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    NES to 2600 Booster Grip Controller FAQ by CPepin

    Version: 1.01 | Updated: 03/17/01 | Search Guide | Bookmark Guide

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    NINTENDO CONTROLLER TO ATARI 2600 BOOSTER GRIP CONVERSION
    
    FAQ Volume 1.01
    
    BY Chris Pepin
    
    cpepin1@hotmail.com
    
    Copyright (c) 2001 by Christopher James Pepin
    
    03/17/01
    
    This FAQ should be available at my web site.
    
    THE FORGOTTEN ARCHIVES
    http://www.geocities.com/cpepin1976
    
    It should also be available from http://www.gamefaqs.com.
    Only the best source for Video Game FAQS in the world!
    
    Here is a way to convert old 8-bit Nintendo controllers to
    work just like the CBS Booster Grip Adaptor for the Atari 2600.  This
    mod actually gives you three different buttons A,B, and Start.  A
    being the normal fire button and B and Start being the two extra
    booster grip buttons.  As of this writing, there aren't any games that
    take advantage of the second booster grip button, but possibly a
    future home-brew game might.
    
    1)  Get yourself a 9-pin extension cable that has all of the pins.
    A multi-meter to test the pins is almost a must.  You also need
    some small pieces of wire, a soldering iron, and a small drill.
    
    2) Have an old 8-bit standard NES controller, preferably in working
    condition.
    
    3) Cut the male end off the extension cable.
    
    4) Open up the NES controller and unsolder EVERYTHING.
    
    Remove the chip and cable.
    
    Chip Socket Diagram
    
    A B C D E F G H
    
    I J K L M N O P
    
    5) Take a razor blade and cut the circuits in the board directly
    above holes I, J, K, L, & M and just below hole E.
    
    6) Directly to the right of the chip socket, there will be four
    vertical black stripes.  Take a razor blade and cut the circuit
    traces where all four stripes attach to the rest of the board.
    
    7)  Here's the pinout you need to follow.
    
    9-pin female connector on the extension cable.
    ___________
    \5 4 3 2 1/
      \9 8 7 6/
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    1. UP
    2. Down
    3. Left
    4. Right
    5. Booster Grip #1 (Button B)
    6. Fire (Button A)
    7. Don't Use (+5v)
    8. Ground
    9. Booster Grip #2 (Start Button)
    
    All of the buttons need to be connected to ground on one side and
    their respective pin on the other side, except for the two booster
    grip buttons.  They don't connect to ground at all.  For them what
    you are doing is sending the digital high signal coming off of
    pin 6 and shooting it back down pin 5 or 9 respectively.  It's
    just as if you had turned paddle one or two all the way to the left.
    
    If you run into problems with using pin 6 to send the booster grip
    signal, use the +5 volts off of pin seven instead, but that's a bit
    more work to rig up.  So far, I haven't had any problems with pin 6,
    but then again I only have one game that uses the booster grip. :-)
    
    8) Solder the following wires into the holes left by the unsoldered
    chip (see diagram above.) You also need to solder a wire from
    hole G to hole P.  So when you go to solder the wire from pin 6
    into place you need to stick both wires into the hole and solder
    them together.
    
    Pin 8 = I
    Pin 4 = J
    Pin 3 = K
    Pin 2 = L
    Pin 1 = M
    Pin 6 = P
    Pin 9 = E
    
    
    Pin 5 is the trickiest one to solder into place.  What you need to
    do is cut the circuit board to the left of button B right next to
    where the trace joins up with the trace coming from button A
    (this leads to ground).  Since the booster grip doesn't use ground
    we can't have this connected.  Then we need to drill a hole in the
    circuit trace between where we cut it and button B.  There's not
    much room so be carefull.  What we are doing is creating a hole
    where we can solder the wire from pin five into place.  The trouble
    is, the green stuff on the circuit board doesn't take to soldering
    too well.  Once the hole is drilled, you need to gently scrape some
    of the green stuff off of the trace between button B and the hole
    for the wire.  This will allow solder to stick to it.  Once all of
    that is done, solder the wire from pin 5 into place.
    
    
    9) Cut the circuit trace right below the select button.
    
    10) Put the circuit board back into the case and screw the back on.
    You now have an atari 2600 controller with three buttons and booster
    grip functionality!
    
    I've tried to be as clear as possible and I don't think I've left
    anything out, but USE THESE INSTRUCTIONS AT YOUR OWN RISK.  IF YOU
    USE THESE INSTRUCTIONS, I AM NOT LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGE OR PERSONAL
    INJURY CAUSED TO YOU, YOUR PROPERTY, AND/OR ANYONE ELSE AND THEIR
    PROPERTY.
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