than console, but it will last me much longer if i upgrade parts ,etc over time right?


Well, it can last for a pretty long time if you take good care of it. My pc has been running well since 2013, I know 4 years isn't a long time but as of now it seems to me that it can last 4 more years easily.

Just don't forget to open your pc every once in a while so that dust doesn't accumulate too much.
And yeah, obviously you'll need to upgrade it from time to time.

Jgurn0421 posted...
- Any recommendations at all? Looking forward to getting out of console and switching, just looking for advice


The Bethesda open worlds (Old Skyrim and New Vegas mainly) are obvious suggestions as the mods for those games on pc are things consoles can't use (not afaik), Dragon's Dogma: Dark Arisen and GTAV.
BORED TO DEATH. I'm bored, I'm bored, I'm bored. I am bored.
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User Info: OUberLord

OUberLord
4 weeks ago#3
Breaking this down into a few sections:

- You're still better off building your own. I get the fear of "breaking it", but even with a prebuilt you'll end up at some point swapping motherboards. No other part leads you to that process, and it's just the same that you do that with your own build up front. I'd recommend looking up some Youtube videos on how to do it, how to mount a CPU, etc. Again, I get the angle of not wanting to screw it up, but doing your own built will likely be better and/or save you significant cash.

- You can generally upgrade a prebuilt just as you would any other machine. However, this assumes the prebuilt doesn't use some sort of goofy style of case, which sometimes means proprietary power supplies. This is highly uncommon anymore.

- Depends on the parts you get now. The cutting edge parts can last 5-6 years before you'll start to have performance issues in the newest games. The older parts you get the less money you'll spend up front, but relatively they'll also have less time before those same performance issues manifest themselves. Generally speaking, middle range parts last 3-5 years in this regard but again; it varies.

User Info: Jgurn0421

Jgurn0421
4 weeks ago#4
OUberLord posted...
Breaking this down into a few sections:

- You're still better off building your own. I get the fear of "breaking it", but even with a prebuilt you'll end up at some point swapping motherboards. No other part leads you to that process, and it's just the same that you do that with your own build up front. I'd recommend looking up some Youtube videos on how to do it, how to mount a CPU, etc. Again, I get the angle of not wanting to screw it up, but doing your own built will likely be better and/or save you significant cash.

- You can generally upgrade a prebuilt just as you would any other machine. However, this assumes the prebuilt doesn't use some sort of goofy style of case, which sometimes means proprietary power supplies. This is highly uncommon anymore.

- Depends on the parts you get now. The cutting edge parts can last 5-6 years before you'll start to have performance issues in the newest games. The older parts you get the less money you'll spend up front, but relatively they'll also have less time before those same performance issues manifest themselves. Generally speaking, middle range parts last 3-5 years in this regard but again; it varies.


So if i get a mid-tier or a little more, i would be replacing/upgrading parts in 3-5 years? But i can technically spread that out to upgade SOMETHING every couple years right and that would keep me going longer.

Sorry, i know it's probably a dumb question haha im brand new to this and sick to death of consoles

User Info: zxxcman

zxxcman
4 weeks ago#5
Well, first tip if you're going prebuilt, replace the power supply unit. Important as it is, most people don't check it or know a lot about it, so prebuilts usually cheapen out on them to save money, and the average customer is none the wiser.

The PC would last you until the CPU starts becoming the bottleneck. In which case you'd have to change the motherboard and possibly the RAM as well. If you go with a high end CPU (an i7 or the Ryzen equivalent), that's around 10 years before you absolutely must replace it. Generally, if you have to replace the Motherboard, CPU, and RAM, you're basically starting a new build.

As to how often you'd want to upgrade, once every 3-5 years would be enough. I usually don't play a game unless I can max it out, and didn't upgrade my gtx 770 (which I got in 2013, and still a valid card for lower-mid range gaming) till this year.

So for gaming, the necessary upgrades are basically a GPU upgrade once every 2-5 years (2 if you want to have the top performance). Everything else is kinda optional. More RAM and storage might be needed, but the CPU is usually not an issue but can be if you wanted to play on higher frame rates (120fps and higher).
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User Info: Pelaaja82

Pelaaja82
4 weeks ago#6
Jgurn0421 posted...
OUberLord posted...
Breaking this down into a few sections:

- You're still better off building your own. I get the fear of "breaking it", but even with a prebuilt you'll end up at some point swapping motherboards. No other part leads you to that process, and it's just the same that you do that with your own build up front. I'd recommend looking up some Youtube videos on how to do it, how to mount a CPU, etc. Again, I get the angle of not wanting to screw it up, but doing your own built will likely be better and/or save you significant cash.

- You can generally upgrade a prebuilt just as you would any other machine. However, this assumes the prebuilt doesn't use some sort of goofy style of case, which sometimes means proprietary power supplies. This is highly uncommon anymore.

- Depends on the parts you get now. The cutting edge parts can last 5-6 years before you'll start to have performance issues in the newest games. The older parts you get the less money you'll spend up front, but relatively they'll also have less time before those same performance issues manifest themselves. Generally speaking, middle range parts last 3-5 years in this regard but again; it varies.


So if i get a mid-tier or a little more, i would be replacing/upgrading parts in 3-5 years? But i can technically spread that out to upgade SOMETHING every couple years right and that would keep me going longer.

Sorry, i know it's probably a dumb question haha im brand new to this and sick to death of consoles


Just get a good cpu/decent motherboard/16gb of ram in the beginning and you can just upgrade the gpu in 3-5 years from now on to make the computer last for many years to come.
Pc: i7 6700k/980 ti/16gb ram and Ps4.

User Info: OUberLord

OUberLord
4 weeks ago#7
Pelaaja82 posted...
Jgurn0421 posted...
OUberLord posted...
Breaking this down into a few sections:

- You're still better off building your own. I get the fear of "breaking it", but even with a prebuilt you'll end up at some point swapping motherboards. No other part leads you to that process, and it's just the same that you do that with your own build up front. I'd recommend looking up some Youtube videos on how to do it, how to mount a CPU, etc. Again, I get the angle of not wanting to screw it up, but doing your own built will likely be better and/or save you significant cash.

- You can generally upgrade a prebuilt just as you would any other machine. However, this assumes the prebuilt doesn't use some sort of goofy style of case, which sometimes means proprietary power supplies. This is highly uncommon anymore.

- Depends on the parts you get now. The cutting edge parts can last 5-6 years before you'll start to have performance issues in the newest games. The older parts you get the less money you'll spend up front, but relatively they'll also have less time before those same performance issues manifest themselves. Generally speaking, middle range parts last 3-5 years in this regard but again; it varies.


So if i get a mid-tier or a little more, i would be replacing/upgrading parts in 3-5 years? But i can technically spread that out to upgade SOMETHING every couple years right and that would keep me going longer.

Sorry, i know it's probably a dumb question haha im brand new to this and sick to death of consoles


Just get a good cpu/decent motherboard/16gb of ram in the beginning and you can just upgrade the gpu in 3-5 years from now on to make the computer last for many years to come.

I agree. Heck, I'm pretty sure you could still make a 2500k run some new games, granted with an overclock, and that processor is over 6 years old.

User Info: DAP1MP13

DAP1MP13
4 weeks ago#8
If you can put Legos together, you can put your own PC together.
NYC. The City never sleeps, it's full of villains and creeps, it's where I learned to do my hustle, had to scuffle with freaks.
PSN/XBL/Steam: DAP1MP13

User Info: good_mangorush

good_mangorush
4 weeks ago#9
zxxcman posted...
Well, first tip if you're going prebuilt, replace the power supply unit. Important as it is, most people don't check it or know a lot about it, so prebuilts usually cheapen out on them to save money, and the average customer is none the wiser.


This is most important part. Bad power supply unit can risk your computer, replace it ASAP with good PSU.
The Truth Has Set Me Free!

User Info: JKatarn

JKatarn
4 weeks ago#10
OUberLord posted...
I agree. Heck, I'm pretty sure you could still make a 2500k run some new games, granted with an overclock, and that processor is over 6 years old.


I've had no issues with my 2600K and newer games - granted I'm not gaming at 4K or on an high-refresh rate monitor, just standard 1080p/60hz, but unless you are doing 4K/120Hz+ a Sandy Bridge CPU should still be more than enough for gaming purposes.
Asus P8Z68-V LE | Core i7 2600K | 8GB G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3 | EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB
PS3 | PS2 | PSP| Wii-U | 3DS | DS | X-Box 360 | X-Box | NES
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