Game Trivia

At one point in development, Rareware thought of the ability to reload a weapon by unplugging the Rumble Pak and replugging it in. This feature was nixed by Nintendo's request.

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The Klobb submachine gun is named after Ken Lobb, the producer of the game.

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The game's famous multiplayer mode was actually added as an afterthought in the month before the game was set to release.

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Dr. Doak is named after David Doak, who wrote the screenplay for the game.

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There is a functional ZX Spectrum emulator hidden in the game's coding. It includes games such as Atic Atac, Sabre Wulf, Jetpac and Knight Lore.

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The Tank weapon doesn't actually require Bond to drive a tank. When the All Guns cheat is enabled, the explosive shells will launch straight of the character's head.

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There is a small building on the Dam level that can be seen across the water by using a fully zoomed sniper rifle. This was part of a scrapped objective to locate Bond's bungee equipment.

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Ourumov's key and case in the Silo was part of another scrapped objective. This supposedly contained plans of the Pirate helicopter on the Frigate.

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View the CCTV tape in Bunker 2 from the inventory menu and you'll find the Goldeneye VHS movie cover.

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This is the first video game to have the likeness of actor Pierce Brosnan, which paved the way for his likeness to reappear in Tomorrow Never Dies, 007 Racing, The World is Not Enough, Agent Under Fire, Nightfire, and Everything or Nothing.

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While the micro camera appears in the Bunker 1 and Silo levels, it wasn't featured in the film. It was actually taken from the eleventh film in then James Bond series entitled Moonraker, from a scene in which the the current "Bond" actor Roger Moore used the camera to photograph documents.

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While this is based upon the James Bond film of the same name, and shares the same story, it has many differences with the story. In the film, James Bond never even goes to Severnaya. He meets Natalya after he meets Janus, A.K.A., 006. There also wasn't a scene in a Silo, nor a hostage situation on the Frigate, and 007 never met Zukovsky at Statue Park.

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At first it was thought the cheats could only be accessed via tasks, it was not revealed for a couple of years that in fact you could do push button codes to access the cheats as well.

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The game was originally conceived as an on-rails shooter, mainly inspired by Sega's Virtua Cop.

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Although far from being the first video game classified as a first-person shooter, GoldenEye scored many landmarks on release and further popularized the first-person shooter genre. The game pioneered features such as atmospheric single-player missions, stealth elements, and a console multiplayer deathmatch mode.

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The original development team consisted of 10 people, and 8 of those people had never made or worked on a video game before.

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Due to the success of Donkey Kong Country, GoldenEye was originally suggested as a 2D side-scrolling platformer for the Super Nintendo, but director and producer Martin Hollis proposed a 3D shooting game for the Nintendo 64, which was still being developed under the name "Ultra 64".

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While the game was ultimately not made as an on-rails shooter, Martin Hollis still credited Sega's Virtua Cop as a strong influence for features such as gun reloading, position-dependent hit reaction animations, penalties for killing innocent characters, and an alternative aiming system that is activated upon pressing the R button of the Nintendo 64 controller.

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In order to achieve a greater sense of realism for the game, the development team visited the studios of the GoldenEye movie to collect photographs and blueprints of the sets used in the movie. Silicon Graphics Onyx workstations and Nintendo's NINGEN development software were used to create the geometry of the game's environments based on these photographs and blueprints.

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Many of the game's missions were extended or changed to allow the player to participate in sequences which the film's James Bond didn't. Karl Hilton explained, "We tried to stick to the reference material for authenticity but we weren't afraid of adding to it to help the game design. It was very organic."

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Because the game was being developed before the release of the Nintendo 64, the development team did not have access to Nintendo 64 workstations or the system's technical specifications. A modified Sega Saturn controller was used for play-testing, and the developers had to estimate what the finalized console's capabilities would be. The game's textures had to be cut down to half once the Nintendo 64's tech specs became public knowledge.

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In improving the game's processing performance, much of the game was developed in grayscale with no RGB (Red Green Blue). Karl Hilton explained: "A lot of GoldenEye is in black and white. RGB colour textures cost a lot more in terms of processing power. You could do double the resolution if you used greyscale, so a lot was done like that. If I needed a bit of colour, I'd add it in the vertex."

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David Doak explained how the game's stealth elements were implemented: "Whenever you fired a gun, it had a radius test and alerted the non-player characters within that radius. If you fired the same gun again within a certain amount of time, it did a larger radius test and I think there was a third even larger radius after that. It meant if you found one guy and shot him in the head and then didn't fire again, the timer would reset."

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One notable feature in the game is the ability to spy on enemies through windows though the enemies cannot see through windows. This design was intentional to encourage players to spy on enemies, further catering to the stealth element.

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This game was released two years after the movie's debut in 1997. While most movie-based games are released timely, much more time was spent on developing GoldenEye. The development team was under little to no pressure to get the game finished, so they used this time to their advantage making sure every detail was just right.

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The game's multiplayer mode was "a complete afterthought" according to Martin Hollis. Steve Ellis was the main designer of the multiplayer mode who was handed the game's source code. According to David Doak, he "sat in a room with all the code written for a single-player game and turned GoldenEye into a multiplayer game."

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The ZX Spectrum emulator found within the game's code was added in by staff of Rareware as an experimental side-project. Although this feature was deactivated from the final build of the game, it can still be accessed with fan-developed patches.

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The game was first revealed at the 1997 Electronic Entertainment Expo to a non-receptive audience and was initially met with low expectations.

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GoldenEye is often cited as the first-person shooter game that brought the genre to consoles as these kind of games were limited to PC users.

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The designs of characters and objectives did not begin until development of the game's levels and environments were completed. Martin Hollis commented "The benefit of this sloppy unplanned approach was that many of the levels in the game have a realistic and non-linear feel. There are rooms with no direct relevance to the level. There are multiple routes across the level.."

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Famous Quotes

Trevelyan: For England, James?
Bond: No. For me.

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Xenia:This time Mr Bond, the pleasure will be all mine.

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Boris: Aha, I am invincible!

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Connection to Other Media

The various multiplayer settings are named after James Bond movies. These include You Only Live Twice, The Living Daylights, The Man With the Golden Gun, and Licence to Kill.

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Though he appears in the final level, Baron Samedi is not from Goldeneye; he is the villain of Live and Let Die, another James Bond film.

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Unlike most of the weapons available in the game, the Golden Gun originally belonged to a Bond film villain: Francisco Scaramanga from The Man with the Golden Gun.

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The entirety of the Aztec bonus level was based on the James Bond film, Moonraker. The Aztec temple, Jaws as the recurring villain, and the laser rifles were all featured in the movie.

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Oddjob cameos as an unlockable multiplayer character. He originally appeared as the iconic henchman in the Goldfinger film.

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