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    FAQ/Walkthrough by headbanger

    Version: 1.27 | Updated: 01/08/06 | Search Guide | Bookmark Guide

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         ---------------------------------------------------
         -Winner of GameFAQ's January 2004 FAQ of the Month-
         ---------------------------------------------------
    
    
    Game: Blades of Exile/Exile Scenario Editor
    System: Computer
    Author: Paul "headbanger"
    E-Mail: headbanger1547 [at] gmail [dot] com
    FAQ Version: 1.28
    
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    To hop to a specific section, just hit CTRL + F and type in the code shown
    here.
     ___________________
    |Table of Contents  |
    |___________________|             
    I. Introduction...................................8852
      A. Introduction to this Guide...................1452
        1. Version History............................4522
        2. About/Contacting Me........................1856
        3. Legal Information..........................7523
        4. Getting the Most out of this Guide.........6666
      B. Introduction to BoE..........................2058
        1. Just what is Blades of Exile?..............3251
        2. Where can I find Blades of Exile?..........8451
      C. Basic Information............................0014
        1. Controls...................................7535
        2. Description of Scenario....................9985
    II. Blades of Exile...............................1485
      A. Description..................................3845
      B. Helpful Files................................9584
        1. Creating a Party...........................1548
        2. Statistic Descriptions.....................3435
        3. Trait Descriptions.........................1512
        4. Spell Archive..............................8568
        5. Alchemy Recipes............................7487
        6. Conditions.................................0312
        7. Combat Help................................2137
        8. The Perfect Party..........................8467
      C. Complete Walkthroughs........................4633
        1. Valley of Dying Things.....................9400
        2. A Mild Rebellion...........................9339
        3. The Za-Khazi Run...........................5368
      D. Playing Custom-Made Scenarios................6911
    III. The Scenario Editor..........................9811
      A. Basic Description............................2542
      B. Overview.....................................0957
      C. Constructing a Scenario......................0579
        1. Help Files.................................8226
            a) Stuff-Done Flags.......................9796
            b) Special Nodes..........................1877
            c) Constructing Towns and Outdoors........6931
            d) Dialogue...............................0969
            e) Creating Custom Monsters...............1776
            f) Creating Custom Items..................5753
            g) Modifying Terrain Types................0753
            h) Customizing the Graphics...............6941
        2. Suggestions................................8899
            a) Building a Plot........................3072
            b) How To Pre-Plan your Scenario..........3081
            c) Making Your Scenario a Reality.........8343
      E. Other Information............................1478
        1. Testing Your Scenario......................3527
        2. How to Distribute Your Scenario............1830
    IV. Comments from Other Scenario Authors..........1921
      A. Alec Kyras...................................8306
      B. Thuryl.......................................3061
      C. Drakefyre....................................8856
    V. Other Information..............................1010
      A. BoE Websites.................................8565
        1. Scenario Downloads.........................1265
        2. Information................................3652
      B. Top 5 Custom Scenarios.......................8859
      C. Closing Words................................6663
        1. Credits....................................5548
        2. Special Thanks.............................4925
    
    
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    I. Introduction
    
    
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    ______________________________________________________________________________
    1. Version History                                                        4522
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Version: 1.28
    Completed: 4/8/10
    Changes: Small stuff here and there.
    Size: I dunno.
    
    Version: 1.27
    Completed: 1/8/06
    Changes: Updated the "Legal Information" section to reflect the new year...
              again.
    Size: Probably still 311k.
    
    Version: 1.26
    Completed: 2/9/05
    Changes: Updated the "Legal Information" section to reflect the new year.
    Size: 311k
    
    Version: 1.25
    Completed: 11/28/04
    Changes: Removed several ways of contacting me, bringing it down to just
              e-mail. Also made a few other changes here and there.
    Size: 311k
    
    Version: 1.24
    Completed: 9/23/04
    Changes: Ugh, changed my e-mail address AGAIN. This should be the last time.
              Or at least I hope it will be.
    Size: 310k
    
    Version: 1.23
    Completed: 9/4/04
    Changes: Changed my e-mail address once again. Also added in a link to my
              message boards as a way of contacting me.
    Size: 310k
    
    Version: 1.22
    Completed: 8/16/04
    Changes: Fixed my e-mail address to keep away spammers.
    Size: 310k
    
    Version: 1.21
    Completed: 8/5/04
    Changes: Updated the fact that I don't allow people to send me scenarios
              anymore. I just don't have that kind of time, and virus threats are
              there as well. I'm sorry. If you do have a scenario somewhere on
              some website, you can link to it and send it to me, although I
              really doubt I'll ever get around to playing it. I plan on making an
              HTML version of this guide fairly soon, to be hosted on my website.
              This will take a long time to be implemented, and may be rather
              pointless. We'll see. Oh yeah... I changed the intro ASCII as well.
    Size: 309k
    
    Version: 1.20
    Completed: 7/21/04
    Changes: Fixed up the ASCII borders and added a way to "hop" from one section
              to another.
    Size: 310k
    
    Version: 1.12
    Completed: 7/6/04
    Changes: Changed Legal Information and updated my AIM and MSN.
    Size: 304k
    
    Version: 1.10
    Completed: 6/27/04
    Changes: Added in the comments made on the SpiderWeb software forums.
    Size: ?
    
    Version: 1.05
    Completed: 6/15/04
    Changes: Modified the "Rate this FAQ!" link.
    Size: ?
    
    Version: 1.04
    Completed: 5/28/04
    Changes: Added my AIM address and changed my e-mail address.
    Size: ?
    
    Version: 1.03
    Completed: 4/4/04
    Changes: Added my new IM address and added that this guide won FAQ of the 
              Month on GameFAQs.
    Size: ?
    
    Version: 1.02
    Completed: 1/31/04
    Changes: Added some sites that can post this guide.
    Size: ?
    
    
    Version: 1.00
    Completed: 1/22/04
    Changes: Walkthroughs on all three scenarios that come with BoE, in-depth BoE
              and Scenario Editor help.
    Size: ?
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    2. About/Contacting Me                                                    1856
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If you have a desire to contact me, just send an e-mail. My e-mail address is
    headbanger1547 [at] gmail [dot] com.
     
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    3. Legal Information                                                      7523
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This document copyright 2003-2010 Paul Buzbee.
    Well, after thinking things out a bit, I decided to lax up my rules on letting 
    other sites post this guide. I decided that I'm not running a business with 
    these FAQs, so why should I be demanding in who can use them? There are a lot 
    of gamers out there who need help, and they should be able to get that help. 
    So, I decided that ANY site may post this, or any of my other FAQs, so long as 
    they keep to the following guidelines:
    1. Try to keep this guide updated the best you are able to. It's a real pain 
    receiving e-mails asking questions that you have answered already. So, if you 
    want to post this guide on your site, try to keep it updated. The most recent 
    version can ALWAYS be found at http://www.gamefaqs.com/.
    2. Post this guide as a .txt page, not as a .html page. Also, the whole guide 
    should be on one page. If you are unsure as to what this means, check out the 
    version of this guide posted at http://www.gamefaqs.com/. That is what I mean 
    by a .txt page.
    3. Give me full credit. Honestly, it's not that hard to do. All you really 
    have to do is just post the full guide, not clip it or anything. In this guide 
    it says I wrote it, and that's all that I'm asking for. Sure, if you give me 
    credit in a bigger way I will be grateful, but you don't have to do that. Just 
    give me credit. My guide, my work, so give me my credit. That's the only 
    reason I write FAQs anyways. Don't take away my hobby from me.
    4. If you plan to make any sort of profit from this guide, ask for my 
    permission first. I will say yes, almost guaranteed.
    5. I ask that you e-mail me the name of the site this guide will be posted on.
    This is for my own personal reasons, and I doubt I'll ever do anything with
    the information. I'd just like to know how many sites are getting use out of
    my guide. My e-mail address is headbanger1547 [at] gmail [dot] com.
    
    These regulations are not hard to follow. I'm not asking a lot. So, please, 
    just follow them. And thank you.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    4. Getting the Most out of this Guide                                     6666
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Before reading any further, know this.
    Throughout the entire FAQ, I assume that you have general simple knowledge
    about Blades of Exile and have played it. I am not going to act as an
    instruction manual. You should know what Spell Points, PCs (<-not talking
    about the computer), HP, resting, and all of that good stuff are before
    reading further. If you have no clue what I'm ranting about, get yourself a
    copy of the game and play it a bit to see what I'm talking about.
    
    Another thing to do before reading any further is to find the word in this
    ASCII art:
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    Parts of this FAQ are made up of ASCII charts.
    If you cannot read the word, you must switch your browser to a fixed-width
    font. Otherwise, you will have a hard time viewing parts of this FAQ.
    
    If you can read the word, you will be in the clear for the entire FAQ.
    
    
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    ______________________________________________________________________________
    1. Just what is Blades of Exile?                                          3251
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    If you are one of the many who have played at least one of the three games
    that make up the Exile Trilogy, then you know just how much fun they are. If
    you are also one of the many who have beaten the entire Exile Trilogy, then
    you know that beating Exile III left you wanting more. That's why Blades of
    Exile was created.
    Blades of Exile ("BoE" for short) is a scenario-based role-playing game
    created by the good folks at Spiderweb Software. Using a registered version of
    the game, you can create and play custom scenarios and download from a large
    amount off of the Internet. The game also comes with three scenarios which are
    pretty in-depth. I, being kind, have provided walkthroughs for each.
    Anyways, in other words, Blades of Exile is a game which can never truly end.
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    2. Where can I find Blades of Exile?                                      8451
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    You can download a package off of http://www.spiderwebsoftware.com/ that
    contains the following:
    1) A demo (unregistered) version of Blades of Exile. Only the first scenario,
       Valley of Dying Things, is playable until the game is registered.
    2) An unregistered version of the Blades Character Editor. This program alters
       your party to become stronger/weaker.
    3) A free version of the Exile Scenario Editor. This is used to create custom 
       scenarios. Note, however, that BoE must be registered before you can play 
       your own custom scenario.
    You can register your copy in several ways which are listed in the
    documentation that comes with the game. If you are debating on whether or not
    to buy this game, you can read my review on the game that is posted at
    gamefaqs.com.
    
    
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    ______________________________________________________________________________
    1. Controls                                                               7535
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The controls for BoE are pretty simple and basic.
    9 (keypad): move northeast
    8 (keypad): move north
    7 (keypad): move northwest
    6 (keypad): move east
    5 (keypad): pause, in combat: stand ready
    4 (keypad): move west
    3 (keypad): move southeast
    2 (keypad): move south
    1 (keypad): move southwest
    p (lower-case): choose priest spell to cast
    m (lower-case): choose mage spell to cast
    P (capital letter): cast most recent priest spell
    M (capital letter): cast most recent mage spell
    g: get nearby items
    r: rest
    w: wait (in combat, go last)
    a: bring up map
    d: parry (dodge all attacks)
    x: become active PC (in combat)
    t: shoot arrows/throw missiles (in combat mode)
    e: end combat (in town, in outdoor combat mode)
    f: begin combat (in town)
    l: look
    u: use
    Clicking in any direction moves you that direction.
    
    I think that is it, but if I missed anything, make sure to inform me via
    e-mail.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    2. Description of Scenario                                                9985
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    As I mentioned earlier, BoE is a scenario-based game. A scenario is a
    situation that your party is put into and must get out of. Not like a little
    battle, but an entire storyline complete with monsters, specials, towns, and
    dialogue. The average scenario is a little bit smaller than one of the Exile
    Trilogy, but some of the ones out there are bigger than any of the Exile
    epics. Each one is also rated based on its content, so if you don't want to or
    don't want your kids to play scenarios that might be offensive, you can easily
    sift through them due to content. Scenarios are also rated by difficulty. You
    can get an easy one, or a hard one. Depends on what you feel like playing.
    Note that difficulty is based on the level of the combat, not the puzzles.
    
    
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    II. Blades of Exile
    
    BoE is where you PLAY the game. The scenario editor is where you MAKE the
    game. Just so you know and don't get confused.
    
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    As I said above, BoE is where you play the game. BoE runs off of scenarios,
    which are described in the previous section. You can create scenarios for
    others to play with BoE (see Scenario Editor), but you yourself must be
    registered before you are able to play them.
    It is in BoE that you create a party.
    BoE comes with three scenarios:
    1) Valley of Dying Things-"The crops have withered, the children are dying,
                               and even the water burns. Can you find the source
                               of the sickness before the entire valley dies?"
    
    2) A Mild Rebellion-"The enemy - a secret band of deadly rebels. The job -
                         infiltrate them, win their trust, and find their leader.
                         The question - are you fighting on the right side?"
    
    3) The Za-Khazi Run-"A fortress is under siege, and only you can get them the
                         weapons they need to survive. You have 20 days to find
                         your way through the nastiest caves in Exile, or all will
                         be lost."
    
    Walkthroughs to all of the scenarios are provided a little ways below. Now, on
    to creating a party.
    
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    1. Creating a Party                                                       1548
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Your party is 1-6 characters that you play the game with. They are the ones
    who attack, cast spells, etc. I will guide you into making an effective party.
    
    The way I see it, there are 3 types of characters:
    Thieves: Thieves are the ones who pick locks, disarm traps, perform alchemy, 
                   and, if you're me, tend to use archery and thrown missiles.
    
    Spellcasters: Spellcasters are people who, well, cast spells (huge 'ol 
                   discovery). They cast mage & priest spells.
    
    Warriors: Warriors excel only in hand-to-hand combat. All they're good for is 
                   hacking foes to pieces. Even still, they are the most needed 
                   type of character in the game.
    
    A party is generally a 6-man combination of the three. Here are some common
    combinations:
       
     _____________________________________________________________________________
    |Party A     |This is an even mix of the three. I do not recommend this one as 
    |____________|much as some of the others because one thief is usually enough.
    |Warrior     |Thieves don't do much offensively, making two sort of redundant.
    |Warrior     |
    |Thief       |
    |Thief       |
    |Spellcaster |
    |Spellcaster |
    |____________|________________________________________________________________
    
     _____________________________________________________________________________
    |Party B     |This version is more effective than Party A. Triple spellcasters
    |____________|helps in long battles and means you are a lot less likely to run 
    |Warrior     |low on spell points.
    |Warrior     |However, having triple spellcasters means fighting monsters with
    |Spellcaster |magical resistances will become a lot harder.
    |Spellcaster |
    |Spellcaster |
    |Thief       |
    |____________|________________________________________________________________
    
     _____________________________________________________________________________
    |Party C     |Three warriors makes hand-to-hand combat a breeze. Two
    |____________|spellcasters is much better than just one, but not as effective
    |Warrior     |as three. You may find yourself running low on spell points
    |Warrior     |sometimes.
    |Warrior     |All that aside, I recommend playing with this party.
    |Spellcaster |This is also the party I use.
    |Spellcaster |I'm going to assume, in this FAQ, that this is the party you
    |Thief       |possess.
    |____________|________________________________________________________________
    
    Whenever you create your party, remember that you don't have to follow mine to 
    the word. Feel free to change it whenever (and please e-mail me with your
    ideas)
    
    Creating a Warrior
    A warrior (at least mine) possesses the following traits:
     Race: Slithzeraki
     Advantages: Toughness
     Optional: Ambidextrous, Exceptional Strength, Good Constitution (recommended)
    A warrior should be trained to the following:
     Health: 22
     Strength: 7
     Dexterity: 5
     Intelligence: 1
     Pole OR Bashing OR Edged weapons: 10
     Defense: 1
    Once you are done, your strength will be boosted by 2, your IQ by 1.
    As time goes by, fill up Strength, Dex, and one or two Weapon types. Slowly
    work up Defense and Assassination. After you reach level 30 or 35, work
    upwards on Luck.
    
    Creating a Spellcaster
    A spellcaster should possess the following traits:
     Race: Slithzeraki
     Advantages: Toughness, Magically Apt
     Optional: Highly Alert, Recuperation, Good Constitution
    A spellcaster should be trained to the following:
     Health: 9
     Spell Points: 3
     Strength: 2
     Dexterity: 1
     Intelligence: 5
     Mage AND Priest Spells: 3 each
    Once you are done, your strength will be boosted by 2, your IQ by 1. Having
    both 3 in Mage and Priest Spells will add to your spell points.
    As you gain your first few level, raise strength by one and then fill up your
    health a bit. Until you reach level 6, only work on HP. Then, fill up IQ, Mage 
    Spells, and Priest Spells. As time goes by, fill up Mage Lore. After you reach 
    level 40, you can start worrying about luck.
    
    Creating a Thief
    Give a thief the following traits:
     Race: Slithzeraki
     Advantages: Cave Lore, Woodsman, Nimble Fingers, Toughness.
     Optional: Highly Alert, Ambidextrous, Good Constitution
    Train a thief to the following:
     Health: 18
     Strength: 2
     Dexterity: 5
     Intelligence: 3
     Archery/Some Other Weapon Type: 7
     Disarm Traps: 4
     Lockpicking: 2
    As time passes, work up Disarm Traps, Lockpicking, Item Lore, Archery (or
    whatever weapon type you used), Intelligence, Dexterity, and Strength all
    evenly. Over time, you might want to look into adding a normal weapon type if
    you didn't do so in the beginning. At level 40, look into luck.
    
    
    As I said earlier, feel free to alter from this. And, should you have a better
    idea of the best way to start off, be it party combination or creating a
    character, feel free to let me know.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    2. Statistic Descriptions                                                 3435
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Here is a description of all of the statistics in Blades of Exile. Use them as
    you need them.
    
    Health Points (HP): This is how much damage your character can take before
     being mortally wounded. The higher this is, the more damage you can withstand
     before dying. This regenerates over time. Maxes out at 250.
    
    Spell Points (SP): This is how many magic power you have at your discretion.
     Each spell uses up a certain amount of this. When you do not have enough SP
     left, you cannot cast any spells without a wand or scroll of that spell. Only
     people who cast spells should invest in this, because otherwise it is
     pointless. Regenerates over time. Maxes out at 150.
    
    Strength: A measure of how much base damage you do. The higher this is, the
     more damage you will be guaranteed for every blow that connects (the weapon
     you are using affects your damage a lot too). Also, based on how high this
     is, more HP is added per each level you gain. This is a key stat and should
     not be overlooked by any class of adventurer. Maxes out at 20.
    
    Dexterity: A measure of accuracy. Needs to be high for archers and anyone who
     must lockpick, disarm traps, etc. Warriors will only ever need 10, and even
     that might be too much. Anyone who participates in hand-to-hand combat should
     have this at least at 5. Anyone who uses missile weapons should have this at
     at least 10, and anyone who disarms traps and all that good stuff needs this
     at least at 15. This stat maxes out at 20.
    
    Intelligence: Does two things: Increases the effectiveness of spells and the
     skill of all thievery stats. Any spellcaster should have this at a minimum of
     15 by the time they reach level 50. Any thief should work this up to at least
     10. This stat maxes out at 20.
    
    Pole, Bashing, Edged: Those are the three types of melee weapons. Edged
     weapons are weapons with a true blade, like swords and sabers. Bashing
     weapons are like maces and axes. Pole weapons are like spears and halberds
     and tend to be the most powerful type of weapon. Anyways, these three stats
     tell your skill and accuracy with these types of weapons. The higher it is,
     the more likely you are to hit your mark with one of those types of weapons
     equipped. Anyone who uses hand-to-hand combat should at least have ten in the
     type of weapon they are using. Each of these stats max out at twenty.
    
    Archery, Thrown: These two are missile weapons, which means they are
     thrown/launched from one place to another. They tend to be weaker and less
     accurate than the melee weapons. These stats are to missile weapons what the
     melee stats are to hand-to-hand combat. These two stats max out at 20.
    
    Defense: A very useful skill. This does three things:
    1) When parrying (dodging), your chance of evading blows is increased by
       having a high number in this stat.
    2) It increases your chances of dodging attacks when you are not parrying.
    3) Gives you a chance of casting Mage spells when your encumbrance is at 2.
     This skill is handy, and thus necessary to be at least at five on all of your
     characters. It reaches its top at 20.
    
    Mage Spells, Priest Spells: These two stats allow you to use Mage/Priest
     spells of the level that your stat is. (ex: If you have a 6 in Mage Spells,
     you can use all level 6 Mage Spells you know). You need to know that you must
     have learned the spells to be able to use them also. This skill just allows
     you to use your knowledge. Obviously, these skills are necessary for all
     spellcasters, and should always reach 7, its max, eventually.
    
    Mage Lore: Sometimes, Blades of Exile has special nodes that give you spells
     or other magical knowledge/items. The higher this is, the better your chances
     of getting that item/knowledge. Basically, this skill tells of your magical
     knowledge of the world. This skill is very important to the "free-upgrading"
     of your PC. This skill should be spread out rather evenly throughout the
     entire party. It maxes out at 20.
    
    Alchemy: Sort of like Mage and Priest Spells, Alchemy determines what potions
     you can make. The higher this is, the more potions you will be able to
     create. Only one character in your party should be given this stat. I never
     really bother with alchemy, but since there are people who do, I guess I can
     say it does have its uses. Alchemy reaches its highest level at 20.
    
    Item Lore: Most items in Blades of Exile come to you as unidentified, and you
     have to cast a spell or pay for them to be identified. The higher this skill,
     the more likely your character will be able to interpret what the item is
     when you come across it, and so you will not have to pay/cast anything for
     the identification of your items. I only recommend this stat in 6-PC parties
     where you have extra Skill Points to spread around. Maxes out at 10.
    
    Disarm Traps: This skill, which should only be given to thieves, determines,
     along with Dexterity and Intelligence, your talent at disarming traps. At
     times, this skill is crucial, and so your thief should have at least 10 in
     this. Disarm Traps maxes out at 20.
    
    Lockpicking: I never really bother with this skill as I usually just unlock
     doors by using the Unlock spell. Anyone whose party has a Mage Level 3
     spellcaster should not bother with this skill either. What this skill does,
     though, is increase your talent at picking the locks on doors. Your chance of
     unlocking the doors depends on several things: Your IQ, your Dexterity, the
     lockpicks you are using, the door you are picking the lock of, and, of
     course, this stat. If you decide to give this stat to anyone in your party,
     give it to the thief. Lockpicking is at its highest level at 20.
    
    Poison Use: I have never once used this. What it does, though, is increase
     your ability to self-poison your weapons. I think that it is far easier to
     just cast Envenom on your weapons if you want to poison them. However, this
     skill is, I believe, used by some people. Only give this max-out-at-20 skill
     to thieves.
    
    Assassination: A handy skill that can help eliminate and shorten many tiresome
     combats. Assassination gives you a chance of doing extra damage to monsters.
     The chance depends on the following:
    1) The level of your PC. Your level needs to be higher than the enemy for
       Assassination to work.
    2) The level of the monster. The lower it is, the better the chance
       Assassination will occur.
    3) The level of this stat. The higher it is, the better the chance of
       Assassination and the higher the level of the monsters you can use it on.
     This is a skill that should only be given to PCs that use hand-to-hand
     combat. It is a waste of Skill Points for all other characters. But know that
     this skill is extremely useful and that it maxes out at 20.
    
    Luck: Arguably the most useful skill, Luck minimizes your chance of dying.
     When you are hit with your would-be death blow, Luck lowers the chances that
     that blow will kill you. The higher that Luck is, the more that chance of
     death is lowered. When this skill is at 20, its top, it will take about
     twenty near-deaths before even one of your PCs is killed. But don't invest in
     Luck until other stats have been supported enough. Skill Points should go
     elsewhere first.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    3. Trait Descriptions                                                     1512
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    When you create a character in Blades of Exile, you will first be forced to
    choose between that character's traits. It is important to make sure you know
    exactly what each one does, seeing as once you make your selections you are
    stuck with them. Of course, you could always follow my guide to creating a
    party, but maybe you want to try it on your own. And what's wrong with that?
    Here is an in-depth list of all of the possible traits in BoE.
    
    You must first choose what species your character is to be. You may only
    select one.
    Human (adds 0% to experience to the next level): Nothing special, just keeps
     the traits it is given. Not recommended because the bonuses in the beginning
     are actually very helpful.
    Nephilim (adds 12% to experience to the next level): After you create your
     character, your Dexterity is boosted by one. Any thieves or archers in your
     party should probably be chosen as Nephils. But don't make spellcasters and
     warriors Nephil.
    Slithzeraki (adds 20% to experience to the next level): All spellcasters and
     warriors should be sliths, despite the high experience requirement boost. All
     slithzeraki gain a boost of two to Strength and one to Intelligence after the
     character is created.
    
    The next section of traits are your character's bonuses. You may select as
    many as you want.
    Toughness (adds 10% to the required experience for the next level): Nothing
     hurts you as much as it would normally because you are more resistant to
     damage. In my opinion, everybody in your party should possess this attribute,
     the warriors in particular.
    Magically Apt (adds 20% to the required experience for the next level): If
     your character is most likely not going to cast spells at all, then do not
     bother to give them this trait, as it is pointless. Magically Apt boosts the
     power of your spells. In my opinion, any character who is fully a spellcaster
     should possess this trait to boost their power.
    Ambidextrous (adds 8% to the required experience for the next level):
     Normally, you can equip two one-handed weapons at a time. But there is a
     penalty to the damage you do because of that. If you select Ambidextrous,
     there will be no penalty. This is handy for the most "hardcore" warrior in
     your party, but no one else really. Most of the weapons you use will be
     two-handed, making this kind of useless and a waste of experience.
    Nimble Fingers (adds 10% to the required experience for the next level): Only
     one character in your party should have this trait, and that character is
     your party's thief. Nimble Fingers boosts your effectiveness at disarming
     traps and picking locks, and these boosts can be quite handy at times. Just
     make sure than no more than one character in your party has this stat.
    Cave Lore (adds 4% to the required experience for the next level): Cave Lore
     tells of how well you know how to survive and of the life in the caves. This
     attribute has no direct effect, but it can be helpful. In some special nodes,
     you will not receive the desired effect without this trait. Example of what
     might happen with Cave Lore: "Your Cave Lore comes in handy as you find an
     alchemy ingredient underground.". Example of what might happen without Cave
     Lore: "You find an odd, familiar-looking plant lying on the ground, but you
     cannot remember if it is safe or dangerous, so you walk on." At least one
     person in your party should have this trait. Cave Lore generally affects only
     specials that are underground.
    Woodsman (adds 6% to the required number of experience for the next level):
     This skill is identical to Cave Lore in every way but two: (1) It affects
     what is above ground instead of what is below ground, and (2) the experience
     per level is added to more than with Cave Lore. As with Cave Lore, only one
     person in your party should possess this, but it is crucial that one person
     possess it.
    Good Constitution (adds 10% to the required number of experience for the next
     level): Helps the PC who possesses this trait to resist Poisoning and
     Disease. It is generally up to you if you should add this to a PC or not, but
     I think you should judge it by how much exp. it looks like they will need to
     the next level. Play it as you feel. But know that this trait is useful.
    Highly Alert (adds 7% to the required number of experience for the next
     level): All I know is that this trait helps you to resist sleep. I never
     select it, but maybe you will.
    Exceptional Strength (adds 12% to the required number of experience for the
     next level): This trait increases the amount of damage you do with melee
     weapons. I find it useful to give to all of my warriors because it makes
     combat a lot faster.
    Recuperation (adds 15% to the required number of experience for the next
     level): This stat increases your PCs ability to regenerate health (I don't
     think it gives you a boost on regenerating SP). It is useful to give to
     spellcasters because when you create them, they will have little health to
     spare.
    
    Now choose the negative bonuses for your character. In my opinion, you should
    never select any of these, so I will give no recommendations for these traits.
    Sluggish (decreases the amount of experience to the next level by 10%): Your
     character gets one less action point each turn.
    Magically Inept (decreases the amount of experience to the next level by 8%):
     The PC this is used on can never cast spells or use certain magical items.
    Frail (decreases the amount of experience to the next level by 8%): Your
     character is more sensitive to damage and dies easier.
    Chronic Disease (decreases the amount of experience to the next level by 20%):
     Disease and poison are a lot more effective on your PC.
    Bad Back (decreases the amount of experience to the next level by 8%): Your PC
     cannot carry as much weight as they would normally be able to carry.
    
    Always remember that once you choose a trait, you are stuck with it. The only
    way to switch between traits is by using the Editor that comes with the game.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    4. Spell Archive                                                          8568
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Blades of Exile contains a lot of spells (124 in all), and half of them are
    Mage, the other half are Priest. Some spells are more useful than others, and
    it takes a lot of time playing Blades of Exile for you to realize which spells
    are better than others. Fortunately, I am going to tell you what each spell
    does along with some other information I have discovered. Here is an example:
    
    Spell Name: <-the name of the spell that this part is about
    Casting Cost: <-how much SP it takes to cast the spell
    Spell Range: <-if it applies, how many spaces away from the caster this spell
                   can be targeted. I found this out by using the document that
                   comes with Blades of Exile.
    Description: <-what the spell actually does. Nothing else is put here.
    Rating: <-my rating of the usefulness of the spell. Out of five.
    Comments: <-my comments on the spell.
    
    A couple of things to know:
    ->You start knowing all Mage and Priest spells up to level 3. You must find
      additional spells in the game.
    ->To use these spells, you must have learned the spell itself. You must also
      have the stat Mage/Priest spells up to the level that the spell is.
    Spells are sorted from lowest level to highest level, and Priest spells come
    after Mage. Let us begin, shall we?
    
    
    Mage Spells
    ->Level 1:
    Spell Name: Light
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Creates a weak light.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: I have never once used this spell. The only spell I use for light is
      Long Light because it lasts longer. Just forget about this spell. It
      sucks. A lot.
    
    Spell Name: Spark
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: 6
    Description: Does a small amount of damage to the selected monster.
    Rating: 0/5
    Comments: This spell really sucks. It does like 2 damage to the selected
      monster, if even that. Never cast this spell because it is a waste
      of Spell Points.
    
    Spell Name: Minor Haste
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Weakly hastes the selected PC.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: The hasting effect is very weak, and doesn't last very long. I
      recommend using Haste or Major Haste, or something better than this.
      I find that this spell is very little help, and I can think of very
      few instances in which I have used this spell.
    
    Spell Name: Strength
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Blesses the selected PC.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: The bless is weak, and it wears off fast. I think that you would
      have a lot better of luck casting the priest spell Bless. This spell
      doesn't have enough of an effect to be really useful.
    
    Spell Name: Scare
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: 6
    Description: Reduces the morale of the selected monster. When the morale
      becomes low enough, the monster will flee from your party.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Since I prefer just to kill all of the monsters, I detest this spell
      and anyone who uses it.
    
    Spell Name: Flame Cloud
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: 7
    Description: Creates a small field of flame.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Yet another one of those spells that I have never really used. Don't
      waste your time on weak spells like this.
    
    Spell Name: Identify
    Casting Cost: 50
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: When cast, this spell identifies all of the items your party has.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Good when you have like 50 unidentified items and you need to
      identify them. Also good when you want to know if you have an item
      of a certain kind when you are in the heart of some massive dungeon.
    
    Spell Name: Scry Monster
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: 14
    Description: When casted on a monster, a box appears showing the monsters
      stats. The monster also appears in the "Monster" menu at the top
      of the screen.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: When you are fighting a single hard enemy, this spell is useful as
      it tells you just what you are up against, as well as how much
      harder you will have to fight to win. Being able to see the monster
      in the menu isn't a very big help, but it is pretty cool, actually.
    
    Spell Name: Goo
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Webs the selected area.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Gosh, a lot of these low-level spells really suck. I hate this
      spell. There are much better low-level spells out there, like
      Fireball, that you could be using instead.
    
    Spell Name: True Sight
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Displays all of the area within several spaces of the caster.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Although this spell becomes useless with Magic Map, it is quite
      useful to the low-level party. It is good for finding secret
      passages and what not.
    
    ->Level 2:
    Spell Name: Minor Poison
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: 6
    Description: Weakly poisons the selected monster.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Weak, and the poison will have little (if any) effect. You will have
      better luck by hacking the monster to pieces.
    
    Spell Name: Flame
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Does fire damage to the selected monster.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: The first good offensive Mage spell. This one isn't as good as
      Fireball or Wound, but it is a start. The casting cost is a bit high
      for the effect you get, but it is still better than nothing. Cast
      this when you are fighting against a single monster.
    
    Spell Name: Slow
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: 7
    Description: Slows the selected monster
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Useful when fighting a single powerful monster. This is actually
      useless against a lot of monsters. When fighting multiple monsters,
      opt for Slow Group instead.
    
    Spell Name: Dumbfound
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: 10
    Description: Dumbfounds whatever monster you select.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Useful against very high level and powerful mages and priests. Other
      that, this spell has little real use, and you would be better of not
      using it.
    
    Spell Name: Envenom
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Poisons the weapon of the selected PC
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: The only time I ever really bother with poisoned weapons is when I
      cast Major Blessing. I find that Envenom has little use, and is a
      prefect waste of a turn. I prefer to just cast Poison on the monster
      I want poisoned.
    
    Spell Name: Stinking Cloud
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Creates an area that curses all monsters who walk into it.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Sort of useful. There have actually been times when I have casted
      this spell, although those occasions were admittedly rare. Don't
      overlook this spell, but don't worship it either.
    
    Spell Name: Summon Beast
    Casting Cost: 4
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Summons a weak monster to fight on your side
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: All I can say is that you should NEVER bother to cast this spell. 
      The monsters it generates are weak and you will find yourself
      regretting that you ever casted this spell.
    
    Spell Name: Conflagration
    Casting Cost: 4
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Creates Flame fields over a fairly large area.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Sort of like an upgrade to Flame Cloud. But I still hate this spell
      as it is weak and a waste of a turn.
    
    Spell Name: Dispel Field
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: 10
    Description: Can dispel magical fields like fire, ice, blades, etc. Does NOT
      work on magical barriers.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Another one of those spells that I never use. I have little more to
      say than that.
    
    Spell Name: Sleep Cloud
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Creates a cloud that has a chance of putting any monsters who
      enter it to sleep.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Another one of those spells that I never use. I have little more to
      say than that.
    
    ->Level 3:
    Spell Name: Unlock
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Has a chance of unlocking locked doors.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: If a door is locked, this is the only way I try to unlock it. Forget
      lockpick. Forget bashing the door. This spell is better than both of
      those ways combined, and it becomes more effective the higher the
      level that the caster is. If the door doesn't open the first time,
      just try it a couple more times. That should tell you if the door
      can be unlocked or not.
    
    Spell Name: Haste
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Increases the Action Points of the selected PC for a short period
      of time.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: There are better hasting spells out there, but, until you learn
      them, this spell is pretty handy. I liked to haste my most powerful
      warrior and then have him run in and wreak havoc. This is handy, but
      there are, as I mentioned, better hasting spells out there like
      Major Haste and Major Blessing.
    
    Spell Name: Fireball
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: 12
    Description: Does fire damage. Here is how it is layed out:
               xxx     +=targeted square
               x+x     x=damaged areas
               xxx
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: When you first start off with a new party, this spell will be the
      best thing ever. It does a fair amount of damage for a fair casting
      cost. It is a fairly low level and so you can practically always use
      it. Once you learn more powerful spells like Divine Thud and Death
      Arrows, though, this spell becomes sort of useless.
    
    Spell Name: Long Light
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Identical to the level-one spell Light, but this spell lasts
      longer.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Considering its use, this spell is the best source of light. It
      lasts for a good amount of time and has a low casting cost. This is
      the only spell I ever use for light. Ignore the other light spells
      and use this one instead.
    
    Spell Name: Fear
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: 10
    Description: Increases the fear (lowers the morale) of the selected monster
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: As I've said, I detest fear-inducing spells and anyone who happens
      to use them.
    
    Spell Name: Wall of Force
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: 12
    Description: Creates a force wall that affects monsters who walk through it.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: I never bother with any wall spell except Wall of Blades. I find
      that Wall of Force is relatively effective, but it is not effective
      enough to justify the use of it and the loss of a turn.
    
    Spell Name: Weak Summoning
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: 4
    Description: Summons several weak monsters to fight for you. Monsters
      disappear after a while.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: The monsters are so weak, this spell becomes practically pointless.
      I have probably only used this spell once or twice, ever. Don't
      waste your time with it.
    
    Spell Name: Flame Arrows
    Casting Cost: 4
    Spell Range: 10
    Description: Casts multiple Flame spells.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Of all of the arrow spells, I feel this one is the worst. The effect
      is actually less than a Flame spell, and so I would rather just cast
      Fireball or something like it to have a better and bigger effect.
      This spell isn't terrible, but there are just better spells out
      there to choose from.
    
    Spell Name: Web
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Creates webs over a large area.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: This spell is effective, but once enough monsters come through your
      webs, they will no longer do any good. This spell will eventually be
      replaced by Slow Group.
    
    Spell Name: Resist Magic
    Casting Cost: 4
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Makes the selected PC magic resistant for a short while.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Although this may sound like a useful spell, you will soon find that
      there are few times when you will actually use it. When those happy
      occasions come, though, this spell is pretty handy to have.
    
    ->Level 4:
    Spell Name: Poison
    Casting Cost: 4
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Poisons the selected monster.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: I only poison my enemies by using poisoned weapons, not by spells. I
      practically never use this spell anymore, but it is useful when you
      are at a lower level and have little more firepower than this.
    
    Spell Name: Ice Bolt
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: 12
    Description: Does cold damage to the selected monster.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Few monsters are immune/resistant to cold, so there are some
      monsters on whom this spell will be effective. But otherwise, cast
      Fireball or Kill for damage. This spell is good, but I rarely use it
      as I have more powerful spells in my arsenal.
    
    Spell Name: Slow Group
    Casting Cost: 4
    Spell Range: 12
    Description: Casts a "Slow" spell on all monsters within 12 spaces of the
      caster.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Useful to make would-be long combats short. You can cut down the
      attacks of your enemies and up yours with this. Not bad, but there
      are a few better spells out there to make combat easier.
    
    Spell Name: Magic Map
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Completes the map for wherever you are. Know that you must have a
      sapphire to cast this spell.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Very useful. With the whole map, you can find secret passages,
      locations where you might have a mission at, etc. This is one spell
      to learn, and, once you learn it, you should always make sure you
      have a steady supply of sapphires with you.
    
    Spell Name: Capture Soul
    Casting Cost: 30
    Spell Range: 10
    Description: Preserves the selected monster into your party. It can then be
      summoned up with the following spell. However, this spell isn't
      guaranteed to succeed.
    Rating: -Varies-
    Comments: This spell can be useful or pointless. It all depends on which
      monsters you capture.
    
    Spell Name: Simulacrum
    Casting Cost: -Varies-
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Remember the monsters you captured with Capture Soul? Well, with
      this spell, you can summon them. The casting cost depends on the
      monster you are summoning.
    Rating: -Varies-
    Comments: As with Capture Soul, this spell all depends on which monsters you
      capture. Capturing a rat will do you little good, but capturing
      something like a Golem will do a lot of help. As long as you capture
      good monsters, this spell is extremely great.
    
    Spell Name: Venom Arrows
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Casts multiple Poison spells.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: A lot better than Flame Arrows. This spell is when you are fighting
      a lot of hostile mages/priests. It will poison them all and so you
      will have a much easier time of winning the battle.
    
    Spell Name: Wall of Ice
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Creates an ice wall. They are more damaging and last longer than
      a wall of force.
    Rating:
    Comments: Even though this spell is one step up from the Wall of Force, I
      still never really use it. If you want a wall spell, I recommend
      Wall of Blades. But until you learn that spell, this spell should do
      enough for you.
    
    ->Level 5:
    Spell Name: Stealth
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Makes you sneaky for a little while. Monsters will see you less,
      and so you can sneak by them and enter your destination a lot
      faster.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: I use this in dungeons where I want/need to avoid combat. It saves
      me a lot of pointless combat. This is yet another one of those
      useful spells that I rarely use at all, mainly because I forget
      about its existence.
    
    Spell Name: Major Haste
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Casts Haste on every PC in your party.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Useful. The group-haste effect is extremely handy before entering
      large combats. This is one spell that should be cast before every
      battle, and never be overlooked. However, once you learn Major
      Blessing, you can forget about ever using this spell again.
    
    Spell Name: Firestorm
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: 14
    Description: Does fire damage like the following:
         xxx
        xxxxx
        xx+xx    +=Targeted Square
        xxxxx    x=Affected Area
         xxx
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Pretty much an upgrade to Fireball. This spell does just as much
      damage, just over a larger area. It is extremely useful, especially
      when you just learn it and have no spells that are more powerful.
      However, this spell loses practically all of its luster once you
      learn Divine Thud, which is a lot better.
    
    Spell Name: Dispel Barrier
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Has a chance of dispelling magical barriers (fire or force) in
      your path.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Once you get this spell, you will immediately notice that a lot more
      of the scenario is now available to you. This is a spell handy only
      in that way.
    
    Spell Name: Fire Barrier
    Casting Cost: 9
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Creates a Fire Barrier. Fire Barriers last until you dispel them
      or a monster breaks through it. You can also walk through Fire
      Barriers.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: The only real use of this spell is to block Quickfire from killing
      you. Fire Barriers are easy for monsters to break down, and so
      useless from that respect. But as I said, they are useful for using
      to stopping Quickfire.
    
    Spell Name: Summoning
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Like Weak Summoning, but the monsters that you summon will be
      stronger.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Better than Weak Summoning, but this spell still isn't anything 
      special. There are better spells for summoning out there.
    
    Spell Name: Shockstorm
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: 10
    Description: Creates a lot of Force Walls in the shape of a circle.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Pretty much just an upgrade to Forcefield. The increase in the
      affected area is nice, though.
    
    Spell Name: Spray Fields
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: 12
    Description: Like an arrow spell, but this one shoots out a randomly-selected 
      field.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Sometimes useful. Sometimes not. It actually depends on which fields
      are summoned.
    
    ->Level 6:
    Spell Name: Major Poison
    Casting Cost: 7
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Greatly poisons the selected monster.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: The effect of the poison is great and will do a lot of damage. A
      great spell to cast on powerful enemies. Just make sure that they
      are not resistant or immune to poison.
    
    Spell Name: Group Fear
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: 12
    Description: Reduces the morale of all monsters within several spaces of the
      caster.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: If you are going to use a fear spell, just make sure you use this
      one. The effect will actually do some good, and you can avoid combat
      pretty well using this spell. Still, I never use this spell.
    
    Spell Name: Kill
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: 6
    Description: Does a good bit of damage to the selected monster
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Because this spell does like 70 damage, it is a great spell to cast
      for damage. You should buy this spell the first chance you get. You
      will not regret it. I promise.
    
    Spell Name: Paralyze
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: 6
    Description: Like an arrows spell, but each monster you target has a chance of
      being paralyzed.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Useful against a ton of powerful monsters. In combats against weaker
      monsters, this is a useless spell.
    
    Spell Name: Daemon
    Casting Cost: 12
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Summons a demon to fight on your side.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Preferable to Summon Guardian as you can see the demon. The demon
      will cast a lot of spells and so help you in that respect.
    
    Spell Name: Antimagic Cloud
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: 12
    Description: Creates an area where magic can not enter/exit.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Useful when you are fighting a large group of enemy mages/priests.
      But if the monsters you are fighting do not cast spells, make sure
      that you do not use this spell!
    
    Spell Name: Mindduel
    Casting Cost: 12 (I think)
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: The caster enters a mindduel with the targeted monster. Leads to
      loss/gain of Spell Points, and, eventually, death. Requires a
      Smoky Crystal to cast.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: A great way to kill powerful monsters. If you are at a high enough
      level, it will be easy, and you will find yourself victorious.
    
    Spell Name: Flight
    Casting Cost: 20
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Allows the party to fly for about three spaces.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Unless you are not given an item to allow you to fly, I find this
      spell useless. The short flight distance almost guarantees that you
      will not reach your goal in time. I usually do not use this spell.
    
    ->Level 7:
    Spell Name: Shockwave
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Sends out a wave of power damaging all creatures, hostile, PC, or
      friendly, within ten spaces of the caster. More damage is done
      for the farther away the creature is from the caster.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Useful in debug mode to clear out all of those annoying monsters.
      Also useful when you enter combat and the entire party is on one
      square. This spell is handy, but there are better combat spells out
      there.
    
    Spell Name: Major Blessing
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Blesses, Hastes, and mildly poisons weapons for every PC.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Another one of the greatest spells in the game. For only eight Spell
      Points, you get the equivalent of: Six Haste spells, six Bless
      spells, and six Envenom spells. Using this spell before a huge
      combat will at least quadruple your chances of victory. It can also
      shorten those annoying combats against weaker monsters. This is one
      of those must-have spells. Get it the first chance you get it.
    
    Spell Name: Mass Paralysis
    Casting Cost: 20
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Paralyzes all monsters within about 8 spaces of the caster.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: About as useful as Paralyze, but able to affect a lot more monsters.
    
    Spell Name: Protection
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Makes the selected PC invulnerable for a little while, and the
      entire party magically resistant.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: This is a useful spell, but I often find myself never using it. You
      will sometimes find uses for it, though.
    
    Spell Name: Major Summoning
    Casting Cost: 14
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Summons up several powerful monsters to fight on your side
      temporarily.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: One of the few summoning spells I actually use. This one actually
      gives you powerful monsters that will do some damage. It is great to
      cast in large combats to make it go by faster.
    
    Spell Name: Force Barrier
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Creates a Force Barrier. Force Barriers cannot be walked through.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Preferable to Fire Barriers (unless you are boxing in quickfire),
      and are great for blocking the monsters from you. This is a useful
      spell. Don't forget it exists.
    
    Spell Name: Quickfire
    Casting Cost: 50
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Creates Quickfire, which will spread to cover almost all areas.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Useful, so long as you don't ever touch the quickfire. Quickfire
      will not travel diagonally or through Force or Fire barriers, so,
      when you cast it, make sure you know what you are doing.
    
    Spell Name: Death Arrows
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: 6
    Description: Casts multiple Kill spells at once.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: It's Kill x2-6! This spell saves a lot of time, and the only other
      offensive spell as good as this one is Divine Thud. Also, when you
      cast this spell on monsters who take up more than one square, you
      can place a target on each square, so they will get blasted more
      than once! This is undoubtedly a must-have spell, and if ever you
      get the chance to get it, go for it!
    
    
    Priest Spells
    ->Level 1:
    Spell Name: Minor Bless
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Gives the selected PC a weak bless.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Blessing is effective, but this spell doesn't give you a whole lot
      of power. You will be much better off with the spell Bless.
    
    Spell Name: Minor Heal
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Lightly heals the selected PC from anywhere from 1-25 HP.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Useful when you really need to heal a PC and you have little Spell
      Points left.
    
    Spell Name: Weaken Poison
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Weakens the poison of the selected PC.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Useless, considering you already have Cure Poison! I recommend that
      over this any day, as the former is much more powerful and effective.
    
    Spell Name: Turn Undead
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Does damage to the monsters who are undead. If the monster is not
      undead, the spell does no damage.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: The amount of damage is decent (though not as good as Dispel
      Undead), and it can make your undead troubles a lot smaller. When
      you are fighting undead, don't forget about the presence of this
      spell.
    
    Spell Name: Location
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Gives your party's coordinates. X is the horizontal location and
      increases as you travel to the right (east). Y is the vertical
      location and increases as you travel down (south). I use this
      spell to describe locations in my walkthroughs.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: The only purpose of this spell is so that you can communicate with
      people in real life where you went (like in my walkthrough). Other
      than that, this spell has no use, no purpose.
    
    Spell Name: Sanctuary
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Makes the selected PC invisible for a little while.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Useful when one PC is nearly dead. Just remember that if they attack
      a monster, they will be seen.
    
    Spell Name: Symbiosis
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: You heal the selected PC, but you end up taking some damage
      yourself.
    Rating: 0/5
    Comments: Kill your caster to revive a PC?! For three spell points?! Forget
      that! Don't waste your time with this spell.
    
    Spell Name: Minor Manna
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Gives the party a little food.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Useful when you are extremely low on food, out in the middle of
      nowhere, and have Spell Points to spare. The spell "Manna" is
      better, though.
    
    Spell Name: Ritual of Sanctification
    Casting Cost: 50
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Sometimes, this spell must be casted on an area for you to do
      something in the scenario.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Only gets a five-out-of-five because some scenarios require that
      this spell be cast on a certain area for you to pass the scenario.
    
    Spell Name: Stumble
    Casting Cost: 1
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Webs the targeted monster.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Weak. You will be better off with the Mage spell Slow.
    
    ->Level 2:
    Spell Name: Bless
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Blesses the selected PC, making them more effective for a little
      while.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Blessing is useful, especially when done with this spell. The effect
      here is good and will actually make a difference. Cast this on your
      most powerful PC and watch them unleash some hell!
    
    Spell Name: Cure Poison
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Cures the poison of the selected PC
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Poison is a pain, and can easily kill a PC. With this spell, you can
      eliminate poison quickly. It is a great thing that you start off
      knowing this spell, otherwise you would be screwed over.
    
    Spell Name: Curse
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: 10
    Description: Makes the selected enemy less effective in all ways for a little
      while.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Good when fighting a single tough enemy and you have hardly any SP
      left. If you do have a lot of SP left, cast Holy Scourge. It is a
      lot more effective.
    
    Spell Name: Light
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Does the same thing of the Mage spell of the same name.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: I never really use this spell. I only use Long Light to create
      light.
    
    Spell Name: Wound
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: 5
    Description: Does damage of no kind to an enemy.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Because the damage is of no kind, it damages all enemies that don't
      have the trait "Invulnerable". Very handy against enemies with tons
      of resistances, despite the fact that it only does like 20 damage.
    
    Spell Name: Summon Spirit
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Summons a shade to fight alongside you.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Shades are pretty weak and die quick. You will have more luck with
      Summon Host.
    
    Spell Name: Move Mountains
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Some terrains are weak/crumbling/moldy and can be destroyed. This
      spell blasts the targeted area, and if it can be destroyed, it
      will be.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Useful to allow you to access hidden areas that are usually very
      hard to access. This is a handy spell, but rarely is it required to
      reach certain areas.
    
    Spell Name: Charm Foe
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: 6
    Description: Has a chance of getting the targeted monster to join your side.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: Charming is useful, but only being able to charm one monster is
      little help (unless the monster you are charming is very powerful).
    
    Spell Name: Disease
    Casting Cost: 4
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Diseases the selected monster.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: I prefer not to bother with disease, as by the time it starts to
      truly take effect, I have usually killed the monster. You will
      probably quickly discover this if you try out this spell.
    
    Spell Name: Awaken
    Casting Cost: 2
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Wakes the selected PC from their snoozing.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: I just wait out sleep, and never cast this spell.
    
    ->Level 3:
    Spell Name: Heal
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Restores some of the Hit Points on the selected PC. Has an effect
      greater than that of Minor Heal.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Heals about 20-40 damage. Useful, but usually you will have more
      than one damaged PC.
    
    Spell Name: Minor Heal All
    Casting Cost: 4
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Casts "Minor Heal" on ever PC in your party.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Whenever I cast this spell, it heals as much damage as the spell
      "Heal" does, and it does it on every member of the party. This is 
      one useful spell when all PCs are damaged.
    
    Spell Name: Holy Scourge
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Heavily curses the selected monster.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Great to cast on a single very powerful monster. It will make things
      a lot easier because they will be weaker and less effective.
    
    Spell Name: Detect Life
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Displays, for a short time, all of the monsters in regions you
      have explored on your map.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Useful after you cast Magic Map to find out the best way to get to
      your destination. Also helps you find that one crucial monster that
      got away from you.
    
    Spell Name: Cure Paralysis
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Cures the paralysis of the selected PC.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: I cannot think of very many occasions where I have been paralyzed. 
      And I can guarantee you I didn't use this spell then.
    
    Spell Name: Manna
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Identical to the spell "Minor Manna", but the casting cost is
      greater and so is the effect.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Yes! Now you will practically never have to buy food again. This
      spell is useful, especially to parties who have a lot of
      spellcasters.
    
    Spell Name: Forcefield
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Creates a 3x3 area of Force Walls.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Good because it continues to remain there even after you place it.
      Fairly useful.
    
    Spell Name: Cure Disease
    Casting Cost: 3
    Spell Range:  N/A
    Description: Cures the disease on the selected PC.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: The easiest way to get rid of disease. This is one of those spells
      that you need, and will use often. Being diseased is a pain in the
      ass, and you can avoid/end it with this spell.
    
    Spell Name: Restore Mind
    Casting Cost: 4
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Helps to remove Dumbfounding from the selected character.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: I can only think of one really bad thing about this spell: It has a
      high spell level, so sometimes you will not be able to cast it due
      to the condition you are trying to remove! That can cause some real
      headaches sometimes, and can suck. But otherwise, this spell is very
      useful to your party as it is the only spell that removes
      dumbfounding. Otherwise, you need a potion, a healer, or the Editor
      to get rid of dumbfounding.
    
    Spell Name: Smite
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Should be called "Ice Arrows". This spell just fires cold damage
      at several targets.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: As bad as Flame Arrows. I didn't even know what this spell did until
      I wrote this part of the guide. Just goes to show that you can live
      without this spell.
    
    ->Level 4:
    Spell Name: Cure All Poison
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Cures the poison from the entire party
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Great when your entire party is heavily poisoned. Saves a lot of
      time and Spell Points. For its class, this is a great spell to use.
    
    Spell Name: Curse All
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: 10
    Description: Curses all enemies within about eight spaces of the caster.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Handy in massive combat against a lot of enemies. But when fighting
      against only like 2 or 3 enemies, do not cast this spell.
    
    Spell Name: Dispel Undead
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: 8
    Description: Like Turn Undead, but with a much stronger effect.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: In difficult scenarios, undead are not common, but in lower-level
      scenarios where you are most likely low-level, this spell will be
      quite handy. Don't overlook its presence.
    
    Spell Name: Remove Curse
    Casting Cost: 15
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Has a chance of removing the curse from a cursed item.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: I always just toss/sell my cursed item, so I can't really talk too
      much about this spell....
    
    Spell Name: Sticks to Snakes
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Summons a lot of snakes and asps
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Another one of the useful summoning spells. This one is good because
      it creates a lot of monsters, and you can use those monsters as a
      distraction, and so sneak by/kill easier your enemy.
    
    Spell Name: Martyr's Shield
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Puts a Martyr's Shield on the selected PC (see the Conditions
      section for more info.)
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: The effect is useful, yes, but there are few occasions when it is
      "right" to cast this spell. If you want a Martyr's Shield, you will
      have better luck casting Avatar.
    
    Spell Name: Cleanse
    Casting Cost: 5
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Cleans the selected PC of disease and webs.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Disease can be easier removed by "Cure Disease", and webs can be
      removed by pausing in place. This is one spell to ignore. Major
      Cleansing is a lot better, and actually useful.
    
    Spell Name: Firewalk
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Allows the party to walk over lava without taking damage for a
      short while.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Saves you A LOT of damage for little Spell Points. This is a spell
      that will make the game a lot easier.
    
    
    ->Level 5:
    Spell Name: Bless Party
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Blesses your entire party.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Handy when you only know spells up to level 6. The bless effect is
      noticeable, and it will actually help you out. The Mage spell Major
      Blessing is better, though.
    
    Spell Name: Major Heal
    Casting Cost: 7
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Greatly heals the selected PC.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Useful when only one PC in your party is in need of healing. The
      effect is good, and you will actually find it useful.
    
    Spell Name: Raise Dead
    Casting Cost: 25
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: With a Resurrection Balm, has a chance of reviving a dead person.
      If it fails, the person will be reduced to dust, and then they
      cannot be revived with this spell.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: My PCs rarely die anymore (being humble :D), so this spell is never
      used by me. If my PCs do die, and I decide to use a spell to revive
      them, then I will cast Resurrection instead.
    
    Spell Name: Flamestrike
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: 9
    Description: Identical to the Mage Spell "Fireball", but more powerful.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: The first great offensive Priest Spell. This is better than Fireball
      because it does about 20-30 more damage.
    
    Spell Name: Mass Sanctuary
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Makes the entire party invisible for a period of time.
    Rating: From 2/5 to 5/5
    Comments: If you combine this spell with Major Blessing and enter combat mode,
      this spell kicks enough ass to earn its five-out-of-five rating. If
      you just cast this and walk straight through the dungeon, it will
      only get a two-out-of-five. This spell is handy as your entire party
      will not be attacked by monsters for a while. Just remember that
      attacking a monster removes the Invisible effect.
    
    Spell Name: Summon Host
    Casting Cost: 12
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Summons up a Deva and 4 Spirits to fight for you.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Useful for low-level spellcasters as this spell always summons the
      same amount of monsters.
    
    Spell Name: Shatter
    Casting Cost: 12
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Casts Move Mountains on all areas immediately next to your party.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Just saves the time of casting Move Mountains on all the areas next
      to you. That's all this spell really does.
    
    Spell Name: Dispel Fields
    Casting Cost: 6
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Dispels the magical fields in a large area.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: I usually just tough the magical fields out. Using this spell is a
      waste of a turn and SP.
    
    ->Level 6:
    Spell Name: Heal All
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Casts "Heal" on the entire party.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Useful, but becomes redundant when you learn Revive All. However,
      until that happy day comes, this spell is amazingly useful for
      healing your party.
    
    Spell Name: Revive
    Casting Cost: 7
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Completely heals and cures the selected PC of damage and most
      conditions.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Extremely awesome for one-PC parties or parties where only one
      character is in need of healing. Good because it completely heals
      them, saving a lot of worry.
    
    Spell Name: Hyperactivity
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Wakes up all sleeping characters and, if any PCs are slowed, sets
      them back to normal.
    Rating: 2/5
    Comments: If my whole party is slowed, I will counter-act it with a Major
      Haste/Blessing! But, if my whole party is asleep, I will cast this
      spell.
    
    Spell Name: Destone
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: If one of your PCs has been turned to stone by a Basilisk or
      something else, this spell will turn them back to normal.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: It is rare that you become stoned (not talking about wasted :D), but
      when you do, this is a handy spell to know as it will help to
      restore you immediately.
    
    Spell Name: Summon Guardian
    Casting Cost: 14
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Summons one Guardian (who are invisible) to fight on your side.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: It is, in my opinion, a bad idea to summon guardians. This is
      because they are invisible, and, by accident, you could attack them
      physically or hit them with a spell. If you are sure that this will
      not happen, this spell is fine to cast as Guardians are quite
      effective as bodyguards.
    
    Spell Name: Mass Charm
    Casting Cost: 17
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Has a chance of getting all hostile monsters within close
      proximity to your party to become friendly and fight on your
      side.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: I very rarely use this spell, but when I have used it, I have had no
      bad experiences. This is just one of those spells that are actually
      quite useful, but you just forget about its presence. One thing I
      have used it for, though, is in an outdoor combat with weaker
      monsters. I cast it, and, since all monsters become on my side, I
      can than end the combat. This is a good spell; make sure you don't
      forget it like I do.
    
    Spell Name: Protective Circle
    Casting Cost: 8
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Creates a circle in which you will not take damage, so long as
      you do not attack any monsters.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: Very useless. You are only protected in the circle, so, seeing as
      this spell is used primarily to avoid/escape combat, the moment you
      leave the circle as you escape or whatever, you will be vulnerable
      to attack. Never, ever use this spell.
    
    Spell Name: Pestilence
    Casting Cost: 7
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Inflicts a powerful disease on all monsters within eight spaces
      of the caster.
    Rating: 1/5
    Comments: I never bother with this spell, primarily because by the time the
      disease starts to take effect, the combat is almost finished. I
      suppose this spell has its uses, but I do not know them...
    
    ->Level 7:
    Spell Name: Revive All
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Despite the name, this spell does not cast Revive on the entire
      party. Instead, it has the effect of several Healing spells
      casted on each member of the party.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Useful after things where the entire party was massively damaged,
      like large combats or walking through a huge pool of lava. The
      effect is great.
    
    Spell Name: Ravage Spirit
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: 4
    Description: Does like 70-150 damage to all members of demonkind
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Finally a spell that works on demonkind! Useful against the
      pain-in-the-ass Haakai's and all of there henchmen. Saves a lot of
      time and hard combat. However, if you are not at high enough level,
      the demons will resist the spell and no damage will be done to them.
    
    Spell Name: Resurrect
    Casting Cost: 35
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: This spell requires a Resurrection Balm to cast. It revives the
      selected dead member of your party, even if they were reduced to
      dust.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: It has been a very long time since I have used a low-level party,
      and so my PCs rarely die. When they do, I just go to a healer. I
      have no real comments on this spell.
    
    Spell Name: Divine Thud
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: 12
    Description: This spell does Magic damage in the following pattern:
          xxx
         xxxxx   +=targeted space
         xx+xx   x=affected areas
         xxxxx
          xxx
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Arguably the best damage spell in the game, Divine Thud is very
      handy. Fewer monsters are resistant to magic than fire, so more
      monsters will be affected by this spell. It has a high range and
      does anywhere from 20-70 damage, and does more when you are at a
      higher level. If ever you have an opportunity to get this spell, go
      for it.
    
    Spell Name: Avatar
    Casting Cost: 12
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: In one spell, you are blessed, made invulnerable, hasted, given
      magic resistance, and given a martyr's shield.
    Rating: 5/5
    Comments: Very useful for single-PC parties, Avatar is like the super-boost
      spell that is great for your spellcasters to cast before a large
      combat. A lot is done for a mere 12 Spell Points, and the effects =
      last a good amount of time. With single-PC parties, they find
      themselves completely prepared for a huge battle, and will have a
      much easier time than normal.
    
    Spell Name: Wall of Blades
    Casting Cost: 12
    Spell Range: 10
    Description: Creates a Wall of Blades, the most damaging of all of the wall
      types.
    Rating: 3/5
    Comments: Good to cast when a lot of monsters are coming after you. The spell
      will weaken them before they even touch you. I rarely use the wall
      spells, and so I know little about tactics with this spell. I do
      know that it has its uses and does a fair bit of damage.
    
    Spell Name: Word of Recall
    Casting Cost: 30
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Returns the party to the starting location of the scenario they
      are in.
    Rating: -Varies-
    Comments: The rating varies because in some scenarios, it is bad to teleport
      to the beginning of the scenario (like the Za-Khazi run). That can
      trap you there and make the scenario unbeatable. But in other
      scenarios where that doesn't apply, this spell is relatively handy,
      despite the high casting cost. I only really use this spell to save
      the time of traveling from place to place.
    
    Spell Name: Major Cleansing
    Casting Cost: 10
    Spell Range: N/A
    Description: Cleans the entire party of webbing and disease.
    Rating: 4/5
    Comments: Useful unless you are dumbfounded. Tossing everybody's disease at
      once saves both Spell Points and time, and tossing webs is just an
      added bonus. This is a handy spell to buy.
    
    
    Well, those are all of the spells in Blades of Exile. Please let me know if
    there are any errors with the information regarding the above spells.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    5. Alchemy Recipes                                                        7487
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Blades of Exile contains about 20 potions, and, although I never really use
    alchemy, you might. And, if you do, here is a description of each recipe.
    If you happen to know the ingredients required to make any potion or have any
    tips/corrections to make, please let me know.
    
    Recipe Name: Weak Curing Potion
    Required Skill to Make: 1
    Description: Helps to cure you off your poison.
    
    Recipe Name: Weak Healing Potion
    Required Skill to Make: 1
    Description: Restores some of your HP.
    
    Recipe Name: Weak Poison
    Required Skill to Make: 1
    Description: Can be used on weapons. Effect is weak.
    
    Recipe Name: Weak Speed Potion
    Required Skill to Make: 3
    Description: Will weakly haste whoever drinks this potion.
    
    Recipe Name: Medium Potion
    Required Skill to Make: 3
    Description: Like Weak Curing Potion, but with a greater effect.
    
    Recipe Name: Medium Heal Potion
    Required Skill to Make: 4
    Description: Like Weak Healing Potion, but this has a greater and more useful
      effect.
    
    Recipe Name: Strong Curing
    Required Skill to Make: 5
    Description: Like Medium Potion, but completely cures you.
    
    Recipe Name: Medium Speed Potion
    Required Skill to Make: 5
    Description: Hastes you stronger than the Weak Speed Potion.
    
    Recipe Name: Graymold Salve
    Required Skill to Make: 7
    Description: A healing potion of great power.
    
    Recipe Name: Weak Power Potion
    Required Skill to Make: 9
    Description: Increases your skill temporarily.
    
    Recipe Name: Potion of Clarity
    Required Skill to Make: 9
    Description: A Potion of Clarity is one potion that any party with
      spellcasters should always carry at least one of. It
      automatically cures you of dumbfounding.
    
    Recipe Name: Strong Poison
    Required Skill to Make: 10
    Description: A powerful weapon poison.
    
    Recipe Name: Strong Heal Potion
    Required Skill to Make: 12
    Description: Greatly heals the drinker.
    
    Recipe Name: Killer Poison
    Required Skill to Make: 12
    Description: A very powerful and potent weapon poison.
    
    Recipe Name: Resurrection Balm
    Required Skill to Make: 9
    Description: Required if you are going to cast the spells Raise Dead or 
      Resurrect.
    
    Recipe Name: Knowledge Brew
    Required Skill to Make: 19
    Description: Increases the drinker's skill points a little bit.
    
    Recipe Name: Strong Strength
    Required Skill to Make: 10
    Description: Greatly increases your strength temporarily. Useful if you can
      find one of these.
    
    Recipe Name: Bliss
    Required Skill to Make: 18
    Description: I believe that this potion prepares you perfectly for battle by
      hasting and blessing you. I am not sure on this. Please let me
      know if I am wrong.
    
    Recipe Name: Strong Power
    Required Skill to Make: 20
    Description: Greatly increases your skill in battle temporarily. Useful if
      you can find one of these, and I have, on very rare occasions,
      made this potion myself.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    6. Conditions                                                             0312
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Aside from just having HP and Spell points, your character also can gain a
    condition. Each condition has a different effect on your character. Some of
    these effects are positive, and others are negative.
    
    Poisoned: Your character takes damage every couple of turns. This can be cured
    by waiting for it to go away, or by casting Cure Poison. Its icon is green goo
    with a white P in the middle.
    
    Very Poisoned: This is similar to Poisoned, but your character takes more
    damage more often. It is also harder to get rid of. If you are waiting around,
    it will take a lot longer, and if you are casting a spell, it may take 2. Its
    icon is a red P in the middle of green goo.
    
    Hasted: Your PC gets more Action Points. I think the highest you can get
    without any help is 12. What I mean by help is by wearing a ring of speed,
    helmet of speed, boots of speed, etc. I think you can get up to around 18 this
    way. By hasting your party, you can shorten many would-be long battles to just
    a few turns. Casting multiple times makes the hasting last longer. Wears off
    after a while, though. Notice the icon (when your PC is normal) where there is
    a person with two arrows coming out of it. When hasted, it turns yellow and
    three arrows come out of it.
    
    Slowed: The opposite of haste. Your PC has fewer action points if hasted, and
    otherwise they will miss a turn. Counter with Haste. Being slowed several
    times makes your PC miss more turns in a row. Wears off after a while, though.
    The icon is like Haste's, but with one arrow and a brown body.
    
    Blessed: This is handy, and the more times it is casted, the more the effect.
    Basically, being blessed has several benefits: In physical combat, you hit
    your target more and do more damage, your spells are better, and your enemies
    can't hit you as well. Plus, I think this also boosts all of your stats
    (except the things like Mage/Priest Spells, HP, and Spell Points) by 1.
    Combine with Haste to wreak major havoc. A bless wears off after a while. The
    icon is a blue B with a yellow # right next to it.
    
    Cursed: The opposite of a bless. Your spells are worse, your stats get worse
    (I think), you do less damage, and hit your foe less. Also wears off, and
    multiple curses have a greater effect. The icon is the same as Bless, but with 
    a C instead of a B.
    
    Webbed: This, unlike the above conditions, does not wear off after a while.
    The only way to eliminate it is to cast Cleanse, or just pause where you are.
    Your PC's will clean there webs. It usually takes several times, though. When
    webbed, your PC will have less AP's, one less for each time you are webbed.
    Your spell's range also is reduced. The icon is a spider web.
    
    Disease: This is like a combination. When diseased, it acts on a time basis,
    like Poison. When it acts, you might be Dumbfounded, Cursed, Slowed, or
    Poisoned. The only way to get rid of this is to cast Cure Disease; but I think
    it wears off in time. The icon is a frowny face.
    
    Dumbfounded: This condition only affects people who are casting spells. When
    dumbfounded, you cannot cast spells of high level. More levels become 
    off-limits to you when you get dumbfounded worse. The only cure is to cast
    Restore Mind or drink a Potion of Clarity. I think (don't take my word) that
    this wears off after a LONG time. The icon is a gray question mark.
    
    Invulnerable: When invulnerable, you cannot take damage. Obviously, its very
    handy because of that. You can get this, among others, when casting Avatar.
    Invulnerability can also come to you by the way of a scroll. Unfortunately, it
    does wear off fast. Way too fast. The icon is an I with a gray shield around
    it.
    
    Invisible: When invisible, you cannot take physical damage. This wears off
    with time and also if you attack someone else. Useful for sneaking through
    dungeons. The icon is a gray body.
    
    Weapon Poisoned: When this is present, your weapon is poisoned. This means
    that it may poisoned the attacked monster. I don't use this much except for
    when I cast Major Blessing. I usually just cast Poison on the monster. The
    only exception is that the spell Poison has bad range. So I poison my archer's
    arrows and shoot the person, which poisons them. The icon is a PW with a blade
    dripping poison.
    
    Magic Resistant: When Magic Resistant, you cannot take damage from Magic. I
    don't use this much, so I can't really say anything about it. The icon is a
    body leaving a yellow shadow.
    
    Martyr's Shield: If you have this, when you are attacked, the person who
    attacked you will receive as much damage as they did to you. Useful on golems.
    The icon is a M with a red shield behind it.
    
    Asleep: To be perfectly honest, I do not know just what this one does. Please
    let me know if you should find out.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    7. Combat Help                                                            2137
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    
    Blades of Exile generally revolves around two things: puzzles and combat. I
    cannot help you with the first one, but I can help you with the second.
    Combat is a major part of BoE, and it really helps to know what you are doing.
    In this part, I will describe how to survive in several situations. I do this
    in a step-by-step program.
    I assume that you have the following. If you do not, you will have to look for
    alternatives to the ways I say:
    1) A six-person party with 2 spellcasters and 4 warriors.
    2) Spell knowledge and ability up to level 7.
    
    
    ->Killing a Single Powerful Monster<-
    1. Enter combat mode.
    2. Hit "wait" on all of your warriors, and have each spellcaster cast "Major
       Blessing".
    3. Send my warriors to attack and block off the primary route to my
       spellcasters.
    That should have ended the first turn. Now, on the second turn, I do/consider
    the following:
    4. Attack the monster with my warriors.
    5. Have a spellcaster cast "Scry Monster" and discover its health and
       everything.
    6. If the monster does a lot of damage or can cast spells, I will cast "Slow"
       on that monster. Otherwise I will cast "Curse" on it.
    7. Have my other spellcaster bash it with "Kill" spells. If the monster is
       immune to magic, I will cast Major Summoning around the monster.
    You are generally now prepared to last out this monster. Some things to do:
    1. Alternate between casting Major Blessing, Slow, and Curse.
    2. Cast Revive [All] if the situation calls for it.
    3. Cast Major Summoning or Daemon every once in a while.
    4. If you run low on spell points and you are fighting a spellcaster, use your
       last bits of energy to cast Antimagic Cloud on the monster.
    
    This should work when fighting that single monster. Of course, the monster
    could just plain be stronger than you and could kill you.
    
    ->Killing Many Monsters<-
    1. Enter combat mode.
    2. Hit "wait" on all of your warriors, and have each spellcaster cast "Major
       Blessing".
    3. Send out my warriors to attack the monsters.
    That will end the first turn. On the next few:
    4. Cast "Slow Group" a couple of times. This can really shorten your battle.
    5. Cast spells like Divine Thud and Death Arrows. This will greatly reduce the
       number of monsters left.
    6. If there are any enemy mages/priests, send a warrior out to busy them.
    7. Summon a lot of monsters with either Sticks to Snakes or Major Summoning.
       Each one will have a great effect.
    All you really have to do is repeat steps 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7. That should last
    you through the battle. If the situation calls for it, cast Revive [All].
    
    
    A few tips:
    1. When casting spells, think before you cast. Consider the good and bad
    effects of your spell (of course, this is only in difficult combats). Choose
    the one that will benefit you the most, not the one that will have the most
    devastating effect.
    2. Take out enemy spellcasters first. They will build up a large amount of
    damage and summonings to fight you.
    3. Send multiple warriors onto hard targets. They will have a greater effect
    than one and will be better in the long run.
    4. If the situation calls for it, consider a Wall spell. Example:
       -------------|--------**-*-          -:Empty Space.
       -----x-------|-----*--*---*          x:One of your PCs.
       ----x--------|---*--*--*--*          *:Hostile Monster
       ---x---------|---**-*-*-*-*          |:Place to put the wall.
       ---x---------|+-*-**-*-*-*-
       ----x--------|*-*-**---**--
       -----x-------|--*--*----*-*
       -------------|**-*-*-*-*-*-
    5. If you find yourself hopelessly outnumbered, just cast Quickfire and make a
    run for it.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    8. The Perfect Party                                                      8467
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    
    When I say "The Perfect Party", I am, of course, referring to mine. Yes, that
    is right, you are blessed. I am going to share with you my ultimate and
    perfect party!
    
    Some things to know:
    ->Of course, every PC has full stats and complete spell knowledge.
    ->There are six PCs.
    ->To make this party, just make a custom scenario with the items I use, and
      use the Editor/your scenario to boost stats and things like that.
    
    
    Here are the items. The items that each PC has equipped is a combination of
    the following. Note that all of these items are made from scratch and have
    nothing to do with the default items which have similar names.
    DeathBlade: 1-Handed Weapon
    ->Ability: Soulsucker
    ->Comments: Good for automatic restoration of HP.
    DoomBlade: 1-Handed Weapon
    ->Ability: Poisoned Weapon
    ->Comments: Poisoning the monster makes combat a lot shorter.
    Sickness Plate: Armor
    ->Ability: Full Protection
    ->Comments: This is practically the perfect armor.
    Regeneration Amulet: Necklace
    ->Ability: Regeneration
    ->Comments: Enhances regeneration, reducing the risk that I will die.
    Speed Ring: Ring
    ->Ability: Speed
    ->Comments: Adds to my speed.
    Strength Ring: Ring
    ->Ability: Giant Strength
    ->Comments: Adding to strength means more damage.
    Speed Helmet: Helm
    ->Ability: Speed
    ->Comments: One more AP is always nice....
    Boots of Strength: Boots
    ->Ability: Giant Strength
    ->Comments: Adds to the damage I do.
    Gloves of Spells: Gloves
    ->Ability: Intelligence
    ->Comments: Increases the effectiveness of spells.
    Thieving Gloves: Gloves
    ->Ability: Thievery
    ->Comments: Boosts my skill at working away at traps and such.
    Hasting Gloves: Gloves
    ->Ability: Occasional Haste
    ->Comments: The occasional hasting along with lots of extra AP means tons of 
      AP.
    
    
    First PC:
    Name: Kavon
    Used As: Warrior
    Weapons: DoomBlade, DeathBlade
    Armor: Sickness Plate
    Helm: Speed Helmet
    Gloves: Hasting Gloves
    Boots: Boots of Strength
    Amulets: Regeneration Amulet
    Rings: Speed Ring, Strength Ring
    Comments: Leading off in combat is a warrior. He rushes up and strikes all who
       dare oppose me.
    
    Second PC:
    Name: Dylan
    Used As: Warrior
    Weapons: DoomBlade, DeathBlade
    Armor: Sickness Plate
    Helm: Speed Helmet
    Gloves: Hasting Gloves
    Boots: Boots of Strength
    Amulets: Regeneration Amulet
    Rings: Strength Ring, Speed Ring
    Comments: If my first warrior did not finish of all of the monsters, Dylan
       rushes in to do his part.
    
    Third PC:
    Name: Johnny
    Used As: Warrior, Thief
    Weapons: DoomBlade, DeathBlade
    Armor: Sickness Plate
    Helm: Speed Helmet
    Gloves: Thieving Gloves
    Boots: Boots of Strength
    Amulets: Regeneration Amulet
    Rings: Strength Ring, Speed Ring
    Comments: My third warrior also acts as a thief. Every party needs a thief,
       and mine just so happens to double as a warrior. As a warrior, Johnny is
       there to do what Dylan and Kavon could not.
    
    Fourth PC:
    Name: Lance
    Used As: Primarily Warrior, but sometimes Spellcaster
    Weapons: DoomBlade, DeathBlade
    Armor: Sickness Plate
    Helm: Speed Helmet
    Gloves: Hasting Gloves
    Boots: Boots of Strength
    Amulets: Regeneration Amulet
    Rings: Speed Ring, Strength Ring
    Comments: Sometimes you need more than two spellcasters in certain combats.
       Sometimes you need more than three warriors in certain combats. That's what
       Lance is for. He is usually a Warrior, but sometimes he is a spellcaster,
       and sends out extra spells when the party is in need of some help.
    
    Fifth PC:
    Name: Paul
    Used As: 1st Spellcaster
    Weapons: DoomBlade, DeathBlade
    Armor: Sickness Plate
    Helm: Speed Helmet
    Gloves: Gloves of Spells
    Boots: Strength Ring
    Amulets: Regeneration Amulet
    Rings: Speed Ring, Strength Ring
    Comments: Yeah, this is me. I am the most powerful PC in the party :D. I act
       as the first real spellcaster, and I usually unleash the offensive spells
       like Divine Thud and Death Arrows. Also, if the situation calls for it, my
       character will run forward and hack the monsters to bits with my Death and
       Doom Blades.
    
    Sixth PC:
    Name: Kyle
    Used As: 2nd Spellcaster
    Weapons: DoomBlade, DeathBlade
    Armor: Sickness Plate
    Helm: Speed Helmet
    Gloves: Gloves of Spells
    Boots: Strength Ring
    Amulets: Regeneration Amulet
    Rings: Speed Ring, Strength Ring
    Comments: The second spellcaster usually does the little side spells like
       cursing, slowing, healing, and Major Blessing. This is generally the
       behind-the-scenes guy that ends up actually doing a lot. Although Kyle's
       position is not as crucial as Paul's, this is still a necessary character.
    
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    <>C. Complete Walkthroughs<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>4633<>
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    
    As I stated earlier, Blades of Exile comes with three scenarios: Valley of
    Dying Things, A Mild Rebellion, and the Za-Khazi Run.
    I have provided walkthroughs on all three.
    Be aware, though, that, in my walkthroughs, I say the quickest way to beat the
    game. I leave out all of the detail that I can to give you the shortest and
    fastest way to end that scenario. In future updates I might add more detail
    and information about each scenario, but for now, you'll just have to stick
    with this.
    But feel free to stray from the guide to pick up more of the plot.
    And, should I have made an error typing the information, e-mail me to let me
    know.
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    1. Valley of Dying Things                                                 9400
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     You start in Fort Talrus. Leave to the north and follow the road into
    Sweetgrove City.
     Once you are in Sweetgrove, pick the lock of the abandoned shop with "Avizo"
    written on the sign. Inside, walk across the rune and attempt to disarm the
    trap. After that, search the potted plant and take the stone.
     Leave Sweetgrove and go north until you reach the round mountain. All four
    sides (east, west, north, and south) have entrances. Enter each (the west
    entrance is across a river that you have to ford) and place the stone into
    each slot.
     When you place the stone into the fourth hole, the portcullises will open and
    you will have access to the School of Magery. Walk in and go to the middle of
    the level. Walk down the path.
     Once on the second level, go south through the magic barrier. Then walk
    through one of the barriers on the east side of the room. Follow the hallway
    around both corners and go north until you find the Goblin Eater (it's a big
    monster). Kill it. Leave the room to the west. From there, go north until you
    find the wall on the west side that has green mold on it. Cast Move Mountain
    on it. Walk through the hole in the wall and look around until you come across
    a stairway. Go down it.
     On this level, walk south until the dragon gives you a vision. From there, go
    into the western passage just south of you. Walk over the runes and around
    until you come into the dragon's chamber.
     Ask the dragon about "word". She will tell you that the word to set her free
    is "quark".
     After talking to the dragon, go back up the stairway. Cast Move Mountain on
    the same spot as before and again walk through the hole in the wall. Walk
    north and then east as the walkway bends. Go south and then down the stairway.
     If you have done everything right so far, you should be at the Holding Cells.
    Follow the path around, across the rune, until you reach the part with the
    odd-colored walls. Go north and then turn into the eastern hallway. Keep going
    east until you reach the very end of the hallway. At (46,26[<-cast the Priest
    spell "Location" to find out. First number is horizontal location, second is
    vertical location]) there is a secret passage. Walk into the control room and
    sit at the northwest panel. Type in "quark" to set the dragon free.
     After that, leave the control room and walk as if you were going back to the
    School of Magery's 2nd level. But when you come across the sign on the south
    side of the hallway that says "Administrative Level". Go down that staircase.
     At the Administrative Level, work your way to (27,35). You should receive a
    message about spiders. Search around until you find the spider standing still
    guarding the passage to the "yummy bugs". Say "gnats" to the spider and he'll
    skidaddle.
     Fight your way to (59,4) and grab the gnat eggs. After grabbing the eggs, go
    back to the Spider Caves.
     In the Spider Caves, ask every spider about their job until you find one that
    tells you he is the chief. Ask him about "rock" until you see a message, at
    the bottom of the dialogue, that says "you take note of this".
     Go back into the gnat caves and search the filth at (25,3) to find the
    opening stone. When used, the opening stone opens those damned green glowing
    portcullises.
     After getting the Opening Stone, leave the gnats & spider caves by going to
    the heart of the Administrative Level.
     Go through the doors at (11,48) and kill the two Haunts. Leave the
    Administrative Level to the south of the room.
     When you leave the level, you will be outdoors in an underground passage. At
    the west side of this passage is a cavern that takes you back to the surface.
    I advise going through it because it will save you time going through the
    levels of the School of Magery.
     Anyways, in the outdoor cavern, follow the road south across the diseasing
    bridge. Follow the road into the Lower School.
     It should be known that past a secret door in the Apothecary (which is in the
    northwestern part of this level) is a scepter that can cure your disease when
    used.
     But that's beside the point.
     Upon entering this level, go through the western door. Follow the hallway
    south. Unlock the door of the room that has a sign reading "PROVOST" right
    next to it. Search the bookshelves to find a key you need.
     After getting the key, go back to the entrance to this level. This time, go
    through the eastern door in the level. Go through the hole in the southern
    wall and then through the door at the south side of the room. Go west down the
    hallway and use your key to get through the door. In this room, go down the
    stairway on the east side. It will take you to the Library. Go east, past the
    main library entrance with the glowing portcullis. After crossing the Library
    entrance, go through the first door on the north. Then go through the second
    door. Go down the passage to the Vahnatai Caverns.
     In the Vahnatai Caverns, follow the passage to the room with three Vahnatai
    sitting in it. Ask the southwestern one about "stone". Then go back to the
    library.
     In the library level, go back out both doors into the heart of the level. Go
    east and then down the staircase. Go through the doors at (36,9) and at
    (40,11). Kill the Spirit and grab the School Textbook. Again, go back to the
    Library level.
     At the Library level, use the Opening Stone to open all of the glowing
    portcullises.
     Once in the library, go to (43,6). Place the School Textbook on the pedestal.
    A key will be given to you.
     Go back down the stairway to the Experiment Halls (where you found the
    textbook). Go straight south and follow the hallway back to the surface.
     You are to find a man called "Pangle".
     Starting right next to the town Marralis, go southwest until you are
    alongside the mountains. Go south until you find a passage within the
    mountains that pops up a message "this land is doing better than the rest of
    the Vale" or whatever it says. Go into the hut.
     Ask Pangle about "papers". You will spend 500 gold and buy a scroll. Go out
    into his shed and search the southern chest to get your scrolls.
     Go back into the Experiment Halls the way you came out.
     Once in the Experiment Halls, work your way west to (14,16). Follow the
    hallway until you can't go west anymore. Then go south until you can't go
    south anymore. Then go east until you can't go east anymore. Then go north
    until you can't go north anymore (I think that covers every direction...).
    Unlock the doors right to the east of you and go south down the path to leave
    the level.
     In this outdoor cavern, follow the path until you reach the cave (the Control
    Chamber).
     Upon entering, use the Opening Stone. Then walk into the building. Go south
    and stick alongside the western wall. As it bends, stick alongside it, no
    matter what. When you turn north, go north until you reach the pit. Sit in the
    chair at (34,20). Leave this town/dungeon/thingie and go all the way back to
    the first outdoor cavern (where there is also an exit to the surface). This
    means you have to go through the experiment halls, the library, and one other
    floor.
     Once in that cavern, follow the road going EAST. Enter the cave you find.
     In the cave, don't enter the actual building yet. Go east until you come
    across the cracked wall. Cast Move Mountain on it. Go north through the rooms.
    At the farthest north one, go west into the "WASTE ARRIVAL" room. Go through
    the gap in the western wall and then go south. Keep going south until a fight
    with demons occurs. After killing all of the demons, go through a portcullis
    in the eastern wall. This takes you to the Control Chamber. Use the Opening
    Stone to get rid of the glowing portcullis and sit in the chair. Push the
    button and insert the crystal. After the quickfire starts, go east until you
    are teleported.
    And, viola! You have finished this scenario!
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    2. A Mild Rebellion                                                       9339
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    You start this scenario in Selanthi. Go north until you are off of the dock
    than go east until you reach the inn. Go in the inn and talk to the dude in
    the blue. Ask him about "contact".
    Leave Selanthi and follow the road going east. You should get a message from
    the Hill Runners asking you to join them. Ignore the note-for now. Instead,
    follow the road until you get to Willow.
    Enter Willow from the west side and go through the secret passage at (x6 y26).
    Go down the stairway. Follow the path until you reach the chair. Sit in the
    chair and say "yes" to its question. Now, go to where that note from the Hill
    Runners told you to go to. The town is east of Willow.
    Go into the alchemy shop and ask the wizard about "mission". He will give you
    a scroll telling you what to do.
    Head back to Selanthi, but don't go in the town. Instead, go northwest until
    you reach the mountains. Go in the cavern/fort thingie. Kill the ogres on the
    way to the stairway at (x9 y18). Go down the stairway, and get ready for a few
    good fights.
    Follow the ice tunnel path thing around until you reach the Drake at the end.
    When you talk to the drake, click the buttons in this order: wait, yes, yes.
    That will get you the scroll and you will avoid a fight.
    Once you leave the fort, go back into Selanthi. Go into the storage room at
    (x9 y50). Walk around in there until you find a place to put the scrolls.
    Go back to the dude who gave you the scroll mission in Liam and ask him about
    "mission" again.
    Go to the town of Muck. It is a little ways north of Selanthi in a large
    swamp. Walk into the barracks and ask the dervish about "rebellion". Then ask
    him about "test". Go back to Willow and go down that hidden stairway. Sit in
    the chair once more.
    Then go back to Selanthi and ask the chick in the store at (x48 y41) about
    "saintwood". Then ask her about "chest."
    Go into the room she is talking about. It is at (x40 y7). Break in and search
    the dresser to take the chest.
    Leave Selanthi and go north to Zaskiva. It is on the way to Muck, but then
    turn left at the bridge. Follow the path until you get to the ferry. Take the
    ferry and go into the town.
    Once in Zaskiva. ask the man at (x33 y13) about "statue". He will unlock the
    door for you to enter. Go into the room and place the box in the square where
    it gives you that option. That square is on the west side of the room.
    Once you are in the sewers, go and follow the path as it generally heads
    north. Don't cross the bridge over the water.
    At the end of the path, jack one of the the boats and row it over to (x22
    y11). Get off and search the chest in the southeast corner of the room to find
    a key. Get back in the boat and row over to (x4 y34). Go into the little path
    in the cave and open the door.
    Follow the path around. There is one secret passage, but it is easy to find as
    it is right at the end of the first bridge. At the end of the path, you will
    be right next to a chasm. At the chasm, turn south and follow this path
    around, past the roaches and everything. There is a secret passage at (x47
    y23). Go through it. Go south and search the body at (x60 y28). Take the key.
    Go back through the secret passage and the roach caves until you come to the
    building.
    Use the key you found to open the door. Inside, pull the lever. Leave the
    control room and this time, go south and follow the path is it turns back
    north. Keep going north and turn at (x21 y38). Go into the undead lair and
    kill all of the undead. Loot the place and leave the way you came in. Once on
    the path, go north and follow the path around and into the building. Search
    the far eastern desk to find Sewer Key 3.
    Now, backtrack all the way back to the place were you picked up Sewer Key 2
    (on the dead body, remember?).
    In the little nook with the dead body, go through the southern door. Go south
    until you reach the water and then go along the east side of the water. Follow
    the path along until you get to the ghost. Ask it about "revenge". If you
    killed all of the undead in that one lair, then the ghost will help you
    escape.
    If you killed the undead, backtrack until you find the newly-finished bridge
    at (x60 y55). Cross it and hop in the boat.
    Boat over to the dock at (x42 y56). Go west onto dry land, kill the basilisks,
    and go up the stairs.
    In the safehouse, kill the Empire soldiers and flee the safehouse.
    Once you're outside, go to the ferry that leaves the island. At the dialog
    box, select "yes".
    Go back and sit in the chair in the hidden place under Willow.
    Now, go to the northeast part of the isle, into the mountains. Enter the town
    of Buzzard from the south.
    Search the plant at (x22 y18). Go through the newly-opened secret passage and
    down the staircase.
    Sit in the chair at (x10 y11).
    Here, unfortunately, you must make a decision:
    Do you want to join the Hill Runners and help the strike against the Empire,
    or continue to secretly work for the Empire against the Hill Runners?
    If you want to truly join the Hill Runners, read on. Otherwise, skip down a
    ways until I skip a line.
    
    So, you decided to join the Hill Runners.
    First, leave Buzzard and then leave the Hill Runner lands. Walk alongside the
    mountainside and cross the bridge.
    Follow the southside of the mountain around until you come across the cavern.
    That is the Empire's fort. Walk into it.
    Once inside, go due north, through the mountain. Even though the portcullises
    close when you walk in, just keep going north. They will open up. Still, keep
    going north and click "approach" at the next dialog box that appears that has
    that option. Now all of the soldiers in the fort will attack you. Follow the
    path around and through the laboratory, killing soldiers as you go. In the
    room where the quickfire tries to kill you, go through the secret passage at
    (x26 y17). Wait it out there. Walk back out and kill the new soldiers. Go
    through the door on the western wall. When you get the message about the door
    being locked, go through the northeastern path. Open the chest and run south.
    The door is now blown away. Go down the hallway and go through the door on the
    west wall. Try to pull the lever. When the quickfire comes, flee through the
    secret passage at (x1 y4). Go through the secret passage in the south wall and
    kill the soldiers there, especially the Empire Dervish. After killing the
    soldiers, go through a secret passage at (x18 y11) and pull the lever.
    Backtrack all the way into the chamber where you set off the alarm and pull
    the lever at (x16 y36). Now run out of the fort.
    Go back to the chair underneath Buzzard and sit down. You will be told to go
    see Stalker. Leave Buzzard to the south and head southeast from there. Follow
    the path along until you come across the rebels that want to kill you. Do not
    surrender, and kill all of them in the combat.
    Keep going north after killing the rebels and go into Stalker's fort. Follow
    the path along and go into the north door from the courtyard. Go into one of
    the doors in the western wall and then talk to Stalker. He is sitting in that
    room. Ask him about "mission" to receive your final mission.
    After that, go towards Liam. Instead of entering the town, stand one square
    north of it. Go straight north until you reach Jaen's fortress. Ask the dude
    in the blue about "enter" to receive some information. Then go down the hole.
    Follow the path and head north until you get a chance to enter the fort. Go in
    and prepare yourself for a fight. Walk in and kill Jaen.
    Then, run outside and leave the fort to the east.
    Go back up to Stalker's fort and walk back into his throne room. Ask him about
    "mission" to receive your reward. Go through the door at the north side of his
    throne room and go down the stairs. Walk to the end of the dock and leave
    Morrow's Isle.
    Congratulations! You have finished this scenario!
    
    
    So you've decided to still work against Stalker.
    Here's what you do:
    From the chair, go back to the chair in Willow. Sit in it. You will be sent
    back to the chair under Buzzard. In Buzzard's chair, tell them that you wish
    to see Stalker.
    Go to where they tell you: the far east side of the isle. Go due north
    alongside the coast. Keep going along the path until you enter the Pit of
    Plentiful Goo.
    Once in the Pit of Plentiful Goo, follow the path around, killing slimes as
    you go. Enter the subterranean building. Go through the secret passage at (x26
    y7). In this room of levers, pull all of them except the one farthest east. Go
    back out into the hall of portcullises and go through the one second from the
    right. Search the body at (x24 y44) and get the key. Go back into the hall of
    portcullises. Go through the second door on the left this time. Wander around
    until you find the bodies of the dead magi. Search them until you find the one
    with the key. Go back into the subterranean building and use one of your two
    new keys to get through the door at (x25 y1). Keep going west until you grab
    the exploding box. Now, go back through the portcullis on the far left. Follow
    the path around until you reach the closed portcullis. Place the exploding box
    right next to it and leave to the west after it explodes.
    Walk down the mountain path and surrender to O' Grady and his soldiers. You
    will awake in a cell.
    Hit the "w" key until you are set free by Jaen's troops. Talk to the man in
    blue and then head north, out of the cell block.
    Once you receive the message that the game is now timed, head due west and
    kill the troops in there. Leave this area at (x41 y43). Then, work your way
    around and go through another secret passage at (x21 y43). Go through the
    portal. Go north and into the barracks-like area. Leave the room you enter and
    then go north in the hallway. Follow it as it turns west and go into the most
    western door available to you. In the western wall of this room is a secret
    passage you are to go through. Walk into the dining room and kill the guards.
    Then, go into Stalker's throne room. Kill everyone there, including Stalker
    himself. After assassinating Stalker, go through the secret door at (x7 y7).
    Go through the secret door at (x8 y5) and then the door northeast from there.
    Follow that path and go downstairs. At the docks, search the chest and then
    walk north to the end of the dock. Say you want to leave the island.
    Congratulations! You beat this scenario!
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    3. The Za-Khazi Run                                                       5368
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    You start this mission in Fort Goodling.
    Head into the main dining room and go into the commanderÕs office. The door is
    in the southeast corner of the room. Ask the woman sitting there about
    ÒacceptÓ. Then go back into the dining room. Look for the guy in purple robes.
    His name is Seletine. When you find him, ask him about ÒbundleÓ.
    After getting the wands, go through the doors in the northwest corner of the
    room. Get the food and hop into one of the boats.
    Leave Fort Goodling and follow the river, even through the waterfalls, until
    you reach the first fork in it. At this fork, go north. This puts you in a
    large lake. You are to leave it through the north, but there are five rivers
    to choose from! You are to go through the middle one.
    In the next lake that the game puts you on, go northwest to the fairly big
    island. Go into the cave. Go straight into the room. Here, check if you have
    1,200 gold. If so, ask the slith on the left in the chair about ÒgoldÓ. Answer
    ÒyesÓ to his question.
    Leave the cave and hop back into your boat. Keep going northwest and go
    through the narrow passage between the obelisks. Follow this river around.
    Keep following the river until the game tells you that you must continue on
    foot. From there, walk onto shore and go northwest through the cave passage.
    Once you enter the huge cave, go west. In the southwest corner of the cave is
    a unicorn cave. In there, talk to the unicorn named ÒAetheriusÓ. The unicorn
    is in the northwest corner of the unicorn place. Ask the unicorn about
    ÒacceptÓ. Then leave the cave to the north.
    Backtrack towards where you left your boat. This time, cross the bridge that
    crosses the river. Kill the giants that you are forced to do combat with.
    Follow the road into the giantsÕ cave.
    In the northwest corner of this cave is a stairway that you are to go down. At
    (x5 y37) there is a secret passage. Walk through it and go through the door.
    Search the chests until you find the horn.
    Leave this cave the way you came in. Go back to the Unicorn Citadel and talk
    to Aetherius about Òhorn". Leave this dungeon and head north, out of the
    unicorn caves. Enter the unicorn gate and walk up the portcullis. It will
    open. Leave the unicorn gate and walk north. When the specters ask for the
    password, tell them "calamity".
    Go north in this cave and walk into the cave caldera and enter Morog's Castle.
    Go south and talk to the lich. Ask her about "mission". Then go through the
    portal at (x42 y57). Then go through the portal at (x46 y41). Once in this
    cavern, go through the secret passage at (x24 y4). Go straight east through
    another secret passage. Go into the northeast corner of this room and grab the
    mushrooms. Go back through the all of the portals you came in. Talk to the
    lich about "mushrooms". Say "no" to both of her offers. Then leave this
    castle.
    Leave the lich's caves to the northwest. You will now be in the poppy caves.
    Work your way through the caves slowly. You want to head northeast, but there
    are less poppys in the southeast, so kinda curve that way.
    In this next outdoor section, you will be told that you need another boat. Go
    west into the Spiraling Cave. Fight your way into the corners of the level and
    climb the stairway.
    On this level, step on the runes at (x15 y3), (x19 y3), (x3 y11), and (x15
    y27). You have to do this fast. If you get a message that the colors have
    changed, then you will have to start over. After stepping on those four runes,
    step on one of the runes in the large corner rooms. Then go back downstairs.
    At (x13 y10) a passage has opened up. Grab one of the boats. Go north until
    you reach the lake, and go to the north shore of the lake. Take this path
    north. Navigate to the eastern part of these paths and into the Broken Fang
    Clan dungeon. Pull the levers at (x33 y6) and (x34 y40). Now go back to your
    boat and navigate your way through the water back to the Broken Fang Clan.
    This time, go straight through the place, only this time on water. Keep going
    on the river until you find the castle. Go in it. This castle is a maze of
    conveyor belts that even I do not know by heart how to pass. What you must
    first do, though, is work your way to the southeast corner of the dungeon and
    tell the statue "yes". After a lot of hard work, you will find yourself in the
    Pillar Hall. Slay the golems and move on. Work your way into Khoth's chambers.
    Ask the mighty dragon about "payment". He will allow you to leave this tower
    to the northeast. Go through the obvious secret passage in the cave wall.
    Now, all you have to do is merely walk to Fort Cavalier. Kill the Sliths in
    the combat, and then walk into Fort Cavalier. If you made it, you will know
    it. Go through the Emergency Exit in the east part of the fort after talking
    to the fort commander to exit this scenario.
    Congratulations! You have beaten this scenario!
    
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    <>D. Playing Custom-Made Scenarios<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>6911<>
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    
    BoE would not be nearly as good as it is if it weren't for one thing: You can
    play custom-made scenarios.
    It's not that hard, really. Here is what you have to do:
    
    A) Get/make a scenario to play. This is the hardest part.
    B) Place the scenario in the Blades of Exile Scenarios folder. The scenario is
       an 8-character-or-less name and then a .exs
    C) If there is also a custom graphics file, that must also be in the folder.
       If you are using a Windows computer, it will end with .bmp. If you are
       using a Macintosh, it will end with .meg.
    D) Launch Blades of Exile
    E) Load/Create a party that isn't in a scenario.
    F) Select Custom Scenario.
    G) Select your scenario.
    
    At least that's how you do it on a Macintosh computer. If it is different on a
    Windows, please E-mail me the steps to playing a custom scenario on it.
    
    
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    /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\9811
    III. The Scenario Editor
    
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    <>A. Basic Description<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>2542<>
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    You have reached the heart of this guide. Congratulations.
    The Exile Scenario Editor comes with BoE (at least it did for me). This
    program is free (at least it is as far as I know anyways). It has only one
    purpose: to make and/or edit scenarios.
    Keep in mind, though, that those scenarios cannot be played without a
    registered version of BoE.
    Anyways, the Exile Scenario Editor (which I will sometimes call "ESE") is a
    complex program capable, pretty much, of making an Exile-sized game to play.
    Be warned, though, that scenario making isn't for everyone. It takes months of
    hard work and thought to make a large scenario, and at least a week to make a
    small one. And that's not including time it might take to test your scenario.
    At times it can get pretty boring, but you will just have to stick through it.
    
    This section describes how to use different parts of the editor. It gives
    information and explains what things are and how to do them. Further info can
    be found in the file, "Blades Scenario Editor Docs", which comes with the
    Scenario Editor. You will, however, learn best through the classic methods of
    trial and error.
    
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    <>B. Overview><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>0957<>
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    This section covers what each menu item does. It also lists the
    numbers/information for the following:
    1) Sounds
    2) Mage Spells
    3) Priest Spells
    4) Alchemy Recipes
    5) Statistics
    6) Scenario Text Messages
    7) Town Text Messages
    8) Outdoor Text Messages
    
    "File" Menu
    1) Open: Loads a different scenario. If scenario was given a password, you
       will be asked to type it in.
    2) Save: Saves any changes you have made since the last time your scenario was
       saved.
    3) New Scenario: Starts you from the beginning in making a new scenario.
    4) Quit: Quits the Exile Scenario Editor.
    
    "Scenario" Menu
    1) Create New Town: Makes another town. Your scenario must be saved to create
       a new town.
    2) Scenario Details: Brings up a box which contains information on your
       scenario. Here is where you can change your version number (default is
       1.00), your contact information (usually an e-mail address). You can also
       say who created the scenario and use one of the two boxes to describe your
       scenario. There are also buttons at the bottom to specify the content
       rating (G, PG, PG-13, R, NC-17) and the scenario's difficulty (this refers
       to what level the party should be).
    3) Scenario Intro Text: This is where you set the text that is to appear when
       you begin your scenario. It is also where you choose the icon for your
       scenario.
    4) Set Starting Location: This is where you set where the party begins its
       adventure. The game asks for the X and Y coordinates, as well as a town
       number referring to where the party starts. If done right, the word START
       will appear where the party is to start.
    5) Change Password: This where you change your scenario's password. If you set 
       the password at 0, then ESE will not ask for a password.
    6) Edit Special Nodes: This is where you can edit the 255 special nodes that 
       run for the whole scenario, not just a town or outdoors. You can edit a 
       special item's ability here. Just click on the node to change. See the 
       section on special nodes to find out just what these are.
    7) Edit Scenario Text: You can edit all of your the basic scenario text
       messages here. Just click on one and type it the way it should have been
       typed (for more info, see Scenario Text Messages later on in this section).
    8) Import Town: If there is a town in a different scenario you would like to
       put in yours, select this. It asks for the number of the town you want and
       that scenario's password. Make sure you have both handy. This is useful
       when you are making a series of scenarios that use the same towns. It saves
       a lot of time. Be warned, though, that the personalities will not match the
       town's range.
    9) Edit Saved Item Rectangle: The game can remember your items in three
       different places (three different towns). This means that when you leave
       that town and come back God-knows-when later, all items you dropped in the
       area will still be there. You are to specify the town number. You also have
       to list the coordinates of each side (Top and Bottom are Y coordinates,
       Right and Left are X coordinates).
    10) Edit Horses: A scenario can have up to 30 horses. I have no clue what the
        purpose of horses are, and, should anybody know, please e-mail me to tell
        me. Anyways, you list the STARTING x & y coordinates of the horse and the
        town it starts in.
    11) Edit Boats: A scenario can also have up to 30 boats. These I know the
        purpose of. Boats allow you to move across water (just like in real life!
        Sorry to anybody who doesn't know what a boat is). As with horses, you
        must tell the program the X and Y coordinates and the town the boat will
        be in.
    12) Set Variable Town Entry: If anybody has ever played Exile I, they know
        what I'm talking about. You would go to Fort Remote when it was hustling
        and bustling, all fine and dandy. Then, one day, it was destroyed. When
        you entered the town, it was different. It had rubble all over the place
        and everything. That's what this does. If a stuff-done flag (one you tell
        the game, more about them later) was set to one, you enter a specified
        town instead of a different specified town.
    13) Set Scenario Event Timers: Using this tool, you can have something happen
        every so often. The first number (number of moves, I think) is where you
        specify how many times you move before the event happens (keep in mind
        that time goes by faster outdoors). The second number is where you list
        what happens. This is a scenario special node number that will happen no
        matter where you are. The game recommends, and I agree, not to have these
        happen too often as it does slow down the game. These are useful for
        things like regrowing alchemy ingredients and scenarios with a time limit.
    14) Edit Item Placement Shortcuts: When you start creating towns, you will
        find that placing the basic dungeon loot can become very long and
        annoying. That's what this feature is for. You set what items are to
        appear on what terrain number and what the percentage chance of them
        appearing is. I recommend using this, of course, but not to have too
        many items or have too high of a percent chance (if you're over five,
        that's probably too much). This is a good way to decide what items should
        be in treasure chests, though.
    15) Delete Last Town: Deletes the highest numbered town in your scenario (ex:
        you have towns numbered 0-43. Deletes town number 43). I think it would be
        better if you could delete any town you want, not just the last one.
    16) Write Data To Text File: Creates a text file (called "scenario data") that
        lists the names of your terrains, monsters, and items. I usually do not
        bother with this at all.
    17) Do Full Text Dump: Writes every single word in your scenario to a text
        file (called "scenario text"). You can then go through the file to find
        errors in things like spelling, grammar, or information. I recommend
        running this document under  a spellchecker to correct your scenario's
        spelling mistakes.
    
    The "Outdoor" Menu
    1) Outdoor Details: When you select this option, a box appears where you are
       to type in a basic description on an area (ex: "Near Erotu City", or
       something like that). This appears at the bottom of the screen when people
       play your scenario.
    2) Outdoor Wandering Monsters: Don't get Wandering Monsters confused with
       Special Encounters, as the dialog box that comes up looks nearly identical.
       Anyways, Wandering Monsters are the monsters that appear on their own every
       so often when you're outdoors. These are the basic fights that occur. The
       window gives you the choice of adding people who will fight on your side,
       should you want it. The number ranges (ex: "15-30", [the monster's name
       here]) refer to how many will appear. So if you put "Soldier" next to the
       above example, a number between 15 and 30 would be chosen and that's how
       many soldiers you'd have to fight. The game also provides several other
       options: "Monster's Can't Flee Party" means that a monster group will never
       flee your party because you are too strong. "Encounter Is Forced" means (I
       believe) that right when the monsters are spawned, you will fight them. You
       can also set special nodes to be called when your party wins, flees, and
       when the encounter begins. You can use these to say things like, "After
       killing off all of the slith invaders, you find a nice sword." and then
       give the party a sword. You can also set a stuff-done flag (more about
       these later) that, when set to or above 1, causes the encounter to become
       non-existent. This is handy when, say, you fought your way deep into Nephil
       lands, killed their king, and all of the other Nephils fled. That way, it
       shows that they fled because you won't have to fight them anymore. In
       conclusion, I want to let you know that there are four encounter slots
       (0-3). Just remember that.
    3) Outdoor Special Encounters: Special Encounters occur only when you do
       something. An example is this: "You walk into an ominous crypt, only to be
       ambushed by undead." Suddenly, a bunch of undead appear right next to your
       party that you're gonna have to fight. The dialog window is the same as
       above. I just want to say a few things: I recommend always having "Monsters
       Can't Flee Party" set. Otherwise, your encounter loses its flavor. You also
       shouldn't set a stuff-done flag unless you have good reason. Again, you
       still have four encounter choices.
    4) Frill Up Terrain: Adds frills to the two basic terrain types (cave floor
       and grass). Random parts of grass will gain flowers, random parts of cave
       floor will gain mushrooms. Select multiple time to show that the land is
       very verdant and prosperous.
    5) Remove Terrain Frills: Removes the frills you set in the above. All of
       them.
    6) Edit Area Descriptions: You can make area description rectangles (see
       Constructing Towns & Outdoors). Here is where you edit/delete the text if
       you messed up or changed your mind regarding it.
    7) Set Starting Location: For some reason, when you leave a town for the first
       time in your scenario, the game has to put you in this spot. You can only
       have one of these.
    8) Edit Special Nodes: Allows you to edit the 60 (0-59) special nodes in the
       selected outdoor section.
    9) Edit Outdoor Text: Allows you to edit the outdoor text messages (see
       Outdoor Text Messages later on in this section).
    
    The "Town" Menu
    1) Town Details: Brings up a dialog box where you set the following things
       about your town: "Town Name": Every town needs one. Don't just stick with
       "Large Town" or whatever. "Day When Town Dies": When you reach this day in
       your scenario, the town will become abandoned. If -1, town will not be
       abandoned on a certain day. "Event Which Prevents Town Death": If there is
       a number here, when this event occurs (see General Special Nodes), the town
       will not be abandoned on the above date. "Lighting": How well lit the town
       is. Fully light means that it will always be bright and you can see
       everything. Dark (usually used on caves) means that you will have to use a
       light source (spell, torches, etc) to fully see the town. Very Dark means
       the same thing, just that it will get dark faster. Totally Dark means that
       it will always be dark, and there's nothing you can do about it. "Maximum
       Number of Monsters": When you've killed this many monsters in the town, all
       monsters (friendly or hostile) will leave for good and the town will be
       abandoned. "Difficulty": Supposed to set the difficulty of traps and doors
       and how fast wandering monsters appear, but I tend to see no difference. I
       do know one thing, though. This number affects the sound that is played
       when you enter a town. If 0 or 1, it is probably a friendly town because of
       the noise.
    2) Town Wandering Monsters: Every so often, the monster numbers (the numbers
       refer to the monster, of course) will appear at the space you select (see
       Constructing Towns and Outdoors). If it is set to "empty", no monster will
       appear in that category.
    3) Set Town Boundaries: You are to set the upper-left and lower-right corner
       of the town. When the white line it draws is crossed by your party in a
       scenario, they leave the town.
    4) Frill Up Terrain: Does the same thing as in the outdoors.
    5) Remove Terrain Frills: See Above
    6) Edit Area Descriptions: See Above
    7) Add Random Items: If you have set items to appear on a terrain number (See
       "Set Item Placement Shortcuts" in the scenario menu), they will then be
       randomly generated.
    8) Set All Items Not Property: When this option is selected, all items you
       have placed in a town become nobody's property (party doesn't have to steal
       them)
    9) Clear All Items: All items you have placed in a town are removed.
    10) Edit Special Nodes: Change any of a town's 100 special nodes by clicking
        on it.
    11) Edit Town Text: Edit a town's text messages (See "Town Text Messages"
        later on in this section).
    12) Advanced Town Details: Brings up a dialog box that requests certain
        information. If you set a number into the "Exit Town Specials", a town
        special node will be called when you leave the town in the specified
        direction. "Town Entry" nodes are called when you enter the town when it's
        alive and kickin' and when you come when it's been abandoned. "Exit Town
        Locations" are where your party is placed when they try to leave the town
        in a certain direction. An example of this is the School of Magery in the
        scenario, Valley of Dying Things. If the button "Town Hidden" is pressed,
        that town is hidden and cannot be entered until a special node reveals it.
        An example of this is the two side exits to the School of Magery in Valley
        of Dying Things.
    13) Set Town Event Timers: Every so often, you can have a town special node be
        called. Box works similar to the one in the "Scenario" menu.
    
    "Help" Menu
    This menu just provides more information on testing, distributing, and getting
    started on a scenario. It also provides info about a scenario contest held
    about 5 years ago.
    
    "'I1'-'I5'" Menus
    These menus list all of the items in your scenario. In towns, by selecting an
    item from these menus, you can place it in the town by clicking on the desired
    location.
    
    "'M1'-'M4'" Menus
    Works the same as the above, only with monsters instead of items.
    
    Main Menu
    OK, this isn't a menu. But when you first start editing a scenario, right from
    when you loaded it, these are the options given to you directly:
    1) Edit Terrain Types: Allows you to edit the different terrains in your
       scenario.
    2) Edit Monsters: Allows you to edit the different monsters in your scenario.
    3) Edit Items: Allows you to edit the different items in your scenario.
    4,5) Create New Town, Edit Scenario Text: Does the same things as the
       respective options in the Scenario menu.
    6) Edit Special Items: Allows you to edit the 50 special items in your
       scenario. Brings up a dialog box that asks for the item's name, a
       description, if the item is with the party from when they start a scenario,
       if it can be used, and, if the item can be used, what scenario special node
       is to be called when it is used.
    7) Load New Section: If you have your work saved in the current outdoor
       section, you can load another one to edit.
    8) Edit Outdoor Terrain: Puts you in the terrain-editing window for the 
       outdoor section you have selected.
    9) Load Another Town: Same as Load New Section, only with towns.
    10) Edit Town Terrain: See "Edit Outdoor Terrain", but this time it is for
        towns, not outdoor sections.
    11) Edit Town Dialogue: Can edit/create the personalities and their responses
        for the 10 personalities the game gives you per town.
    
    And, finally, we have finished with the menus.
    
    Now, here is the list of all of the sounds and the numbers of each. Note that
    I have copied the wording from the document that comes with the editor.
    
    0: High Beep
    1: Low Beep
    2: Sword Swish
    3: Cough
    4: Bless Noise
    5: Explosion
    6: Chewing
    7: "Cool"
    8: Bubbles
    9: Lock click
    10: Teleportation sound
    11: 3 Fast Booms
    12: Longbow
    13: Party death sound
    14: Thrown Missile
    15: Cash Register
    16: Town entry
    17: Short cough
    18: Drawing sword
    19: Sword swish
    20: Yawn
    21: PC Dying
    22: Opening Music (You can't call this sound)
    23: Start Outdoor Combat
    24: Cast Priest Spell
    25: Cast Mage Spell
    26: Gremlin Laugh
    27: Monster dying 1
    28: Waterfall29: Monster dying 2
    30: Monster dying 3
    31: Monster dying 4
    32: getting hit 1
    33: getting hit 2
    34: Button press 135: Spider "Hi"
    36: Spider "Hello"
    37: Button press 2
    38: Coins on counter
    39: Coins jiggling
    40: "Thank you"
    41: "Darn"
    42: "Dang"
    43: Stoning noise
    44: Monster Breathe
    45: "On who?"
    46: growl
    47: Walk - gravel
    48: Boat move
    49: Step 1
    50: Step 2
    51: Magic noise 1
    52: Magic noise 2
    53: Magic noise 3
    54: Scream
    55: Walk - squish
    56: Swallow
    57: Special Noise
    58: Open door
    59: Close door
    60: Small boom
    61: Summoning
    62: "Mmmmmmm"
    63: "Ow"
    64: Spit
    65: Draining Noise
    66: Disease
    67: "Huh?"
    68: Identify noise
    69: Sword 1
    70: Sword 2
    71: Sword 3
    72: Club
    73: Fire Impact
    74: Fireball Swoosh
    75: Cold Damage
    76: Chirp 1
    77: Chirp 2
    78: Drip 1
    79: Drip 2
    80: Bark
    81: Meow
    82: Baa
    83: Moo
    84: Neigh
    85: Gallop
    86: Attack - Claw
    87: Attack - Bite
    88: Attack - Slime
    89: Attack - Zap
    90: Paralyze
    91: Chirp 3
    92: Chicken
    93: Sheathe sword
    94: Lever
    95: Enter Dungeon96: Sleep
    97: Damage - "Uh"
    98: Missile hit
    
    Here are the numbers for all of the Mage Spells that are Level 4+.
    0: Poison
    1: Ice Bolt
    2: Slow Group
    3: Magic Map
    4: Capture Soul
    5: Simulacrum
    6: Venom Arrows
    7: Wall of Ice
    8: Stealth
    9: Major Haste
    10: Firestorm
    11: Dispel Barrier
    12: Fire Barrier
    13: Summoning
    14: Shockstorm
    15: Spray Fields
    16: Major Poison
    17: Group Fear
    18: Kill
    19: Paralyze
    20: Daemon
    21: Antimagic Cloud
    22: Mindduel
    23: Flight
    24: Shockwave
    25: Major Blessing
    26: Mass Paralysis
    27: Protection
    28: Major Summoning
    29: Force Barrier
    30: Quickfire
    31: Death Arrows
    
    Here are the numbers for all of the Priest Spells that are Level 4+.
    
    0: Cure Party Poison
    1: Curse All
    2: Dispel Undead
    3: Remove Curse
    4: Sticks to Snakes
    5: Martyr's Shield
    6: Cleanse
    7: Firewalk
    8: Bless Party
    9: Major Heal
    10: Raise Dead
    11: Flamestrike
    12: Mass Sanctuary
    13: Summon Host
    14: Shatter
    15: Dispel Fields
    16: Heal All
    17: Revive
    18: Hyperactivity
    19: Destone
    20: Summon Guardian
    21: Mass Charm
    22: Protective Circle
    23: Pestilence
    24: Revive All
    25: Ravage Spirit
    26: Resurrect
    27: Divine Thud
    28: Avatar
    29: Wall of Blades
    30: Word of Recall
    31: Major Cleansing
    
    Here are all 20 alchemy recipes and their corresponding number.
    0: Weak Curing
    1: Weak Healing
    2: Weak Poison
    3: Weak Speed
    4: Medium Poison
    5: Medium Healing
    6: Strong Curing
    7: Medium Speed
    8: Graymold Salve
    9: Weak Power
    10: Potion of Clarity
    11: Strong Poison
    12: Strong Healing
    13: Killer Poison
    14: Resurrection Balm
    15: Medium Power
    16: Knowledge Brew
    17: Strong Strength
    18: Bliss
    19: Strong Power
    
    Here are the numbers for all of the statistics. A statistic is your PC's stat
    (strength, bashing, luck, etc.)
    
    0: Strength
    1: Dexterity
    2: Intelligence
    3: Edged
    4: Bashing
    5: Pole
    6: Missile
    7: Bow
    8: Defense
    9: Mage Spells
    10: Priest Spells
    11: Mage Lore
    12: Alchemy
    13: Item Lore
    14: Disarm Traps
    15: Lockpick
    16: Assassination
    17: Poison
    18: Luck
    
    Here are all of the Scenario Text Messages. Info came from Blades Scenario
    Editor Docs.
    0: Name of Scenario
    1,2: Descriptive text and credits (each max. 60 characters long)
    3: Contact Information
    4-9: Intro Message (when scenario is started)
    10-59: Currently unused
    60-159: Name and description of 50 special items (60 is name of special item
            0, 61 is description of special item 0, 62 is name of special item 1,
            and so on)
    160-259: The 100 text messages for the scenario special nodes. The messages
             that begin with an * are unused special messages.
    
    Here are all of the Town Text Messages. Info came from Blades Scenario Editor
    Docs.
    0: Name of Town
    1-16: Descriptions of area rectangles
    17-19: Private comments on the town (not used in scenario)
    20-119: The 100 text messages for the town section special nodes
    120:134: The text for the area's signs (string 120 is for sign 0)
    
    Here are all of the Outdoor Text Messages. Info came from Blades Scenario
    Editor Docs.
    0: Name of area
    1-8: Descriptions of area rectangles
    9: A private comment on the section (not used in scenario)
    10-99: the 90 text messages for the outdoor section special nodes.
    100-107: The text for the area's signs (string 100 is for sign 0).
    
    Would you know it? It looks like we've finally finished with the overview.
    Read on to find out just HOW to make a scenario.
    
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    <>C. Constructing a Scenario<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>0579<>
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    
    Before reading further, test out the Scenario Editor for a little while. I
    promise you that you won't regret it.
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    1. Help Files                                                             8226
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Within this section is a bunch of information pertaining to individual parts
    of the Scenario Editor.
    
    /-------------------|------\
    |a) Stuff-Done Flags| 9796 |
    \-------------------|------/
    
    What are Stuff-Done Flags?
    If you have played any of the games of the Exile trilogy, you might remember
    things like the following happening:
    1. You walked into a dungeon and killed the leader of the dungeon. You later
       returned to the same dungeon and found that that leader was not there
       again.
    2. You walked into a room and a message appeared. You walked into the same
       room again, but no message appeared.
    So, how did these things happen only once?
    Well, with stuff-done flags, of course. A stuff-done flag (from now on called
    a SDF for short) is something that the game is supposed to remember in
    particular about your scenario.
    
    This next bit is kind of hard to explain, so you will just have to bear with
    me.
    
    In the computer's mind, there is a grid of all of the possible SDFs. This grid
    contains 10 columns (it is ten units wide. The numbering starts at zero, so it
    goes from 0-9. This is part A, or X, if you prefer, of a SDF) and has 300 rows
    (it is three hundred units tall. The numbering starts at zero, so it goes from
    0-299. This is part B, or Y, if you prefer, of a SDF). So, in other words, an
    SDF is a coordinate pair. (<-told you it was confusing)
    
    Now, each SDF has a value, from 0-250. The value is what you use to tell the
    game if something has been done and doesn't need to be done again. Here is an
    example:
    
    You want someone in the game to reward you if you killed an evil Banshee, so
    you use an SDF. First, you decide that the SDF will be (x3, y16). Then, when
    the Banshee is killed, you set a value to it. Let's say you set it to 1. Then,
    in the dialogue, you make the game check if that value is 1 or higher (more
    about checking SDFs later). If so, you receive your reward and a message
    unlike if you hadn't killed the Banshee (because the SDF would still be one).
    
    Now, here are three common values of SDFs and their common uses in BoE:
    0: All SDFs start as this by default. Zero usually means that you have not yet
       done the task, or that something has not occurred. Some circumstances
       change this, but that is very rare.
    1: Usually means that something has been done, but the SDF can still be called
       upon.
    250: Means that the flag is done. Used mainly for one-time things like dialog
       boxes and text messages (more about this later).
    
    One thing to know is that no scenario can be proper and fun without the use of
    at least 30 SDFs, and no scenario can be great without using at least 60 SDFs.
    For this reason, it is important to take notes on which SDFs you have used and
    which ones are free as to prevent the shared use of a SDF which could make th
    game unwinnable.
    
    
    /----------------|------\
    |b) Special Nodes| 1877 | 
    \----------------|------/
    
    Oh boy. This section is long. In fact, it is probably longer than any other
    section of the FAQ. I mean, seriously, this could stand as its own FAQ. So,
    you should get ready for a lot of reading. If you are looking for a specific
    thing, I recommend that you search for it.
    
    
    If there is one thing in the scenario editor you must master, it is the use of
    special nodes.
    No one thing is more crucial to the running of a scenario. You might think
    that Stuff-Done Flags are more crucial, but how would you set any of those
    flags without special nodes? My point exactly.
    
    Anyways, special nodes are the way you get the game to do this or that. As I
    said, it is crucial to master the use of Special Nodes.
    
    Alas, I cannot teach you to be a master of special nodes. Only trial, error,
    and playing other scenarios can make you that. But I can put on that path. I
    will do this by describing every single different special node in the game. I
    will give examples of when it might be used.
    But still, I recommend that you make a test scenario and try out the special
    nodes there. It will give you a better feel for what special node chains work
    best.
    If you are a little bit confused by my description, I advise that you check
    the Scenario Editor documentation. There is a listing of the special nodes
    there as well.
    Here is how I describe each special node:
    
    Name: <-the name of the special node
    Description: <-a description of what the node really does
    Uses: <-an example of when you might use this node
    
    So, let's begin, shall we?
    Oh, and, by the way, the nodes are sorted by type.
    
    ------>General<--------
    Name: No Special
    Description: This does nothing. However, if there is a node number in the Jump 
      To box, then that node is called.
    Uses: When you mess up in the special node chain and can't start over. Just
      make all of the bad nodes this type.
    
    Name: Set Flag
    Description: Sets the specified stuff-done flag to the specified value.
    Uses: A simple way to mark that something has happened. Let's say that Jim
      sells you a club for 100 gold, and you only want him to sell it once. You
      mark that it has been bought by using this node.
    
    Name: Increment Flag
    Description: Changes the value of a Stuff-Done flag the desired amount.
    Uses: Let's say that the party has to find a sword, a crystal, and a shield to
      reach a certain point in the game. The order in which the party gets these
      items doesn't matter. So you increment the selected stuff-done flag by one
      every time the party gets one of the three items. Then have a special node
      checking if the flag is at the value of "3", and, if it is, the party can
      advance in your scenario.
    
    Name: Display Message
    Description: Brings up a dialog box containing either one or two messages.
    Uses: This is your simple way of giving text to the party. Use this when you
      want the party to know something or are describing something. This node will
      be used quite a lot in your scenario.
    
    Name: Secret Passage
    Description: I believe that I read somewhere that this has to be the first
      node in a chain, but I'm not sure....Anyways, this node only does something
      when the party steps on it. What it does, though, is allow the party to step
      on that space, even if they are not normally allowed to do it (for example,
      the party can walk through solid walls)
    Uses: When there is a terrain that the party is able to walk through.
    
    Name: Display Small Message
    Description: Places the selected message in the lower-right corner of the
      screen (where text is displayed).
    Uses: Seeing as there is no notification of the message being received, the
      only way the party will even know about it is if they happen to look down
      there. Use this node only when the text that is displayed is entirely
      optional as to whether or not the scenario player uses it.
    
    Name: Flip Flag
    Description: If the stuff-done flag that you specify has a value of 0 or 1, it
      is switched to 1 or 0 (respectively).
    Uses: I use this as a simple way of setting a stuff-done flag to zero. Other
      than that, I have used this flag for nothing else. I believe that you could
      probably use this for alchemy ingredients, though.....
    
    Name: Out Block
    Description: Ends the special node chain if the party is outdoors.
    Uses: Let's say that you have a special item whose effect should only work in
      a town. Use this node in the beginning of the chain to make sure that the
      special item only works in towns.
    
    Name: Town Block
    Description: Ends the special node chain if the party is in a town.
    Uses: Going with the above example, let's say that you have a special item
      whose effect should only work outdoors. Use this node in the beginning of
      the chain to make sure that the special item only works outdoors.
    
    Name: Combat Block
    Description: Ends the special node chain if the party is in combat mode.
    Uses: Let's say that, for example, in your town, you have a bunch of hostile
      nephil mages blast through a wall. When the party steps on the space where
      the wall used to be, it displays a message. This message shouldn't be
      displayed if the party is in combat, so you should use a combat block to
      prevent this from happening.
    
    Name: Looking Block
    Description: Just like all of the other blocks, this node ends the special
      chain if the party looks at the space with the node.
    Uses: When the node is on the border of a blocked off area and its content is
      based on the fact that the party has unlocked this area.
    
    Name: Can't Enter
    Description: The party cannot enter the space that this node is used on. Even
      if the party repeatedly tries to step on this space, it will do nothing for
      them.
    Uses: To block off certain parts of your map from the party. Also useful when
      the party can't enter certain areas unless they have done something.
    
    Name: Change Time
    Description: Adds to the number of ticks in your scenario. "Ticks" are the way
      that time is measured. One is added for every step you take in a town, and
      ten are added for every step you take outdoors. About 3,000 ticks equals one
      day.
    Uses: When the party triggers a special node that is supposed to take some
      time. Like, for example, "you awake three days later". Then follow up that
      message with one of these nodes, set to nine thousand ticks.
    
    Name: Start General Timer
    Description: Starts a timer that decreases by one for every move the party
      takes. When the timer runs out, a SCENARIO special is called. If you do not
      want a scenario special called, use the town special node with a similar
      name.
    Uses: When the party only has a limited time to do something.
    
    Name: Play a Sound
    Description: Plays one of Blades of Exiles sounds. See the "Overview" section
      for a listing of each sound's number.
    Uses: When you do something that should call a sound, use this node.
    
    Name: Change Horse Possession
    Description: Changes the possession of the horse number that you specify. If
      the horse belonged to the party, you can set it to not be the party's
      property. If it did not belong to the party, you can set it to be the
      party's property.
    Uses: Shouldn't this be obvious? You use this node when you want to set
      whether or not the party owns a specific horse.
    
    Name: Change Boat Possession
    Description: Changes the possession of the boat number that you specify. If
      the boat belonged to the party, you can set it to not be the party's
      property. If it did not belong to the party, you can set it to be the
      party's property.
    Uses: Shouldn't this be obvious? You use this node when you want to set
      whether or not the party owns a specific boat.
    
    Name: Show/Hide Town
    Description: If the town number you specify is hidden to the party, then that
      town is now revealed and the party can now enter it. If that town was
      revealed, it is now hidden.
    Uses: When you want to reveal the location of a town without using dialogue
      (there is a dialogue option that reveals towns, too)
    
    Name: Major Event Has Occurred
    Description: Each scenario has ten major events. They are used often, like in
      determining when monsters appear/disappear, when towns are abandoned, and in
      many more places. They are always referred to "events". As I said, you have
      ten. Use this node to mark if one has happened.
    Uses: If killing the evil assassin is a major event, use this node to mark if
      it has happened.
    
    Name: Forced Give
    Description: The selected item is placed in the party's inventory, no matter
      if it is too heavy for them. I do not believe that this node works if the
      entire inventory is filled.
    Uses: When the party finds an item outdoors and you give it to them by using
      nodes. This all but guarantees that the party receives the item.
    
    Name: Buy Items of Type
    Description: The party is able to purchase all items of the set special class.
    Uses: When, for example, all helmets have a special class of "2". You want the
      party to be able to buy all helmets, so you use this node and have the party
      by all items with a special class of 2.
    
    Name: Call Global Special
    Description: *Only works in Town or Outdoor Special Nodes* This node type
      calls a scenario special node that you specify the number of.
    Uses: If there is some big long scenario special node chain that you need the
      exact same thing for, just use this node to avoid recreating it.
    
    Name: Set Many Flags
    Description: Sets all flags with the same part A to the value that you set.
    Uses: When you have a set of stuff-done flags with the same A that all need to
      be set to a certain value (I use this node for alchemy ingredients)
    
    Name: Copy Flag
    Description: The value of a specified stuff-done flag becomes the same as a
      different stuff-done flag.
    Uses: When two flags are related in their use, and you just want to save time
      by using this node.
    
    Name: Ritual of Sanct. Block
    Description: The special node chain ends. The only way for it to continue is
      if the party casts "Ritual of Sanctification" on the space.
    Uses: When the party has a mission to cast Ritual of Sanctification on a
      certain space.
    
    Name: Have a Rest
    Description: The party takes a rest and the set amount of health and spell
      points are restored.
    Uses: When the party is forced to rest in your scenario, like when they walk
      into a room with lots of beds and choose to rest.
    
    Name: Wandering will fight
    Description: You can set if the wandering monsters will attack the party or
      not.
    Uses: When the outdoor wandering monsters only attack the party if they have
      done a certain deed.
    
    Name: End Scenario
    Description: Pretty straight-forward. This ends the scenario, and the only way
      for a party to re-enter it is to start over or load a save file.
    Uses: This is the node to call when the party beats your scenario. At no other
      time should it be called (except in special circumstances).
    
    ---------->One-Shot<----------
    *When nodes of this type are given a stuff-done flag, then this node will only
     occur once because the stuff-done flag is set to 250. If no stuff-done flag
     is given, this node can occur over and over again.*
    
    Name: Give Item
    Description: An item is given to the first character in the party with room to
      carry it. You can also give the party gold or food.
    Uses: When you give the party an item in your scenario.
    
    Name: Give Special Item
    Description: Gives the party the selected special item.
    Uses: When you want the party to get a special item, and only once should they
      get it. For example, the party finds a key on the ground outdoors, and they
      take it with them as a special item.
    
    Name: One-Time do Nothing
    Description: Identical to "No Special", but with one difference: This node
      only does something if the stuff-done flags value is not at 250, so the Jump
      To: Value is done only once.
    Uses: This is how you make other one-time encounters in your scenario that are
      not listed in the One-Shot section.
    
    Name: One-Time and Set
    Description: I'm sorry, but I have no idea what the difference between this
      and the above node is. Please tell me if you know.
    Uses: ?
    
    Name: One-Time Text Message
    Description: Like a "Display Message" node, but it can only be called once.
    Uses: When a text message should only be displayed once, like with room
      descriptions.
    
    Name: Display Dialog (dialog pic)
    Description: Displays many text messages, and this node also can contain
      several buttons, each of which can call different special nodes. Also, a
      Dialog picture is displayed along with the text.
    Uses: You can use these nodes for situations where the party is given choices.
      These are also a useful way of displaying a lot of text.
    
    Name: Display Dialog (terrain pic)
    Description: Displays many text messages, and this node also can contain
      several buttons, each of which can call different special nodes. Also, a
      Terrain picture is displayed along with the text.
    Uses: You can use these nodes for situations where the party is given choices.
      These are also a useful way of displaying a lot of text.
    
    Name: Display Dialog (monster pic)
    Description: Displays many text messages, and this node also can contain
      several buttons, each of which can call different special nodes. Also, a
      Monster's picture is displayed along with the text.
    Uses: You can use these nodes for situations where the party is given choices.
      These are also a useful way of displaying a lot of text.
    
    Name: Give Item (dialog pic)
    Description: Like the "Display Dialog" nodes, this one displays multiple text
      messages, can contain several buttons, and shows a Dialog picture. In
      addition, though, it also gives the party an item.
    Uses: When you want to give the party an item along with display a lot of
      text.
    
    Name: Give Item (terrain pic)
    Description: The same as the above, but with a terrain picture instead of a
      dialog picture.
    Uses: See above.
    
    Name: Give Item (monster pic)
    Description: The same as the above two, but with a monster's picture instead
      of a dialog or a terrain picture.
    Uses: See the above two.
    
    Name: One-Time Place Outdoor Enc.
    Description: Remember how I said that each outdoor section can have several
      special encounters, which only appear when called with special nodes? This
      is how you spawn one of those encounters.
    Uses: When you want an outdoor special encounter monster group to appear and
      hunt the party down.
    
    Name: One-Time Place Town Enc.
    Description: Also, do you remember how I said how monsters in towns can belong
      to special encounter groups, and that they will only appear when you use a
      special node placing their special encounter group? This is how you do it.
    Uses: Did I just say that in "Description"? My bad....
    
    Name: Trap
    Description: This space is a trap. You can set the effects of the trap, and
      how hard it is to disarm. This is a common and useful special node.
    Uses: When you have put a trap on a treasure chest and the party has to disarm
      it to get the goods inside of it.
    
    ------->Affect PC<--------
    Name: Select a PC
    Description: The party selects a particular PC. Everything else in the special 
      node chain only affects that one PC.
    Uses: When, for example, the party has to choose which one of its members will
      learn the particular mage spell.
    
    Name: Do Damage
    Description: The entire party is damaged. You can set the amount and type of
      damage to be done.
    Uses: An effective and useful way of doing damage to the party.
    
    Name: Affect Health
    Description: You can increase/decrease each PCs health. Note that it effects
      the CURRENT health, not the maximum health.
    Uses: This is a useful way of restoring health to a PC. It is also another
      method of doing damage to a PC.
    
    Name: Affect Spell Points
    Description: You can increase/decrease each PCs spell points. Note that it
      effects the CURRENT spell points, not the maximum spell points.
    Uses: A way of restoring a PC's spell points. Also a way of removing a PC's
      spell points.
    
    Name: Affect Experience
    Description: Adds/Decreases the set amount of experience from the party.
    Uses: As a reward for completing a mission. Make sure not to give out too much
      experience, and also make sure not to use this node type too often.
    
    Name: Affect Skill Points
    Description: Adds/Decreases the set amount of skill points from each member of
      the party.
    Uses: A way of rewarding party members. This node type is not used often.
    
    Name: Kill/Raise Dead
    Description: Kills/Resurrects the party.
    Uses: This is the node to use when the entire party dies, one way or another.
      An example of when to use this is when the party is robbing the nation's
      treasury. An explosion goes off and burns the party to dust. You then set
      this node to kill, and the party dies. However, you should usually run the
      node twice in case any members of the party have items that are lifesaving.
    
    Name: Affect Poison
    Description: Poisons/Removes the poison on the party.
    Uses: When, just for example, the party is walking in an area and a poisonous
      gas fills the room and poisons the entire party.
    
    Name: Affect Slow/Haste
    Description: You can slow or haste the entire party.
    Uses: Useful when the party is about to enter a large combat, and, still
      running off of an example, you step across some runes and the party is
      slowed (in case you were wondering, that "example" is off of the scenario "A
      Mild Rebellion").
    
    Name: Affect Invulnerability
    Description: Affects whether the PCs are invulnerable or not.
    Uses: Here's an example I thought up: The party is walking into a massive
      combat against some demon. Then, a spiritual guardian of the party comes in
      and makes them temporarily invincible for a while. This node type isn't used
      very much.
    
    Name: Affect Magic Resistance
    Description: Affects whether magic can hurt PCs or not.
    Uses: You can use a node of this type and link it to a special item that makes
      the party temporarily resistant to magic.
    
    Name: Affect Webs
    Description: Affects the amount of webbing on each PC in the party.
    Uses: Some scenarios have used this node in dungeons where there are lots of
      opportunities to get webbed. They have a "Cleansing Area", where the party
      press a button or pulls a lever and they are cleansed of all webs.
    
    Name: Affect Disease
    Description: Affects whether or not PCs are diseased.
    Uses: This can be used as a defense mechanism (like with the "Affect Poison"
      node), or like with the "Affect Webs" node (which would be an example of
      curing the disease).
    
    Name: Affect Sanctuary
    Description: Affects whether or not PCs are invisible.
    Uses: Here is one way that I have used this node: The party has just defeated
      a powerful demon, and now they must escape the crumbling fortress. A
      guardian angel comes down and makes the entire party invisible (using this
      node).
    
    Name: Affect Curse/Bless
    Description: Use this node to curse or to bless the party.
    Uses: Used almost exactly as the "Affect Slow/Haste" node. However, there are
      times that this node is very preferable to that node.
    
    Name: Affect Dumbfounding
    Description: Affects the amount of dumbfounding in the party (you can remove
      or add dumbfounding).
    Uses: Usually used as a defense mechanism (as with the "Affect Disease" and
      "Affect Poison" nodes) or as a type of cleansing thing (like having a
      special item that calls this node when used).
    
    Name: Affect Sleep
    Description: Affects whether or not PCs are asleep.
    Uses: Can be used similar to cursing/slowing the party. This node is used
      generally like all others of this type.
    
    Name: Affect Paralysis
    Description: Affects whether or not PCs are paralyzed.
    Uses: Pretty much like "Affect Sleep", but this paralyzes instead of putting
      to sleep. This is like a step-up on the intensity scale from "Affect Sleep".
    
    Name: Affect Statistic
    Description: Affects any of the parties statistics ("statistics" are like
      Dexterity, Strength, Mage Spells, Item Lore, etc.)
    Uses: What it says in the Editor documentation is pretty true: Don't use this
      node too much, and don't take away too much from party stats. You should
      avoid using these nodes more than five times in your scenario (unless the
      party has to pay for improvement) when improving PCs, and you should avoid
      using the nodes more than six times when taking away from PCs stats.
    
    Name: Give Mage Spell
    Description: Gives the selected Mage Spell to the party.
    Uses: This is a useful node, but don't use it too often. This is how you give
      spells to the party for free. Let's say that they search a bookshelf and
      find a book that teaches them a spell. You use this node to give them that
      spell.
    
    Name: Give Priest Spell
    Description: Gives the selected Priest Spell to the party.
    Uses: The same uses as "Give Mage Spell" (if you don't get the hint, that
      means to look at the uses of "Give Mage Spell" :D).
    
    Name: Affect Gold
    Description: Affects how much gold the party has.
    Uses: When things in your scenario give/take away gold, mainly as a
      reward/checkpoint (like some statues jump out and demand your gold for you
      to pass).
    
    Name: Affect Food
    Description: Affects how much food the party has.
    Uses: Pretty much the same uses as "Affect Gold". Use this either as a way of
      rewarding the party or as a way of taking things from the party.
    
    Name: Affect Alchemy
    Description: Gives the party an alchemy recipe that you specify.
    Uses: As with "Give Mage Spell", this is useful when, say, the party reads a
      book in a library and it teaches them how to make a specific potion.
    
    Name: Affect Stealth
    Description: Affects whether or not the party is in stealth mode.
    Uses: Here is one way that I have used this node: The party enters a large
      building, and a message pops up saying that there are guards all around, and
      that the party had better be sneaky. As you walk into the room, this node is
      called making the party enter stealth mode.
    
    Name: Affect Firewalk
    Description: Affects whether or not the party is in firewalking mode.
    Uses: For example, let's say that you have a demon who lives in a huge fort.
      This fort just so conveniently happens to be across a huge path of lava, and
      the only way to get to the demon's fort is to cross the burning hot lava.
      So, most likely, the party will cast "Firewalk" and start walking across the
      lava. But, when they get about halfway, the demon appears and removes their
      firewalking status (by using this node). Of course, you would have to
      repeatedly use this node as the party could just cast "Firewalk" again.
    
    Name: Affect Flying
    Description: Affects whether or not the party is flying through the air.
    Uses: I don't think I ever really use this node, so there isn't really that
      much I can say about it. Sorry. If you ever use this node, let me know how.
    
    -------->If-Then<----------
    Name: Stuff Done Flag?
    Description: If the selected stuff-done flag is at a certain value or higher,
      the selected special node is called. If it is less that another value, a
      different special node is called. If it is between the two values, then yet
      another node is called.
    Uses: This is the node you use to check stuff-done flags that end up having
      multiple values (like when its value is zero, the party hasn't started the
      mission. When its value is one, the party has started the mission. When the
      value is two, the party has finished the mission). If you only give a
      stuff-done flag two values (like zero for not being done and one for being
      done), than you should use the "Stuff-Done Equal?" node instead of this one.
    
    Name: Town Number?
    Description: If the party is in the specified town, then the node that you
      choose is called.
    Uses: The only node type that uses this is scenario special nodes. Even then,
      it is generally only used for items that work in certain towns only.
    
    Name: Random Number?
    Description: The game generates a random number between 1 and 100. If it is
      above the number you set, a certain special is called. If it is below the
      number that you set, a different special is called.
    Uses: This is how you have the game decide randomly whether or not an even
      occurs. This is a useful node, as there are no other way of randomly
      determining outcomes.
    
    Name: Have Special Item?
    Description: If the party has a certain special item, a node is called. If
      they do not have the special item, a different node is called.
    Uses: This is the node to use when you want to check whether or not the party
      has a certain special item before they can do a certain thing. For example,
      the party cannot enter the capitol city unless they have a pass (the pass is
      a special item). You then use this node to check whether or not the party
      has the pass when they enter the town.
    
    Name: Stuff-Done Compare?
    Description: Compares the values of two different stuff-done flag. The node
      that is called depends on he outcome of the node.
    Uses: To be honest, I didn't even know what this node did until I tried it out
      to type it here. In other words, that means that I never use it, and thus
      don't know why it exists. Let me know if you have a use for it.
    
    Name: Terrain this type? (town)
    Description: If the specified space in the town that you are in is the terrain
      that you select, the set special node is called.
    Uses: For example, the party pulls a lever. The lever reveals a secret passage
      (changing the terrain on the space). You then use this node to check if the
      terrain has changed. If it has, then you display a message telling that it
      would be pointless to pull the lever again.
    
    Name: Terrain this type? (out)
    Description: The same as the above, but the terrain that is checked is
      outdoors.
    Uses: Rarely do I check the terrain type outdoors. I usually use this to check
      to see if previously-hidden areas have been revealed or not.
    
    Name: Has gold?
    Description: If the party has the set amount of gold, then the specified
      special node is called.
    Uses: When the party is looking into buying an item of some sort and you need
      the game to first check if the party has enough money to afford it.
    
    Name: Has food?
    Description: If the party has enough food, the set special node is called.
    Uses: For example, a salesman only sells the party food if they have too
      little. Use this node to check if they have enough food.
    
    Name: Item Class on Space?
    Description: If an item with the selected special class is on the space that
      you set, then a certain special node is called. Otherwise, a different
      special node is called.
    Uses: The party has to place a unique item, like maybe an amulet, on a certain
      place, like a pedestal, before they can advance in the scenario.
    
    Name: Have Item with Class?
    Description: If the party has an item in their inventory with the specified
      special class, then a different node is called.
    Uses: To check if any members of the party have a certain item before they can
      go further. For example, a dead man's ghost jumps out and tells the party
      that they can go no further until they have the Sword of Waluba.
    
    Name: Equipped Item with Class?
    Description: The party has to have an item with the selected special class
      equipped for a certain node to be called.
    Uses: The same as the above example, but the party has to have the Sword of
      Waluba equipped, not just in their inventory.
    
    Name: Has Gold? (+take)
    Description: Every single special node with "(+take)" in it does the same
      thing as its counterpart without that addition, but with one difference: It
      takes the gold/food/item that it is checking to see if the party has.
    Uses: Use this node type when the party is buying something, like say a unique
      sword, through special nodes instead of the buy screen.
    
    Name: Has Food? (+take)
    Description: Every single special node with "(+take)" in it does the same
      thing as its counterpart without that addition, but with one difference: It
      takes the gold/food/item that it is checking to see if the party has.
    Uses: For example, a bunch of statues come out and will not let you pass
      unless you give them 2000 food. Use this node to check and take that much
      food from the party, allowing them to pass.
    
    Name: Item Class on Space? (+take)
    Description: Every single special node with "(+take)" in it does the same
      thing as its counterpart without that addition, but with one difference: It
      takes the gold/food/item that it is checking to see if the party has.
    Uses: The party has to place a certain item on a certain spot, and, when they
      do, that item is also taken away, so the party can never retrieve it.
    
    Name: Have Item W. Class? (+take)
    Description: Every single special node with "(+take)" in it does the same
      thing as its counterpart without that addition, but with one difference: It
      takes the gold/food/item that it is checking to see if the party has.
    Uses: For example, the party steals a sword from a crypt, but, as they are
      leaving, the tomb's security enchantments make the sword disappear from your
      inventory.
    
    Name: Equip Item W. Class? (+take)
    Description: Every single special node with "(+take)" in it does the same
      thing as its counterpart without that addition, but with one difference: It
      takes the gold/food/item that it is checking to see if the party has.
    Uses: To take all equipped items with a certain special class. For example, a
      demon does not want the party to fight using powerful items they may have
      found in the scenario. All of these powerful items have the same special
      class. You can say that the demon takes these items by using this node to
      take all items with that one special class.
    
    Name: Day Reached?
    Description: If the party has reached a certain day in your scenario, than a
      specified special node is called.
    Uses: When, say, the scenario will only tell a party certain information if
      they have been in a certain area for long enough (and since the party starts
      the scenario in that area, the day number reflects how long they have been
      in that area).
    
    Name: Any Barrels?
    Description: If there are any barrels in the selected town, then the set
      special node is called instead.
    Uses: As a puzzle, the party must push all of the barrels into the water to
      advance.
    
    Name: Any Crates?
    Description: If there are any crates in the selected town, then the set
      special node is called instead.
    Uses: As a puzzle, the party must push all of the crates into the water to
      advance.
    
    Name: Special Thing Happened?
    Description: If an event has occurred before the given day, than a specified
      special node is called.
    Uses: For example, the party has to kill the evil mage before day 20. You want
      to check sometimes if the party has killed the mage. So you use this node to
      check that.
    
    Name: Has Cave Lore?
    Description: If any living PCs in the party have Cave Lore, then the selected
      special node is called.
    Uses: Just so that you know, Cave Lore is to test whether or not the party is
      to know rare information BELOW ground. For example, the party might not know
      that that is graymold they're walking on, because graymold is rare and only
      those skilled in Cave Lore know what it is. So you use this node to check
      it.
    
    Name: Has Woodsman?
    Description: If any living PCs in the party have the Woodsman skill, then the
      selected special node is called.
    Uses: Just so that you know, Woodsman is to test whether or not the party is
      to know rare information ABOVE ground. For example, the party might not know
      that that is graymold they're walking on, because graymold is rare and only
      skilled Woodsmen usually know what it is. So you can use this node to check
      it.
    
    Name: Has Enough Mage Lore?
    Description: If the combined Mage Lore of every living PC in the party is a
      certain amount, than the given special node is called.
    Uses: For example, the party reads a book in a library and the book is in
      another language. The party only knows this language because their Mage Lore
      involves it. So use this node to check whether or not the party can read the
      book. You shouldn't set this higher than 20.
    
    Name: Text Response?
    Description: The party is given a blank text box, where they type in their
      response. If it is the same as the set SCENARIO (not outdoor or town) text
      message (see the Overview section for the numbers of scenario text
      messages), then a certain special node is called.
    Uses: This is how you ask the party riddles and passwords. Remember that this
      node is here, and also remember to check for a scenario special message.
    
    Name: Stuff Done Equal?
    Description: If a stuff-done flag has an EXACT value, then the specified
      special node is called.
    Uses: When you give one stuff-done flag multiple uses by using multiple
      values, and this node checks to see if you have done an exact deed by
      checking for the exact value.
    
    ----------->Town<----------
    Name: Town Hostile
    Description: Makes all of the friendly monsters in the town hostile.
    Uses: For example, you have just stolen a dragon's treasure, and now all of
      his minions are out to attack you.
    
    Name: Change Terrain
    Description: Changes the set space to the set terrain.
    Uses: For example, the party pulls a lever that rolls up a portcullis and
      allows them to pass.
    
    Name: Swap Terrain
    Description: Switches the terrain of a space from one type to another or back.
    Uses: This is generally a more complicated way of using the "Change Terrain"
      node. I personally never really bother to use this node.
    
    Name: Transform Terrain
    Description: Changes the selected space to the "Transform To What" value (see
      the section on modifying terrain types for more information).
    Uses: Let's say that the "Transform To What" value of a portcullis is the same
      as that of an open portcullis. The party presses a button that opens that
      portcullis. You can use this node on that space to open/close that
      portcullis.
    
    Name: Move Party
    Description: If the party is not in combat, then they are moved to the
      selected location within the town.
    Uses: For example, the party wants to go see the king. The only way to get
      into the king's chambers is a portal. Use this node on the portal for the
      party to enter the king's chambers.
    
    Name: Hit Space
    Description: All monsters on the selected space take damage of the set type
      and amount.
    Uses: Use this for just about anything that does damage in your town that does
      not involve traps, monsters, or explosions.
    
    Name: Explosion on Space
    Description: Like "Hit Space", but affects a greater area and makes an
      explosion.
    Uses: For example, the party tries to pick the lock of a chest, but it fails.
      There is an explosion that badly damages the party.
    
    Name: Lock Space
    Description: If the terrain on the selected space is unlocked and has the
      ability to be locked, it will be locked.
    Uses: Use this when doors in your town get locked by the party's actions.
    
    Name: Unlock Space
    Description: If the terrain on the selected space is locked and has the
      ability to be unlocked, it will be unlocked.
    Uses: Use this when doors in your town get unlocked by the party's actions.
    
    Name: Do sfx Burst
    Description: There is a fire/electric/teleportation burst on the screen. This
      does nothing else.
    Uses: A way of displaying effects in your town, like explosions, and such.
    
    Name: Make Wandering Monster
    Description: Places one of the town's wandering monster groups at one of the
      designated arrival points.
    Uses: When you want the monsters to spawn a little bit early.
    
    Name: Place a Monster
    Description: Places the selected monster on the selected space.
    Uses: Used to spawn an individual monster in your town. If there is room in
      the Special Encounter groups for this monster, it is usually better to place
      the monster using one of those nodes instead of this.
    
    Name: Destroy Monster
    Description: Destroys all monsters of the selected type.
    Uses: To destroy all the monsters of the same kind all at once. Usually, nodes
      of this type are called when the party accomplishes a certain goal, and the
      monsters that are destroyed are hostile to the party.
    
    Name: Destroy All Monsters
    Description: Destroys all of the friendly, hostile, or both, types of monsters
      in your town.
    Uses: For example, you kill the boss of the town and his minions flee from you
      out of fear.
    
    Name: Generic Lever
    Description: A box appears saying that the party has found a lever. They have
      the choice of whether or not to pull it. A different special node is called
      depending on whether or not the party pulls the lever.
    Uses: For example, the party has to free a certain prisoner from his cage. If
      they pull the lever, a node is called that changes the terrain, freeing the
      prisoner.
    
    Name: Generic Portal
    Description: There is a portal that gives the party the choice of whether to
      leave or to enter. If the party enters the portal, they are taken to the
      selected space within the town.
    Uses: The party uses a portal to get to a different place within the town.
    
    Name: Generic Button
    Description: Same as "Generic Lever", but the text reflects that of a button
      instead of a lever.
    Uses: See what I put for "Generic Lever" instead.
    
    Name: Generic Stairway
    Description: Text appears telling the party that they have found a staircase.
      They are given a choice of whether or not to go up/down it.
    Uses: The simple staircase format, and, by far, the most common. Almost all
      scenarios use this node when they want the party to move up a story within
      the town or dungeon.
    
    Name: Lever
    Description: A more complicated form of "Generic Lever". In this node, you
      choose the text that appears.
    Uses: Use this whenever the text that pops up in "Generic Lever" is not what
      you are looking for.
    
    Name: Portal
    Description: A more complicated form of "Generic Portal". In this node, you
      choose the text that pops up.
    Uses: Use this node whenever the text that appears in "Generic Lever" is not
      quite what you wanted, and you need to be more in-depth.
    
    Name: Stairway
    Description: A more complicated form of "Generic Stairway." In this node, you
      can choose the text that pops up. You can also make the party go up the
      staircase, and no message will appear.
    Uses: Use this node whenever the text that comes up with "Generic Staircase"
      is not what you were looking for. Also use this in situations where the
      party is forced to go up/down the staircase.
    
    Name: Relocate Outdoors
    Description: Puts the party at the selected location in the selected outdoor
      section.
    Uses: This is how you move the party great distances throughout the scenario.
      For example, let's say that you have a portal that takes the party to right
      by a faraway town. Use this node to place them in the outdoor location right
      next to the town that you want them to be put into.
    
    Name: Place Item
    Description: Places the selected item on the selected space.
    Uses: For example, the party pays someone to forge an item for them. You want
      this item to appear on an anvil. So use this node with the X and Y
      coordinates set to that of the anvil.
    
    Name: Split Party
    Description: This node splits up the party, and only one PC can go on.
    Uses: You should make sure that the party can always be reunited when you use
      this node. But, generally, use this node in situations where you only want
      one PC to enter.
    
    Name: Reunite Party
    Description: Reunites a split-up party.
    Uses: Always use this node in situations where you split the party up.
    
    Name: Start General Timer
    Description: Starts a timer that, when it expires, a town special node is
      called. If the party leaves the town, the timer is ignored and no special
      node will be called.
    Uses: When the party must complete certain things within the town in a certain
      amount of time.
    
    Name: Unused
    Description: Why are this and the next four nodes even listed in the special
      node choices? Maybe Jeff Vogel messed up a bit.... Who knows.
    Uses: NOTHING! This node is useless and to select it would make you look like
      a complete idiot.
    
    Name: Unused
    Description: ?
    Uses: ?
    
    Name: Unused
    Description: ?
    Uses: ?
    
    Name: Unused
    Description: ?
    Uses: ?
    
    Name: Place Fire Wall
    Description: Fills the selected area with a wall of fire.
    Uses: Obvious. When you want a certain area filled with walls of fire.
    
    Name: Place Force Wall
    Description: Fills the selected area with a wall of force.
    Uses: Also obvious. When you want a certain area to be filled with force
      walls.
    
    Name: Place Ice Wall
    Description: Fills the selected area with a wall of ice.
    Uses: Again, obvious. Use this when you want a certain area to be filled with
      ice walls.
    
    Name: Place Blade Wall
    Description: Places walls of blades within the selected area.
    Uses: For the fourth time, obvious.
    
    Name: Place Stinking Cloud
    Description: Places clouds that curses anyone who enters it within the
      selected area.
    Uses: When you want a cloud with the power to curse anyone who enters it in a
      certain area.
    
    Name: Place Sleep Field
    Description: Places clouds that have a chance of putting to sleep anyone who
      enters it within the selected area.
    Uses: When you want a cloud with a chance of putting to sleep anyone who
      enters it in a certain part of your town.
    
    Name: Place Quickfire
    Description: Puts quickfire in the selected space.
    Uses: Be careful. Remember the properties of quickfire when you use this node.
      Otherwise you will end up making your scenario very frustrating, as the
      party will always die when they reach certain points with nodes of this type
      in it.
    
    Name: Place Fire Barrier
    Description: Puts a fire barrier in the selected area. Fire Barriers can be
      walked through, and are permanent.
    Uses: When you want walkthroughable barriers in certain parts of your dungeon.
    
    Name: Place Force Barrier
    Description: Puts a force barrier in the selected area. Force Barriers cannot
      be walked through at all, and are permanent.
    Uses: When you want certain areas to be blocked off. Note that these areas
      will be accessible if the party casts "Dispel Barrier" on most/all of the
      barriers. 
    
    Name: Cleanse Rectangle
    Description: Removes all fields, walls, and clouds from the rectangular area
      you select. It can also be set to remove magical barriers, quickfire,
      crates, barrels, and webs as well.
    Uses: Usually used when the party reaches a certain point in the level that
      causes these annoying things to go away (sort of like a checkpoint).
    
    Name: Place SFX
    Description: Fills in the selected area with blood, slime, ashes, rocks, or
      bones.
    Uses: Obvious. When you want any of the above to fill in a certain area.
    
    Name: Place Barrels, Etc.
    Description: Use to place webs, crates, or barrels in selected areas.
    Uses: When you want to fill in a certain area with crates, barrels, or webs.
    
    Name: Move Items
    Description: Moves items within the rectangle to a space that you select.
    Uses: When you want the items to be removed from an area and brought to
      another.
    
    Name: Destroy Items
    Description: Destroys all of the items within the rectangle whose boundaries
      you set.
    Uses: When you want all of the items in a certain area to be destroyed.
    
    Name: Change Rectangle Terrain
    Description: Changes all of the terrain within the selected area to the
      specified terrain type.
    Uses: When you want an entire area to be changed to one terrain type.
    
    Name: Swap Rectangle Terrain
    Description: Switches all terrains of a certain type within the specified
      rectangle to the selected type.
    Uses: For example, you want all of the pillars in the room to be removed when
      the party pulls a lever. So you set the rectangle to the boundaries of the
      room, and set the terrain type to be changed to that of the pillar, and set
      it to be changed to normal floor.
    
    Name: Transform Rectangle Terrain
    Description: Switches all terrains in the selected rectangle to their
      "Transform To" value.
    Uses: When you want to use the "Transform To" values over a larger area.
    
    Name: Lock Rectangle
    Description: Locks all unlocked terrains that are capable of being locked in
      the selected rectangle.
    Uses: When, for example, you want to lock many doors throughout your town or
      dungeon.
    
    Name: Unlock Rectangle
    Description: Unlocks all locked terrains that are capable of being unlocked
     within the selected rectangle.
    Uses: When, for example, you want to unlock many locked doors throughout your
      town or dungeon.
    
    ------->Outdoor<-----
    Name: Make Outdoor Wandering
    Description: Makes one of your wandering monster groups appear at one of the
      designated arrival points.
    Uses: When you want to spawn one of your wandering monster groups a little bit
      early.
    
    Name: Change Out Terrain
    Description: Changes the terrain of the given space to the selected terrain
      type.
    Uses: When you want the terrain of the outdoor space to be switched to
      something else. Usually used when the party completes a certain task and is
      allowed to enter a certain space by way of changing terrains.
    
    Name: Place Outdoor Encounter
    Description: Places an outdoor special encounter monster group near the party.
    Uses: For example, the party enters a space and they are told that a band of
      slimes jumps out and attacks them. Then, you use this node to spawn that
      monster group right by the party.
    
    Name: Outdoor Move Party
    Description: Moves the party to the selected space outdoors.
    Uses: When you want to move the party to another space in the current outdoor
      section. For example, they near a hermit mage's hut, and he casts a spell
      that makes the party go away.
    
    Name: Outdoor Store
    Description: The party is put into shopping mode, and can buy the selected
      items from a store, all without ever entering a town.
    Uses: For example, there is a woman who lives in a small hut that sells items.
      You do not want to make an entire town for this one woman, so you can use
      this node instead.
    
    
    Those are all of the different special node types. I am sorry if my
    information was unclear or inaccurate at parts. Please let me know by e-mail
    if this is true, and I will make sure to look into it. Thank you.
    
    /----------------------------------|------\
    |c) Constructing Towns and Outdoors| 6931 |
    \----------------------------------|------/
    
    
    One thing that is unique to each scenario author is their design of towns and
    outdoors. Each designer seems to style theirs a different way, and I guess
    that that is a good thing.
    Taking your time when designing your towns and outdoors in a good way will,
    although you most likely will not notice it, add to the flavor, feel, and fun
    of the scenario.
    Not taking your time will lead to boring, wide-open landscapes filled with too
    many monsters and a lack of flavor. It will also make your scenario seem
    unrealistic.
    
    Here is how you edit the terrain:
    Starting at the main menu, decide if you want to edit outdoor terrains or town
    terrains. Click on the button for the one you decided to do.
    
    Now, a window changes to show a couple of things:
    1. In a large square, the terrain. It shows what the land looks like for a
       zoomed in area (I will tell you how to zoom out a little bit later on).
       When you want to place something in here, all that you have to do is click
       on the desired location for it to go to.
    2. All of the terrain types. There is a place to change them, but it is not
       here. Click on a terrain type to select it.
    3. A bunch of buttons. Each one has a different function. Here is what they
       do, going from left to right and then top to bottom. Note that the names
       for each function thingie were copied out of the Blades Scenario Editor
       Docs.
    
    ->Draw Terrain: Places the selected terrain on whichever space that you click
      on. You can drag around to change multiple areas quicker. This one is really
      pretty obvious.
    ->Big Paintbrush: Fills in an area like the following with whatever terrain
      you have selected:
                xxxxx            
               xxxxxxx       x=all other areas changed
              xxxxxxxxx      +=area you click on
              xxxxxxxxx   
              xxxx+xxxx      I know that it looks elongated, but in the
              xxxxxxxxx      editor it is actually round.
              xxxxxxxxx
               xxxxxxx
                xxxxx
      The paintbrushes are useful when you want to fill in large areas that are
      not able to be filled with the "Full Rectangle" command.
    ->Small Paintbrush: Basically just a smaller form of the above. Fills in an
      area like the following with whatever terrain you have selected:
               xxx     x=all other areas changed
               x+x     +=area you clicked on
               xxx
    ->Large Spraycan: Remember the large area that the "Big Paintbrush" filled up?
      The Large Spraycan affects that area, but whether or not the chosen terrain
      is placed is chosen at random. So, let's go with this:
                xxxxx            
               xxx-xxx       x=all other areas that could have changed
              xx-xxx-xx      +=area you click on
              -xx--xx-x      -=areas changed
              x-xx+xx-x      I know that it looks elongated, but in the
              xx-xxx-xx      editor it is actually round.
              -xx-xxx-x
               xx-xx-x
                xx-xx
    ->Small Spraycan: Same as the above, but the area that has a chance of being
      affected is the same as that of the "Small Paintbrush".
    ->Eyedropper: Changes the selected terrain to whichever terrain you click on
      in the editing window.
    ->Empty Rectangle: Creates a hollow rectangle that the borders are the same as
      the selected terrain. So, in other words, only the outer edge of the area
      you select is changed to the terrain. Everything else stays the same as it
      was. This is useful when putting walls into your buildings.
    ->Full Rectangle: The same as the above, but the entire area that you select
      is changed to whichever terrain you currently have selected. Useful when
      filling in large areas of the map.
    ->Change View: If the editing window is zoomed in, you will zoom out. If the
      editing window is zoomed out, you will zoom in. Pretty simple, but also very
      useful.
    ->Eraser: Changes a fairly large amount of terrain back to what it is by
      default (which is usually grass or cave floor). It is generally better to
      fix your mistakes by hand than with this tool, but there are some
      exceptions.
    ->Edit Sign Text: If the area that you click on is a sign (you will no because
      the area will have a picture of a sign in its corner), than you will be able
      to edit the text that the sign displays when the party looks at it.
    ->Set Area Description: Works like the Rectangle options, but, when the party
      enters this area, the text in the bar at the bottom of the screen changes to 
      match what you enter in here. Make this a description of the area (big
      discovery). For example, "Hal's Kitchen", "Ominous Dungeon", or, if you're
      outdoors, "Near Geata" (assuming that Geata is a town). You should be
      descriptive here.
    ->Place Wandering Monster Arrival Point: In towns and outdoors, you can have
      up to four spaces where wandering monsters appear at. When you click on this
      button, you will be asked to designate each point where they appear. If the
      situation calls for it, place each arrival point judging by the monsters
      that appear through it. Like you should place the slith point by the slith
      castle and the nephil point by the nephilim fort, not the other way around.
    ->Replace Terrain: Should be called "RANDOMLY Replace Terrain". This option
      gives you the choice of switching one type of terrain (specified by the
      number that you enter) to another type of terrain (specified by another
      terrain number) with the chance of the switch being a percentage that you
      set. Useful when filling up your outdoors. This will save a lot of time in
      certain parts of the editing window. And, should you make a mistake, it is
      quite easy to correct. 
    ->Set Town Entry: *Only Works OUTDOORS* If the space that you click on is a
      town (it is a town if it has the little crown icon on the space), you will
      then be told to give a number of the town. When the party steps on this
      space, this is the number of the town that they will enter. It is here that
      you will link towns to their locations outdoors. Every scenario uses this
      button at least once.
    ->Edit Item: *Only Works in TOWN* Seeing as there are no items outdoors, this
      one is obvious as to why it only does something in towns. Anyways, if you
      have an item layed on whichever space you click on when this option is
      selected, a dialog window appears with several options to tweak the item you
      just placed:
        a) Amount or Charges: If this item is gold/food, then type in the amount
           of gold/food that this item is. If the item has charges, type in how
           many charges it has.
        b) Always Here: This item will always be here. If the party takes the
           item, leaves the town, and then comes back, the item will be back. No
           matter how many times the party takes the item, it will always appear
           there.
        c) Someone's Property: This item belongs to someone. If the party takes it
           and someone sees, the current town that the party is in will become
           hostile. Most items in towns have this option selected.
        d) Contained in Something: If the terrain that this item is placed on is a
           container and this option is selected, the only way the party will know
           of the existence of the item is if they search the container. If the
           item is in a treasure chest, dresser, etc. you should select this
           option.
    ->Duplicate Item: *Only works in TOWN* When this option is selected and you
      click on any space in the town, it places the last item that you
      edited/placed. So let's say you just placed a Bronze Broadsword. Then you
      click on this button and then on the space right next to the sword. Another
      Bronze Broadsword will appear there. Also, the item is given whatever
      features the last one had. So, going back to the Broadsword, let's say that,
      before clicking on the "Duplicate Item" button, you edited the item. You
      made it someone's property and set for the item to always be there. Then,
      you click on the "Duplicate Item" button and click on the space next to the
      sword. Now, a Bronze Broadsword will appear that has "Someone's Property"
      and "Always Here" selected. This is a very useful features when creating
      duplicate items that you changed a little bit.
    ->Erase Item: *Only works in TOWN* Deletes all of the items on whichever space
      that you click on. Not just one, but all. Useful when you realize that that
      item shouldn't be there at all.
    ->Create/Edit Special Encounter: This is where you put a special encounter
      into the town/outdoors. When you select this option and then click on a
      space in the town/outdoor, a special node box comes up. This is the special
      node that will be called whenever the party steps on this space. For
      example, you want a message to appear whenever the party steps on that one
      piece of flooring. So you use this option on that space, and then make a
      "Display Message" node displaying your message. Also, if there is already a
      special node encounter on the space you click on, you will now be able to
      edit the special node chain. Oh, and, by the way, the nodes that this option
      creates are outdoor or town, depending on which you are editing. It doesn't
      use any Scenario Special Nodes.
    ->Copy Special Encounter: Let's go with the above example. Let's say that you
      wanted that special node on another space, too. So you hit "Copy Special
      Encounter" and then click on the space with the node. This option just copys
      the node number of the space you select. It does nothing more.
    ->Paste Special Encounter: Continuing off the above example, you will notice
      that the node hasn't been placed on the space that you wanted! So now what?
      Well, then you click on "Paste Special Encounter" and then you select the
      square where you also want that message to be displayed! Pretty much, the
      Copy/Paste Special Encounter options work just like it would when you are
      editing text. These are useful features.
    ->Erase Special Encounter: Again, we'll go with the above example. Let's say
      that you realized that you didn't want the message to be displayed on both
      spaces. So what do you do? Well, you select this option and then click on
      the space where you do not want the node to be called upon when the party
      steps on that space. So, pretty much, this option deletes having the node
      called when the party steps on the space. Note that the nodes are unchanged
      by this option.
    ->Set Special Encounter: For the last freaking time, we will go with the above
      example. Let's say that, after erasing the "Display Message" node encounter
      thingie, you realized that you would be better off with it. So you have to
      put it back. But do you have to do the whole copy-paste procedure? Heck no
      you do not! If you know the special node number (let's say that it is 2),
      then all you have to do is select this option and then click on the space
      where you want that goddam special node at, and, when the box appears asking
      you for the node number, just type in whatever number your special node is
      (so for the example it would be two)! Note that this option is only useful
      if you know the special node number. Otherwise, it is faster just to use the
      copy-paste method.
    *****The rest of these options ONLY appear when editing a town's terrain.*****
    ->Edit Monster: If you have placed a monster on whichever space that you click
      on, a dialog box will pop up giving you several ways to tweak the monster.
      Here is what you can do:
       a) Creature Type: Let's say that you accidentally placed the wrong
          creature. Well, you can now edit that. Just select the button right by
          this and pick the monster that it should have been.
       b) Creature Starting Attitude: (for a description of what each attitude is,
          see the section on editing monsters) Sometimes the default attitude that
          your monster is set to is not what it should be for this individual
          monster. Rather than create an identical monster that has a different
          attitude, just select the one here that matches your needs. This is
          useful when, for example, you have a slith prisoner who will give you
          the information you seek.
       c) Creature Can Move?: Select "Yes" if the creature is able to walk around
          the town. Select "No" if the creature is stuck in the space that you
          place it.
       d) Personality: This and the next option are only important if the party is
          able to talk to this character. Anyway, this option is the personality
          number that is brought into dialogue when the party selects to talk to
          this character. Note that ANY personality can be placed here, not just
          ones within the town's range (if what I just said confuses you, see the
          "Dialogue" section for more help).
       e) Facial Graphic: When this character is brought into Dialogue mode, this
          is the graphic that appears as their face.
       f) Advanced Traits: Sometimes the above options aren't what you are looking
          for. If so, click on the button that says "Advanced". A dialog box comes
          up giving you a few more options:
         1) When is creature here?: This is also what the next two value boxes
            depend upon. Select one of these options:
          a) Always Here: This character is always at the location you place it.
          b) Appear on Given Day: When the party reaches a certain day in your
             scenario, this character will appear.
          c) Disappear on day: When the party reaches a certain day in your
             scenario, this character will disappear and never return.
          d) Sometimes here A: This creature will be present on days 1, 4, 7, 10,
             13, 16, 19, 22, etc.
          e) Sometimes here B: This creature will be present on days 2, 5, 8, 11,
             14, 17, 20, 23, etc.
          f) Sometimes here C: This creature will be present on days 3, 6, 9, 12,
             15, 18, 21, 24, etc.
          g) Appear when event: When a certain event occurs, then this character
             appears.
          h) Disappear when event: When a certain even occurs, this character
             disappears.
         2) What special encounter group is this creature a part of?: There are 10
            special encounter groups, and the monsters of each do not appear until
            the party triggers a special node that creates them (like a Place Town
            Encounter Node). These are used, for example, when a party destroys an
            altar and you have demons summoned. The demons, still going by
            example, would all be encounter 3, and when the altar was destroyed
            you called a special node that summoned all encounter 3 monsters. By
            the way, if you select "None", than the monster is always there and no
            special node is needed for it to appear.
         3) Number of town special node to call when creature is killed: That is
            pretty self-explanatory, but I'll tell you what it means anyways. When
            this monster dies, a town special node will be called, the number of
            which you put here. For example, the king of the country dies from
            your party, and a special node is called that kills the party, saying
            that the guards do not allow for you to escape. Set this option to -1
            if you do not want a special node called when this creature dies.
         4) Stuff-Done Flag creature's life is linked to: The stuff-done flag that
            you specify will always be set to zero, until the creature is killed.
            For example, you set Stuff-Done Flag (x7, y8) here. That stuff-done
            flag is supposed to be linked to the Slith King's life (so later on
            you can check to see if the party killed him). So you would set "7" in
            the first box and "8" in the second. When the Slith King is killed,
            this stuff-done flag's value will be changed from zero to one. Note
            that if either box is at -1, then no stuff-done flag is set to the
            creature's life.
    ->Duplicate Monster: First read the option "Duplicate Item" a little ways
      above. Finished? Well this option is identical to that, except that it
      duplicates monsters instead of items. This is really handy when you are
      tweaking the settings of one monster a little bit but need a lot of monsters
      with the same settings. Just use this to avoid editing all of them.
    ->Delete Monster: Deletes the monster on whichever space you select. If more
      than one monster is on the space, then they will all be deleted.
    ->Set North Entry: When the party enters this town from the north side,
      whichever space you select after clicking on this option is the space that
      they will be placed within the town.
    ->Set West Entry: Same as the above, but the space the party is placed on when
      they enter from the west.
    ->Set South Entry: Same as the above, but the space the party is placed on
      when they enter from the south.
    ->Set East Entry: Same as the above, but the space the party is placed on when
      they enter from the east.
    ->Place Web: Places a web on the space you select.
    ->Place Crate: Places a crate on the space that you select.
    ->Place Barrel: Places a barrel on the space that you select.
    ->Place Fire Barrier: Places a Fire Barrier on the space that you select. Fire
      Barriers can be walked through, but the party will take damage. Fire
      Barriers are permanent until a monster breaks through them or the party
      casts "Dispel Barrier" on the space.
    ->Place Force Barrier: Places a Force Barrier on the space that you select.
      Force Barriers are identical to Fire Barriers, but they cannot be walked
      through.
    ->Place Quickfire: Places Quickfire on the space that you select. Remember
      that Quickfire spreads to fill up most/all of the level unless blocked off
      by a Fire/Force barrier or a wall. Use Quickfire with caution.
    ->Erase Space: Erases all of the special effects on the space that you select.
      Special effects include blood, slime, ash, bones, rocks, magical barriers,
      crates, barrels, webs, and quickfire.
    ->Place Blood: Places a small stain of blood on the space that you select.
    ->Place More Blood: Places an averaged-size stain of blood on the space that
      you select.
    ->Place Lots of Blood: Places a large amount of blood on the space that you
      select.
    ->Place Little Slime: Places a small pool of slime on the space that you
      select.
    ->Place Lots of Slime: Places a large amount of slime on the space that you
      select.
    ->Place Ash: Places an ash pit on the space that you click on.
    ->Place Bones: Places bones on the space that you click on.
    ->Place Rocks: Places a small pile of rocks on the space that you click on.
    
    
    Those are all of the terrain-editing options. But the terrain-editing windows
    also use some different symbols. What do they mean?
    
    Symbol: "START" in blue letters
    Description: Starting location
    What that means: This is where the party starts the scenario (if you are in a
     town), or were they are placed when they go outdoors for the first time (if
     you are outdoors). Only one town and one outdoor section contain this.
    
    Symbol: Purple arrow, pointing either up, down, right, or left.
    Description: Town entry point
    What that means: Only towns contain this. When the party enters the town from
     the relative direction, this is where they appear at in the town.
    
    Symbol: A brownish stick-figure of a dog
    Description: Wandering Monster Spawning Location
    What that means: When wandering monsters spawn, this is one of several
     locations that they spawn.
    
    Symbol: Black arrow, pointing either up, down, right, or left.
    Description: Conveyor Belt
    What that means: When the party steps on this space, they will be moved in the
     direction that the arrow points.
    
    Symbol: Red dot
    Description: Fire Damage
    What that means: When the party steps on this space, they will take fire
     damage.
    
    Symbol: Blue dot
    Description: Cold Damage
    What that means: When the party steps on this space, they will sustain cold
     damage.
    
    Symbol: Purple dot
    Description: Magical Damage
    What that means: When the party steps on this space, they will be hit with
     magical damage.
    
    Symbol: Treasure chest
    Description: Can contain items
    What that means: If an item is placed on one of these spaces, it will not
     appear unless the party searches the spot. This is usually used for things
     like treasure chests.
    
    Symbol: a green "G"
    Description: Grass walkway
    What that means: A walkway that exists on the surface. At the bends of the
     walkway, grass appears.
    
    Symbol: a blue-green "C"
    Description: Cave walkway
    What that means: A walkway that exists below the surface. At the bends of the
     walkway, cave floor appears.
    
    Symbol: A picture of a brown sign
    Description: Sign
    What that means: If the party searches one of these terrain types, a text
     message that you enter will appear.
    
    Symbol: A brown crown symbol
    Description: A town
    What that means: These terrains can be given a town number, and so, when the
     party steps on the space, they enter a town.
    
    Symbol: A black "S"
    Description: Special encounter
    What that means: When the party steps on this space, a special encounter that
     you set is called.
    
    Symbol: A light-green "L"
    Description: Locked
    What that means: This is a locked door, and can be opened by bashing,
     lockpicking, or casting "Unlock" on it.
    
    Symbol: A green "M"
    Description: Magically Locked
    What that means: This is a locked door, and can only be opened by casting
     "Unlock" on it.
    
    Symbol: A black "I"
    Description: Impenetrable
    What that means: This door cannot be opened by lockpicking, bashing, or by
     casting "Unlock" on it. The only way to open it is to call a special node
     that changes the terrain type.
    
    Symbol: A blue "S"
    Description: Secret Passage
    What that means: The party can walk through this space, even if it is solid
     (like a secret passage in a wall).
    
    Symbol: A light-green "P"
    Description: Poisons
    What that means: When the party steps on this space, they will have a chance
     of getting poisoned.
    
    Symbol: A green "D"
    Description: Diseases
    What that means: When the party steps on this space, they will have a chance
     of getting poisoned.
    
    Symbol: A blue "B"
    Description: Blocked to Monsters
    What that means: Non-PCs (monsters) cannot step on this space at all.
    
    Symbol: A blue "A"
    Description: Can be destroyed
    What that means: If the party casts "Move Mountains" or "Shatter" on this
     space, it will change to a different terrain (almost always cave floor or
     grass).
    
    
    Tips when building Towns & Outdoors:
    *Avoid wide, open, spaces. These make your scenario look really boring and
     drab. It also makes it look unrealistic. It is better to be too crammed than
     too spread out.
    
    *Stick to one thing. Except in some special circumstances, you will not switch
     between terrain types too much. For example, you should not have one kind of
     flooring in one room and a different one in the room right next to it. It
     will look fake, and, moreover, funky.
    
    *Include a lot of detail. Put things like they would be in real-life, not like
     they would be in a video game. This will add a lot of flavor to your
     scenario.
    
    *<OUTDOORS ONLY> Add in things like alchemy ingredients, outdoor shops, and
     special encounters. It will make the outdoors something that people will also
     remember about your scenario.
    
    *<TOWNS ONLY> Put in a lot of monsters. It is better to have too many than to
     have too few.
    
    /-----------|------\
    |d) Dialogue| 0969 |
    \-----------|------/
    
    
    Yet another major factor in most Blades of Exile scenarios is dialogue. I am
    referring, of course, to talking to other characters in the game. Without
    dialogue, your scenario is drab, simple, and yet a lot more boring. Nobody
    wants to play a scenario that lacks dialogue.
    
    To begin editing the dialogue, click on "Edit Town Dialogue" in the main menu.
    
    Before we begin, here are some things to know:
    Each town has 10 different personalities and 60 speech nodes. Every character
    has to have a personality. The personality is then linked to the nodes, which
    are your characters responses to whatever the scenario-players asks. The nodes
    are tied to the personalities.
    
    Let's start with editing personalities.
    First, click on a personality. They are at the top of the scroll box.
    A dialog box appears. It asks you several things:
    Character Name: This is what appears up top in the dialog box as your
       character's name. This should relate to the response for "Name".
    Don't Understand Response: What this character says if the party asks it about
       something in which it was not given a response to in the nodes. For
       example:
          This character is set to respond to:
          a) pain      c) mayor
          b) evil      d) wife
          But a party asks it about "death". What you type in this blank is what
          the character will respond with.
    Response to 'look': When someone who is playing your scenario clicks on "Look"
       in the dialogue box, this is the text that appears. This box is generally
       used to describe the physical appearance of this character. You should be
       descriptive when describing your character. Here is an example:
          "Sitting in this chair is a crusty elderly man who reminds you of a
           pirate. His face is covered with deep red scars, and he wears a gold
           necklace encrusted with diamonds. He eyes you suspiciously."
    Response to 'name': When someone who is playing your scenario clicks on "Name"
       in the dialogue box, this is the text that appears. In this box, your
       character should state his name. Here is something that you might enter
       into this box:
          "The crusty man looks up. 'My name is Roy, but most people call me
           Red.'"
    Response to 'job': When someone who is playing your scenario clicks on "Job"
       in the dialogue box, this is the text that appears, In this box, you should
       put your character's occupation and maybe a few other comments that could
       link to your character's speech nodes (more about this later). Here is an
       example of something you could put in the 'job' box:
          "Roy shakes his head. 'I used to be a pirate, the scourge of the seas.'
           He suddenly looks angry. 'That was until that damned king took the
           throne.'"
    
    
    So now that you have created a personality, it is time to add a few speech
    nodes to it. So click on a node number. A box comes up which asks you these
    things:
    
    For Personality: The personality number of the character whom these responses
       generate this answer. If this number is -1, then this node is pretty much
       inactive. If it is -2, then all personalities in your town will generate
       this response. Let's continue with my crusty man example. Let's say that
       his personality was, oh..., 15. Then I would put 15 in this box.
    Response to: What two words, that, when asked, generate this response. When
       someone who is playing your scenario clicks on "Ask" and they type in one
       of these two words, they get this node's response. Remember how I had the
       crusty dude say " 'That was until that damned king took the throne.'"?
       Let's use that. We'll assume that people will be interested in "that damned
       king". They will then ask the character about "king". So I type "king" in
       this box. By the way, you should have these responses be what you think
       that people are most likely to ask. Like for mine I would not put "that" in
       this box. Also note that everything in this box must be at least four
       letters and they may not have any caps whatsoever. If you only want one
       response, then just leave the other at "xxxx".
    Node Type: Choose what extra things this dialog does. Here are the choices:
    ->Regular Speech: Does no extra things. Just displays the text. Nothing more.
    ->Response depends on Flag: Sort of like an Stuff Done Flag? If-Then node.
      Pretty much, this means that if a stuff-done flag is a certain value, then a
      certain message will be displayed. If it is not, then a different message
      will be displayed. Useful when you want the game to check if/if not the
      party has done a certain thing, and, if they have, the character gives a
      different message.
    ->Set flag to 1: Sets the specified stuff-done flag's value to one. This is
      useful when, later on, you want the game to check to see if the party was
      given a certain response. For example, one character tells you that the
      hidden ring is under a rock. The party goes to that rock, and you have a
      special node check if the stuff-done flag is at one. If so, the party finds
      the ring. If not, then the party finds nothing at all.
    ->Inn: When the character you are talking to runs an inn and you pay to get a
      room. Just fill in the "Extra Values" boxes and the "Message" boxes.
    ->Depends on Day: If the party is past a certain day in the scenario, then a
      different message is displayed than if they were not. Useful when, for
      example, a bunch of sliths have sieged a fort. Before day 25, the fort
      commander says that they will fight back. After day 25, the commander says
      that they have begun to consider surrender.
    ->Depends on time (and event): If the party is past a certain day in the
      scenario and the specified event has not occurred, then a different message
      is displayed. Continuing off the above example: If you have not eliminated
      all of the slith troops sieging the fort (which you set to be event 3) by
      day 30, then the commander gives you an order to suggest surrender to the
      fort's council.
    ->Depends on town: Since you can give any character any personality, this is
      useful when you have the same character in two or more towns. For example,
      Mary Sue moves to Yima from Juk when Juk gets destroyed. In Juk, she says
      how happy she is where she lives. In Yima, she says how pissed she is that
      her hometown got destroyed.
    ->Buy Items: When the party can buy items from this personality, like with a
      shop. Just fill in the Extra Value boxes.
    ->Receive Training: This personality is a trainer, and will train the PC the
      party selects in the statistics that the party chooses.
    ->Mage Spell Shop: This personality sells Mage spells. Similar to "Buy Items",
      but with spells instead of items.
    ->Priest Spell Shop: The same as above, but for Priest spells instead of Mage
      Spells.
    ->Alchemy Shop: Similar to the above two, but sells Alchemy recipes instead of
      spells.
    ->Healer: This personality is capable of healing injured, poisoned, diseased,
      dead, etc. PCs for a cost. Useful when you have a town healer.
    ->Sell Weapons: The party can sell their weapons to this personality. Useful
      when Billy Bob needs swords, so you can sell him yours.
    ->Sell Armor: The party can sell their armor to this personality. Useful when
      Billy Bob needs armor now, so you can sell him yours.
    ->Sell All Items: The party is able to sell all of their items to this
      personality. Usually used for sages.
    ->Identify Items: This personality gives the party the choice to identify any
      unidentified items that they have.
    ->Enchant Weapons: This personality can magically augment/enchant/improve
      (whatever you call it) the party's non-magical weapons. Useful for really
      powerful characters who are capable of things like this. Don't use this too
      often because this option is supposed to be pretty rare.
    ->Pay for Response: The party has to pay to get the desired response. Useful
      when, for example, Jim won't tell you where he saw the ghost ship unless you
      pay him 250 gold.
    ->Buy Response, Change Flag: The party has to pay to get the desired response.
      If they get the desired response, the selected stuff-done flag is set to the
      value that you specify. Let's go with the above example. When the party
      nears the ghost ship, they do not see it unless the above flag is set to
      one. So they have to go through Jim first.
    ->Ship Shop: Used when the party is purchasing a boat. You can have the party
      buy one or more boats. This is useful when the town that the party is in
      sell boats and there is a boatshop.
    ->Horse Shop: Same as the above, but sells horses instead of boats.
    ->Buy Special Item: This personality is selling special items. When the party
      asks the character about whatever it is you want, they pay a set amount for
      a special item. If you do not want the party to pay for the special item,
      then set the cost to 0. This is good when, for example, Frank sells the
      party the Staff of Demon Summoning, which summons demons at will (assuming,
      of course, that the staff is a special item)
    ->Magic Shop: The party is offered several random (and often magical) items
      that they can buy. This should be called "Sell Random Items", but for some
      reason it is not. This is useful, but do not use too many of these. They are
      meant to be fairly rare.
    ->Reveal Town Location: Let's go back to that example with Jim and the ghost
      ship. Let's say that you set for the ghost ship not to appear unless the
      party has talked to Jim. In other words, even if you are right on top of
      where the ghost ship is, you will see no ship and will not enter it. When
      you ask Jim about whatever it is you set it to, though, he will describe the
      location of the ship and the ship will appear. You will be able to enter the
      ship as well as see it. This is a very useful dialogue node.
    ->Eliminate Creature: Ends the conversation, as with below, and gets rid of
      the creature. For example, you are talking to a Nephil sailor in a chair.
      This message type is called, and the conversation ends. But the Nephil is no
      longer in the chair!
    ->Force Conversation End: When the party asks the character about whatever it
      is you set, the dialogue options (which are like "Name","Look","Job",
      "Record", etc.) all disappear except for "Record" and "Done". In other
      words, the party has no choice but to end the conversation. Useful when, for
      example, you bring up a topic that the personality is very emotional about,
      and he gets sad/mad and turns away from you.
    ->Hostile Conversation End: The same as above, but, when the conversation
      ends, the character also becomes hostile. Using the above example, let's say
      that that dude got really mad when you brought up that topic. Now he wants
      to kill you.
    ->Town Hostile Conv. End: The same as the above, but, when the conversation
      ends, the entire town becomes hostile, along with that character. Useful,
      when, for example, you have an evil character that the party has to kill.
      His minions have surrounded you, but are not attacking. You have to talk to
      the evil character first, and he suddenly gives the order to kill you. He
      and his minions then attack you.
    ->Call Town Special: Calls the town special that you choose. This is really
      useful, and you can have a lot happen here. You can use this to do just
      about anything that the dialogue nodes can do (with a few exceptions, and,
      besides, to only use this is a waste of time). However, you end up with the
      added responsibility of perfecting your special node chain. This is useful,
      but just make sure that it is necessary. Here's an example of how you would
      use this. Let's go back to good-old Red, the crusty old fart.
                 You tell Red: "king"
           Calls special node: "Display Dialog" (tells part of his story)
          Above node Jumps to: "Display Dialog" (tells more of his story)
          Above node Jumps to: "Display Message" (Red telling you that that is his
                                                  story)
      As I've said, this is a very useful dialog node in situations like this.
      Other times to use this are when you are rewarding the party for their
      mission. Then it would look like this:
                            Party's Response: "mission"
                                       |
            If-then node checking for mission-completed stuff-done flag.
                 /                                        \
         Stuff-Done Flag                               Stuff-Done Flag
         not high enough.                              is high enough
                |                                              |
          Display Message                               Affect Gold node
          node saying that                                     |
          the party hasn't                             Affect Experience Node
          completed the                                        |
          mission.                                        Display Message
      As you can see, this is a very useful option.
    ->Call Scenario Special: The same as "Call Town Special", but this calls a
      scenario special instead of a town special. In some ways more useful than
      the above, but in others more limiting than the above.
    Anyways, those are all of the Node Types. Make sure you choose the one that
    fits this response best.
    Extra Values: Here is where you enter in the numbers that the dialogue nodes
       require. For example, if you used an "Inn" dialog node, then you would have
       to set the quality and cost of the inn along with where the party is
       placed.
    Message 1, Message 2: The text that appears when the party gives the response.
       The top part is basically the first half, the bottom part basically the
       second half. Some Node Types use these boxes in different ways than normal.
       When you select the Node Type, make sure that you know what you are doing.
       For example, that crusty-dude named Red says what he thinks of that "damned
       king" here. 
           "Yep." He snarls. "The king was the one who lost me job." He suddenly
            looks really angry. "He also lost me my family."
       Note that, if the dialogue requires it, you should have some text here
       suggesting that the conversation goes on. For example, with the above
       message, after Red says this, the scenario player is then likely to ask Red
       about "family". You should then have a new dialogue node for "family". Of
       course, you do not need a response for everything, but for more major
       things like the example, you probably should.
    
    So, now you know how to edit Dialogue! Here are a few tips/pointers of mine:
    *You are not limited to ten talking characters per town. Although the
     personalities specified in the dialogue nodes have to match the town range
     (the personality numbers that are offered for that town), there is nothing
     stopping you from placing a Personality #64 in a town whose personality range
     is 10-19. You just have to make the dialogue nodes and personality in the
     town whose range is Personalities 60-69, and, when in the former town's
     editing window, place your monster and then go to "Edit Monster". Type in the
     personality there. This works, but only under one condition: The characters
     with those out-of-range personalities use no dialogue nodes that call upon
     specials, no matter if they are town specials or scenario specials. This
     feature is useful when you want to have the same character in two or more
     towns or you need more than 10 personalities in one town.
    
    *Always put a lot of dialogue in your town. It is best to fill up most/all of
     the towns personalities, and use most of your nodes. The more that one
     character says, usually, the better. It is much better to have too much
     dialogue nodes than too little, as talking is basically optional in this
     game. So, don't cut corners, and add a lot of dialogue. It will add to the
     overall quality of your scenario.
    
    
    /---------------------------|------\
    |e) Creating Custom Monsters| 1776 |
    \---------------------------|------/
    
    Sometimes, when creating a scenario, you will have a need to use a monster
    that is different from the default ones in one way or another. Maybe your
    scenario revolves around one really powerful monster. Maybe your scenario
    involves several shape-shifting blobs. Who knows.
    But a great thing about the Blades of Exile Scenario Editor is the ability to
    make/change the monsters used in your scenario. Read on for how to do it.
    
    First, at the main menu of the scenario, select "Edit Monsters". Now, scroll
    down until you find the monster slot in which your monster should be in (the
    slot generally doesn't matter, but if you already have special nodes depending
    on a certain monster number, than you will have to use that slot). Click on
    it.
    Now, a dialog box appears that asks you many things. Here is a description of
    the dialog box:
    
    Monster Type Name: The name of this monster. Make it something both general
      and specific.
    Monster Picture: The picture number that the monster will use as its graphic.
      In other words, what the monster looks like. If you are unsure of the number
      of the graphic you are going to use, click on "select icon" and scroll
      around until you find the picture suitable to you.
    Monster Level: A number that determines a lot of things, like how much
      experience your monster gives when killed, how hard it is to
      charm/capture/scare, and things like that.
    Monster Health: How much HP the monster has and how much damage it can take.
    Monster Armor: How resistant your monster is to blows and thus how hard it is
      to damage. Don't make this too high unless your scenario is supposed to be
      really hard. Otherwise would-be simple combats will take a lot of time.
    Monster Skill: Adds extra damage to your monsters attacks and acts as the
      accuracy rating.
    Monster Speed: How many action points your monster gets each turn.
    Monster magic/priest spells: The level of mage/priest spells that your monster
      has the ability to cast, if any.
    Monster Type: Select which classification that your monster most closely fits
      under.
    Attack 1 type: The text that appears when attack 1 hits your PC.
    Attack #2,3 type: The same as the above, but for both attacks 2 and 3.
    Default talking picture: In dialog, this is the picture that will be the
      default for your monster. It doesn't matter too much as to what is here
      because you can always change it later.
    Default Attitude: Choose one of these four:
       Friendly, Docile: This character will not attack the party or hostile
        monsters.
       Friendly, Will Fight: Will not attack the party, but it will attack hostile
        monsters.
       Hostile, Type A: Attacks all friendly and "Hostile, Type B" monsters.
       Hostile, Type B: Attacks all friendly and "Hostile, Type A" monsters.
    Attack 1-3 Number of Dice/Sides: This goes for all six boxes, and it might be
      kind of confusing. Damage is figured out by dices. What the game does is it
      rolls the number of dice for Attack 1 (so let's say you chose three). Each
      one picks a random number from 1 to what you put for number of sides (so
      lets say you chose ten sides, and the game rolls a one, an eight, and a
      six). It then combines what it rolls to give you the amount of damage for
      that attack (so this one would have done 15 damage). The game does this for
      each of the three attacks your monster can have (although I recommended that
      you only give each monster one attack to prevent excessively large damage
      rates).
    Monster Treasure: Each increasingly higher number means that your monster will
      dish out increasingly more treasure when it is killed. Don't set this too
      high, or your scenario will be giving out too much cash.
    
    Okay, this is all good and well, but what if you wanted to give your monster a
    special ability or two? Then what do you do? Well, then click on "Abilities"
    at the bottom of the screen. A dialog box appears that asks you some things:
    Monster Poison: The level of poison that your monster inflicts on any PC it
      hits.
    Monster Breath Weapon strength: Remember what I said about damage using dice
      and sides? That's what this is. You are setting the number of eight-sided
      dice to be rolled when the monster breathes.
    Breath weapon type: The type of damage that is done when your monster breaths.
    Special Ability: See below.
    Create monsters/fields: See below.
    Summon Type: Choose the one that fits your monster best.
       No Summon: This creature cannot be summoned.
       Type 1: Summoned with Weak Summoning.
       Type 2: Summoned with Summoning.
       Type 3: Summoned with Major Summoning.
    Item to drop when killed: The number of the item that your monster might drop
      when it is killed. For example, if you have a mage that always drops a
      certain amulet when it dies, you can enter in that amulet's item number
      here.
    Chance of dropping: The percentage chance that the item you set to drop will
      be dropped.
    Monster Resistances: The type of damage(s) that your monster is resistant or
      immune to. Choose carefully.
    
    ->Special Abilitys<-
    *can only choose one*
    No special ability: This monster has no special ability (what a discovery...)
    Throws darts (dam 1-6), Shoots arrows (dam 2-12), Throws spears (dam 3-18),
      Throws rocks (dam 4-24), Throws rocks (dam 5-30), Throws rocks (dam 6-36),
      Throws razordisks (4-24), Good archer (dam 7-42), Shoot spines (dam 7-42):
      All of these are what type of missile weapons your monster uses, and in
      parenthesis are its damage range. Choose the one that fits your monster the
      best.
    Petrification ray: Used in basilisks, this means that your monster can petrify
      PCs from a distance.
    Spell point drain ray: Monsters with this can drain PCs spell points from a
      distance.
    Heat ray: This monster can do fire damage from a distance. The difference
      between this and breathing fire is the text that appears. This one shows up
      as  "heat ray".
    Invisible: Your monster cannot be seen. Whatever graphic you put does no
      effect.
    Splits when hit: Your monster splits in half when hit with most types of
      damage (physical included).
    Mindless (resists fear): Your monster will not have its Morale reduced, and
      so is unlikely to flee your party.
    Breathes stinking clouds: Breathes clouds that curse anyone who walks in them.
    Icy touch: Monster does extra ice damage when it makes physical contact with a
      PC.
    Experience draining touch: Your monster sucks experience when it makes contact
      with a PC.
    Icy and draining touch: Your monster does extra ice damage when it makes
      physical contact and it sucks some life out of them as well.
    Slowing touch: When it makes contact, your monster will slow whoever it hit.
    Shoots webs: Your monster can web from a distance.
    Steals food when hits: When your monster makes contact, it will steal some
      food as well as do damage.
    Permanent martyr's shield: Your monster always acts as if it had just been
      cast with a Martyr's Shield spell.
    Paralysis ray: Your monster can paralyze PCs from a distance.
    Dumbfounding touch: Your monster will dumbfound any monster it makes contact
      with.
    Disease touch: Your monster diseases any monster that it hits.
    Absorbs Spells: When hit with magic, your monster will absorb its power and
      become stronger.
    Web touch: When your monster hits someone, they will be automatically webbed.
    Sleep touch: Anything your monster hits will go to sleep.
    Paralysis touch: If your monster hits someone, they have a chance of being
      paralyzed.
    Petrification touch: Anything that your monster hits has a chance of being
      petrified.
    Acid touch: When your monster makes contact with something, it sprays acid all
      over them.
    Breathe sleep clouds: Your monster breathes out clouds that puts anyone who
      walks into them asleep.
    Acid spit: Like Acid touch, but is done from a distance instead of physical
      contact.
    Death Touch (use with care): That is right. Use this with care. If a monster
      has this, there is a chance that they will kill any monster they hit. It is
      not recommended that you put this on a monster that the party is supposed to
      kill.
    Invulnerable (use with care): Again, you should use this with care, and you
      should NEVER put this on a monster that the party is supposed to kill. That
      is because any monster who has this ability cannot be harmed in any way, and
      thus is virtually impossible to kill (the only way to kill them, I believe,
      is to use a special node that does unblockable damage or kills all
      monsters).
    Guard: Normally, this monster will not move, but when the party commits a
      crime, the monster gains more health and power and goes hunting after the
      party.
    
    ->Create monster/fields<-
    *only one may be selected*
    No ability: This monster does not radiate fields or automatically summon
      monsters.
    Radiate fire/ice/shock/antimagic/sleep/stink fields: Your monster will radiate
      a field of the type you select. The chance that your monster will radiate
      the fields is set in the blank when you hit OK.
    Summon (x% chance): Your monster will summon the monster number you select
      when you hit okay the percentage that is set in parenthesis.
    Death Triggers scen. Special: When your monster is killed, it will call a
      scenario special. This node number is chosen when you hit OK.
    
    /------------------------|------\
    |f) Creating Custom Items| 5756 |
    \------------------------|------/
    
    One pretty cool thing about making your scenarios is that you can customize
    the items. This is a good thing to know how to do. First, go to the main menu
    and click on "Edit Items". Then click on the item you wish to edit. Empty
    slots are at the bottom.
    Right now, a window pops up. It asks you for the following information:
    
    ->Name: What will this item be called when identified? Mages Staff? King
      Sword? You decide.
    ->Unidentified Name: If this item is not identified, what will it show up as
      in your inventory? It should be a simpler form of its full name. If you were
      going with the above examples, it could be like 'Staff' or 'Greatsword'.
    ->Item Picture: Select the "choose" button and scroll through the default
      pictures for the one that most closely matches your item.
    ->Item Type: Select what kind of item your item is. Make sure you are exact,
      because otherwise you could end up making something that is supposed to be a
      sword a piece armor by accident. It is usually very easy to find out the
      item type you are looking for, but, if you are unsure, go ahead and ask me.
    ->Item Level: Item Level only affects certain things. For armor, it affects 
      how much damage is blocked. For weapons, it affects how much base damage it
      does. It also affects the default amount of gold/food.
    ->Awkwardness: The higher this is, the more is added to the PCs encumberance
      when this item is equipped.
    ->Bonus: Weapons and Armor only. For armor, it increases the number of damaged
      blocked. For weapons, it increases the amount of base damage the weapon
      does.
    ->Protection: If this item is equipped, it will reduce the amount of damage
      you take.
    ->Charges: The number of uses you can get out of something. Examples of this
      would be wands, some rings, potions, missiles, etc.
    ->Type Flag: Some items are identical and can be combined. Give these items a
      unique type flag. Know that the designers of Blades of Exiles have already
      used flags 0-100.
    ->Value: How much you can sell/buy the item for.
    ->Weight: How much weight the item has. The more, the more space it takes up
      in your inventory. Make it reasonable, not too light or too heavy, and
      relative to the item that it is (ex: swords are heavier than potions).
    ->Special Class: If you want the game to check sometime if the party has this
      item, give it a special class. You can than create a special node checking
      for this special class. Remember to take notes on the special classes you
      use and that the game deletes your party's items with a special class after
      you finish your scenario.
    ->Weapon Type: If your item is either a 1- or 2-Handed weapon, you must give
      it one of these types. Edged is generally for things like swords and sabers,
      Bashing is for weapons like maces and axes, and Pole is for things like
      Halberds and spears. If your item is not a weapon, the box that is selected
      will not matter.
    
    Abilities: You can give your item a special ability. To do so, select the
    button that reads "Abilities" at the lower portion of the screen. A box
    appears giving you the following options:
    
    ->Ability Strength: How strong is the special ability you gave the item? Ten
      is the highest, and zero is no effect at all. It is recommended that you
      relate this number to two things: How rare your item is, and how much it is
      worth. This is an important number. Make sure that you know what you are
      doing when you make it.
    ->Item Use Properties: This only affects items which can be used, not items
      that are equipped. Decide whether the item hurts/helps, and if it affects
      the PC who uses it, or if it affects the entire party. This is also
      important, but not as much as the Ability Strength.
    ->Item Treasure class: Pretty much decides how likely monsters are to drop
      this item. 1 is the least rare, and 4 is the most rare. 0 means that the
      item will not be dropped by monsters under any circumstances.
    ->Other Properties: "Always Identified" makes it so that the item will always
      be identified, no matter what your Item Lore is. This is useful for common
      items or for rare items that you hear about often in your scenario, and so
      it is common knowledge what the item is. "Magical" means that the item is
      already magical, and cannot be augmented for improvement. Useful for already
      too-powerful items. "Cursed" means that this item has a negative effect on
      the user/wielder. "Conceal Ability" means that the item, even when
      identified, will never tell its special ability. This is useful for powerful
      items that no one in your scenario seems to know about.
    
    Now you must also choose the ability in question. You do this by clicking on
    one of the six buttons. Each one brings up a box with different options. Here
    is what each option is:
    
    ->Weapon Abil<-
    *For melee weapons only*
    No Ability: This item has no special ability, and any other options which have
       to do with the special ability are ignored.
    Flaming Weapon: When you strike a monster with this weapon, it will do extra
       damage (fire damage, which is where it gets the "Flaming Weapon" name
       from).
    Demon Slayer: Does extra damage to the members of demonkind.
    Undead Slayer: Does extra damage to all of the undead monsters.
    Lizard Slayer: If a monster is of the "reptile" type, a weapon of this type
       will do extra damage to it.
    Giant Slayer: Does extra damage to giants.
    Mage Slayer: If your opponent is classified as a mage, a weapon of this type
       does more damage to it.
    Priest Slayer: If your opponent is classified as a priest, a weapon of this
       type does more damage to it.
    Bug Slayer: If the opposing monster is an insect and you strike it with one of
       these weapons, extra damage will be done.
    Acidic Weapon: Sprays acid all over the monster it hits. The acid will burn at
       the monster for several turns.
    Soulsucker: When you hit a monster, you will suck up some of their HP.
    Drain Missiles: If the opponent you hit has missiles of any kind, you will
       steal some of them.
    Weak Weapon: Does less damage than normal. The effect that the Weak Weapon
       ability has is based on the number you enter for Ability Strength. The
       higher, the less damage is done with this number.
    Causes Fear: Lowers the morale of any monster this weapon hits.
    Poisoned Weapon: When a monster is hit with this weapon, they will be
       poisoned. Consecutive hits will increase the effect of the poison.
    
    ->General Abil<-
    
    Protection: Helps protect whoever equips this item from damage.
    Full Protection: Helps protect whoever equips this item from everything,
       damage included.
    Fire Protection: Helps reduce the amount of damage fire does to the PC who
       equips this item.
    Cold Protection: Helps to reduce the amount of damage cold does to the PC who
       equips this item.
    Poison Protection: Reduces the effect of poison on whoever equips this.
    Magic Protection: Reduces damage from enemy magic on the PC who equips this
       item.
    Acid Protection: Reduces acid's effects on whoever equips this item.
    Skill: Increases the effectiveness of whoever equips this in hand-to-hand
       combat.
    Strength: Ups the strength stat of whoever equips this.
    Dexterity: Increases the dexterity stat of whoever equips this.
    Intelligence: Adds to the intelligence stat of whoever equips this.
    Accuracy: Makes the user of this item more accurate with combat weapons.
    Thieving: Makes the user more effective at thievery.
    Giant Strength: Like "strength", but with a much greater effect.
    Lighter Object: Object weighs less than it normally would.
    Heavier Object: Object weighs more than it normally would.
    Occasional Bless: Every once in a while, the PC who equips this item will be
       blessed.
    Occasional Haste: Every once in a while, the PC who equips this item will be
       hasted.
    Life Saving: If you die, this item will bring you back to life and restore you
       to full health once.
    Prot. From Petrify: The PC who equips this item will have a smaller chance of
       being petrified.
    Regenerate: Every PC regenerates health, although it happens slowly. With an
       item of this type equipped, then the PC will regenerate a lot faster.
    Poison Augment: If you are poisoned, this will make the effect a lot worse
       than it would normally be.
    Disease Party: Every once in a while, an item of this type that is held in a
       PC's inventory will disease the entire party.
    Will: The PC with one of these items equipped is harder to dumbfound and more
       effective in Mindduels.
    Free Action: Sorry, but I do not know what this item does.
    Speed: Increases the Action Points the PC with an item of this type equipped
       gets each turn.
    Slow Wearer: Read Occasional Haste. Done? This is like the opposite, slowing
       instead of hasting.
    Protection from Undead/Demons/Humanoids/Reptiles/Giants: Members of whichever
       classification of monster you choose will do less damage to a PC with an
       item of the respective type equipped.
    Prot. from Disease: Disease will have a smaller effect.
    
    ->Usable Ability (Not spell)<-
    *All effects occur when the item is used.*
    NOTE: Everything in here has a good/bad effect, Some items openly say it, like
    with "Add/Lose Web". Whether the effect is positive or negative depends on
    what you set it to in the "Item Use Properties".  Pretty much everything here
    ends up being self-explanatory, but the items that are not are listed here.
    Poison Weapon: Poisons the weapon of the PC who uses this item.
    Bliss: I believe this has a random effect.
    Doom: Hurts the PC who uses this in one way or another.
    Light: Affects the light around your party.
    Stealth, Firewalk, Flying: Affects your party's current status with "Stealth".
    Major Healing: Greatly heals/hurts the party.
    
    ->Usable Ability (Spell)<-
    *All items of this type cast the selected spell when used. For info on the
    spells, see the Spell Archive.*
    
    ->Reagents<-
    *These abilities are always in effect*
    
    Holly/Toadstool, Comfrey Root, Glowing Nettle, Crypt Shroom/Wormgr., Asptongue
    Mold, Ember Flowers, Graymold, Mandrake: All of these have to do with alchemy,
       and whichever effect you choose ends up being the alchemy ingredient that
       your item stands for.
    Sapphire, Smoky Crystal, Resurrection Balm, Lockpicks: Acts as that item.
    
    ->Missiles<-
    Returning: This missile is infinite, and your amount of it will never
       decrease.
    Lightning: Extra electric damage is done when the missile hits home.
    Exploding: Makes a huge explosion that damages a large area and all monsters
       in it.
    Acid: Does acid damage to the monster it hits.
    Slay Undead/Demon: Does extra damage to Undead/Demons.
    Heal Target: Heals whoever you hit with this. Only should be shot at PCs.
    
    
    /--------------------------|------\
    |g) Modifying Terrain Types| 0753 |
    \--------------------------|------/
    
    One of the great things about the Scenario Editor is that you can change
    things about the terrains available to you.
    
    First of all, you should know that the only thing you can change for the first
    90 terrains is the graphic. Other changes you make will not be saved.
    
    
    Terrain Picture: When you change the graphic, you have two choices: animated
                     or basic. Basic terrains are just pictures that do not change
                     at all. Animated terrains are terrains that seem to "move".
                     Animated terrains go through a cycle of four different
                     pictures over and over again. They look nicer, but there are
                     few animated terrains available to you, so you will have to
                     make do with what they give you.
    
    Terrain Blockage: There are 6 options here, and it is quite crucial to make 
                     sure you make the correct choice.
        a) Clear: You can see through this terrain, and you can walk onto it as
           well. This is your basic terrain type.
        b) Walkthrough, Opaque: You cannot see through these terrains, but you are
           able to walk onto/through them freely. Few terrains have this option,
           but you will undoubtedly find it useful at times.
        c) Clear, Special: Terrains of this type are identical to clear, but
           monsters cannot access these spaces. Useful for special encounters.
        d) Clear, Blocked: Your party can see through this terrain, but they
           cannot walk through it.
        e) Blocked, Obstructed: Your party cannot access the space. It is blocked
           to vision as well as movement.
        f) Blocked, Opaque: As far as I know, terrains of these type are identical
           to Blocked, Obstructed.
    
    Can fly/boat/horse over?
    Fly: If your character has casted Flight or used an item that gives them the
     ability of flight, they will be able to step onto this space in midair.
    Boat: If you are in a boat, you will still be able to boat over these
     terrains. Useful for water.
    Horses: If you do not want a party to be able to bring a horse onto the space,
     check the box.
    
    Shortcut Key: In the editing window, by typing a certain letter, you will be
    automatically given certain choices as to the terrain you are choosing. This
    option is the key that this terrain falls under. If you do not want a
    shortcut, leave the box empty.
    
    Light Radius: If your item is meant to give off light (like lamps or fire),
    than set this to how many spaces out from the terrain light is given off to.
    
    Transform to What?: When the special node "Transform Terrain to..." is used on
    a terrain of this type, this number is the terrain that it will be transformed
    to.
    
    Special Properties:
    None: Just your basic terrain, and it might be there for decoration or just to
       walk on. In other words, your terrain has no unique purpose.
    Change When Step On: When a party steps onto terrains of this type, it will
       transform to another terrain.
    Does fire Damage: Self-explanatory
    Does cold Damage: Self-explanatory
    Does magical Damage: Self-explanatory
    Poison Land: When a party steps on a terrain of this type, they have a chance
       of becoming poisoned to a set level.
    Disease Land: Same as the above, but this terrain type diseases you instead of
       poisoning you.
    Crumbling Terrain: If you cast Move Mountains or Shatter on a terrain of this
       type, it will transform to another terrain type that you specify below.
    Lockable Terrain: No clue what this is for, but it seems to be used for
       portcullises somehow.
    Unlockable Terrain: Your basic locked door. By setting the difficulty to 10,
       the door is impossible to unlock.
    Unlockable/bashable: Anything of this type is the same as the above, but it
       can be bashed open as well as lockpicked or magically opened.
    Is a Sign: You can create text to be displayed when the party views this
       terrain.
    Call Local Special: When terrains of these types are searched/stepped on, a
       town or outdoor special is called.
    Call Scenario Special: When terrains of these types are searched/stepped on, a
       scenario special of your choice is called.
    Conveyor north, south, east, west: When the party steps on a terrain of one of
       these types, they are moved one space in the direction shown in
       parenthesis.
    Blocked to Monsters: Monsters cannot step on spaces of this type under any
       circumstances. Used to block monsters from leaving/entering certain areas.
    Town Entrance: These spaces can be set to act as a town and when parties
       enter, the enter a town number that you set.
    Can be Used: If you select "use" and then click on a terrain of this type, it
       will be changed in one way or another.
    Call Special if Used: If you select "use" on this terrain, it will call a
       special node that you set.
    
    
    /---------------------------|------\
    |h) Customizing the Graphics| 6941 |
    \---------------------------|------/
    
    
    One of the coolest thing about making scenarios is that you can change the
    graphics to fit your scenario needs. Know that custom-graphic making is not
    for everyone and that it will take some time. Also know that the information I
    am about to give you will be a little confusing, and so it is helpful if you
    try it out yourself.
    I also got much of this information from the documentation that comes with the
    Scenario Editor, and little of it did I find out myself.
    
    This is very confusing, so please read this carefully. Each individual custom
    graphic is called a slot, and it must be 28 x 36 pixels. When you have created
    all of your custom graphics, they must be assembled on a single .BMP file
    (Windows users) or a PICT (Macintosh users). This huge graphic containing your
    small graphics must be 280 pixels wide (that is wide enough for 10 slots) and
    any multiple of 36 pixels high. This single large picture is called the custom
    sheet. In the first row (rows are horizontal) are slots 0-9, going from left
    to right. In the second row are slots 10-19, and so forth.
    If you are confused by this, I recommend you look into the custom graphics
    files that come with the scenarios that accompany BoE or the Scenario Editor
    documentation. As I've said, this is a confusing concept and will take a while
    to understand fully.
    
    If you are on a Macintosh computer, you will need to download a program called
    ResEdit. This program is free, and can be found at several websites. I believe
    that there is a link to it at spiderwebsoftware.com.
    You must first make all of your graphics (info about the graphics is below)
    into that one single custom sheet and make sure it fulfills the requirements.
    Then, open up ResEdit and create a new file. Then, name it the same as your
    scenario but end it with .meg instead of .exs. Create a PICT resource and then
    copy-paste your custom sheet into the PICT resource. Go to Get Info and give
    the resource a resource number of one. Save this file in the Blades of Exile
    Scenario Folder.
    
    If you are on a Windows computer, do the following:
    1) Duplicate one of the Blades of Exile graphic files.
    2) Give it the same name as your scenario, but end it with .bmp instead of
      .exs.
    3) With your painting program, open up this file.
    4) Change the size to the size of the custom sheet. Draw your graphic here.
    5) Place your bitmap file in the BLDSSCEN folder.
    
    That is how you make the finished sheet work, but how do you specify what each
    graphic type will be?
    
    Terrain (not animated terrain): One 28 x 36 graphic. If you are going to make
      a terrain use this graphic, you must add 1000 to wherever it asks for a
      terrain number (usually modifying terrain types, but there are other places
      you might want to use your custom terrain as well)
    Terrain (animated this time): Animated terrains need four graphics, and they
      must be in consecutive slots. In case you are confused about what an
      animated terrain is, it is a terrain that changes what it looks like every
      couple of turns (usually to give the notion that it is moving, like water or
      fire). Add 2000 to the slot the first graphic is in to use it.
    Dialog Picture/Dialog Face: A 36x36 picture that must be split into two
      halves. Put each 18x36 half into two consecutive slots in your custom
      graphics sheet. To use this graphic in a "Display Dialog" node, add 1000 to
      the slot number the first part of the graphic is in. If you are using this
      graphic as a character's face, then you still add 1000 to the slot the first
      part of the graphic is in and place it in wherever it asks for a facial
      graphic.
    Item: Each item is a 28x36 picture. To give something this picture, add 150 to
      the slot number the item is in.
    A 1x1 Monster: You need 4 graphics, and they must be placed in this order:
    ->monster, normal, facing right
    ->monster, normal, facing left
    ->monster, attack picture, facing right
    ->monster, attack picture, facing left
      When giving monsters this picture, add 1000 to the first slot that the 4
      graphics are in and put that number in wherever it asks for a monster pic.
    A 2x1 Monster: You need 8 pictures, and in this order:
    ->left half of monster facing right
    ->right half of monster facing right
    ->left half of monster facing left
    ->right half of monster facing left
    ->left half of monster attacking right
    ->right half of monster attacking right
    ->left half of monster attacking left
    ->right half of monster attacking left
      Add 2000 to the first slot the monster's graphics are in and place that
      number wherever it asks for a monster picture number.
    A 1x2 Monster: You need these 8 graphics, in this order:
    ->top of monster facing right
    ->bottom of monster facing right
    ->top of monster facing left
    ->bottom of monster facing left
    ->top of monster attacking right
    ->bottom of monster attacking right
    ->top of monster attacking left
    ->bottom of monster attacking left
      Add 3000 to the slot number of the first graphic, and place that resultant
      number wherever it asks you for your monster graphic number.
    A 2x2 Monster: You need to have a full sixteen graphics, and in this order:
    ->top-left of monster facing right
    ->top-right of monster facing right
    ->bottom-left of monster facing right
    ->bottom-right of monster facing right
    ->top-left of monster facing left
    ->top-right of monster facing left
    ->bottom-left of monster facing left
    ->bottom-right of monster facing left
    ->top-left of monster attacking right
    ->top-right of monster attacking right
    ->bottom-left of monster attacking right
    ->bottom-right of monster attacking right
    ->top-left of monster attacking left
    ->top-right of monster attacking left
    ->bottom-left of monster attacking left
    ->bottom-right of monster attacking left
      When asked to give the monster's number, add 4000 to the first slot that the
      monster's graphics are in. Place this number in wherever you are asked for
      it.
    
    So that is how you customize the graphics. Use this features to give your
    scenarios a personality all their own!
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    2. Suggestions                                                            8899
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    /------------------|------\
    |a) Building a Plot| 3072 |
    \------------------|------/
    
    To be good, every scenario must have this one thing. This one four-letter
    word: PLOT.
    Without a quality plot, a scenario will suck. Nobody wants to play a scenario
    without a story to go along with it. Period.
    When thinking of a plot, here are some things to think of:
    1) The conditions of the setting of the story.
    If the story takes place on an island, how are things there? Are they
    miserable, wealthy, abandoned? This is very important as most characters in
    your scenario must reflect this decision.
    2) Based on the conditions, what is the biggest problem?
    This is what most people in your scenario are focused on. In the Valley of the
    Dying Things, it is the plague. In A Mild Rebellion, it is the rebellion.
    3) What is the party supposed to do?
    This is the whole point of the story. What problem is the party supposed to
    solve? Are they supposed to solve the biggest problem, or just a small thing?
    
    Once you have answered those three questions, move on to the next section. If
    you haven't answered them yet, read on.
    
    I know it is hard to answer those three questions. It took me a long time to
    think of a genius plot, and it still isn't even close to being perfected. But
    once you get an idea, answer those questions fast to get a good idea of what
    your scenario will form into.
    Remember, the plot is the heart of your story. If it sucks, your scenario 
    sucks.
    Take your time deciding a plot. It is worth it.
    Here's some advice, though:
    1) Take an event that happened in history. Reproduce it into a scenario, but
       make a few changes here and there.
    
    
    /--------------------------------|------\
    |b) How to Pre-Plan your Scenario| 3081 |
    \--------------------------------|------/
    
    1) What you should first do is estimate how many outdoor sections there should
       be. If your scenario is a going to be a large epic, it might need a lot of
       sections. Otherwise, 10 or so sections will be enough.
    2) After you decide how many sections there is going to be, then draw a grid
       on a piece of paper with that many sections within it. Then, ignoring the
       grid lines (except in some special circumstances), fill in the map for your
       scenario. Color in water and cave walls/mountains.
    3) After you do this, place in the cities on your map where you think they
       should be placed. Place the cities most important to the plot down first.
       That will make them there and in the best space possible. Remember that if
       there are too few of cities, your scenario might become too boring. If
       there are too many, your scenario may seem overcrowded and it will take a
       lot longer to make your scenario.
    4) After you decide on the amount and locations of the cities, then you should
       decide where the party starts your scenario. I think the party should start
       scenarios as far away from the ending place as possible, but that can
       definitely change based on the scenario's plot.
    5) After deciding where the party is to start, go ahead and decide what parts
       of the quest are done where. Is the party supposed to talk to a poor beggar
       in this town? Or are they supposed to talk to the king of the land in the
       huge castle? This is important is it makes some things necessary right from
       the start.
    6) Make a list of all of the towns in your scenario. Write down what number
       they are or will be.
    7) Go ahead and launch the Exile Scenario Editor
    8) Click on "Make a New Scenario".
    9) Follow the steps filling in all of the information EXCEPT for the town
       numbers. Just keep that as it is.
    10) Go on to the next section.
    
    
    /---------------------------------|------\
    |c) Making Your Scenario a Reality| 8343 |
    \---------------------------------|------/
    
    If you really want to make your scenario famous, popular, good, whatever, just
    remember this one thing:
                      "Good scenario design takes time."
    That is really true. If you are going to make an epic like the Exile trilogy,
    expect to take at least three months to do it-and that's if you're lucky.
    
    Here are a few other tips:
    
    While making your scenario, take careful notes. On everything: The stuff-done
    flags you use, coordinates for something, special item numbers, etc. All of
    that is very important that you know it because otherwise, you will go looking
    for it and not be able to find the answer to your question.
    
    TAKE YOUR TIME. If you rush through your scenario, it will suck. Believe me, I
    found that out after building my first scenario. I only put the necessary
    characters in a town and maybe 1 or 2 others. My scenario was VERY boring
    because no one really had anything to say, and so my scenario turned out not
    only boring, but easy because I could find the right characters easier than I
    should have. If you take your time your scenario will be a lot more fun, more
    in-depth, and the storyline will seem amazing.
    
    Size doesn't ALWAYS matter. A 100k scenario could be a lot better than a 1000k
    scenario. The plot is more important than anything in your scenario, be it
    items, monsters, whatever. If one scenario has 200 towns, that doesn't make it
    better than one with 20 towns. But, if plot is of equal quality, a larger
    scenario is generally better.
    
    Always stick to your original plot. Don't change things around unless you will
    be able to change it everywhere you first put it. Otherwise, your scenario
    will become confusing, annoying, and, in some cases, unbeatable. Nobody wants
    to play a scenario like that.
    
    Don't give players too much loot. If you give them like 10,000 gold for one
    simple mission, it makes your scenario way to easy. Don't just hand out
    DoomBlades+50. Make the player earn it (if it is even in your scenario at
    all), and make them earn it well. On the same line, don't lower the cost of
    should-be expensive things too much because it makes your scenario too easy.
    
    
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    <>E. Other Information<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>1478<>
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    1. Testing Your Scenario                                                  3527
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If you are planning on releasing your scenario to the whole wide world, then
    make sure you test it. I found out a lot of errors in my scenarios when
    testing them that I had no clue even existed. My scenario would have been
    impossible to beat if I had not tested it.
    Although you may think that yours is perfect in every way known to mankind, it
    is probably not. Not to insult you or anything, but that is probably true.
    First, you yourself should test your scenario to look for major errors that
    make the scenario completely unbeatable.
    This might take a while, but it can go faster by using Debug mode. More
    information about Debug mode is available in the "Help" menu of the Scenario
    Editor.
    After that, give your friends a copy of your new scenario and have them play
    it. This will let you know if there is some information that only the author
    of the scenario (you) would know and no one else can find it and,
    conveniently, it is needed to beat the game. Make sure you don't give them any
    help whatsoever. If they can beat it (without editing it, that is), then your
    scenario is ready for release.
    If your friends could not beat it, then ask them where they got stuck. Fix
    whatever problem was there, and all of the others they found. Then have them
    try again.
    Once your scenario is thoroughly tested, go ahead and read on.
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    2. How to Distribute Your Scenario                                        1830
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I recommend submitting your TESTED scenario straight to spiderwebsoftware.com.
    They have a way of uploading your scenario into their database. I forgot the
    exact link, but I know it is there. Just make sure you follow their
    instructions. As far as I know, spiderwebsoftware.com is the best place to
    submit a scenario to.
    If you know of any others, feel free to e-mail them to me.
    
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
    [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\1921
    IV. Comments from Other Scenario Authors
    
    I would post most of this stuff throughout the FAQ where it belongs, but that 
    would take me too long and I would have to filter out my errors and everything 
    else...most of what is here I can say for sure is correct....these guys know 
    more about the game then I do.
    
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    <>A. Alec Kyras><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>8306<>
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    1. Party Creation: I'd say that it's important to note that more than one NC 
    character is unnecessary, and thus to steer well clear of Party 1.
    2. Party Creation: It's worthy of note that parties can and do get created 
    with fewer than 6 characters; this tends to be more challenging, but makes the 
    division of loot and EXP among party members less harsh.
    3. Party Creation: It's also worthy of note that the default party has many, 
    many more points to work with than a scratch party.
    4. Party Creation: I would personally discourage the use of nonspecialized 
    spellcasters until the party hits a higher level; casters with both mage and 
    priest tend to be weaker than just mages or just priests.
    5. Character Archetypes: Luck is useful for ALL character archetypes, and best 
    gotten early. At 20 luck, the character has a 95% chance to cheat death 
    whenever killed.
    5. Stats: Dexterity is an important statistic for warriors more than anyone 
    else: it has NO impact on lockpick/disarm traps/&c.
    6. Stats: Intelligence has NO impact on lockpick/disarm traps/&c.
    7. Stats: The maximum encumberance a mage can cast spells with is 1, not 2. 
    Defense does not change this, it merely makes it so that mages with 1 
    encumberance fail less.
    8. It is worthy of note that ALL characters get all the spells of level 3 and 
    below automatically, and can cast them whenever they get the skill.
    9. Stats: Again, Disarm Traps is the ONLY skill which makes any difference in 
    disarming traps.
    10. Stats: Lockpicking skill, type of lockpicks, and TOWN DIFFICULTY (NOT type 
    of door -- locked doors can be lockpicked, magically lock doors can't, and 
    impervious doors can't be lockpicked or magically unlocked) determine chance 
    of success in picking door locks.
    11. Stats: I personally think one should get luck early, and lots of it, but 
    that's a doctrine difference, really.
    12. Attributes: Nephil also boosts either archery or thrown weapons, I forget 
    which. I repeat, 'thief' characters do not benefit from extra int or dex 
    unless they are also casters or warriors, respectively.
    13. Attributes: Toughness removes exactly 1 point of damage. It is nearly 
    worthless, IMO.
    14. Attributes: Ambidextrous is a very valuable trait, actually -- all of the 
    best late-game weapons are one-handed, and there are few good late-game 
    shields or late-game 2-handers.
    15. Attributes: Cave Lore and Woodsman are almost utterly worthless, given 
    that no one seems to use them.
    16. Attributes: Highly Alert is rather good for the simple fact that it's 
    impossible to be immune to magic without complete invulnerability, and sleep 
    and paralysis are devastating and dangerous effects.
    17. Spells: It's worthy of note that no hasting spell is more effective than 
    any other, they just affect more people and last longer.
    18. Spells: Ignore Drakefyre's propaganda. Summoning spells are good for 
    situations where you get chewed up if you don't have a lot of targets flying 
    around.
    19. Spells: Sleep Cloud is EXTREMELY useful against magic-weak monsters, which 
    constitutes a lot of them. It stops them from acting and makes any melee 
    damage you do to them more effective.
    20. Spells: Wall of Force can be useful as a screening spell; monsters hate 
    crossing fields even if they are immune to them, and it will do damage to 
    quite a few monsters if used properly.
    21. Spells: Anyone who's ever participated in the Arena will tell you you're 
    dead wrong about Weak Summoning, for the same reason I gave a little bit ago 
    for Summon Beast.
    22. Spells: I find it vaguely ironic you give Web a 2 and Sleep Cloud a 1.
    23. Spells: Paralysis is strong for the same reason Sleep is, only it's harder 
    to resist (resistance to it is flat, not increasing by level), it increases 
    extra damage done by more, and the monster doesn't have a chance to swing at 
    you after being paralyzed.
    24. Spells: I've never been able to use Mindduel to any great good since it 
    was tied to Magic resistance in E3.
    25. Spells: Both Shade-summoning spells are useful because undead pierce 
    armor, which is rather common.
    26. Spells: Cure Paralysis is good because being paralyzed stops the PC from 
    acting and causes them to take scads more damage, as well as being rather hard 
    to resist.
    27. Potions: Potion of Power only changes physical combat skill, I think.
    28. Potions: It is impossible to overemphasize how good Knowledge Brew is.
    29. Potions: Liar -- you can't make Strong Power potions.
    30. Conditions: Being blessed does not change your stats or your magical 
    skill.
    31. Conditions: Being cursed doesn't either.
    32. Conditions: You are wrong on Dumbfound -- it's permanent.
    33. Conditions: Sleep and paralysis wear off after some time -- paralysis 
    takes longer to wear off -- and cause the character to be unable to act, and 
    take much more damage in melee combat. Sleep looks like 3 'Z's, and Paralysis 
    looks like a character icon with bars over it.
    34. Combat with spellcasters: ALWAYS cast AM cloud if you can help it. Being 
    anywhere near an AM cloud prevents mages and priests from casting, and they 
    seldom have an attack much better than their spells. Monsters cannot breathe 
    out of or into AM clouds, unless they use Darkness.
    35. It is good to note that most types of monsters with ranged (NOT breath) 
    attacks can be stopped from using these by closing into melee range with them 
    with one character -- if a missile monster can attack at melee range, it will 
    never shoot.
    36. Judicious use of paralysis and Sleep Cloud on magic-weak monsters can 
    really shorten combat.
    37. Do note that BoE comes with 3 scenarios, but there are hundreds available 
    for download free.
    38. I'll let someone with editor experience look at the guide to the editor.
    39. *coughs loudly* ONLY SW offers quality scenarios? Look up Alexandria and 
    the Lyceum; they both offer a tremendous wealth of information about good 
    scenarios and bad ones, as well as an accurate reviews system.
    40. After you've seen some of the scenarios at Alexandria, you might change 
    your Top 5 list a bit (I liked Tatterdemalion too, but I wouldn't call it my #
    1 favorite)
    41. Your spelling of 'awesome' makes me cry.
    
    On custom monsters:
    1. It's important to note that skill doesn't change anything except chance to 
    hit in melee.
    2. It's also important to note that some types change things: slimes, stone, 
    and undead are immune to sleep, demons and undead ignore armor, Importants 
    cannot be copied with Capture Soul, and some monsters make different death 
    sounds when killed.
    3. It's important to note that a monster with 1d20 is more effective than a 
    monster with 20d1, because a 20d1 monster will always do 20 (or, well, 22), 
    whereas a 1d20 monster does an average of about 10; similarly, 20d1 20d1 20d1 
    is more effective than 20d3, because 20d1 * 3 does 60 (or, well, 66), whereas 
    20d3 only does an average of about 40.
    4. It's also important to note that the number of dice that a monster will use 
    is one MORE than the one entered -- e.g. a monster which is given 20d1 in the 
    editor will do 21d1 in the game, and a monster given 0d50 in the editor will 
    do 1d50 in the game.
    5. Darkness breath is distinguished in that it damages everyone except 
    invulnerable PCs and has even more awful AI than regular breath. It is notable 
    that, on Windows BoE, regular breath costs 3 AP and darkness costs 5, whereas 
    in Mac BoE, all breaths cost 4.
    6. You neglected to mention resistances/immunities: monsters with 
    cold/fire/poison resistance will take less damage from those sorts of damage, 
    and with C/F/P immunities will take NO damage from those sorts of damage. 
    Monsters with magic resistance will take reduced damage from magic damage and 
    have a reduced chance of being harmed by special effects. Monsters with magic 
    immunity will take no damage from magic damage and will be immune to nearly 
    all special effects. Resistance and immunity can be stacked, but this is silly 
    and pointless.
    7. It is important to note that antimagic clouds do a horrible hatchet job on 
    all monster spellcasters, both friendly and hostile to the user; and also, 
    monsters are loath to cross fields they are weak to, and not even enthusiastic 
    about crossing fields they resist or are immune to.
    8. There is a BIG difference between Heat Ray and fire breath: heat ray costs 
    only 1 AP, as opposed to 4 (Mac) or 3 (PC), has fewer crippling AI problems 
    than Breath, and so on. A high-speed monster with heat ray will chew up a non-
    invulnerable party and spit it out.
    9. It is important to note that Splits When Hit is ineffective on friendly 
    monsters: the copy it creates is Hostile Type A no matter what. It's ALSO 
    notable that the monsters created by Splits have as many HP as the monster who 
    generated them did after being hit -- so eventually, it's possible to reduce a 
    single strong monster to a crowd of weak ones.
    10. It is important to note that Steals Food, both Drain Touch abilities, 
    Spell Point Drain, and Permanent Martyr's Shield do not work monster-to-
    monster.
    11. Specifically, when hit with non-poison, non-physical, non-darkness damage, 
    a monster will gain as many HP as it would normally lose. This does not work 
    if it is immune to those elements, and works less if it is resistant to them. 
    It does NOT block paralysis or sleep, poison, darkness, or physical damage.
    12. Petrification Touch does not work in any version of BoE.
    13. Your description of Death Touch is inaccurate. It does tremendous amounts 
    of what I believe to be Darkness damage on physical contact, but it does NOT 
    instantly kill anything.
    14. Invulnerable reduces physical, darkness, and poison damage by 90%, as well 
    as rendering the monster completely immune to everything else, incl. all 
    status effects. Wound counts as Darkness damage, apparently; the 90% comes 
    with some kind of threshold, so it does NOT render a monster completely 
    impervious to damage, although it takes very little. A monster with 
    Invulnerable and ~30 HP would be an easy kill for a medium-level party.
    15. Guard: This is an ability no sane scenario maker should have any truck 
    with -- the monster gains 1000 HP a round (up to the 16-bit maximum, 32767) 
    whenever it becomes Hostile Type A. This basically makes it immune to 
    everything except superparties.
    16. Incidentally, poison only strikes on the first attack -- a monster with 
    poison 4 will not poison any more severely on a 3-hit barrage than on a 1-hit 
    barrage. If the first hit of a barrage misses or does no damage, no poison 
    will be inflicted.
    That should be all for that.
    
    EDIT: List of abilities in terms of AP cost:
    
    0-REACTIVE: Field, summon (these abilities take place at the same time of any 
    other action -- e.g. whenever a monster performs any action, they have a % 
    chance to surround themselves with fields or summon one monster 
    automatically). To an extent, touch specials are also reactive -- although 
    they only work on melee attacks, NOT any other action.
    1: Heat Ray, Move
    2: Good Archer, Throw Razordisks, Shot Missile (PC?)
    3: All remaining missile specials, non-dark Breath (Win), thrown missile (PC), 
    Use Item (PC), all ray specials
    4: Physical Attack (PC/Monster) (NOTE: This includes all physical attacks in 
    the barrage and any associated touch specials; ambidextrous PCs have a two-hit 
    barrage, and monsters can have two-or-three hit barrages), all breaths (Mac)
    5: Priest (Monster?/PC), Mage (Monster?/PC), Dark Breath (Win)
    
    Note that abilities take that many AP or however many are left, whichever 
    number is less. A monster with 5 speed can give two attack barrages, and so 
    can a monster with speed 7, provided BOTH are at melee range when they start 
    the combat.
    There's a list of what level mage monsters can cast what spells; I don't know 
    where it is, or I'd repost it.
    
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    <>B. Thuryl><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>3061<>
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        quote:Immediate corrections:
        1. Party Creation: I'd say that it's important to note that more than one 
    NC character is unnecessary, and thus to steer well clear of Party 1.
    
    Agreed. I give one of my fighters 5 or 6 ranks of Disarm Traps to start with 
    and then forget about it, and don't normally bother with alchemy or 
    lockpicking at all.
    
        quote:3. Party Creation: It's also worthy of note that the default party 
    has many, many more points to work with than a scratch party.
    
    Right. And more importantly, at character creation these points can be 
    reallocated to other skills more useful than the ones they're in by default 
    (Poison Use? Really, now...) This almost feels like cheating, though.
    
        quote:4. Party Creation: I would personally discourage the use of 
    nonspecialized spellcasters until the party hits a higher level; casters with 
    both mage and priest tend to be weaker than just mages or just priests.
    
    In the long run, the best way to make a spellcaster is to avoid investing too 
    many points in intelligence or SP during character creation. There's no reason 
    to start with more than 4 intelligence; at low levels, I find myself doing 
    most of my damage with field spells (Conflagration, Wall of Force, etc.) 
    anyway, which inflict damage not dependent on intelligence.
    
    As for spell points, those 3 free spell points for every starting spell level 
    add up, and you'll be grateful for them at higher levels. I try to get all my 
    spellcasters at least 12 total spell levels (mage + priest) right from the 
    start.
    
        quote:5. Character Archetypes: Luck is useful for ALL character 
    archetypes, and best gotten early. At 20 luck, the character has a 95% chance 
    to cheat death whenever killed.
    
    Agreed. Start all characters with 1 luck if you can spare the points; it 
    effectively allows you to get out of ANY situation by saving/reloading a few 
    times.
    
        quote:5. Stats: Dexterity is an important statistic for warriors more than 
    anyone else: it has NO impact on lockpick/disarm traps/&c.
    
    Weapon skills (Edged, Bashing, Pole, even Archery or Thrown if you're into 
    that sort of thing) are much more effective than Dexterity, as long as you can 
    decide early on what weapon type each fighter is going to be using. I don't 
    bother putting Dexterity higher than 4.
    
        quote:7. Stats: The maximum encumberance a mage can cast spells with is 1, 
    not 2. Defense does not change this, it merely makes it so that mages with 1 
    encumberance fail less.
    
    This just isn't true. My mages' spells never fail with 1 encumbrance and no 
    defence; at 2 encumbrance, they always fail with no Defence and still fail 
    fairly often with 5 or even 10 Defence. I'm not sure if it's possible to 
    succeed with more than 2 encumbrance; I suspect not. I'd rather just keep my 
    mages' encumbrance at 1 and not waste points in Defence.
    
    Defence may also reduce the chance of fighters losing AP due to high 
    encumbrance. I'd still rather keep my fighters' encumbrance down to 2 or 3, 
    though.
    
        quote:10. Stats: Lockpicking skill, type of lockpicks, and TOWN DIFFICULTY 
    (NOT type of door -- locked doors can be lockpicked, magically lock doors 
    can't, and impervious doors can't be lockpicked or magically unlocked) 
    determine chance of success in picking door locks.
    
    Actually, there is a field in the editor with "Lock Difficulty" in it on 
    locked door terrain types, that can be set to a number from 1 to 10. I think 
    it has at least SOME effect in determining chance of success in picking the 
    lock.
    
        quote:11. Stats: I personally think one should get luck early, and lots of 
    it, but that's a doctrine difference, really.
    
    In my experience, 5 luck is enough to cheat death more than half the time. 10 
    luck is enough to cheat death nearly every time. More than that is excessive.
    
        quote:12. Attributes: Nephil also boosts either archery or thrown weapons, 
    I forget which.
    
    It's an effective bonus, like the Slith bonus with polearms. It doesn't 
    actually show up in stats, I don't think.
    
        quote:14. Attributes: Ambidextrous is a very valuable trait, actually -- 
    all of the best late-game weapons are one-handed, and there are few good late-
    game shields or late-game 2-handers.
    
    I don't mind halberds, actually. Dual waveblades may theoretically do more 
    damage, but most things you're likely to fight with a party that well-equipped 
    are going to be armed. I'd recommend two polearm-wielders and one ambidextrous 
    edged-wielder, or vice versa.
    
    Of course, all this balancing goes out the window when scenario designers fill 
    their scenarios with 50+60 swords and the like, but if you're going to count 
    that sort of thing you may as well just cut out the middleman and get your 
    items from a cheat scenario.
    
        quote:15. Attributes: Cave Lore and Woodsman are almost utterly worthless, 
    given that no one seems to use them.
    
    On the other hand, hey, 4% and 6%, and you only need them on one character 
    each. It's not like they cost the world.
    
        quote:16. Attributes: Highly Alert is rather good for the simple fact that 
    it's impossible to be immune to magic without complete invulnerability, and 
    sleep and paralysis are devastating and dangerous effects.
    
    Highly Alert doesn't protect from paralysis -- or doesn't protect completely, 
    at any rate. Immunity to sleep is still good fun, though.
    
        quote:17. Spells: It's worthy of note that no hasting spell is more 
    effective than any other, they just affect more people and last longer.
    
    Well, if you haste yourself strongly enough, you can triple your AP instead of 
    doubling it. Still, your basic point holds; this can be done by repeated 
    castings of Minor Haste just as well as it can be done by one or two Major 
    Blessings.
    
        quote:20. Spells: Wall of Force can be useful as a screening spell; 
    monsters hate crossing fields even if they are immune to them, and it will do 
    damage to quite a few monsters if used properly.
    
    Better still, trap them; surround them completely with walls as well as 
    dropping one on their heads, so they're taking damage every round and can't 
    step out of the field (or if they do, they take more damage in the process). 
    This is how my low-level parties deal with most outdoor encounters in high-
    level scenarios.
    
        quote:22. Spells: I find it vaguely ironic you give Web a 2 and Sleep 
    Cloud a 1.
    
    Webs do have one useful feature, in that 2 or 3 of them in a line will obscure 
    vision. Good for stealing from shopkeepers before you get Fire or Force 
    Barrier.
    
        quote:26. Spells: Cure Paralysis is good because being paralyzed stops the 
    PC from acting and causes them to take scads more damage, as well as being 
    rather hard to resist.
    
    Hee hee. Scads. You're right, though; paralysis takes hundreds of rounds to 
    wear off and is generally bad, although getting paralysed isn't actually very 
    common.
    
        quote:27. Potions: Potion of Power only changes physical combat skill, I 
    think.
    
    There's no such thing as a Potion of Power. I think the alchemy screen calls 
    energy potions power potions (or some of them, anyway). It's Strength potions 
    that bless you (which increases your accuracy and damage inflicted with melee 
    and missile weapons, and decreases opponents hit rate and damage against you).
    
        quote:28. Potions: It is impossible to overemphasize how good Knowledge 
    Brew is.
    
    It takes almost 40 skill points invested in Alchemy to be able to make 
    Knowledge Brew. Just to recoup the costs you'd therefore need about 40 of each 
    of the ingredients. I doubt I've run across 40 mandrake roots in all the 
    scenarios I've ever played... well, there are scenarios where you can buy the 
    things, but eh.
    
        quote:35. It is good to note that most types of monsters with ranged (NOT 
    breath) attacks can be stopped from using these by closing into melee range 
    with them with one character -- if a missile monster can attack at melee 
    range, it will never shoot.
    
    Shoots Spines is the exception to this.
    
    Regarding AP use for missile weapons used by player characters, I believe bows 
    cost 2 AP per shot and crossbows cost 3 AP per shot.
    
    Poison also does a small amount of damage to invulnerables. It's a bit of a 
    slow and inefficient way of doing things, and no use if the monster's also 
    immune to poison, but worth knowing if you ever happen to be up against an 
    invulnerable monster and you can't or don't want to fight it in melee or 
    Quickfire it.
    
    Does anyone know if field spells other than Quickfire can damage 
    invulnverables? I suspect they can. Ordinary damaging spells can't, though 
    (not even Wound); a small amount of damage will sometimes appear in the 
    "splash" when the spell hits, but Scry Monster reveals the damage hasn't 
    actually been inflicted.
    
    Assassination and flaming/lightning weapon damage are definitely the best way 
    to go, though, because they do full damage (not reduced!) against invulnerable 
    monsters. Of course, to get that full bonus damage you have to damage the 
    invulnerable monster with an ordinary hit...
    
    Regarding AP costs for monsters' missiles: I'm pretty sure it's 3 for 
    everything except Razordisks and Good Archer.
    
    Regarding AP costs for mage spells: It seems to depend on the spell being cast 
    and the caster's level (and intelligence?) for PCs, and the spell only for 
    monsters. For both PCs and monsters, Major Haste, Major Blessing and Shockwave 
    *always* seem to cost 6 AP. Summoning spells and lesser hasting spells also 
    usually seem to cost 6 AP, especially for monsters.
    
    Regarding AP costs for priest spells: Always 5 for PCs, 4 or 5 for monsters. 
    Avatar always costs 5, all other spells usually seem to cast 4.
    
    All results are for my copy of Blades on my Mac. YMMV.
    
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    I have all priest spells and low-level mage spells as 5, while higher level 
    mage spells cost six, but at a lower level, even some lower level mage spells 
    will cost six AP.
    
    Quickfire will not damage someone fire immune, though, and most invulnerables 
    we run across are Fire Immune.
    
    Scenario Editor Section:
    
    1. Scenario Details: Contact information box does not display on the scenario 
    entering screen.
    2. Variable Town Entry: Not exactly. You have an SDF for the town, and the 
    value it's set to is a number you add to the town's number to find the new 
    town. If town 6 has SDF 3,4 set to 5, town 11 will be the new town.
    3. Events generally don't work as they're supposed to. This does not apply to 
    the timers, which are a different kind of 'event'.
    4. Writing data to a text file is useful when you need to put in the number of 
    an item/terrain/monster and have it right there on paper.
    5. Outdoor Special Encounters: it's also recommended that you check the box to 
    have them fight the party right away.
    6. 95: Enter Dungeon96: Sleep - should be a line break.
    7. Show/Hide Town is extremely buggy in all aspects.
    8. Major events - don't work.
    9. If the inventory is full for a forced give, the item drops to the ground.
    10. Buy All Items of Type - doesn't work like that. NPCs buy the items of that 
    class from the party.
    11. One Time Do Nothing vs. Do Nothing and Set - the 'do nothing' does not set 
    the flag to 250 when it jumps to - another node is needed to do that. In 'do 
    nothing and set', the flag is set to 250 when the next node is jumped to.
    12. SFX Burst - Electricity and Teleportation are switched - the docs are 
    wrong in the order.
    13. Stairways are extremely useful for teleportation between towns. They're 
    the only node that changes towns.
    14. Some rectangle nodes only work in the upper left corner. I don't remember 
    which ones those are.
    15. Creature Can Move: If it sees a hostile creature, it will move no matter 
    what this value is.
    16. On Macs, dialogue that's too long is sometimes cut off at the bottom of 
    the window.
    17. Ability Strength for items doesn't work like it's supposed to.
    18. Weak Weapons and Poisoned Weapons don't work like they're supposed to.
    19. Accuracy only helps missile weapons.
    20. Free Action protects from sleep, paralysis, and other movement-restricting 
    status effects.
    21. Bliss is a strong blessing.
    22. You can also change the names of the first 90 terrain types, along with 
    their graphics.
    23. Lockable terrain is for opened doors/portcullises
    24. Look at the Lyceum forums and TM's BoE Website List.
    
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    /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\1010
    V. Other Information
    
    This section contains information that couldn't be placed into any other
    category.
    
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    <>A. BoE Websites><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>8565<>
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    ______________________________________________________________________________
    1. Scenario Downloads                                                     1265
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Of all of the websites I have been to, only one actually gives you QUALITY
    scenarios available to download. I am talking, of course, about this website:
    http://www.spiderwebsoftware.com/
    Here there are many scenarios available to download, and, as I've mentioned
    before, you can submit your own to this website as well.
    
    If you happen to know of any more download sites, please let me know via
    e-mail.
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    2. Information                                                            3652
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    These are websites that give you tips and help for making scenarios. They
    provide input from BoE users. I have only been to one, and it is really great.
    Here it is:
    http://www.spiderwebsoftware.com/
    Man, this website seems to have everything.
    
    If you know of any more, please let me know soon.
    
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    <>B. Top 5 Custom Scenarios><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>8859<>
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    As of today, these are the five best scenarios that I have played:
    1. Tatterdemalion
    2. Falling Stars
    3. Shadow of the Stranger
    4. Emulations
    5. New Life
    
    All of these scenarios are available for download at spiderwebsoftware.com
    (where else). You should check them out today.
    
    If you have played a scenario that you think is really great, submit your
    rating of it to me. Your rating must follow these guidelines:
    
    1. You cannot rate a scenario that you wrote, and the scenario must be posted
       at spiderwebsoftware.com.
    2. Your ratings must be out of 10. No 11/10, 10.5/10 -1/10, etc. Decimal
       ratings are OK. Ex: 9.5/10
    3. (optional, but strongly preferred) Give me a reason behind your rating.
    4. Give me your name, so I can post your comments up here (if you don't want
       your comments posted, let me know that in the e-mail).
    
    Chances are I will look into your scenario to see just how great it is,
    unless, of course, I have already played it.
    
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    <>C. Closing Words<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>6663<>
    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    1. Credits                                                                5548
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    1. The author of the documentation that came with Blades of Exile (I do not
       know who the author is). It is here that I found out the range of each
       spell and some of the info for the custom graphics. Thank you very much.
    
    2. The program FIGlet, for the ASCII intro-text. Thank you.
    
    3. Alec Kyras, Drakefyre, and Thuryl. Thank you for your input and
       corrections. Sorry I couldn't put them where they belong, but still, thank
       you very much.
    
    ______________________________________________________________________________
    2. Special Thanks                                                         4925
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    1. All of the wonderful people in my life!

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